• University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
SOAS University of London Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Strathclyde Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
"food" AND "culture"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Food Culture)

  • "food" AND "culture" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 70
Order by 
Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City. From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Read more
Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City.

Who is it for?

From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Our students come to study the MSc in Food Policy from around the world, across the food landscape and go on to develop their careers in a variety of ways once they graduate.

The course is for students who are passionate about food policy and are open to challenging their own assumptions. We want you to graduate from this Masters with a more disciplined and rigorous approach so you can be more effective in pursuing your passions within the food domain.

Objectives

How does a coconut growing in Malaysia become a coconut drink in the UK? On this programme we explore how policy influences the trajectory of food not just from field to fork but across time and territory.

The MSc in Food Policy is about analysing, researching and informing the future of food policy from the local to global scale. It is run by the Centre for Food Policy, which has pioneered an integrated approach to food policy since 1994.

The ways in which we produce, process, distribute, market, prepare and consume food have important consequences for our health and that of the planet. We look at the positive and negative impacts of food, from the health, environmental, political, socio-economic and cultural perspective.

This Masters promotes genuine interdisciplinary because we think you need to look at the subject from all angles to make the most holistic evaluation. It draws on social sciences (sociology, politics, economics, anthropology, psychology) as well as health sciences and epidemiology. We look at the latest food policy debates and place them in a historical context.

You will be taught by a team of specialist food policy specialists who are leaders in the field. Our academic staff are actively involved in research and in policy-making on the local, national and global stage. Our teaching reflects this engagement.

Students are exposed to conflicting narratives about the problems facing the food system and the best ways to resolve them. We address important questions of our time, such as:
-Are we producing too much or too little food to feed the world population?
-How have we ended up living in a world where there are more overweight and obese people than under-nourished people?
-Why is a third of the food produced globally lost or wasted?
-How can we deal with the massive impact of agriculture on climate change?
-How do lobbyists and the media influence what we eat?

Academic facilities

As a food policy student at City, University of London you can learn from experts at leading institutions across the UK through the Innovative Food Systems Teaching and Learning (IFSTAL) initiative.

Created for postgraduate students, the initiative aims to address an urgent skills shortage in the food industry and tackle systematic failings in the food system by combining resources and knowledge. The network, which is made up of five leading higher education institutions including City and the University of Oxford, gives you the opportunity to take part in research and internship placements during your degree.

When it comes to studying food policy, London is an amazing location. Giving you one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories, it offers a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city and hone your focus towards your own area of interest and/or expertise. As part of the University of London, you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We are a passionate and engaged team who will help you understand how to change the food system for the better. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small group activities, whole class discussions, workshops and independent study. There are a lot of group discussions in class. We encourage you to ask questions, contribute your own experiences and apply your own perspectives to the issues we explore. The programme also encourages a strong peer-to-peer community through social media.

For the distance-learning mode you will be able to watch the lectures online, which are supplemented with written exercises and one-to-one Skype tutorials with the teaching staff.

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of written work. The first is handed in during the middle of term so that you receive useful feedback before moving on to the second assignment. In each case you will choose the topic. You will also be asked to write different kinds of documents (briefing papers, memos, reports as well as essays) that correspond to those you would have to write in policy-making organisations. Then you work on your dissertation, which is a longer (15,000 word) piece of work, enabling you to delve into a food policy topic of your choice in depth. You will gain support from a personal supervisor who is a senior academic from the Centre for Food Policy.

Modules

The course consists of four core taught modules (worth 30 credits each) and a dissertation (worth 60 credits). The dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a topic of your choice that is relevant to food policy. The course has been designed to enable you to pursue your own interests and passions. In every assignment you have the opportunity to engage with the issues you care about.

The course is flexible to fit in with your work commitments so you can study this Masters on a full-time (one year), part-time (two years) or on a distance-learning basis (two years). The taught modules take place in the first and second terms, and the dissertation starts in the third term and continues until September (December for part-time students). For each taught module there are approximately 10 three-hour teaching sessions. In addition you are expected to undertake around 270 hours of independent study. For the whole programme, you should expect to study for around 1800 hours (35 hours per week for full-time students, 17.5 hours for part-time students).

Taught modules
-FPM001 - Food and public policy (30 credits)
-FPM003 - Food, culture and society (30 credits)
-FPM002 The political economy of food (30 credits)
-FPM004 Food, public health and the environment (30 credits)

Career prospects

We are very proud of our alumni. Our employability stats – the highest within the School – reflect the range of opportunities available to our graduates. For example, our alumni run NGOs and progressive food businesses, work in government and UN agencies, and have established great careers in health advocacy, journalism and academia.

Read less
Cattolica’s Cremona campus (part of Piacenza-Cremona campus) boasts one of the world’s most renowned teams of Agriculture academics, scientists and researchers; a team at the forefront of food innovation and technology, whose expertise extends to developing tracking systems for any product transported across the European Union. Read more
Cattolica’s Cremona campus (part of Piacenza-Cremona campus) boasts one of the world’s most renowned teams of Agriculture academics, scientists and researchers; a team at the forefront of food innovation and technology, whose expertise extends to developing tracking systems for any product transported across the European Union. If you would like to study for a graduate qualification in the world’s fastest growing industry, then a beautiful city in the heart of the Italian food valley will open your doors to the world.

Learning objectives

The Agricultural and Food Economics program will prepare students to analyze the Agri-food system and to operate in the various functional areas of businesses and organizations. The program will develop your professional knowledge and skills with regards to:
● Analyzing traditional problems relating to agricultural markets and food, evaluating the implications of Agri-food and commercial policies

● Managing the liberalization processes and rules of free competition also within an international context

● Analyzing the behavior of final consumers with respect to agricultural and food products

● Understanding the different sectors of the Agri-food system, the vertical relations and the coordination of the various phases of the system (e.g. agriculture, food processing, and food retailing)

● Managing emerging issues in agricultural and food production, including the safety of foodstuffs and the environmental impact of agricultural activities, the role of quality, information and traceability, the management of technical innovations, in particular biotechnology, and of the industrialization of agriculture

● Dealing with corporate and logistical problems that affect business functions according to the peculiarities of agri- business companies.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Graduates from the Agricultural and Food Economics program have various professional openings in:
● Agri-food corporations (multinational food companies, Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs), retail chains)

● Professional associations of agricultural and food companies service and consultancy firms for agricultural and food companies

● Entrepreneurial activities

● Academic or applied research

● International organizations

Curriculum

First year credits
● Management basics (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Technology for food health and safety:
○ Principles of food protection (5 ECTS/CFU)
○ Principles of food hygiene (5 ECTS/CFU)

● Economic fundamentals of the Agri-food system:
○ Economics of the Agri-food system (6 ECTS/CFU)
○ Agricultural and food legislation (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Quantitative methods:
○ Applied statistics for the Agri-food system (6 ECTS/CFU)
○ Applied agricultural and food economics (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Industrial organization (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Financial accounting and business evaluation (6 ECTS/ CFU)

● Optional courses* (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Seminars (1 ECTS/CFU)

Second year credits
● Agricultural and food market institutions (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Agricultural and food marketing (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Economics of agricultural and food markets (8 ECTS/CFU)

● Business planning and control (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Strategy and leadership (6 ECTS/CFU)

● Final dissertation (25 ECTS/CFU)

*Suggested optional courses:

● Topics in Agricultural and Food Economics I (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Topics in Agricultural and Food Economics II (4 ECTS/CFU)

● Cultura e Lingua Italiana (Italian Culture and Language) (only for non-Italian students) (2 ECTS/CFU)

Selected students can attend one or two semesters in the following partner universities:
● Technische Universität München

● University of California, Davis

● University of Connecticut

● North Dakota State University

● Iowa State University

● Wageningen University

Location

Cremona is located in the Lombardy Region, which in itself has over 53,000 agricultural businesses and contributes €113 billion to the Agri-food industry revenue. It is also the most advanced region in Italy with regards to biotechnology, with 78 companies operating in the sector.

The school

The course is organized by SMEA Postgraduate School at Università Cattolica. The School has almost 30 years of experience in graduate education, advanced scientific research and extension, in the field of agricultural and food economics and business.

Job ready

Studying Agricultural and Food Econom- ics in Cremona will give you the precious opportunity to combine the high stan- dard education delivered by our faculty and the managerial approach developed during internships and seminars with distinguished agribusiness company managers.

Global perspective

Università Cattolica offers its students the opportunity to study abroad, both during regular terms and the summer. Our exchange and summer programs allow students to earn credits while studying abroad in one of Cattolica’s prestigious partner institutions.

Candidates need to satisfy the English language proficiency requirement in order to submit their application.

Read less
The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. Read more
The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. It will offer the opportunity to obtain a unique qualification in the field of food safety delivered by research-active scientists within the Institute for Global Food Security.

The major focus of the programme will be on new and emerging issues within the diverse field of food safety and it will concentrate on developments in analytical approaches used to monitor and regulate food safety with the view to protect human health.

Key topics covered will include: food fraud and traceability and the analytical methods used to detect fraud and ensure food safety and authenticity; the links between environmental chemical contaminants and biological hazards present in animal feed and human food - highlighting new emerging technologies that enable rapid and early detection of food safety incidents and diagnosis of animal diseases.

QUB MSc Advanced Food Safety Video: http://www.mediator.qub.ac.uk/ms/Food/FoodSec.wmv

Content

Advanced Food Bioanalysis
Bio-entrepreneurship and Advanced Skills
Agri-food Traceability and Fraud
Food Safety, Health and Disease
Foundations for Research in the Biosciences
Literature Review
Research Project (triple module)

Assessment

Continuous assessment of coursework, examinations, and assessment of modules based solely on submitted work related to private individual study. A MSc will be awarded with Distinction to students who achieve a dissertation and average mark both exceeding 70 per cent, and with Commendation for marks over 60 per cent.

Opportunities for Careers

Excellent opportunities exist within agri-food companies, diagnostic research companies and regulatory testing laboratories. Graduates will also be in a position to progress to further PhD level research study.

Special Features

A major component will include the completion of a laboratory-based, food safety related research project within the Institute for Global Food Security, offering the opportunity to gain practical experience in the use of conventional and emerging bioanalytical technology platforms.

Facilities and capabilities include:
Biosensor instrumentation
Cell culture and microbiological suites
GC, HPLC and UPLC systems
Proteomic and metabolomic profiling
ICP, GC, qToF and QqQ mass spectrometers
Spectroscopic analysis
Real time PCR and surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology

Additional information for International students

http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/StudyatQueens/InternationalStudents/

Applicants who are non-EEA nationals must satisfy the UK Border Agency (UKBA) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes, by providing evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.0, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

*Taken within the last 2 yrs.

Please see http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs for more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals.


Up to date information on course fees can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/finance/TuitionFees/

The University provides information on possible sources of awards which is available at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/PostgraduateCentre/PostgraduateFunding/

Information on the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen’s University Belfast can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/InstituteforGlobalFoodSecurity/



Visit the MSc Advanced Food Safety page on the Queen’s University Belfast web site for more details! (http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/InstituteforGlobalFoodSecurity/Education/PostgraduateStudies/MScAdvancedFoodSafety/)

Read less
Taught in both English and French over two years, this course develops in-depth knowledge of European local and regional food production, its economic and environmental impact and how these foods can be marketed to a global consumer. Read more
Taught in both English and French over two years, this course develops in-depth knowledge of European local and regional food production, its economic and environmental impact and how these foods can be marketed to a global consumer. Students learn how to develop and market food products whose typical features are the result of various factors such as geographical origin, history and the culture of a country or region. Students will acquire scientific and technical knowledge to develop these food products as well as skills to promote and market them.

The course

Harper Adams has been involved in the education and training of food industry undergraduates and graduates for many years. Selected by a European consortium of universities to be their UK partner institution Harper Adams offers a PgC in Agricultural Management for the Food Supply Industries to students enrolled on the European Masters in regional Food Production and Global Marketing and spending a proportion of their studies at Harper Adams. This PgC award forms part of the European MSc programme which is awarded and managed by ESA University in Angers, France. Harper Adams is very proud to be part of the European Masters in Regional Food Production Global Marketing course to its portfolio. Based on extensive food industry experience across Europe and current industry contact, this course addresses many of the contemporary issues facing the European food industry. It is designed to meet the requirements of those wishing to join the food industry at management level with accelerated career progression.

Taught in both English and French over two years, this course develops in-depth knowledge of European local and regional food production, its economic and environmental impact and how these foods can be marketed to a global consumer. Students learn how to develop and market food products whose typical features are the result of various factors such as geographical origin, history and the culture of a country or region. Students will acquire scientific and technical knowledge to develop these food products as well as skills to promote and market them. The learning method builds upon close links between the teaching staff of partner universities and the food industry to design a course addressing the challenges of marketing local and regional products on a global scale.

How will it benefit me?

The course aims to develop student knowledge of food production through sustainable agriculture, sourcing, manufacturing and marketing across many different food product categories in relation to country specific considerations and the global market. In so doing it produces students with specialist knowledge who learn to apply this through industry case studies and a professional project. Students are placed in production companies, trading companies, consultancy firms, technical or research institutions, laboratories or certification bodies in the final semester. The combination of in-depth knowledge and practical application makes for highly employable individuals.

To find out more visit http://www.masterfoodidentity.com

Read less
Food tourism is an increasingly popular segment of the tourism industry as culinary experiences drive and are at the core of local, regional and international travel. Read more
Food tourism is an increasingly popular segment of the tourism industry as culinary experiences drive and are at the core of local, regional and international travel. The School of Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts’ Food Tourism program will provide learners with the skills required to develop successful food tourism enterprises and gain employment in existing food and culinary tourism agencies and companies while advocating for social justice, equity and access in communities worldwide. Students will gain small business expertise while exploring their creativity and innovativeness which can be applied within both an entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial setting.

This graduate certificate is targeted at working professionals in and around food, culinary, tourism and events industries. Students will learn about the exciting links between experience, gastronomy, wine, culture, food traditions and communities.

Graduates will be prepared to pursue employment in tourism agencies, local and international tourism attractions, culinary establishments, government agencies, historical tourism sites, food writing and culinary experiential travel groups.

The entrepreneurial skills taught in the program will also permit graduates to pursue self-employment and/or consultancy work establishing local food movements such as farmers markets, community food hubs and destinations attracting food tourism.

Career Opportunities

Companies Offering Jobs
-Tourism Agencies
-Local and International Tourism Attractions
-Culinary Establishments
-Government Agencies
-Historical Tourism Sites
-Culinary Experiential Travel Groups

Career Outlook
-Food Writer
-Local Food Tourism Entrepreneur
-Travel Counsellor
-Adventure/Niche Travel Advisor
-Food & Wine Event Manager
-Travel Writer

Read less
As instances of global and local food injustice are reported with more frequency, the dysfunction of our food system and complexity of food culture is being more widely recognised. Read more
As instances of global and local food injustice are reported with more frequency, the dysfunction of our food system and complexity of food culture is being more widely recognised. Increasingly, it is understood that reductionist approaches to solving food related issues are ineffective.

A more comprehensive understanding and holistic approach is greatly needed. This MSc provides an opportunity to study food and food systems in a more complete sense. This innovative new course - the first of its kind in Scotland - acknowledges the truly complex nature of food and includes studies in nutrition, production and consumer culture, but also delves deeper to consider food culture within the contexts of anthropology, environment, sustainability, politics and communications. Through experience of diverse food related businesses - from soup kitchens to Michelin Star restaurants, community allotments to large-scale agri-business - students will gain all important exposure to the diverse dynamics affecting how we consume, produce, represent and understand food. Scotland will often be the showcase for this, however the concepts are transferable to other countries, for one thing that people require irrespective of nationhood is the ability to feed themselves. Whether you are looking to enhance your career in the food industry or are simply interested in cultivating a fuller understanding of food, please contact us. We are more than happy to discuss the course in more depth and help you discover if this is what you’ are looking for.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Modules will involve elements of inquiry (problem) based learning, report writing, visual presentations, essays and viva voce interviews. Learning therefore will be diverse and teaching will happen anywhere that there is a relationship to food and drink or ancillary industries. This may be in the University, on the streets of Edinburgh, the hills of the Scottish Borders or in a Michelin star restaurant. The course will therefore embed research-led learning, by requiring students to examine information from a diverse range of sources including academic books/journals, online blogs/wiki’s relating to food and drink agendas, and primary and secondary data. The importance of working closely with industry colleagues cannot be underestimated.

Opportunities to interact with for example, farmers, North Sea fishermen, and cooks and producers at all levels will enhance the learning experience. Class sizes are normally around 15-20 students. This ensures that students receive fantastic support from tutors and benefit from sharing experiences with classmates.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module consists of 60 hours of teaching time over a 10-week period. There are two core modules planned for each semester, plus a research module that spans the first two semesters. You will be required to carry out independent work and also complete a dissertation.

Links with industry/professional bodies

This course has been developed in collaboration with a broad range of stakeholders involved in the food and drink industries.

Modules

30 credits: Food & Drink: The Relationship to People and Food/ Science of Food/ The System: From Field to Market/ Food Communications

15 credits: Research Methods

If studying for an MSc, you will also complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates will place themselves in the enviable position of having had exposure to a range of industry experiences and contemporary food issues that will enable them to make interventions and transformations in a wide variety of areas. These may range from education or community work, to advocacy and policy work within the non-profit sector.

Entry requirements

There are several routes to entry.
- Applicants may have a first degree in an associated subject, for example, a BA (Hons) in Hospitality, Culinary
Arts, or Nutrition.
- An honours degree (or equivalent) in a different discipline but where the applicant has a demonstrable passion for food and drink.
- An applicant may potentially be a mature student who has spent a considerable period of time in industry and wishes to formalise their education.

All shortlisted candidates will be interviewed as part of the application process

International: Where your honours degree has not been studied in English, you will be required to provide evidence of English language competence at no less than IELTS 6.5 with no individual component score below 5.5

Quick Facts

-This is the first MSc in Gastronomy in the UK.
-The course has 15 funded places available for potential students resident in Scotland and the EU.

Read less
The Food and Rural Development Research MSc is designed to provide high quality training for those interested in a research career focusing on food social science, rural development and rural sociology. Read more
The Food and Rural Development Research MSc is designed to provide high quality training for those interested in a research career focusing on food social science, rural development and rural sociology. The research focus makes the course ideal if you are interested in gaining a Master's qualification and then continuing on to a PhD.

We provide research training and skills development specifically related to conducting research into rural areas, the environment and food markets. We are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing a 1+3 programme, which is a four year award with a research training Master's in the first year followed by a PhD.

You will study alongside students and staff in our Centre for Rural Economy, which specialises in interdisciplinary social science, researching rural development and policy, food and society and the wellbeing of rural communities. You will also undertake a postgraduate research training programme in our purpose-built Doctoral Training Suite, with facilities for lectures, workshops, seminars and computer access to specialist software required for research in the social sciences and the humanities.

Through studying on our course you will:
-Identify your own research topic
-Specialise and develop skills specific to your research
-Learn research practice fundamentals
-Understand research principles, data handling and analysis

You take compulsory modules and optional modules, and complete a dissertation, which could be a desk-based analysis, or a study involving fieldwork or case studies.

You will be encouraged to participate fully in our research culture by organising and attending seminars and reading groups and contributing to research meetings.

Our staff

You will benefit from being taught by lecturers who are industry experienced and research active. You can find out about our staff in the following research groups:
-Food Quality and Health
-Food and Society
-Rural Development

The Degree Programme Director is Dr Menelaos Gkartzios. Menelaos’ research interests include:
-Rural mobilities, migration and counterurbanisation
-Spatial planning and governance
-Rural housing, planning and architectural studies
-International comparative research

Read less
MPhil supervision covers a number of research topics supported by our research active academic staff. Read more
MPhil supervision covers a number of research topics supported by our research active academic staff. Our broad range of research areas relate to understanding how food and food constituents affect human health and well-being, relating to healthy ageing, food security, sensory quality, international nutrition and personalised nutrition.

Much of the research is multidisciplinary and cross-disciplinary, via links across research areas within the School, and across the University through the Human Nutrition Research Centre.

Research themes

-Health benefits of consuming selected foods and food types, eg whole grains, carrots, nitrate-rich vegetables, food supplements, regarding cardiovascular health, cancer, sarcopenia, cell damage
-Elucidation of roles of fat-soluble vitamins in health and disease, eg vitamins A and D, modelling and understanding sources and metabolism in humans and farm animals
-Medicinal properties of herbs and plant extracts, eg effects on cognitive performance, pain, mood, well-being, dementia
-Effects of production/processing factors on food composition & sensory quality, eg effects of organic/conventional production, supply chain temperatures, varieties/breeds

Facilities

Our modern laboratories provide important teaching and research environments and are equipped with analytical equipment such as HPLCs, GCs, CNS analyser, centrifuges, spectrophotometers and molecular biology equipment. Our specialist research facilities include:
-A tissue culture laboratory
-Plant growth rooms
-A Class II laboratory for safe handling of human biological samples
-Taste panel facilities and test kitchen
-A thin section facility for soils analysis

We operate closely with other Schools, Institutes and the University's Central Scientific Facilities for access to more specialist analytical services. For work with human subjects we use a purpose built Clinical Research Facility which is situated in the Royal Victoria Infirmary teaching hospital and is managed jointly by us and the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Read less
UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. Read more
UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. No prior knowledge of a Nordic language is required, though students can opt to consolidate their language or translation skills, or to start Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish from scratch.

Degree information

Option modules include advanced translation skills, Nordic cinema, Nordic literature in global perspective, the transnational politics of the region, and material cultures as well as modules on Viking and medieval Scandinavia. Assessed modules are supplemented with workshops and a summer school providing opportunities for networking and career development in publishing, translation, filmmaking, and the heritage and creative sectors.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module - Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; for example, topics explored during the current year include the following: Trauma; Memory; Visual Culture; Queer(y)ing Sexuality

Optional modules - students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:
-Advanced Scandinavian Translation
-Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme 95
-Introduction to Old Norse
-Crime and Small Communities in Nordic Literature
-Advanced Old Icelandic Literature
-Sources for the Viking Age

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and reading and language classes. Student performance is assessed through written examination, coursework, and the dissertation.

Careers

An MA in Scandinavian Studies offers prospects for employment in the private as well as in the public sector, whether in Scandinavia or in the English-speaking world. Former graduate students in the department are to be found in a range of challenging careers, which include work in IT and management, museums and university teaching.

Employability
In the UK and abroad, the Nordic countries are increasingly recognised for the success of their political and social model, and for their film, literature, food and design. Our MA graduates bring their deep understanding of Scandinavian culture to careers in which knowledge of the region is key: publishing, the arts, commerce and information management. Expertise in Nordic languages is rare in the UK, and employer demand is accordingly high. Our MA allows students to hone their Nordic language skills or to try a new language. Many of our graduates launch careers with translation companies and as freelancers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Scandinavian Studies is the largest independent Scandinavian department in the UK. Our research and teaching encompasses the languages, literatures, cultures, histories and politics of the entire Nordic region, ranging from the Viking Middle Ages to the present day.

Facilities are excellent: UCL boasts possibly the best Scandinavian Studies library outside Scandinavia, and students also have the outstanding collections of the British Library close at hand. Excellent links with universities in mainland Scandinavia, Iceland and Finland provide further benefits.

The department is home to the Viking Society for Northern Research, a leading publisher of Old Norse texts and monographs on medieval Scandinavia.

Read less
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS). Read more
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS).

All ResM students are supervised by college staff based in Cornwall on the Stoke Climsland or Newquay campuses and co-supervised by Plymouth University staff. The ResM culminates in the examination of a thesis based on a period of extended research, preceded by two taught modules that equip the student for research.

The ResM programme at Duchy is tailored to individual needs and commonly involves working with an industry partner. There are full-time and part-time routes.

Full and partial fees bursaries may be available, please contact Dr Peter McGregor for more information and eligibility criteria.

Indicative project titles for Agriculture & Food:
• Agricultural change and its social, economic and environmental implications
• Farm family wellbeing
• Succession and retirement in farming
• Impact of organic farming on the rural economy
• Sustainable farming and food
• The food and farming economy of Devon and Cornwall

Proposed project titles:
• Generating virus free tulips: A collaborative project with the Botanic Garden Cambridge. You will be based in the nationally renowned micro-propagation laboratory at Duchy College Rosewarne (moving to Eden Project by Sept 2016) and undertake a series of experiments to generate virus free tissue and help preserve a rare and valuable tulip accession of the Botanic Garden Cambridge. Techniques will include tissue culture and molecular viral detection.

Student case study: “Study is flexible and fits in alongside my employment plus the tutors are experts in their field. When I finish I hope to use my knowledge and research to enhance the training offered to farmers in the South West” (Polly Gilbert, ResM Agriculture & Food).

Read less
Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?. Read more
Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on human nutrition and related behaviour and consumption from the perspectives of public health nutrition, nutrition physiology and the social sciences. The programme is built around human nutrition, food behaviour and consumership, as well as related research methods.

The goal of the Master’s programme is to enable you to:
-Understand the significance of nutrition to bodily functions and health.
-Understand the social and cultural aspects that affect the food choices of individuals and communities and know how to influence them.
-Form an opinion about the multifarious issues regarding nutrition and consumption.
-Be able to analyse and solve nutritional issues and related cultural questions in an ecological and socially sustainable manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/masters-programme-in-human-nutrition-and-food-behaviour-master-of-science-2-years/1.2.246.562.17.53446974973

Programme Contents

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on:
-The role of nutrition and other lifestyle factors in promoting health and preventing illness.
-The mechanisms through which food impacts our body at the level of molecular biology.
-Food services and their management.
-Consumption behaviour and food choices, and means of influencing them and communicating about them.
-Food culture, food politics and social movements.
-Research methods in the fields of nutrition and food behaviour.
-The Master’s thesis.
-Other studies, which you can choose according to your interests.

The multidisciplinary nature of the Master’s Programme at the University of Helsinki provides numerous options for other studies. You can choose studies at other Finnish or international universities.

The courses incorporate different methods of study, such as:
-Contact teaching, lectures.
-Group work.
-Oral presentations.
-Written reports (individual, pair, group).
-Independent study.
-Laboratory work and other assignments and related reports.
-Learning journals, oral group examinations, written examinations, take-home essays.
-Seminars.

The diversity of learning methods enhances your development and application of critical thought, argumentation and problem-solving skills.

Selection of the Major

In the Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour, you can choose between three focal areas:
-Nutritional physiology: The impact of nutrition and other lifestyle factors on bodily functions and health, as well as the underlying mechanisms at the level of molecular biology.
-Public health nutrition and food services: Insight into the nutritional factors affecting the health of a country’s population and population groups and the use of this insight to promote health, as well as nutritional questions related to food services and the food industry.
-Food behaviour in a changing society: The ways in which food choices are linked to individual, cultural and social factors, the construction of identity, the consumption society, as well as food and health policies.

Programme Structure

With a scope of 120 credits (ECTS), the Master’s programme can be completed in two academic years. The degree comprises:
-60 credits of advanced studies, including the Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-60 credits of other studies, which can include studies from your own degree programme or other degree programmes, a practical training period or international studies.
-Career orientation and career planning.
-A personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme qualifies you for work in expert, teaching, research and managerial positions in the public sector, NGOs and companies, and as an independent entrepreneur. The education provides you with profound field-specific competence and skills in knowledge work, as well as a solid professional identity.

Examples of duties available to graduates include:
-Expert in nutrition and food.
-Product manager.
-Product development manager, development manager.
-Director of food services.
-Researcher, special researcher.
-Planning officer.
-Senior inspector.
-Senior teacher or lecturer at a university of applied sciences.
-Growth entrepreneur.
-Journalist, press officer, content provider.

Read less
This exciting MSc gives you the breadth and background to bridge disciplinary divides and tackle the environmental issues that face us all. Read more

Programme description

This exciting MSc gives you the breadth and background to bridge disciplinary divides and tackle the environmental issues that face us all.

This programme provides up-to-date knowledge of the contemporary issues and debates on the relationships between the environment, nature, culture and society.

This interdisciplinary programme draws on expertise from across the University, especially from geography, philosophy, theology, science, technology studies and development studies, providing a unique critical perspective.

You will develop the research skills and abilities to assess the importance and implications of geographical, philosophical and other theoretical debates which shape environmental policy and practice.

Our graduates are equipped to think critically, to generate new knowledge related to the environment, and to use this knowledge effectively to address urgent environmental challenges.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

This programme consists of six taught courses, including four option courses, studied over two semesters. In addition, students undertake an individual dissertation project.

Compulsory courses typically include*:
•Values and the Environment
•Political Ecology
•Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:

•Global Environment: Key Issues
•Research Design in Human Geography
•Human dimensions of environmental change and sustainability
•Encountering Cities (PGT)
•Topics in Environmental Humanities
•Ecology, Ethics and Spirit
•Marine Systems and Policies
•Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
•Distributed GIS
•International Development in a Changing World
•Key Concepts in Global Social Change
•Soil Protection and Management
•Principles of Geographical Information Science
•Principles of GIS for Archaeologists
•Archives: History, Geography, Politics
•Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature (PG Version)
•Methodological Debates in Human Geography
•Animals and Society
•Anthropology and Environment
•Understanding Environment and Development
•Case Studies in Sustainable Development
•Forests and Environment
•Global Environment and Society
•Sustainability of Food Production
•Global Environmental Politics
•Climate Change, Justice and Responsibility
•Biobusiness
•Environmental Impact Assessment
•ICT for Development
•Interpreting Development: Institutions and Practices
•Land Use/Environmental Interactions
•Innovation in Sustainable Food Systems
•Humans and Other Species
•Time, Place, Belonging: understanding time in society

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change each year.

Career opportunities

Graduates have pursued careers in environmental policy, conservation, animal welfare, NGOs (environmental charities and development organisations), public consultation and PhD research.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.
https://edingeoscistudents.wordpress.com/

Read less
This is a degree aimed at those who want to engage critically, practically and creatively with global and local environmental problems through different disciplinary lenses. Read more
This is a degree aimed at those who want to engage critically, practically and creatively with global and local environmental problems through different disciplinary lenses. The course brings together theories, methods and insights from the social and environmental sciences and applies these to contemporary environmental issues, debates and controversies.

Students are encouraged to take a range of social and natural science modules offered by the Department of Sociology, the Law School and Lancaster Environment Centre (LEC) and will acquire the skills to navigate, interpret and combine these different ways of knowing the environment. There is a strong emphasis on participatory and engaged research, making insights count in engagement with communities and policymakers.

Modules
Compulsory modules:
• Theories and Debates in Environment and Culture
• Methods in Science and Technology Studies
• Independent Research Dissertation

Optional modules:
Choose four; options may vary from year to year
• Capitalism and Crisis
• Climate Change and Society
• Ecology, Conservation and Culture
• Food Security, Agriculture and Climate Change
• Geological hazards
• International Environmental Law
• Mobilities, Society and Change
• Perspectives on Environment and Development
• The Social Life of Science and Technology: Theories and Debates
• The Rights of Peoples, Minorities and Indigenous Peoples

Read less
We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture. Read more
We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture.

Academic staff interests include: early modern material culture; late medieval art history; medieval and early modern religious history; Anglo-Saxon archaeology and liturgy; early modern politics; medieval and early modern drama; and textual editing.

At present, research topics include: the Reformation; visual and manuscript culture; community; the plays of John Lyly; medieval ecclesiastical architecture; female sexuality and transexuality; priory management; deviant and vernacular language; and kingship. You will be part of a vibrant and varied community of researchers from different disciplines.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/152/medieval-and-early-modern-studies

The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS)

We are an interdisciplinary centre for the study of Medieval and Early Modern periods. Our 28 teaching staff are drawn from English, History, Architecture, Classical & Archaeological Studies, History & Philosophy of Art, and the Canterbury Archaeological Trust.

MEMS offers a successful, interdisciplinary MA programme, which attracts students from across the world. A thriving community of enterprising, supportive graduate students study for research degrees and benefit from the Centre’s involvement in the prestigious EU-funded Erasmus Mundus doctoral programme, Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME). We have close relationships with Canterbury Cathedral and the Archaeological Trust, which allow our students access to a wide range of unique historical, literary and material evidence.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library have unparalleled holdings of manuscripts and early printed books. Kent’s Templeman Library holds a good stock of facsimiles, scholarly editions, monographs and journals, and we are within easy reach of the British Library, The National Archives, and other London research libraries. There are good online computing facilities across campus and, in addition, our students have special access to postgraduate computer terminals and the postgraduate student room provided by the School of History.

The Centre runs a weekly research seminar, and special termly, public lectures to which we welcome distinguished speakers. These events are at the heart of the Centre’s activities. We also run a full programme of conferences and colloquia.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Historical Research; English Historical Review; Renaissance Studies; Medium Aevum; Transactions of the Royal Historical Society; and Studies in the Age of Chaucer.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

The research interests of our staff cover areas as broad as: religion, ideas, material culture, theatre and performance culture, gender, economy, food and drink, legal history, war, visual culture, politics, architecture, history of books and manuscripts, environment and travel, art history, and literature.

Careers

The transferable skills gained from this postgraduate programme are enhanced by the University of Kent’s employability initiative and careers advice service. Many of our recent graduates have gone on to careers in heritage, museum or archivist work. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Read more
Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Our geographic spread, topic diversity and social reach give you an unrivalled opportunity to pursue your historical passions and discover new ones.

Our MA History is rigorous, flexible and wide-ranging, so that you can to choose the modules and thesis topic which best suit your interests.

Alongside four optional modules which enable you to explore the latest in historical research in our specialist areas, you also study a practical module in research techniques, and write a 20,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Historical research at Essex concentrates on the period from 1500 to the present, and covers a wide geographical area that includes British and European history, as well as Latin America, the USA, China, Russia and Africa.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Alternatively you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

Public History Pathway
Further your understanding of, and expertise in, a variety of public history contexts, ranging from museums and documentary films to conflict resolution and computer games.

This pathway makes the most of our status as an institution at the cutting edge of communicating history to the general public, and will involve classes led by scholars who are currently involved in documentary, heritage, oral history and school curriculum projects.

You will be given the opportunity to create, participate in, and/or critique a current piece of public history as part of your coursework assessment on the Public History Workshop module, and your dissertation will demonstrate an engagement with the methods and/or theories of public history, analyse an example of public history, or be an example of public history.

Cultural and Social History Pathway

Explore the varied ways in which understandings of the relationship between evidence and interpretation, language and the material world, economies and identities, have been challenged and changed by the ‘cultural turn’.

This pathway offers you modules which deal with a range of areas, themes and periods, placing you at the cutting-edge of historical thought on issues such as gender, race, class, consumption, modernity, mentalities and identities.

Local and Regional History Pathway
Local (or micro) history, as well as community and family studies, has played an increasingly important part in the development of historical analysis.

We reflect on these developments, drawing on the rich national and comparative literature in these fields, with a primary focus on the period from 1800 to the 20th century.

You also design and conduct a substantial independent study on a chosen historical topic or in the field of local, community or family history.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Your future

We have excellent links with the research community, both in the UK and worldwide, so many of our students have gone on to teach in higher education institutions. Others have found employment in archives, research, managing research funds, other forms of educational provision, the Civil Service, the National Health Service, and management.

Within our Department of History, we offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation. Themes of particular research interest include:
-Class, race and gender formation
-Nationalism
-Wars and revolutions
-International relations and oil diplomacy
-The history of medicine
-The history of crime
-Popular culture and consumption
-Slave societies
-The history of ideas and print culture
-The history of the Roma and Sinti in Europe
-Historical censuses and surveys

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

We also work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in History
-Race and Class in the United States, South Africa and Britain: Select Topics (optional)
-Illness and Culture in 18th-And 19th-Century Europe (optional)
-The Public History Workshop (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern Europe c.1500- c.1800 (optional)
-Approaches to Cultural and Social History (optional)
-A Global History of Food, c.1400 - c.1750 (optional)
-The Making of Consumer Culture: Britain 1780-1960 (optional)
-Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs (From the Sixteenth to the Twenty First Century) (optional)
-Decency and Disorder: Institutions in Essex 1700-1900
-The Patterns of Victorian Life: Reconstructing Nineteenth-Century Communities (optional)
-The Uses of Space in Early Modern History (optional)

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X