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Masters Degrees (Travel)

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The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/

Programme Overview

The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology.

Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide.

Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe.

Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital.

The MA programme draws upon:

- the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel;

- a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology;

- close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism;

- other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation;

- the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas;

- the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and

- the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study.

View a sampling of past MA dissertation titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/ma-anthropology-of-travel-tourism-dissertations.html)

View profiles of alumni and current students (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/student-profiles.html)

Language Study

Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite.

All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Learn more and reserve your place here: Language Entitlement Programme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecultures/studentinfo/language-entitlement-programme/)

Email:

Programme Structure

The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research.

2. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region.

The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses.

Teaching & Learning

The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies.

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research.

While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (https://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Get ahead in the travel industry as you learn the skills to fast track your journey into leadership and management. This course is perfect if you're working in travel and want to progress into a senior position, or simply if you want to take your first steps into this dynamic sector. Read more
Get ahead in the travel industry as you learn the skills to fast track your journey into leadership and management. This course is perfect if you're working in travel and want to progress into a senior position, or simply if you want to take your first steps into this dynamic sector.

We know what travel executives are looking for when recruiting managers - using insights from our contacts at some of the world's best known travel organisations, including ABTA, easyJet and Virgin Holidays, we created this course to help you become a successful travel manager.

You will study all areas of the industry from tour operators to transport providers as you learn the foundations of leading and managing travel organisations. This course focuses on business acumen, financial management and strategic management skills. You will also explore the role of technology in the travel industry and the impact of social media on contemporary marketing, together with the hot topics that dominate travel today, including sustainable tourism and the growth of online booking.

You'll examine the demand areas of the industry as they continue to grow and learn what it takes to keep ahead in this vibrant and diverse field.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 59% of our research submitted was assessed as world leading or internationally excellent.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/travel_business_leadership_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will have the grounding you need to move into management in the travel industry, whether you work for, or aspire to work for, a travel agency, tour operator or in the marketing and insurance sectors. Benefit from our industry partnerships with the top-name travel companies who contributed to our course content. Created by the travel industry to suit their specific needs, you'll gain from this expertise so you stand out in the job market.

- Product Manager
- Brand Manager
- Sales and Marketing Manager
- Business Development Manager

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

We are one of only four universities in the UK to be recognised as a Centre of Excellence by the Institute of Travel & Tourism (ITT). You will become a student member of this professional body, giving you access to networking opportunities. You can attend the ITT's student-focused events such as the annual student conference at World Travel Market in London - a great place to meet like-minded people and create connections to help you in the future.

Delivered purely through online learning, this flexible way of studying makes it easier to fit your work around your current job and family life. You only need to commit to 10 hours online study a week.

Modules

Responsible Tourism Theory & Practice (20 credits)

Technology for Travel (20 credits)
Learn about new developments, how technology influences business, how to assess the need for technology and make investment decisions.

Experiential Marketing (20 credits)
Learn how experiences can communicate brand values and influence consumer behaviour within offline and online environments including social media.

Creativity & Innovation (20 credits)
You'll learn methods and techniques to help organisations innovate effectively and professionally.

Financial Management for Travel (20 credits)
Develop advanced financial management skills, with insights into corporate finance, money markets, and foreign exchange.

Strategic Management for Travel (20 credits)
Develop your critical evaluation skills and learn how to create and deliver successful management strategies.

Masters Research Methods (20 credits)
Gain the knowledge, skills and techniques to develop your abilities to conceive, plan and execute research, preparing you for your chosen major research project.

Masters Research Project (40 credits)
Undertake an extended study of a topic related to the travel industry using the skills and knowledge you've developed during the Masters Research Methods module.

Facilities

- Online Library
Global access to Leeds Beckett's extensive online library, plus free eBooks to supercharge your study.

- Dedicated Support Team
A highly-skilled and dedicated support team whose job is to work with you through every step of your online learning.

- Virtual Learning Environment
A Virtual Learning Environment that's easy to use and available whenever and wherever you are.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Do you enjoy writing about people, places and wildlife? Are you interested in environmental issues in Britain and around the world? Would you like to be published, and make a living as a travel or nature writer? Then this course is for you. Read more
Do you enjoy writing about people, places and wildlife? Are you interested in environmental issues in Britain and around the world? Would you like to be published, and make a living as a travel or nature writer? Then this course is for you.

The MA in Travel and Nature Writing focuses on learning to write from your own experience in the field. You’ll develop your writing skills and techniques, learn from established writers, and examine the history, context and genres of travel and nature writing.

By meeting practitioners – writers, editors, agents and publishers – you’ll gain a unique insight into the professional skills you require to get your writing published.

This low-residency course allows you to be based wherever you wish, so you can pursue your academic work while maintaining your current lifestyle. It can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two.

COURSE STRUCTURE

We aim to give you an understanding of issues and approaches to the representations of peoples, other species, habitats, places, cultures and environments in various kinds of writing. You’ll graduate with the ability to apply what you’ve learnt to your own professional practice.

You’ll study:

• A mix of thematic topics represented by a variety of writers.
• A balance between historical and contemporary writing.
• Issues raised by eco-tourism, conservation and environmentalism.
• Issues related to the experience and representation of people, wildlife and places in specific locations in the UK and elsewhere.
• The genres, and context of contemporary and historical travel and nature writing, and the history of our connections with the environment and the natural world.

MODULES

Writing in the Field is a broad introduction to the skills and techniques required to write from personal experience.whether about people, landscapes, the natural world, or a combination of all three. By using fieldcraft techniques, based on looking, listening, feeling and thinking, we explore ways of writing about the world around us.

Context, History and Genres in Travel and Nature Writing gives an overview, both broad and focused, on the key developments in the travel writing and nature writing genres over time; including analysis of historical trends, specific authors and works, the history and development of both ‘travel’ and ‘nature’ as social pastimes, and the contemporary scene.

In Advanced Travel and Nature Writing, you'll develop new ways of writing about the world: pushing the boundaries of your writing style and content in order to learn what works best for you as a writer.

Professional Skills in Travel and Nature Writing is a practical guide to getting your work published across a range of different media and outlets, including newspapers, magazines, websites, blogs, books and on TV and radio. Featuring advice from senior practitioners, editors and publishers. You’ll also learn to plan a trip requiring commissions, and do a pitch and interview of an idea for publication.

In A Portfolio of Travel and Nature Writing, you'll develop a 20,000 words portfolio of your best work, together with a reflective diary of your progress throughout the year.

For more information on modules please view our Course Handbook via our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-travel-and-nature-writing/

TEACHING METHODS

A large part of the course is taught on three residential courses. You’ll undergo an intensive few days of creative writing, discussion, meetings with practitioners and commissioners and firsthand experience in the field. Please note that you’ll have to pay for travel, food and accommodation on the residential courses.

You’ll also learn online. You’ll have internet-based seminars and group discussions on Google Hangouts. You’ll also post your work on our Virtual Learning Environment, where your peers and tutors can critique it in detail.

For more information about teaching methods and how the course will be structured please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-travel-and-nature-writing/

ASSESSMENT

You’ll be assessed through a combination of formative and summative assessments. This will include creative writing pieces, critical and analytical essays, presentations and a broad portfolio of your writing.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The course is designed to introduce students to the workings of various travel and nature writing publishing opportunities and prepare them for the submission of their own work. It will also equip them with the practical and business skills to operate as freelance writers.

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Travel medicine focuses on the prevention and management of the health issues of international travellers. This course is for those entering or working in the field of travel medicine. Read more

What is travel medicine?

Travel medicine focuses on the prevention and management of the health issues of international travellers.

Who is this course for?

This course is for those entering or working in the field of travel medicine. It is particularly useful for health professionals who provide travel health advice. The program is accredited as an approval qualification by the Faculty of Travel Medicine of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine for their fellowship program.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Travel Medicine will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialist knowledge in the disciplines of travel and tropical medicine and related areas, with depth in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation complications, differential diagnosis, investigation and management of travel‐related communicable and non‐communicable diseases across diverse contexts
*Review, analyse, synthesise and evaluate information, data and evidence to undertake risk assessment and prioritise potential clinical interventions for communicable and non-communicable diseases
*Promote and optimise the health and welfare of travellers and populations impacted by travel
*Deliver and facilitate safe and effective collaborative patient‐centred travel‐related health outcomes within relevant accepted national and international practices and guidelines
*Communicate theoretical knowledge, risk assessment, concepts of therapeutic interventions, treatment options and clinical decisions using a high level of oral and written English language and where appropriate, numeracy skills to a variety of audiences
*Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for continuing professional development requirements based on reflection on current skills, knowledge and attitudes and their application to travel, tropical and geographical medicine and health.

This course is available to International students via external or distance education only.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF TRAVEL MEDICINE (GCertTravM)

Course articulation

Candidates who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Master of Public Health or Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University provides several programs unique to Australia:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories and research facilities.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Food tourism is an increasingly popular segment of the tourism industry as culinary experiences drive and are at the core of local, regional and international travel. Read more
Food tourism is an increasingly popular segment of the tourism industry as culinary experiences drive and are at the core of local, regional and international travel. The School of Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts’ Food Tourism program will provide learners with the skills required to develop successful food tourism enterprises and gain employment in existing food and culinary tourism agencies and companies while advocating for social justice, equity and access in communities worldwide. Students will gain small business expertise while exploring their creativity and innovativeness which can be applied within both an entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial setting.

This graduate certificate is targeted at working professionals in and around food, culinary, tourism and events industries. Students will learn about the exciting links between experience, gastronomy, wine, culture, food traditions and communities.

Graduates will be prepared to pursue employment in tourism agencies, local and international tourism attractions, culinary establishments, government agencies, historical tourism sites, food writing and culinary experiential travel groups.

The entrepreneurial skills taught in the program will also permit graduates to pursue self-employment and/or consultancy work establishing local food movements such as farmers markets, community food hubs and destinations attracting food tourism.

Career Opportunities

Companies Offering Jobs
-Tourism Agencies
-Local and International Tourism Attractions
-Culinary Establishments
-Government Agencies
-Historical Tourism Sites
-Culinary Experiential Travel Groups

Career Outlook
-Food Writer
-Local Food Tourism Entrepreneur
-Travel Counsellor
-Adventure/Niche Travel Advisor
-Food & Wine Event Manager
-Travel Writer

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The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Read more

Multicultural, Multi-Disciplinary MA

The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Students analyse imperial ascendancies, race and racial theories, nationalist movements, postcolonial experiences, the rise of neo-colonial thought, multiculturalism and interculturalism, and the implications of globalisation and development for the modern world.

This MA allows students to combine the specialisation of postgraduate research with the adaptable skills training of a multi-disciplinary approach. Students benefit from the legacy of an MA programme established in 1994; the programme has continuously re-invented itself in changing ideological climates while maintaining its primary goal: to offer a critical education in the cultural discourses of power.

Careers

MA in Culture and Colonialism graduates have gone on to careers in development work, NGOs, law, university lecturing, publishing, media, journalism, community work, teaching (primary and secondary), film-making, advertising, and the Civil Service. The programme has a particularly strong record in research training: a high proportion of its students have proceeded to doctoral programmes in Ireland, Britain and North America, with many of them winning prestigious funding awards.

Teaching Staff

The programme's teaching staff over the years has been drawn from the disciplines of English, History, Political Science and Sociology, Economics, Irish Studies, Film Studies, Spanish, French, Archaeology, German, Italian, and Classics, and is supplemented by Irish and international guest lecturers.

Programme Outline

The full-time degree taken over a twelve-month period from September. The year is divided into two teaching semesters (September to December and January to April), with the summer period devoted to completing the dissertation. A two-year part-time option is also available. Students take six taught modules together with a (non-assessed) research training seminar, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation (30 ECTS) on a topic of their choice.

Programme Modules

Central Modules

EN541 Colonialism in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Cultural Theory
This module focuses on issues of identity, political agency and representation. It offers an introduction to twentieth-century theorisations of colonialism and neo-colonialism, especially in relation to cultural production, and their implications for twenty-first century socio-political thought. The distinctive position of Ireland in relation to postcolonial theory is considered, together with other national and international contexts. Some of the theorists discussed include Fanon, Said, Spivak and Ahmad.

SP544 Decolonization and Neo-Colonialism: The Politics of 'Development'
The phenomena of development and underdevelopment in those lands that have experienced colonial rule have been theorised in two broadly contrasting ways in social science: the modernisation perspective, which derives from the northern hemisphere by and large, and a series of counter-perspectives (such as structuralism, dependency, neo-Marxism and world systems theory), whose exponents hail from the southern hemisphere in the main. The module also considers the issue of how much light modernisation and counter-perspectives can shed on the Irish experience of development and underdevelopment.

HI546 Studies in the History of Colonialism and Imperialism
This module introduces students to some of the key thinkers and concepts in the writing of British imperial history. The work of scholars such as J. A. Hobson, Ronald Robinson and Jack Gallagher, Peter Cain and Tony Hopkins, Chris Bayly, Alan Lester and John Darwin will be discussed. Concepts such as finance imperialism, informal empire, the official mind, gentlemanly capitalism, colonial knowledge, imperial networks, and bridgeheads will be examined from a critical perspective. Students will be asked to read key texts, undertake wider reading and research to help put these key texts in context, comment on their readings, and present their own ideas as the basis for class discussion and debate.

Research Seminar (compulsory but not examined)
This module provides a training in research, analysis and writing techniques appropriate to the programme, as well as individual consultations on the formulation of dissertation topics. The seminar will take place throughout the year.

Option Modules (two chosen)

EN547 Literature and Colonialism
This module considers the relationship between literary modes and aesthetics and political power. It analyses literature connected to the British Empire and its former colonies, discussing English, Irish, Indian and African writers in relation to colonial power structures, nationalist movements and postcolonial developments. Genres covered include imperial adventure fiction, travel writing, late-Victorian urban Gothic, modernist and post-modernist fiction and poetry, postcolonial writing, and the twenty-first century multicultural novel.

EC535 Political Economy, Colonialism and Globalization
The aim of the module will be to identify the fundamental concepts of globalization by analysing the various ideologies, systems and structures that underpin the progression of global capitalism through the ages. Underlying philosophical theories will be linked with political, legal sociological and economic ideals that are often the driving forces behind these processes.

EN573 Travel Literature
The genre of travel writing includes a vast array of literary forms from journals to letters, ambassadorial reports, captivity narratives, historical descriptions, ethnographies, and natural histories. The appearance of such accounts explodes in the early modern period in an era of expanded travel for purposes of trade, education, exploration, and colonial settlement. This module looks at a range of documents from different historical moments to track the development of this important genre, including the emergence of travel writing by women.

EN549 Cinema and Colonialism
This module considers the relationships between colonialism and the theory and practice of cinema. Seminars may address the following themes: the Hollywood genres of the ‘Western’ and the ‘Vietnam movie’; postcolonial theories of cinema; Cuban cinema; cinema of anti-colonial revolution; neocolonialism and Irish cinema; African cinema; gender, colonialism and cinema; and Western representations of imperialism.

HI588 Studies in Regional Identities
This module introduces students to concepts of regional identities and explores various interpretative approaches to regional identity. Students will examine the role of history, language and religion in the construction and perpetuation of regional identity and will consider the relationship between regions and nation states. This is a team-taught module. While the content may vary according to the availability of staff from year to year, it will include Irish and European case studies.

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The programme offers an introduction to the fascinating and fast-changing dimensions of China today. It provides a broad grounding in Chinese society, economy, business, politics and culture. Read more
The programme offers an introduction to the fascinating and fast-changing dimensions of China today. It provides a broad grounding in Chinese society, economy, business, politics and culture. There is the flexibility to combine cultural and political studies with introductory or more advanced modules in Mandarin.

Why this programme

-◾The degree is interdisciplinary, drawing on the expertise of specialists in Chinese politics, economics, business, culture and history, as well as seminars, workshops and lectures delivered by the University's Scottish Centre for China Research.
◾You can spend eight weeks (May to July) in China, where you will have the opportunity to gain firsthand experience of Chinese society and culture. A variety of scholarships are available to fund or part-fund short-term language study at a Chinese university or language institute.
◾Glasgow boasts a number of China-focused organisations and events you can get involved with, including the Confucius Institute at University of Glasgow and the Scottish Centre for China Research, which brings together scholars undertaking cutting edge research on China.
◾You are encouraged to learn Chinese language at the level appropriate to your ability. For those not taking credit-bearing language modules, a free place on one of the Confucius Institute's existing classes is available.

Programme structure

You will take two and four optional courses, and submit a dissertation. The dissertation is your opportunity to explore your own specialist interest in China and to demonstrate the research and writing skills you have developed during the programme.

Core courses

◾Chinese politics and society
◾Research design

Optional courses

The courses are structured into six pathways

Language and Culture

◾Beginner's Chinese
◾China and the West
◾China’s century of conflict: 1839-1949
◾Gender, culture and text
◾Internship and language in China
◾Object biographies (History of Art)
◾Secularisation and society .

Language and Business

◾Beginner's Chinese
◾Business environment in China*
◾Contemporary issues in HR*
◾Internship and language in China
◾Managing strategic change*
◾Marketing management*.

*Courses offered by the Adam Smith Business School

Students taking the internship/language option have to pay for their own travel, accommodation and fees for the internship placement and/or language course in China. The language options are not available to Chinese nationals.

Governance and Society

◾Comparative public opinion: concepts and applications
◾Environmental policies and problems in China
◾Global cities
◾Social change in China**
◾Understanding public policy.

(**) Externally offered. Involves travel around China for one month in the summer. Students have to pay for their own international travel and a fixed fee which includes tuition, internal travel and accommodation in China.

International Relations

◾China's international politics
◾Environmental policies and problems in China
◾International relations research
◾International relations theory
◾International security and strategic thought.

Human Rights

◾Critical perspectives in human rights
◾Critical perspectives in securities & vulnerabilities
◾Environmental policies and problems in China
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Humanitarian intervention: civilian or sovereignty.

Research Methods

◾Generalised linear modules
◾Introduction to social theory for researchers
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis.

You are free to choose options outside your pathway but we would encourage you to consult with the programme convenor if you plan to do so.

Career prospects

This programme is ideal for anyone interested in pursuing a career involving China, whether in the business world, public services, the arts and media or as preparation for further academic study through PhD study. Our alumni have also gone on to successful careers as public affairs consultants, advertising and PR managers, as well as in secondary school education and the charity sector. The programme has helped graduates develop international perspective, critical thinking and writing skills, and also smoothed the path to living and working in the Far East.

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This programme takes a broad view of tourism management, exploring the challenges relevant to a wide range of situations that managers and other professionals are likely to face. Read more

This programme takes a broad view of tourism management, exploring the challenges relevant to a wide range of situations that managers and other professionals are likely to face.

You will develop your academic skills and knowledge, and learn approaches to management decision-making and critical evaluation. Importantly, the programme has a practical focus on the managerial and strategic issues in the rapidly developing tourism industry.

The programme’s intensive but generalist approach prepares you for a wide range of careers in travel and tourism. Our graduates are often employed in official tourist organisations, transport providers, hotels, tour operating and travel agencies and government organisations.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme takes a broad view of tourism and provides an opportunity to explore issues and problems relevant to a wide range of situations and aspects likely to be faced by tourism managers and other relevant professionals.

It gives an opportunity to develop academic skills and knowledge. At the same time it maintains a practical focus on the rapidly developing tourism industry. Its intensive but generalist approach aims to prepare students for a wide range of possible careers in travel and tourism.

It is designed to provide an appropriate base for employment opportunities in official tourism organisations, in transport, hotels, tour operating and travel agency companies, in government and other organisations where knowledge of tourism is important.

The programme draws on the stimulus of the School’s recent research activities, and takes an integrated approach to the relationships between the various components of the programme.

The programme also provides students with opportunities to work directly with industry partners through not only guest lectures, but also on a real tourism project through the Applied Dissertation initiative and during fieldtrips.

The programme encourages students to develop skills in relation to practical research and decision making in a tourism business environment.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

Upon completing the course, students will be able to demonstrate:

  • A systematic, in-depth understanding of the development, issues and influences relevant to tourism management
  • A high level of theoretical and applied knowledge of the management operation, organisation and provision of business or service sector education
  • An understanding of the research process

Intellectual / cognitive skills

Students will have the ability to:

  • Independently critically evaluate approaches and techniques relevant to tourism management
  • Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving abilities in the range of modules studied

Professional practical skills

Students will be able to:

  • Analyse and synthesise issues related to tourism management. Other skills developed include communication and presentation skills, computing skills, critical reasoning, data analysis, organisation and planning, report and essay writing skills, problem solving skills, interactive and group skills, and research skills
  • Evaluate the ethical dilemmas likely to arise in research and professional practice, and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors, supervisors and others

Key / transferable skills

Students will learn:

  • To identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and therefore to propose new areas for investigation, new problems, new or alternative applications or methodological approaches
  • To conduct research and produce a high quality reports: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon an issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of the research work
  • A range of generic skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals, irrespective of their sector of operation. These will include analysis and synthesis, oral and written communication, computing/IT literacy, critical reasoning, data analysis, organisation and planning, problem solving, independent and group working and research

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Course content. Social workers deal with some of the most vulnerable people in society at times of greatest stress. By the end of this programme you will have been assessed against the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and the Professional Capabilities Framework. Read more

Course content

Social workers deal with some of the most vulnerable people in society at times of greatest stress. By the end of this programme you will have been assessed against the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and the Professional Capabilities Framework. Once qualified, you will be able to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration. Competent practice is essential for the award and you will undertake 200 days of practice learning (placement and skills for practice) during the programme. Practice learning through placement experience is undertaken in blocks of the course and skills for practice, 30 days experiential skills for practice during Year one (in the university), 70 days (in placement) during Year 1 and 100 days (in placement) during Year two.

For students enrolled on the programme, you will be expected to travel to placements with employer providers and be able to travel to service users. Being a holder of a current UK driving licence is therefore desirable.

Year One

During this initial year your knowledge and skills for social work practice is developed and assessed. The value base of social work is emphasised and you will engage in teaching designed to support your learning and understanding of anti-oppressive, anti-discriminatory and anti-racist practice in a model that promotes social justice and relationship based practice. The Preparing for Professional Social Work Practice module is designed to develop students’ skills, knowledge and understanding about social work. The course is delivered by a range of qualified social work academics, service users and social work practitioners, which includes 30 days experiential skills. You will have an opportunity to undertake a five-day shadow placement with an employer provider in a social work setting. The first year is designed to prepare and assess students’ ‘readiness for direct practice’ prior to the 70 day placement

Year Two

You will develop your understanding of different service user groups and service provision in social work settings building on the teaching and learning during Year one. The teaching will provide opportunities for you to work in small learning sets developing your reflective critical thinking skills. A module on diversity develops your understanding of the correlations between oppression, discrimination and inequality and how gender shapes organisations and service delivery. A 100-day assessed placement learning opportunity will be completed in a social work setting. During this final year you will also undertake research which is either empirical or literature based which is presented in a final dissertation.

Masters in Social Work students will have the opportunity to enrol onto the Developing Housing Practice module. This is a 10 credit level 7 module which, on completion, gives students partial accreditation with the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) which is equivalent to 10 credits towards postgraduate housing related training. This would be offered to the Masters students as an elective online module. There are a number of overlaps between housing and social work which include: vulnerable adults, people seeking asylum, safeguarding children, domestic abuse, hate crime, community safety and anti-social behaviours. This optional module would support the employability of the Masters students and offer a unique partial accreditation in housing-related training which complements social work.

Course modules (16/17)

-Life Span 1: Human Growth and Development

-Diversity

-Social Work Law and Policy

-Dissertation and Research Skills for Effective Social Work Practice

-Preparing for Professional Social Work Practice

-Life Span 2: Assessing and Managing Risk in Child and Adult Protection

-Developing Housing Practice, Knowledge and Provision

-Gender and Sexuality Studies in Social Work

Facilities and Special Features

-Prepares you for professional social work practice

-Enables you to develop their practice skills

-Develops your skills and knowledge in working with other professions

-Raises political awareness and encourages you to be a creative, critical and reflective thinker

-The Social Work subject team sign up to and hold the International Federation of Social Work definition of social work

-Students will have the opportunity to develop a range of communication skills in the first year through experiential teaching and learning facilitated by Service Users, Social Work Practitioners and Practice Educators.

Careers

You will undertake 170 days of practice learning (placement). You will complete a student profile during the first year of study and through strong partnerships between the University and employer providers, you will be matched to a specific service placement. You will be expected to be able to travel effectively to and from the placement and be able to carry out community based duties (where required) during the placement which may involve independent travel. It is therefore desirable that you hold a current UK driving licence. Placement learning opportunities can be outside of Northampton. All placement providers are quality assured by the University.

Other admission requirements

English Language & Mathematics: Social work entrants must hold at least a GCSE grade C in English Language and Mathematics (O level grade C or CSE grade 1 are the equivalent). Key Skills Level Two qualifications are also acceptable. For students whose first language is not English an IELTS score of 7 is required.

You will be required to declare that you have these qualifications.

-Ability to write thoughtfully, insightfully and coherently about your motivation in applying for the course and understanding and commitment to the social work profession.

-Relevant work experience. Students must demonstrate (100 days or equivalent) relevant previous experience in social care or a related area. This could be paid or voluntary work.

-Students yet to graduate should provide an academic reference on the application, indicating their predicted degree classification. Students who have already graduated can also provide a professional reference.

-All applicants must confirm prior to interview/offer decision making that they have the ability to use basic IT facilities, including word processing, internet browsing and the use of email, and may be asked to specify how these skills have been obtained.



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Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook. Read more
Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook.

Whether your interests lie in the world of the postcolonial or you have a fascination with women's writing, this challenging course will allow you to study recent volumes of poetry, research cultures and explore novels and films relating to current debates. You will use key theoretical models and concepts to gain a greater understanding of how we study literature and the motivations and historical events that have driven the authors you choose to read.

Taught by a team with an international reputation for their research in diverse areas, ranging from Caribbean culture, history and literature to cultural representations of the 2007-08 credit crunch across literature, stage and screen, this course will expose you to new ideas and encourage you to question them.

Check out our twitter feed @BeckettEnglish for up-to-date information on staff and student events, short courses and fun happenings around the school.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/englishcontemp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Course Benefits

You'll learn how to use a range of cutting-edge theoretical approaches to texts, while you will be able to draw upon the course team's research and teaching strengths in contemporary women's writing, postcolonialism and popular fiction.

You will acquire a well-informed, critical understanding of current developments, questions and critical issues in the field of contemporary literatures and develop the transferable skills needed to undertake independent research into contemporary literatures and associated criticism and theory.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
Is an interdisciplinary research methods module, taught with students on other Masters programmes. It prepares students for their dissertation, and equips them with research skills and strategies necessary if they intend to progress to PhD.

Doris Lessing: Narrating Nation & Identity
Explore a selection of the extensive body of work produced during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by the Nobel Prize-winning writer, Doris Lessing.

Contemporary Genre: (Re)Presenting the 21st Century
Examine contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovations and socio-cultural developments.

Haunting the Contemporary: the Ghost Story in 20th & 21st Century Fiction
Discover the contemporary field of haunted narratives and consider them in relation to a variety of theoretical approaches, primarily the work of Jacques Derrida.

Post-Structuralist Theory: Foucault & Derrida
Develop a deeper awareness and more sophisticated understanding of two theorists who have been of fundamental importance to debates in literary studies in the twentieth century: Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Neoliberal Fictions
You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Dissertation
Presents the opportunity for students to synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the course and to write a substantial piece of supervised research, in the guise of a 15,000-word masters dissertation.

With the exception of Researching Cultures and Dissertation, the modules offered each year will be rotated. Other modules include:

Poetry & Poetics
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

Contemporary Gothic
Examine the relevance of the Gothic today by studying contemporary Gothic texts. You will engage not only with novels but with Gothic-influenced US TV drama, South-East Asian vampire films, and Latin American horror.

India Shining: Secularism, Globalization, & Contemporary Indian Culture
Discover the diverse and challenging selection of literary and visual texts offered by modern postcolonial India and explore the different conceptual and political approaches taken by writers and film-makers.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration 1768-1996
Consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries described in a range of travel writing from 1768 through to 1996 and gain an understanding of how travel, tourism and exploration have evolved.

Translating Tricksters: Literatures of the Black Atlantic
Explore postcolonial writing in the form of short stories, novels and poetry, and unpick the ways writers use religion and folklore to define their identity and resist the legacy of western imperialism.

New Yorkshire Writing: Scholarly Practice & Research Methods
Develop the research and writing skills needed to conduct advanced research in your field as you study representations of Yorkshire and the region's position within Britain.

Other Victorians: The Neo-Victorian Contemporary Novel
You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/. Read more
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/

Why study MA Social Work at Goldsmiths?

-This Masters programme is ideal if you are a graduate, with relevant experience, interested in pursuing a professional career in social work

-It prepares you according to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency – Social Workers in England and the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), the Quality Assurance Agency subject benchmark for social work, and the Department of Health's requirements for social work training

-Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record – we house one of the most respected social work units in the UK, and you will be taught by established social work academics and associate lecturers who have considerable research and/or practice experience in their fields

-Our social work programmes are highly regarded by potential employers within London and further afield, and our graduates have an excellent record of securing employment; they've gone on to work in local authority children's services departments, adult services departments, and independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as the NSPCC, Family Action and Mind, and a recent graduate was named Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year

-We'll equip you with the knowledge, values and skills you'll need to practise as a reflective and ethical social worker, equipped for the challenges of contemporary social work practice

-You will cover areas of human growth and development; community; needs and services; law and organisational contexts of social work; and research methods. Specific learning will include mental health and disability, and social work processes of assessment, planning, intervention and review

-The Masters includes practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups, so you'll be able to gain invaluable real world experience

-We'll encourage you to think deeply about human rights and social justice, and to embed these values in your practice

-You will develop your skills for reflective and evidence-based practice and will be able to further your research mindedness

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council.

Excellence in practice and teaching

Goldsmiths has a long tradition of social work education, and our programmes are internationally regarded as excellent in both practice learning and critical studies. They also have a strong focus on anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practice.

We have a lively programme of research taking place in areas as diverse as:

-the links between child abuse and domestic violence
-multi-family group work with teenage parents
-service user perspectives and transnational adoption
-mental health social workers' use of mental health laws and coercion
-equality and diversity in social work education
-the effects of political conflict on social work practice and education
-reflective professional social work practice
-evaluative approaches to service provision

Our research informs and underpins our teaching and students are invited to share our interests as well as develop their own through undertaking a small scale research project and developing their research mindedness in a final year extended essay.

Find out more about service user and carer involvement in social work education at Goldsmiths.

South East London Teaching Partnership

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies at Goldsmiths has recently entered into a formal Teaching Partnership with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lewisham for the delivery of social work education at Goldsmiths.

We are one of only four sites across the country to have received government funding to develop and test new and innovative approaches to social work qualifying education, early career training and continuing professional development programmes. As a result, a significant number of social work practitioners, from all levels within these three local authorities, are involved in the MA Social Work programme, delivering or co-delivering lectures, workshops and seminars. This means that there is a very close relationship with practice to ensure that by the end of the programme students are equipped to deliver authoritative, compassionate, social work practice that makes a positive difference to people’s lives.

You will be encouraged to make links between anti-oppressive practice, social work values, the legal framework, theories, methods and skills of intervention and social work practice throughout the course.

Intake

The programme has an intake of around 35-40 students each year. Goldsmiths is committed in its policy and practice to equal treatment of applicants and students irrespective of their race, culture, religion, gender, disability, health, age or sexual orientation. We particularly welcome applications from members of minority groups.

The teaching includes lectures and workshops with the entire student group and small study groups, reflective practice discussion groups and seminars of between 10 and 14 students. A significant proportion of the course takes the form of small study groups and seminars.

The MA is a full-time course. It is not possible to study the course part-time. It is not possible for students to transfer from a social work course at another university onto the second year of the Goldsmiths MA in Social Work course.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Admissions Tutor.

Modules & Structure

Successful applicants on the MA in Social Work commit to studying on a full-time taught course over two years. On successful completion you will receive a MA in Social Work which is the professional entry qualification to be a social worker and it enables you to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The curriculum aims to provide you with the value, knowledge and skill base for practice and is organised around study units, workshops, lectures/seminar modules, projects and private study. The teaching and learning opportunities centre on the key areas of the social sciences and their application to Social Work practice, as well developing your intellectual capacity, and the skills necessary to get you ready for practice. There is an expectation that you attend at least 85% of all aspects of the programme.

The structured learning includes specific learning in:

human growth and development, mental health and disability
social work theories and methods; assessment, planning, intervention and review
communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs
law, and partnership working across professional disciplines and agencies
social science research methods, including ethical issues
Practice is central to the programme, and there will be practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups (eg child care and mental health). The learning on the programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply your knowledge to practice situations. We work closely with a range of practice organisations in the Greater London Area. The placements are allocated by our placement tutor and matched with individual profiles. In some instances you may have to travel long distances to your placement organisation. You will need to cover the cost of travel to your placement. You will be expected to work the core hours.

At Goldsmiths we recognise:

the unique contribution that all students bring as individuals to the programme in terms of their personal qualities and life experiences
that professional training builds on the uniqueness of each individual by facilitating the student’s exploration of the values, knowledge base and skills of Social Work practice
that it is the student’s responsibility not only to develop a technical acquaintance with the framework of Social Work practice but also to demonstrate competence through its application in practice
that Social Workers are at the interface of society’s attempts to promote welfare
Social workers have a dual responsibility to act within the state’s welfare framework and also to recognise the pervasive influence of oppression and discrimination at an individual and a structural level in most of the situations in which they work. We will prepare you for this professional responsibility.

Year 1

In year 1 you are introduced to social work as a professional activity and an academic discipline. You consider key concepts such as the nature of need, community, social work services, and the significance of the service user perspective.

You are also provided with an introduction to: life-span development, assessment in social work and a range of social work intervention approaches. Your assessed practice consists of 70 days spent as a social worker; this gives you the chance to develop your communication and social work practice skills with service users, and to work in partnership across professional disciplines and agencies.

Year 2

Year 2 provides you with an overview of the legal and organisational context of social work, and extends your knowledge and skills in one of the two main specialist areas of social work practice: working with children and families, or working with adults in need. You will work in small groups to explore methods of intervention, research and theories which are relevant to a particular area of social work, while another assessed practice element enables you to meet the professional requirements for social work training via 100 days of practice under the guidance of a practice assessor.

You are expected to demonstrate competence across a range of standards and this is formally assessed. The learning on the MA Social Work programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply that knowledge to practice situations.

Practice placements

You are required to spend 170 days in practice settings.

In Year 1 there is a practice placement lasting 70 days and in Year 2 the practice placement lasts 100 days. These placements are arranged through the allocation system devised by the College. The practice placements will be supported by 30 days for the development of practice skills.

You have an identified Practice Educator for each of the two practice placements. Most of our placements are located in South East London, so if you live elsewhere you will need to travel.

We have partnership agreements with the following organisations for placements in social work:

London Borough of Brent – Childrens Services
London Borough of Brent – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea – Adults Services
London Borough of Lambeth – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Adults Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Childrens Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Adults Services
London Borough of Croydon – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Childrens Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Adults Services
London Borough of Bromley – Childrens Services
London Borough of Bromley – Adults Services
NSPCC (London Region)

We also work with about 20-30 voluntary/private social care agencies each year. Here are some that we've worked with recently:

Equinox Care Mental Health Services
Body and Soul HIV Service
Jamma Umoja Family Assessment Services
Advocacy in Greenwich Learning Disability Service
Lewisham Refugee Network
Turning Point Mental Health Services
Carers Lewisham

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a range of methods including essays, assessed role plays, take home papers, project work, a practice based case study, a final year dissertation, and the production of a practice portfolio for each placement.

Assessment of practice is by reports by your Practice Educator. This includes direct observation of your work with service users as well as your practice portfolio, and a narrative giving an evaluation of your work.

Professional standards

Social work is a regulated profession. From 1 August 2012, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) took on the regulation of social workers and the regulation of the performance of social work courses. This means that social work students will need to adhere to the standards set out in the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Guidance on conduct and ethics for students (HCPC 2009), and work towards meeting the HCPC Standards of Proficiency - Social workers in England (HCPC 2012). These are the standards social work students are expected to demonstrate at the end of their last placement/ qualifying level.

Skills

You'll develop the ability to practise social work in a wide variety of settings with different service user groups.

Careers

The programme will enable you to register and practise as a qualified social worker.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme offers the opportunity to learn from leading academics and practitioners working in the field of sustainable tourism management. Read more
This programme offers the opportunity to learn from leading academics and practitioners working in the field of sustainable tourism management.

You will learn about management decision-­making, the significance and complexity of managing human and financial resources, and the critical issues involved in marketing international tourism and travel.

All our programmes are underpinned by an emphasis on the impact of globalisation for the international tourism industry, and a critical evaluation of ethical and social responsibility in business, and tourist behaviour.

The School of Sport and Service Management, where the course is based, is an affiliate member of the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) which informs our teaching and your learning. We are also a member of the UNWTO Knowledge Network, which will give you access to the extensive UNWTO e-library.

The course is suitable if you are looking to convert from another subject area and pursue a future career in tourism or if you already have a grounding in tourism or related subject areas such as business, management, events, hospitality or sport.

Course structure

The course is delivered by staff that are actively involved in research and consultancy, ensuring that the curriculum and classroom discussions are informed by current knowledge and practice in the management of international tourism.

Full-time students normally attend class two days per week, while part-time students usually attend once per week. Some modules may be delivered intensively over several consecutive days.The course is delivered through a variety of lectures, workshops, presentations, tutorials and case studies with an emphasis on interactive learning.

A distinctive feature of postgraduate study within the school is the flexibility and choice provided by the final project. Guided by your programme of study and in consultation with an individual supervisor, there are several options open to you. Whether undertaking an academic dissertation, an applied piece of research such as a business or enterprise project or a study that includes a portfolio or exhibition of work, the final project enables you to pursue your own particular interest in an area relevant to your programme of study.

For international students, the MSc also offers an extended masters route with English language study for between two and sixth months before the course begins.

Areas of study

Tourism is a global sector, and so international perspectives will be at the heart of your learning experience. Alongside your student peers, you can expect to gain valuable insight into topics such as destination planning and management, responsible tourism practices, tourism impacts, destination marketing, and mass/niche tourism development strategies. We also offer unique opportunities to study visual discourse in tourism, and management issues in the global cruise industry.

You will work both individually and in small, multi-­national teams to develop international capabilities and build global networks, learning how to adapt your knowledge to a variety of cultural settings.

Our MSc students come from across the world from a variety of backgrounds, and you'll benefit greatly from sharing experiences.

You will take five core management modules and one option module from a choice of four.

Modules:

Globalisation, Society and Culture
Marketing for Tourism, Hospitality and Events
Professional-based Learning
Critical Perspectives in Tourism Management
Destination Management and Planning
Final Project

One from:

Strategic Business
Visual Culture: Travel, Tourism and Leisure
Contemporary Issues in Cruise Management
Consultancy

Professional experience

Professional-Based Learning Module:

All credit-based postgraduate courses at the School of Sport and Service Management offer the Professional-Based Learning module.

The module offers you an opportunity to undertake practical experience in a work environment and gain invaluable first-hand knowledge. It is designed to help you engage with the process of planning and delivering expertise in practice, and to reflect upon and take steps to improve your academic, personal and professional skills.

In Semester 1 (September–January) you will have classes on CV development, interview skills, target setting, reflective practice and experiential learning, leading to 100 hours of professional experience in Semester 2 (February–June). This experience could take the form of a part-time job, an unpaid internship, a volunteering opportunity in the university or time as a mentee in your chosen industry. You can also take this module as part of a live consultancy in connection with one of your tourism, sport, hospitality or event modules, either in the UK or a School of Sport and Service Management project overseas.

Our school-based Employability Hub will be on hand to assist you in securing an experience that best meets your career goals and aspirations. Professional experience will enhance your practice and academic knowledge, and many of our students have started their careers with their placement organisation.

Careers and employability

Our programme prepares you for a wide range of possible employment options in international tourism.

Our graduates work for some of the world's largest tourism and travel companies in sales, marketing, human resources and finance. Many hold senior management positions in private and public sector organisations, such as tour operators, cruise lines, international hotel and restaurant chains, destination management and marketing organisations, and transportation providers.

Those with entrepreneurial skills run their own enterprises, whilst others work as freelance consultants in a wide range of service industries. A substantial number of graduates embark on PhDs before starting their career in academia.

Whether you are thinking of starting a career in tourism management or are already working in the sector, the University of Brighton’s International Tourism Management MSc will enable you to begin a successful and rewarding future.

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Course overview. Tourism is a highly-competitive industry in virtually every country of the world, which has created a demand for managers who possess the knowledge and skills to succeed in this dynamic and global industry. Read more
Course overview

Tourism is a highly-competitive industry in virtually every country of the world, which has created a demand for managers who possess the knowledge and skills to succeed in this dynamic and global industry.

This course will enhance your business management potential by developing your knowledge and skills to identify and respond to the wide range of opportunities and threats in future tourism business environments. You will also appreciate the multi-disciplinary approaches required in the sector.

A strong emphasis is placed on the role of communication and creativity in effective management practice, together with an awareness of contemporary issues. A key feature of this course is the ‘live industry project’, where you will travel overseas for an external organisation and apply your skills and knowledge to a real business. Previous students have completed projects in Malaysia, the Gambia and the Azores in Portugal.


Why should I choose this course?

UCB is a leading provider of innovative undergraduate and postgraduate courses in tourism, with a national and international reputation.
UCB’s well-developed international links are reflected in our thriving international study body, which makes for a diverse and friendly atmosphere.
Our lecturers have a wealth of industry experience to draw from and keep up-to-date on industry developments as well as academic research.
The ‘live industry project’ is a fantastic opportunity to travel abroad, gain experience and use the skills you develop on your course in a real industry environment.
You will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of tourism and business approaches and appreciate the changing nature of the contemporary tourism environment.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, guest speakers, seminars and e-learning activities will help give you an understanding of the travel and tourism sector as a business. There is also a range of action learning opportunities through case studies, scenario-planning, simulations and live projects.

You will be assessed through case study analysis, presentations, essays, e-discussions, examinations and debates through a range of individual and team-based environments.

Our teaching and assessment is underpinned by our Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy 2015-2020.

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Course overview. The global growth of tourism has been accompanied by economic, environmental and social impacts that are crucial to industry development in order for it to expand and develop. Read more
Course overview

The global growth of tourism has been accompanied by economic, environmental and social impacts that are crucial to industry development in order for it to expand and develop.

A key role in the development of tourism lies with the planners and developers who control and cultivate tourism to meet the varied needs of the different types of service providers and principles.

This course will examine these important areas, encouraging you to examine the management and development of tourism destinations so you develop an appreciation of the multi-disciplinary approaches required in the sector. You will focus on planning and development initiatives whilst building an awareness of contemporary issues.

A key feature of this course is the ‘live industry project’, where you will travel overseas for an external organisation and apply your skills and knowledge to developing tourism product and marketing development plans. Previous students have completed projects in Cyprus, Italy and Madeira.

Why should I choose this course?

UCB is a leading provider of innovative undergraduate and postgraduate courses in tourism, with a national and international reputation.
You will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of tourism and marketing development approaches and appreciate the changing nature of the contemporary tourism environment.
UCB’s well-developed international links are reflected in our thriving international study body, which makes for a diverse and friendly atmosphere.
Our lecturers have a wealth of industry experience to draw from and keep up-to-date on industry developments as well as academic research.
The ‘live industry project’ is a fantastic opportunity to travel abroad, gain experience and use the skills you develop on your course in a real industry environment.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, guest speakers, seminars and e-learning activities will help give you an understanding of the travel and tourism sector as a business. There is also a range of action learning opportunities through case studies, scenario-planning, simulations and live projects.

You will be assessed through case study analysis, presentations, essays, e-discussions, examinations and debates through a range of individual and team-based environments.

Our teaching and assessment is underpinned by our Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy 2015-2020.

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Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years. Read more
Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years.

You will have the opportunity to explore a range of social and cultural developments in the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world. Throughout your study, you will work in small groups or individually, guided by your expert teaching team. Their historical research in areas such as urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement, is of an international standing and will feed into your learning.

Our teaching will give you the platform to reflect on historical interpretations of the past and conduct your own independent historical research.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/socialhistory_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will develop a range of transferable skills valued by employers in areas such as teaching, local government, administration, management, the civil service, marketing, public relations and the non-profit sector. Your course will also provide you with an excellent grounding should you want to pursue further postgraduate study.

- Teacher
- Historical Researcher
- Lecturer
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will work in small groups or individually with research-active historians throughout your period of study. Our history team has strengths in many areas and you will benefit from their expertise in urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement history.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
This is an introduction to research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history through the theme of war. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how World War Two has been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

Underworlds: Representations of Crime, Police & the Criminal c.1700 to c.1945
You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Sexuality, Gender & Popular Culture in Britain 1918-1970
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

Organised Crime in the Modern World: Global Criminal Cultures
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

European Cities: Making Urban Landscapes & Cultures since c.1945
You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration, 1768-1996
This is an opportunity to consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs and ethnographic studies. You will learn how travel, tourism and exploration has evolved - influenced by innovations in transport, health and media, public tastes, colonial policies and racial attitudes.

A Cultural Revolution? The Sixties in Comparative Perspective
Focusing on cultural, social and political elements of the 'long 1960s' (1958-1975), you will study a wide variety of political movements, social changes and cultural forms - such as music, film, TV, theatre and literature - looking at the United States, Britain and Western Europe, and the wider world.

Dissertation
You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources.You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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