• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
University College London Featured Masters Courses
"food" AND "policy"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Food Policy)

  • "food" AND "policy" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 285
Order by 
Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City. From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Read more
Discover how to change the food system for the better on this unique MSc in Food Policy at City.

Who is it for?

From artisanal bakeries to Ministries of Agriculture and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Our students come to study the MSc in Food Policy from around the world, across the food landscape and go on to develop their careers in a variety of ways once they graduate.

The course is for students who are passionate about food policy and are open to challenging their own assumptions. We want you to graduate from this Masters with a more disciplined and rigorous approach so you can be more effective in pursuing your passions within the food domain.

Objectives

How does a coconut growing in Malaysia become a coconut drink in the UK? On this programme we explore how policy influences the trajectory of food not just from field to fork but across time and territory.

The MSc in Food Policy is about analysing, researching and informing the future of food policy from the local to global scale. It is run by the Centre for Food Policy, which has pioneered an integrated approach to food policy since 1994.

The ways in which we produce, process, distribute, market, prepare and consume food have important consequences for our health and that of the planet. We look at the positive and negative impacts of food, from the health, environmental, political, socio-economic and cultural perspective.

This Masters promotes genuine interdisciplinary because we think you need to look at the subject from all angles to make the most holistic evaluation. It draws on social sciences (sociology, politics, economics, anthropology, psychology) as well as health sciences and epidemiology. We look at the latest food policy debates and place them in a historical context.

You will be taught by a team of specialist food policy specialists who are leaders in the field. Our academic staff are actively involved in research and in policy-making on the local, national and global stage. Our teaching reflects this engagement.

Students are exposed to conflicting narratives about the problems facing the food system and the best ways to resolve them. We address important questions of our time, such as:
-Are we producing too much or too little food to feed the world population?
-How have we ended up living in a world where there are more overweight and obese people than under-nourished people?
-Why is a third of the food produced globally lost or wasted?
-How can we deal with the massive impact of agriculture on climate change?
-How do lobbyists and the media influence what we eat?

Academic facilities

As a food policy student at City, University of London you can learn from experts at leading institutions across the UK through the Innovative Food Systems Teaching and Learning (IFSTAL) initiative.

Created for postgraduate students, the initiative aims to address an urgent skills shortage in the food industry and tackle systematic failings in the food system by combining resources and knowledge. The network, which is made up of five leading higher education institutions including City and the University of Oxford, gives you the opportunity to take part in research and internship placements during your degree.

When it comes to studying food policy, London is an amazing location. Giving you one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories, it offers a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city and hone your focus towards your own area of interest and/or expertise. As part of the University of London, you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We are a passionate and engaged team who will help you understand how to change the food system for the better. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small group activities, whole class discussions, workshops and independent study. There are a lot of group discussions in class. We encourage you to ask questions, contribute your own experiences and apply your own perspectives to the issues we explore. The programme also encourages a strong peer-to-peer community through social media.

For the distance-learning mode you will be able to watch the lectures online, which are supplemented with written exercises and one-to-one Skype tutorials with the teaching staff.

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of written work. The first is handed in during the middle of term so that you receive useful feedback before moving on to the second assignment. In each case you will choose the topic. You will also be asked to write different kinds of documents (briefing papers, memos, reports as well as essays) that correspond to those you would have to write in policy-making organisations. Then you work on your dissertation, which is a longer (15,000 word) piece of work, enabling you to delve into a food policy topic of your choice in depth. You will gain support from a personal supervisor who is a senior academic from the Centre for Food Policy.

Modules

The course consists of four core taught modules (worth 30 credits each) and a dissertation (worth 60 credits). The dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake research on a topic of your choice that is relevant to food policy. The course has been designed to enable you to pursue your own interests and passions. In every assignment you have the opportunity to engage with the issues you care about.

The course is flexible to fit in with your work commitments so you can study this Masters on a full-time (one year), part-time (two years) or on a distance-learning basis (two years). The taught modules take place in the first and second terms, and the dissertation starts in the third term and continues until September (December for part-time students). For each taught module there are approximately 10 three-hour teaching sessions. In addition you are expected to undertake around 270 hours of independent study. For the whole programme, you should expect to study for around 1800 hours (35 hours per week for full-time students, 17.5 hours for part-time students).

Taught modules
-FPM001 - Food and public policy (30 credits)
-FPM003 - Food, culture and society (30 credits)
-FPM002 The political economy of food (30 credits)
-FPM004 Food, public health and the environment (30 credits)

Career prospects

We are very proud of our alumni. Our employability stats – the highest within the School – reflect the range of opportunities available to our graduates. For example, our alumni run NGOs and progressive food businesses, work in government and UN agencies, and have established great careers in health advocacy, journalism and academia.

Read less
The MSc/PgDip programme in Food Safety and Control addresses the key issues of food control, from both the food producers and food law enforcement points of view, recognising the equally important needs of distributors, retailers and of course, consumers. Read more
The MSc/PgDip programme in Food Safety and Control addresses the key issues of food control, from both the food producers and food law enforcement points of view, recognising the equally important needs of distributors, retailers and of course, consumers.

The course covers the knowledge and skills required for the successful introduction and implementation of systems of control, such as those based on the accepted principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), and other international quality management standards.

The responsibility of assuring the safety of food lies primarily with government and the industry. In today's food industry, all aspects of the production, storage and distribution of food must be effectively controlled, not only to assure safety and wholesomeness, but also to ensure efficient and consistent manufacture at the lowest possible cost. Consumers are demanding a greater assurance of safety as well as more information on which to base their choices. Students are expected to take on demanding roles in a wide range of food control activities in both the private and public sectors upon graduation, while gaining an internationally recognized qualification.

EU study opportunity

EU study opportunities exist with the University of deLorraine Nancy, France, and Universidad Politécnica deValencia (UPV), Valencia, Spain.

Excellent scholarship opportunity

Students who have accepted an offer for a place on this course are encouraged to apply for LSBU's Frank Brake scholarship. Find out more about the Frank Brake scholarship:
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/scholarships/frank-brake-scholarship

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/food-safety-control-msc

Modules

Year 1:
All modules are assessed through a mix of formal examination and coursework. Each module represents 200 hours of learning time with up to 40 hours of class contact time.

- Food regulation and sustainability
Food legislation is an essential element for an effective food safety and control. The module deals with legislative control at various levels, embracing national and European Union legislation and also international approaches to harmonisation. It also provides an awareness of the different types of food standards, and their implications for manufacturers, retailers and consumers. It also addresses the policy issues in sustainable food production and management.

- Food composition and safety
This module comprises of selected topics that are directly relevant to food safety and control. It considers the complex chemical composition of foods, the chemical safety of foods, quality parameters, and develops the skills to interpret and use data. The common themes throughout the module are the choice of suitable, appropriate and cost effective analytical methodology, and the correct interpretation of analytical results.

- Food microbiology and hygiene
This module is designed to help you develop an understanding of food microbiology, to appreciate the principles of food microbiology and explore both microbial food spoilage and food borne microorganisms. You'll be able to critically analyse the means by which food can be processed safely from a microbiological standpoint, and the methodology that is applied to achieve this. Emphasis will be given to the development, application and use of microbiological criteria for foods and their limitations.

- Food quality management
This module introduces the principles behind all effective quality management systems (QMSs) employed in the modern food industry. Quality of product or service does not just happen; it has to be planned and managed. Systems used by small as well as large companies are covered.

- Food product development management
This module examines the management processes involved in the design and development of new safe food products. Students work together in small groups and adopt an allocated role within the group. The groups respond to a product development brief by designing and developing a new food product or an extension of an existing product. You'll prepare an individual portfolio describing your experience and contribution and make a group presentation of your product to a panel of external guests as a 'commercial pitch'.

- Food control operations
This module outlines the rationale, philosophy and concepts of modern food control, introducing the precautionary principle, the scope ranging from 'farm to fork', and the requirement of risk assessment. The principles of control based on prevention rather than detection and self-regulation are underlined throughout. Modern tools, techniques and procedures in food control are also introduced, illustrating the scope, applications and potential benefits of effective food control. You'll learn how to draw up specifications, identify safety hazards, conduct risk assessments, determine product shelf life, apply the commonly used statistical quality control techniques as well as use basic sensory evaluation methods. In the end, you'll have a broad and comprehensive grounding in modern food control operations.

- Research methods
This module aims to equip you with the knowledge and skills required for scientific research and systematic investigation. You'll learn how to ask the right questions, develop meaningful research proposals and evaluate objectively and independently research findings. Emphasis will be given to ethics, background information search, planning, experimental design, data collection and analysis. Principles of scientific methods, objective reasoning, idea formulation and model building will also be included. In data analysis, you'll be introduced to the most common statistical techniques covering both parametric and non-parametric tests.

- Project
The Project forms the climax of the MSc Food Safety and Control programme. It's the opportunity for you to demonstrate your grasp of food control in its widest sense, and produce documentary evidence of that grasp. The project provides the opportunity for you to apply your knowledge in an integrated fashion to a particular challenge in the management and control of food safety. We always try to help you match your project intention with your career aspirations and where possible use our networks to enable you to work on real commercial problems within an industrial placement.

The course has been developed to provide:
- A thorough understanding of the scientific principles on which both the safe handling of food and food control procedures are based

- An appreciation of the importance of the proper control of manufacture, storage and distribution, and the means by which it is achieved in the production and sale of safe food

- An understanding of the food industry's responsibilities to the interests and welfare of the consumer

- Opportunities to consider the social and economic contexts in which the industry operates

- An intellectually stimulating and coherent programme relevant to both your needs and those of the food industry

- A detailed understanding of the philosophy and methodology of research

- The best possible opportunity to develop personally and professionally

- The knowledge and skills necessary to enhance your career prospects.

Employability

The programme covers the knowledge and skills required for the successful introduction and implementation of systems of control such as those based on the accepted principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), and other international quality management standards. This opens up numerous and diverse opportunities in food safety and control.

You'll study all areas of food safety, ranging from microbiological, chemical and physical safety in the different modulesand throughout the programme.

The course will open up a wide range of career opportunities including roles in: product development; quality control; food safety and quality management; catering and retailing; technical auditing; and food law enforcement. Some of our graduates have gone on to PhD degrees.

Recent employers include Kerry Foods, Leathams, Bakkaver, Kraft Foods, Tesco, Asda, Marks and Spencer, Harrods and local authorities.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

You'll be encouraged to undertake a work-based project or dissertation.

Teaching and learning

You'll make extensive use of the Virtual Learning Environment, so materials are available whenever you need them. Personal tutoring support, extraclinics offering support outside lecture and tutorial sessions are available.There's a major focus on the practical applications of knowledge, supported byhands-on laboratory exercises. Various assessment methods are used in modules across the course.

Read less
The MSc in Food Business will provide you with the skills to analyse the key issues impacting on an evolving food chain such as changing consumer demand, the need for better value, the emerging food service markets, food supply chain management, food safety, food and health issues, product innovation, and the application of those skills to the food industry. Read more
The MSc in Food Business will provide you with the skills to analyse the key issues impacting on an evolving food chain such as changing consumer demand, the need for better value, the emerging food service markets, food supply chain management, food safety, food and health issues, product innovation, and the application of those skills to the food industry.

The balance of business and computer skills and a European language on this programme reflects the global nature of the food industry and the dynamic nature of the Irish food industry.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr23/

Course Details

The Department of Food Business and Development offers a full-time MSc in Food Business which is ideally suited to graduates interested in pursuing a career in strategic management or marketing in the food sector. The needs of the food sector in the future involve the development of an efficient and responsive food chain (from farm to processor to consumer) in which market changes are reconciled with strategic and production decisions along all stages of the food business chain.

On successful completion of this course, you should be able to:

- evaluate current food consumer and food industry trends, policy issues and drivers and strategies impacting on the evolving food supply chain
- design and implement innovative marketing strategies for competitive markets
- evaluate the role of market orientation and strategic marketing in new product success
- identify the ethical, regulatory and environmental responsibilities of modern food enterprises
- evaluate your personal and employment skills development as a result of working in some facet of the food supply chain
- apply new research techniques to new marketing situations
- analyse the research process and its key components and design a piece of research to answer a specific research question

Format

The course is divided into two parts. You will complete modules to a total of 60 credits in Part I (year 1). You must undertake a food industry-centred research project after the end of Part I university examinations. In Part II (year 2) of the course you will submit a report on your food industry-centred research project and a dissertation on a research project.

Assessment

Various methods of assessment are used, depending on the chosen modules.

For more information, please see the Book of Modules 2015/2016 - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/food/page05.html

Careers

Employment opportunities from this course can be in the food or non-food sectors as the skills acquired are highly transferable. Recent graduates have secured employment in international food firms (Glanbia, Kerry), banks, food agencies (Bord Bia, UK Home-Grown Cereals Authority), non-food agencies (Enterprise Ireland, IBEC), market research firms (AC Nielsen) and in higher education. A central part of the MSc in Food Business is a food industry placement in a food firm, food agency, university, bank or related establishment, where you gain valuable work experience.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

Read less
MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of topics supported by research active academic staff. We conduct research in all areas of food and society, including subjects which require collaboration between the social and natural sciences, and translate research into policy recommendations. Read more

Course Description

MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of topics supported by research active academic staff. We conduct research in all areas of food and society, including subjects which require collaboration between the social and natural sciences, and translate research into policy recommendations.

Our research primarily involves food systems, food consumption and food marketing:
•consumer studies in food, food provisioning and behaviour change
•perceived risk associated with food and food production
•food supply chains and territorial development
•international political economy of food and agriculture
•risk-benefit communication
•acceptance of novel food and technologies within the value chain

Opportunities are available for postgraduate research in the following areas.

Understanding and measuring societal and individual responses to risks and benefits
•food, nutrition and healthy dietary choices
•sustainable consumption and the reduction of food waste
•food safety and authenticity throughout the supply chain
•emerging food technologies

Developing new methodologies for assessing socio-economic impacts of food risks and communication strategies and other public health interventions related to food choice
•systematic review
•evidence synthesis
•systems thinking
•Bayesian networks
•rapid evidence assessment

Employing qualitative and quantitative methodologies to understand attitudes and behaviours related to food
•microbiological food hazards
•personalised nutrition
•food authenticity
•societal and consumer responses to emerging food production technologies
•behaviour change in relation to food
•food waste

Stakeholder analysis and effectiveness of public engagement
•research agenda setting
•policy and governance, in the area of emerging food technologies
•food and agricultural policy issues

Integrating social and natural science into the development of predictive models of food security to provide evidence for policy translation in the agrifood sector.
•Bayesian networks
•systems thinking

Find out more about the work of the Agr-Food and Society research group.

Modules

See our Prospectus online.

Read less
The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. It tackles policy and regulatory change, the historical and technological evolution of energy sources, energy markets and their participants, the global governance of climate change as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

The programme specifically addresses the requirements of those wishing to deepen their theoretical and practical understanding of how energy and climate policies are designed, shaped, advocated and implemented and by whom across a multitude of cases drawn from the Global North and South and across multiple levels of political organisation from global to local arenas.

The MSc is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy. It prepares for a multitude of careers in public and private contexts, including in public administration and government departments, strategic policy and risk advisory, government relations and public affairs, policy advocacy, think tanks and academia.

Guest speakers on the programme's modules have included Angus Miller (Energy Advisor, UK Foreign Office), Tom Burke (Founding Director, E3G and Environmental Policy Advisor, Rio Tinto), Jonathan Grant (Asst. Director Sustainability and Climate Change, PwC), Kash Burchett (European Energy Analyst, IHS Global Insight), Chris Dodwell (AEA Technology, former Head of International Climate Policy, UK Department of Energy and Climate Change) and Andrew Pendleton (Head of Campaigns, Friends of the Earth).

The programme draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In particular, students will be able to benefit from the expertise located at the Centre for Environment, Development and Policy (CEDEP), the Law School's Law, Environment and Development Centre (LEDC), the Centre on the Politics of Energy Security (CEPES), the Centre for Water and Development, and the SOAS Food Studies Centre.

In addition to the three core modules of Global Energy and Climate Policy (1 unit), Applied Energy and Climate Studies (0.5 units) and Global Public Policy (0.5 units) students choose a fourth module to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Paris and Brussels.

Programme objectives

- Excellent understanding of the nature and development of global energy and climate policy, drawing on a variety of contributing disciplines

- Excellent knowledge of regulatory challenges and their impact on public and private stakeholders in both the Global South and North

- Ability to critically contribute to contemporary policy debates about reforms of international energy and climate governance architectures and their interaction with national and sub-national policy and regulatory frameworks

- Development of practical skills including policy analysis and policy advocacy, risk analysis, strategic communication and media

We welcome applications from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds. It is not necessary to have a degree in a discipline directly related to global energy and climate policy.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Listen to the MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy and CISD's 1st Annual Energy and Climate Change Conference (May 2011) podcast (http://www.4shared.com/mp3/EdRUc-qq/CISD_Energy_and_Climate_Change.html), organised by students.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 172kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/file80890.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of courses to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the courses for Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) accessible to part time students. The majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00 where possible however lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some courses (between evening and daytime slots) so that part time students will have access to as many courses as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GECP course taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:

- Theory and practice of global energy and climate change policy as intertwined global issues

- Practical toolkit including policy analysis and planning, risk analysis, strategic communication, policy advocacy and negotiation skills

- Interaction with policymakers and government officials, energy industry and NGO representatives, and other practitioners

- An elective from a wide range: International Relations, International Law, International Economics, International Security, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a course offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law)

Further activities:

Also included in the degree programme:

- Week-long study trip to energy and climate change related organisations in Brussels and Paris
- Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Participation in workshops attended by public and private sector stakeholders
- Opportunity to organize and run the Centre’s annual Energy and Climate Policy conference
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/all-audios/1) to listen to the podcasts)

This course is also available online and is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy and who wish to study in a flexible way. Please click here to view more information http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy-online/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The course aims to produce and develop well-trained managers who are working in, or wish to follow, careers in the food industry. Read more
The course aims to produce and develop well-trained managers who are working in, or wish to follow, careers in the food industry. It promotes analytical and management skills by focusing on questions raised in relation to public policy issues, the commercial environment and the supply of foods which meet supply chain customer and consumer requirements. You will hone your personal skills and be able to engage in critical analysis and formulate and express sound arguments.

The course

Whether you live to eat or eat to live, the indisputable fact is that we all need to be regular consumers of food and drink. The food industry offers more than careers based solely on farms or in retail food outlets. It is vigorous and dynamic, with the adoption of new technology and the provision of new products satisfying ever changing consumer demands.

An important part of the sector’s success relies on an integrated approach and the close links which have been forged between growers, wholesalers, food processors and retailers. To be successful in today’s fast moving food industry students are provided with a combination of modules focusing on core subjects relevant to the food industry, as well as key priorities facing today’s food industry.

Once students have completed the taught modules they commence their research project, which gives the opportunity to pursue their own interests and provides a valuable addition to their skills set.

The course aims to produce and develop well-trained managers who are working in, or wish to follow, careers in the food industry. It promotes analytical and management skills by focusing on questions raised in relation to public policy issues, the commercial environment and the supply of foods which meet supply chain customer and consumer requirements. You will hone your personal skills and be able to engage in critical analysis and formulate and express sound arguments.

Modules include:
■ Food Processing, Quality and Safety
■ Food Product Development
■ Research and Information Skills
■ Principles of Finance
■ Managing People
■ Agri-food Supply Chain Strategy and Management
■ Food Security and Sustainability
■ Research Project

How will it benefit me?

On completion of the course at MSc level, students will be able to use and evaluate food industry management techniques and assess their relevance to commercial practice under different technical and cultural constraints. You will learn to appraise the dynamic legal, economic and political environment within which food businesses operate.

Students become skilled in collecting, analysing and interpreting qualitative and quantitative data, technical and commercial information, as well as evaluating and exploiting the latest developments in technology. You will learn to identify solutions to food industry management problems appropriate to local, national and international circumstances.

You will become competent at identifying and solving information management and communication problems encountered by food industry managers and will be able to critically review the existing knowledge of a sector specific topic and relate to a hypothesis which will advance that knowledge. Students also undertake strategic analysis, integrating a range of food industry management techniques.

Careers

Career opportunities in food industry management are very good both in the UK and internationally. Our Masters programme has been designed to produce well qualified individuals employable throughout the food industry. A large number of businesses visit the University every year to recruit new staff.

Careers could include procurement, logistics, market research, commercial or general management in the food industry.

Read less
There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. Read more

Food security: a global concern

There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. The Royal Society report Reaping the Benefits: science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture published in October 2009, provided the clearest evidence of the challenge of ensuring global food security during the next 50 years. Crop yields need to rise significantly, but in a manner that requires much lower dependency on chemical intervention and fertilisers.

Meeting the challenge of sustainable agriculture

This programme was developed in collaboration with the agricultural industry, government agencies including Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), and farmers and food manufacturers, to provide a multi-disciplinary training in sustainable agriculture and global food security. Research-led teaching in molecular plant pathology, plant sciences and microbiology is strongly supplemented by Rothamsted Research, North Wyke expertise in grassland management, soil science and sustainable farming systems. Leading social scientists also provide valuable input in rural land use and the rural economy. The combination of expertise in both arable and pastureland systems ensures a truly rounded learning experience.

The curriculum takes account of the key skills shortages in the UK to train highly skilled individuals who can enter government agencies, agriculture and food industries and fulfil very valuable roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security. The programme provides opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences including field trips.

Expert teaching

Teaching is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry. Scientific staff from Fera provide specialist lectures as part of the Crop Security module, members of the Plant Health Inspectorate cover field aspects of plant pathology, and a LEAF1 farmer addresses agricultural systems and the realities of food production using integrated farm management. In addition, teaching staff from the University and BBSRC Rothamsted-North Wyke will draw on material and experiences from their academic research and scientific links with industry.

Industrial and practical experience

All students will have opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences. Teaching visits will be made to the Plant Health Inspectorate in Cornwall to see quarantine management of Phytophthora, and to a local LEAF farm to review the challenges and approaches to food production in integrated farm management systems. You will gain specialised experience in practical science or policy making through a dissertation or project placement with external agencies. Defra and Fera, for example, are offering five dissertation and/or project placements annually.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of modules. The list of modules may include the following; Professional Skills; Research Project; Sustainable Land Use in Grassland Agriculture; Crop Security; Sustainable Livestock and Fisheries; Political Economy of Food and Agriculture and Research and Knowledge Transfer for Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see the website for an up to date list (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/foodsecurity/#Programme-structure)

Addressing a skills shortage to tackle global food security

The MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture curriculum has been designed in collaboration with the agricultural industry to tackle the skills shortage that exists in this vital interdisciplinary area. This programme will provide the highly skilled individuals required in government agencies, agriculture and food industries for critical roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security.

Global horizons

With food security and sustainable agriculture a global concern, opportunities for specialists in the areas of agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant improvement will be worldwide. By combining expertise across the natural, social and political sciences, this programme provides valuable interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in both arable and pastureland systems. Graduates will be prepared to take on the global challenges of food security and sustainable agriculture, being able to adapt to farming systems across the world and identify cross-disciplinary solutions to local agricultural problems.

Learning enhanced by industry

The programme is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry, with specialist lectures, teaching visits to observe the practical application of techniques, and industrial placement opportunities for project work or dissertations in practical science or policy making.

Read less
​The safety and quality of food is a major concern to consumers, retailers, manufactures and regulators. High profile incidents have highlighted the need for the effective management systems and regulatory frameworks for food safety at the local, national and international levels. Read more

Course Overview

​The safety and quality of food is a major concern to consumers, retailers, manufactures and regulators. High profile incidents have highlighted the need for the effective management systems and regulatory frameworks for food safety at the local, national and international levels.

Increasingly, professionals within this field require specialised knowledge and skills to help them identify and effectively manage risks. In response to these challenges, this PgCert/PgDip/MSc has been designed to meet the development needs of UK and international food safety specialists working in commerce and industry and enforcement agencies.

The aims of the programme are to:
- Enable students to evaluate international, national and sector specific frameworks for the prevention and management of and crisis response to food safety risks

- Provide opportunities for students to develop academic and subject specific knowledge and skills of relevance to employment in the field of food safety

- Support the development of reflective practitioners who have the knowledge and skills to appraise, develop and evaluate responses to food safety risks​.

​Course Content​​

The programme utilises theoretical frameworks and practical case studies to enable students to identify potential hazards, assess risk and to develop and monitor risk management strategies. The teaching team has many years experience in policy development, research and consultancy working in industry and the enforcement of legislation. The team operates at the international level and this is reflected in the teaching sessions.

The taught element of the programme comprises the equivalent of 6 modules of 20 credit points each (comprising 4 half modules and 4 full modules).

The taught modules offered are as follows:
- Risk Perception and Communication (10 credits)
- Frameworks for the Assessment of Risk (10 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Epidemiology (10 credits)
- Evaluating Global Food Safety Management Standards (20 credits)
- Implementing Global Food Safety Management Standards (20 credits)
- ​Food Safety Emergency Management (20 credits)
- Product Conformity and Labelling (10 credits)

The dissertation phase of the module is comprised of a number of components including the development of a research proposal, an in-depth literature review and presentation of the findings of self-directed research in the form of an academic paper. This phase of the studies allows students to develop specific knowledge in relation to a food safety issue of particular interest to them.

Upon completion of the Programme, students should be able to:
- Critically evaluate global and national policy, legal and sector specific frameworks for food safety management and propose evidence based approaches for best practice
- Appraise psychosocial factors impacting upon the perception, communication and response to food safety risks.
- Critically evaluate models of risk assessment and risk management
- Critically review relevant research
- Critically appraise approaches to the assessment and management of risk and inform the development of food safety management strategies and the implementation of food safety management systems.
- Evaluate and apply approaches to emergency preparedness and crisis response.
- Critically review relevant research
- Demonstrate the ability to design, plan, and undertake research in the discipline of food safety management and present the findings.
- Critically reflect on professional and personal practice, skills and competencies.​

Learning & Teaching​

​The teaching and learning strategy for the Programme places a strong emphasis on application of theoretical frameworks to real problems and situations. Teaching and assessment focuses on case studies and exercises and scenarios reflecting contemporary issues in food safety management.

The Learning and Teaching strategies adopted, encourages substantial input from students. Whilst lectures are seen as opportunities for imparting key information and pointing students in a particular direction for further study, they are also intended to be interactive and debate is encouraged.
Lectures are complemented by seminar sessions designed to encourage a more detailed examination of issues. In addition to enhancing understanding, these sessions are seen to be important as a means of helping students to develop analytical and critical appraisal skills.

Finally, case study and role-play sessions are scheduled. During these sessions, there is further opportunity not only to develop those skills appropriate for the achievement of learning outcomes but also to develop skills that will enhance performance within a workplace setting.

The Learning and Teaching Strategy emphasises the value of evaluating ones performance and developing approaches to maximize learning and the application of skills and knowledge. Assumptions underpinning the analysis of information and response options are explored and alternative interpretations (that are often based upon cultural orientations) are examined. It is the intention that students graduating from the programme will operate as reflective practitioners.​

Assessment

Students' performance is assessed via a course work of a variety of forms including essays and reports. Tutors will offer advice in relation to the development of assignments; each student is allocated a personal supervisor to support their dissertation phase of studies.

Employability & Careers​

The Programme is seen to be of particular relevance to those wishing to further their expertise in food safety management.

The programme is also of relevance to students with a general enforcement background or food industry background who wish to specialise in food safety. Expertise exists within the teaching team to support graduates of the programme who wish to embark on PhD studies.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
This MPA is designed to train the next generation of policy leaders in how to use science, technology and engineering to address development needs. Read more
This MPA is designed to train the next generation of policy leaders in how to use science, technology and engineering to address development needs. Students learn how to build innovation systems and engage in policy experimentation. Students undertake a major project on a real development initiative and have opportunities to learn from global policymakers and innovators.

Degree information

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to creatively develop innovative sustainable development policies. Students also study how development and innovation policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a major group project module (45 credits).

Core modules - students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focusing on their degree topic.
-Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
-Analytical Methods for Policy
-Development, Technology and Innovation Policy
-Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules - students must select one compulsory option from the following STEaPP modules:
-Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
-Risk Assessment and Governance
-Communicating Science for Policy
-Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy
-Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

Dissertation/report
In the group project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning
The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Careers

Graduates with Development, Technology and Innovation Policy MPA degrees will typically work in government agencies, corporate regulatory affairs departments or within advocacy groups doing legislative, regulatory or policy analysis. The career path for this type of profession begins as research or policy assistant, moves through policy or research analyst, then to technical consultant or project director or other senior professional roles. Ambitious candidates can work towards top- level positions such as assistant secretary or executive director.

Employability
Through the MPA programme, students will:
-Gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in innovation, development, science, technology and engineering.
-Develop a greater awareness of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policy-making processes.
-Learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policymakers and industry experts.
-Develop the skills to mobilise development, technology and innovation policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise, to address the societal challenges they care about.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Developing countries face rapid technological change, increased global interdependencies, and problems such as climate change. This practical programme offers experiential learning for skills needed in innovative development policy-making.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project on development innovation policy for a real-world client involved in development initiatives. Example policy problems include water or energy infrastructure, food, or telecoms.

Students also network with their peers in the sister MPA and doctoral programmes

Read less
This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. Read more
This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. You will gain an in-depth understanding of regional, national, and international standards in regulatory processes, and the role of public institutions and policy makers in delivering safe, quality foods to consumers.

This course is designed for graduates and those working in the agri-food industries who are seeking to advance their knowledge and understanding of food safety and quality management, and progress their professional careers.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two years.

You will study eight modules, followed by the Research Project, carried out over the summer to be submitted in September. It will be presented as a review paper and as a research paper.

If you do not wish to undertake the Research Project may choose to take a Postgraduate Diploma following successful completion of eight modules.

You will learn through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, group workshops and seminars, case studies, individual and student-led research, group projects, and field studies

Students are encouraged to participate in the RAU Enterprise Scheme where they can develop their entrepreneurial skills towards starting their own business.

This course is available to start in either September or January.

September entry

Students will study four modules in the autumn term followed by four modules in the spring term, and complete their Research Project by the end of September.

January entry

Students will study four modules in the spring term, complete their Research Project by the end of September, and study four modules in the autumn term.

Modules

• 4014 Food Chain
• 4075 Research Project
• 4206 Fundamentals of Food Science
• 4207 Systems for Food Safety Management
• 4209 Sustainability and the Food industry
• 4228 New Product Development (NPD) in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4237 The Politics and Policies of Food Assurance

Plus choice of TWO modules, selected from:

• 4040 Sustainable Management of Soil and Water
• 4084 Tourism and Development
• 4110 Fisheries and Aquaculture Management
• 4201 Poverty and Food Security
• 4211 Global Red Meat Chains
• 4212 Global White Meat Chains
• 4213 Global Dairy Food Chain
• 4238 Integrated Organic Systems

Modules will be taught in 10 week blocks.

Assessment

Modules are assessed through written examinations and coursework, including case study analysis, essay writing, oral and poster presentations, and assessed seminars. For the new product development (NPD) module, students are assessed against a food product which they develop and produce in small teams. To complete this module, students are given training in the CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety for Manufacturing, which is beneficial to them post-graduation.

Career prospects

Graduates will be equipped with the education and industry experience to progress their career and become food safety and quality management professionals within:

• An international institution – UN (World Food Programme), IFAD, FAO, IFPRI etc.
• Government and statutory bodies – Defra, DflD, FSA etc.
• Business and industry – major agricultural and food supply companies, consultancy
• NGOs – local food associations, aid and development organisations
• Academia and research – lecturer, PhD

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

Read less
UCC has a history of nearly a century of teaching and research in the food sciences and is amongst Europe’s largest multidisciplinary education and research institutions with world-class academics working in all aspects of the food area. Read more
UCC has a history of nearly a century of teaching and research in the food sciences and is amongst Europe’s largest multidisciplinary education and research institutions with world-class academics working in all aspects of the food area. Our first-rate facilities include extensive and well-equipped laboratories and a large pilot plant with excellent dairy, meat and bakery facilities in addition to a modern pilot-scale brewery.

Course Details

The MSc (Food Science) is a full-time taught postgraduate programme running for 12 months from the date of first registration.

Format

Modules will be chosen with the approval of the Programme Board depending on the student's background.

Part 1 - Taught modules

Students take 60 credits as follows:

- Core Modules -

Students take 15 credits:

PG6001 STEPS - Scientific Training for Enhanced Postgraduate Studies (5 credits)
FS6101 Library Project in Food Science (10 credits)

- Elective Modules -

Student take 45 credits from the following:

FE6101 Food Business: Markets and Policy (5 credits)
FS6105 Material Science for Food Systems (5 credits)
FS6106 Advanced Topics in Dairy Biochemistry (5 credits)
FS6107 Advances in the Science of Muscle Foods (5 credits)
FS6108 Advances in Food Formulation Science and Technology (5 credits)
FS6103 Novel Processing Technologies and Ingredients (5 credits)
FS6120 Cheese and Fermented Dairy Products (5 credits)
FS6121 Meat Science and Technology (5 credits)
MB6114 Hygienic Production of Food (5 credits)
NT6102 Human Nutrition and Health (5 credits)
NT6108 Sensory Analysis in Nutrition Research (5 credits)

Depending on background of the student, the Programme Board may decide to replace some of the above modules to a maximum of 15 credits from:

FS3602 Chemistry of Food Proteins (5 credits)
FS3605 Macromolecules and Rheology (5 credits)
FS4603 Advanced Analytical Methods (5 credits)
FS4606 Cereals and Related Beverages (5 credits)
FS4014 Food Product Development and Innovation (5 credits)
MB4611 Microbial Food Safety (5 credits)

Students who pass Part 1 and achieve a minimum aggregate of 55% are eligible to progress to Part 2. Students who pass Part 1 but who fail to meet the minimum progression standards, or who choose to exit the programme, will be conferred with the Postgraduate Diploma in Food Science.

Part 2

FS6102 Dissertation in Food Science (30 credits)

Assessment

The taught modules of this course are assessed by examination in Winter, Spring and Summer. The research aspect is assessed on the quality of a substantial written dissertation.

Careers

On completing this course, you will be able to:

- conduct original research in food science
- demonstrate an understanding of scientific literature
- apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills in food science
- explain the techniques used in food research, in both principle and practice
- communicate effectively with the food industry and with society at large
- show a comprehensive understanding of current food consumer and food industry trends

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

Read less
This online distance learning Global Food Security (Food Safety) postgraduate programme will be delivered by leading research active staff within the internationally recognised Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) based at Queen’s University Belfast. Read more
This online distance learning Global Food Security (Food Safety) postgraduate programme will be delivered by leading research active staff within the internationally recognised Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) based at Queen’s University Belfast.

The programme will comprise modules focused on food safety and health, global food standards and legislation, analytical methods for food security, food integrity and fraud. Awards will be available at Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) level, and to Masters level following completion of a dissertation-based module.

This programme will be suitable for anyone who wants to know more about this increasingly important area, those working within the wider Agri-food industry sector including food production, processing and retail, regulatory and governmental control agencies, and research organisations.

Awards will be available at Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) level, and to Masters level following completion of a dissertation-based module.

Modern online technology and dynamic advanced audio and video tools will be employed to achieve a stimulating teaching and learning experience. This programme offers learners the opportunity to study this exciting and rapidly changing area taught by world experts within the field at their own pace (60 CATS per year) and within their chosen environment.

PgCert will cover the following modules:
- Food safety and health (30 CATS)
- Advanced analytical tools for food security (30 CATS)

PgDip will include modules in:
- Global food standards and legislation (30 CATS)
- Food integrity, fraud and traceability (30 CATS)

MSc Students will complete a research programme:
- Dissertation (60 CATS)

Read less
​The programme is designed to meet the needs of professionals and practitioners in a range of sectors. The programme combines theoretical studies and practical elements, which can be applied in the modern food processing and management. Read more

Course Overview

​The programme is designed to meet the needs of professionals and practitioners in a range of sectors. The programme combines theoretical studies and practical elements, which can be applied in the modern food processing and management.

The overall aim of this programme is to provide a high quality and professionally relevant curriculum, which will develop graduates with scientific and technical knowledge in the field of food science and technology.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Food-Science-and-Technology---MSc-PgD.aspx

​Course Content​​

There are two main pathways for this MSc, one focuses on Food Safety & Technology, the other on Food Production Management

The structure of the assessment programme will allow students to focus on issues relevant to their interest.

The Cardiff School of Health Sciences, which teaches this course, also houses The Food Industry Centre. This is both a research and practice based centre supporting the activities of the food industry throughout the UK, especially in Wales.

Modules offered as a guide:
- Technology & Quality Policy (taught only for Food Production Management pathway)
- Biochemistry & Food Analysis (taught only for the Food Safety & Technology pathway)
- The modules below are taught in both pathways
- Food Technology & Biotechnology
- Applied Research Methods & Design
- Independent Study
- Sustainable Food Issues
- Food Safety Management
- Food Quality Management & Quality Assurance
- Food Product Conformity & Labelling
- Dissertation:
A written dissertation is based on a project chosen by the candidates to reflect their interest in a specific field. This is coordinated through the programme director and an academic member of staff is assigned to supervise the student for a successful conclusion of the project. ​

Learning & Teaching​

​Lectures are seen as opportunities for imparting key information and pointing students in a particular direction for further study. They are also intended to be interactive and debate is encouraged. Lectures are complemented by seminar sessions as a means of helping students to develop analytical and critical appraisal skills.
Students will be given an opportunity to discuss their choice of pathway with the Programme Director. This consultation and advice is given during the induction period and the first two weeks of the start of the autumn term.

There is a strong emphasis on applying the theoretical frameworks to problem solving which reflects the applied nature of the programme especially through practical sessions. ​

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used. These include closed (or open) book examination, written assignments/ essays, practical report plus a dissertation on a chosen research topic for the MSc.

Employability & Careers​

The programme provides the potential for graduates to progress within the food industry, undertake research in food science and technology or nutrition, or to work in other areas of Food safety and quality management.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
The MSc Food, Space and Society will prepare you to pursue an academic career in food studies; enhancing the skills of those already working in the sector and developing prospective practitioners and policy-makers to understand more deeply the interplay between food security, justice and sustainability. Read more
The MSc Food, Space and Society will prepare you to pursue an academic career in food studies; enhancing the skills of those already working in the sector and developing prospective practitioners and policy-makers to understand more deeply the interplay between food security, justice and sustainability. The course is specifically aimed at those wishing to gain expertise in contemporary food geographies.

You will gain insights into the ways in which food-related problems are defined, and the scope for applying cutting-edge policy and practical solutions to the challenges that an increasingly complex food system is raising for governments, researchers and regulatory bodies.

The course links together theoretical debates about food at different spatial scales with the practical dimensions of policy formulation and implementation. Based on your detailed knowledge of key tensions and debates related to food security, justice and sustainability, you will be able to develop suitable approaches to analysing and explaining trends and developments as well as to discuss appropriate policy responses.

The course addresses three key dimensions:

Principles and processes - how policies may (or may not) achieve more sustainable food systems;
Comparative case studies - comparative and in-depth analysis of food sustainability, justice and security issues in different geographic and governance contexts;
Research training - the development of methodological skills for undertaking both independent and team-based research on food.
Distinctive features

You will study with leading academics from the field of food research in the UK and worldwide.
The course brings an interdisciplinary approach to the study of food – one of society’s grand challenges.
The course focusses on the latest social science research around food, and the teaching team includes staff involved in live research projects.

Read less
Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. Read more
Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. International perspectives on Food Regulatory Affairs have become increasingly important particularly since the formation of the World Trade Organisation and the international acceptance of Codex Alimentarius standards. This part-time programme provides postgraduate training in Food Regulatory Affairs together with a specialism in Veterinary Public Health (VPH) and is particularly designed for veterinarians employed in the food sector who wish to develop their career in this field but who are unable to undertake study on a full-time basis. In addition, the programme fulfils the additional requirement for the training of official veterinarians as set out in European Regulation 854/2004.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/201617/food-regulatory-affairs-veterinary-public-health-9022

Course detail

- Description -

This is a part-time programme which is entirely internet delivered. European and global experts in veterinary and food science, law, economics, and policy contribute to the programme. The awards are granted jointly between Ulster University (UK), and University College Dublin (IRL).

- Purpose -

This programme provides students with broad knowledge and understanding of food regulatory affairs and promotes their ability to assess available evidence and data, make sound judgements and communicate findings effectively to all stakeholders in the food chain – producers, regulators, industry and consumers. Relevant EU food regulatory policy is integrated within the lectures and translated into a coherent regulatory framework so that students will grasp the complex idea of total regulation of the food chain from primary production through to consumer health issues. Core domains of VPH are addressed in relation to the regulatory responsibilities of the veterinarians and the protection of animal health and welfare and human health.

- Teaching and assessment -

Teaching is through online lectures, online discussions, individual support, video and internet links with staff, independent learning, and work in small groups.

The assessment methods are designed to test both knowledge and skills, and include, but are not limited to, critical evaluations of current literature, problem-based case studies, and development of an online scientific discussion board.

Career options

The academic content of the programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of legislative, policy and scientific aspects of food regulatory affairs as well as to acquire skills to disseminate and implement knowledge in practice. This leads to excellent employment opportunities in government (EU and international) and non-government organisations, and in the European and international agri-food industry.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why study at Ulster?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We are an international university with more than 2,000 international students from over 80 countries and Alumni from 121 countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/learnyourway

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X