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Superb industry links and world-class research come together to make Oxford Brookes one of the best places in the UK to study Mechanical Engineering at postgraduate level. Read more
Superb industry links and world-class research come together to make Oxford Brookes one of the best places in the UK to study Mechanical Engineering at postgraduate level. Being in the heart of one of Europe’s highest concentration of high-tech businesses provides opportunities for industry-focused studies.You will take charge of your career by building on your undergraduate degree and developing your professional skills. It introduces you to research, development and practice in advanced engineering design and equips you for professional practice at senior positions of responsibility.You will gain the skills to take complex products all the way from idea to fully validated designs. Using the most advanced CAD packages, you will learn the techniques required to analyse and test your designs followed by full design implementation. Our teaching is centred around our state-of-the-art laboratories in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Why choose this course?

You will be taught by staff with exceptional knowledge and expertise in their fields, including world-leaders in research on sustainable engineering, materials and joining technology and design engineers leading development of novel products such as carbon and bamboo bike. Our research projects and consultancies are done with partners such as Siemens, Yasa Motors, Stannah Stairlifts, 3M etc. using our facilities including analytical and mechanical test equipment, scanning electron microscope and the latest 3D printing technology. Well-funded research programmes in areas of current concern such as modern composite materials, vehicle end-of-life issues and electric vehicles.

Our research incorporates the latest developments within the sector with high profile visiting speakers contributing to our invited research lectures. In REF 2014 57% of the department's research was judged to be of world leading quality or internationally excellent with 96% being internationally recognised. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide professional perspectives, preparing you for an exciting career, for more information see our industrial lecture series schedule. Our close industry links facilitate industrial visits, providing you with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology - to get a flavour of activities within our department see 2015 highlights.

You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), where you have a chance to put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and The Institute of Engineering and Technology (The IET) as meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the beginning of September.

To qualify for a master's degree you must pass the compulsory modules, two optional modules and the Dissertation.

Compulsory modules
-Advanced Mechanical Engineering Design
-Advanced Strength of Components
-Advanced Engineering Management

Optional modules
-Computation and Modelling
-CAD/CAM
-Advanced Materials Engineering and Joining Technology
-Sustainable Engineering Technology
-Noise, Vibration and Harshness
-Vehicle Crash Engineering
-Engineering Reliability and Risk Management

The Dissertation (core, triple credit) is an individual project on a topic from motorsport engineering, offering an opportunity to specialise in a particular area of motorsport. In addition to developing a high level of expertise in a particular area of motorsport, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. Far-Axon, Clayex/Dymola, Tranquillity Aerospace, Norbar, etc.), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include lectures and seminars to provide a sound theoretical base, and practical work designed to demonstrate important aspects of theory or systems operation.

Teaching staff are drawn primarily from the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide further input.

Careers and professional development

Our graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in a wide range of industries.

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The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course provides a unique preparation for work in the motorsport industry. Read more
The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course provides a unique preparation for work in the motorsport industry. Our location in the heart of UK motorsport valley with close proximity of the majority of Formula 1 teams and their supply chain gives our Department unrivalled access to motorsport companies.This informs and directs development and delivery of the programmes, benefiting from contribution by a range of experts with noteworthy track record in the motorsport industry. It also offers students opportunities to undertake industry-based projects, often in conjunction with our high-standing research based around state-of-the-art automotive test equipment in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Our students also have an opportunity to implement their theoretical knowledge by joining Oxford Brookes Racing, our acclaimed Formula Student team to gain an understanding of racing culture and an environment where winning race cars are built.

Why choose this course?

We are known as a premier institution for Motorsport education - our motorsport legacy is recognised worldwide and many of our graduates progress to work with leading motorsport companies, including all of F1 teams, Formula E and major suppliers to motorsport industry. Our programme has been developed with and delivered in collaboration with the motorsport industry: you will be taught in laboratories that include a four-post test rig, four state-of-the-art engine test cells, analytical and mechanical test equipment and the latest 3D printing technology, in addition to a range of racing cars. Our staff have exceptional expertise in the field of motorsport engineering and include winning F1 race car designers and world-leading sustainable vehicle engineering researchers.

Visiting speakers from business and industry provide professional perspectives, preparing you for an exciting career, for more information see our invited research lectures. You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), mentored by our alumni and visiting lecturers from motorsport industry. They put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website. Regular visits to F1 teams, Formula E teams and major suppliers to the motorsport industry provide students with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology - to get the flavour of activities at our department see 2015 highlights.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and and The Institute of Engineering and Technology as meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The Motorsport Engineering MSc is structured around three time periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the end of September.

To qualify for a master degree you must pass the compulsory modules, two optional modules and the dissertation.

Compulsory modules:
-Advanced Vehicle Dynamics
-Advanced Vehicle Aerodynamics
-Laptime Simulation and Race Engineering
-Advanced Engineering Management

Optional modules (choose two):
-Vehicle Crash Engineering
-Computation and Modelling
-CAD/CAM
-Advanced Strength of Components
-Advanced Materials Engineering and Joining Technology
-Data Acquisition Systems
-Engineering Reliability and Risk Management

You also take:
The Dissertation is an individual project on a topic from motorsport engineering, offering an opportunity to specialise in a particular area of motorsport. In addition to developing high level of expertise in a particular area of motorsport, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. Dallara, VUHL, Base Performance, McLaren, AVL), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars to provide a sound theoretical base, and practical work, designed to demonstrate important aspects of theory or systems operation. Visiting speakers from business and motorsport industry provide valuable insights.

Careers and professional development

The department’s employability record is consistently above 90%, which is significantly above sector average. Graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in the motorsport industry.

Many of our students go on to work with leading motorsport companies, including directly into F1 teams and their suppliers. Our notable alumni include William Morris, founder of Morris cars (Lord Nuffield) and Adrian Reynard, motorsport driver and entrepreneur whilst honorary graduates include Sir John Surtees, Adrian Newey and Dr Pat Symonds.

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The MSc in Racing Engine Design is the only programme of its kind in the world - it has been developed with the needs and requirements of the race engine manufacturers in mind. Read more
The MSc in Racing Engine Design is the only programme of its kind in the world - it has been developed with the needs and requirements of the race engine manufacturers in mind. The programme is designed to produce highly-skilled graduates who are ready to undertake advanced design roles with major engine manufacturers and their supply chain.

The UK is a world leader in motorsport and high performance engines industry - many of the world's most advanced high-performance engines are designed not far from our location in the UK motorsport valley. The department’s unrivalled access to motorsport industry informs and directs development and delivery of the programme.

In addition to the strong theory-based modules, graduates gain a comprehensive understanding of how winning engines are created. Our teaching is centred around our state-of-the-art laboratories in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Why choose this course?

We are known as a premier institution for Motorsport education - our motorsport legacy is recognised worldwide and many of our graduates progress to work for most advanced high-performance engine manufacturers, such as Ferrari and Mercedes HPP, all of F1 teams and major suppliers to motorsport industry, such as Riccardo, Xtrac, Prodrive, and Hewland. Our programme has been developed with and delivered in collaboration with the automotive and motorsport industry: you will be taught by staff with many years of racing engine experience, from performance road cars, Rally, IRL, Kart and F3 right up to F1 and equipped with state-of-the-art equipment, that include four engine test cells, analytical and mechanical test equipment and the latest 3D printing technology, in addition to a range of racing cars. Industrial aspect of delivery is enhanced by our visiting speakers from business and industry, providing professional perspectives, preparing you for an exciting career, for more information see our industrial lecture series schedule.

Our close industry links can also be seen through research projects and consultancies that enable us to feed the latest technology and developments into our teaching as well as providing opportunities for students to undertake projects with neighbouring companies, also based in the UK Motorsport Valley, whilst our well-funded research programmes in areas of current concern such as vehicle end-of-life issues, modern composite materials and electric vehicles offer. In REF 2014 57% of the department's research was judged to be of world leading quality or internationally excellent with 96% being internationally recognised. Our research incorporates the latest developments within the sector with high profile visiting speakers contributing to our invited research lectures. You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), mentored by our alumni and visiting lecturers from motorsport industry. You can put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website. You will have an opportunity to work on our novel V-twin engine design and also select this as your dissertation topic, which may lead to the possibility of furthering their studies towards a PhD research degree.

Regular visits to F1 teams, Formula E teams and major suppliers to the motorsport industry provide students with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology -- to get a flavour of the activities within our department see our 2015 highlights.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and Institute of Engineering and Technology (The IET) as meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three time periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the beginning of September.

To qualify for a master's degree you must pass the compulsory modules, two optional modules and the dissertation.

Compulsory modules:
-Racing Engine Design
-Advanced Strength of Components
-Advanced Engineering Management

Optional modules:
-Advanced Powertrain Engineering
-Computation and Modelling
-CAD/CAM
-Data Acquisition Systems

The Dissertation (core, triple credit) is an individual project on a topic from race engineering, offering an opportunity to specialise in a particular area related to high performance engines. In addition to developing your expertise in a highly specialised field, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. McLaren, AVL, VUHL etc.), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation. .

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include lectures and seminars to provide a sound theoretical base, and practical work to demonstrate important aspects of theory or systems operation. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide valuable insights.

Careers and professional development

Our graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in their chosen industry. Many of our students go on to work with leading motorsport companies, including directly into F1 teams and suppliers.

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The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject. Read more
The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject.

Industrial application
Our research is concerned with the processing, characterisation and applications of structural and functional ceramic materials. Structural ceramics are used in engineering applications due to a combination of high strength, chemical / thermal resistance and extreme hardness. In contrast, functional ceramics exhibit unique electrical, magnetic and optical properties, which lead to applications in a diverse range of electronic components – filters in mobile telecommunications, exhaust gas sensors and pyroelectric thermal imaging cameras.

We are engaged in research to understand the structure-property relationships in a wide range of ceramic materials and to develop materials / components with enhanced properties. Materials are developed by conventional powder processing methods and by novel processing procedures.

Research projects
Active projects in this area involve a wide range of processing techniques for functional and structural materials – these techniques are employed in industries as diverse as power generation, mobile telecommunications, aerospace and medical implants. To understand the microstructure-property relationships for the ceramics, we make extensive use of specialist characterisation facilities available in the school and in partner institutions nationally and internationally.

Industrial links
Through our close relationship with industry, we ensure that the research we carry out is relevant and focused on the requirements of new technology. We currently collaborate on research with, amongst others, Rolls-Royce, British Nuclear Fuel, Xaar Printing Technology, Powerwave, Morgan Electroceramics, and BAE Systems. We are also supported by EPSRC, the European Commission, and British Energy.

Read less
The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject. Read more
The Ceramics and Glasses research degrees are part of a progressive research area within the school; we have close links with industry and research councils and we work collaboratively with them on many areas of research within the subject.

Industrial application
Our research is concerned with the processing, characterisation and applications of structural and functional ceramic materials. Structural ceramics are used in engineering applications due to a combination of high strength, chemical / thermal resistance and extreme hardness. In contrast, functional ceramics exhibit unique electrical, magnetic and optical properties, which lead to applications in a diverse range of electronic components – filters in mobile telecommunications, exhaust gas sensors and pyroelectric thermal imaging cameras.

We are engaged in research to understand the structure-property relationships in a wide range of ceramic materials and to develop materials / components with enhanced properties. Materials are developed by conventional powder processing methods and by novel processing procedures.

Research projects
Active projects in this area involve a wide range of processing techniques for functional and structural materials – these techniques are employed in industries as diverse as power generation, mobile telecommunications, aerospace and medical implants. To understand the microstructure-property relationships for the ceramics, we make extensive use of specialist characterisation facilities available in the school and in partner institutions nationally and internationally.

Industrial links
Through our close relationship with industry, we ensure that the research we carry out is relevant and focused on the requirements of new technology. We currently collaborate on research with, amongst others, Rolls-Royce, British Nuclear Fuel, Xaar Printing Technology, Powerwave, Morgan Electroceramics, and BAE Systems. We are also supported by EPSRC, the European Commission, and British Energy.

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This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. Read more
This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. As an advanced product designer, this course supports your continued development and will refine your practice in interaction and user-centred product design.

The course explores academic theories as well as industry practice within interactive media, digital arts, entertainment and product design; and is a combination of two separate fields: product design and interactive media.

In Interactive Product Futures you will focus on user-centred design processes and research and analyse “user interaction” as your primary focus. The emphasis is on technology-mediated communication between humans and objects or spaces, allowing you to apply design and apply technological solutions to people’s infinite needs. You will also examine how technology gives personality to objects, and thereby how to ensure technology and design are more empathetic to people and their behaviours.

In the early units of the course you will be given short project briefs in which to design, implement, test and evaluate solutions in the form of an interactive product. Each project brief may take the form of an online or offline product; for example: an online quiz, an e-commerce type application, a toy. This is also an opportunity to produce a series of creative works within the specialisation of rapid prototyping (3D printing), animation, game design, web design, installation art, projection mapping, creative coding, computation design and entertainment media. The aim is to provide you with the opportunity to develop a software solution to a given problem, or aspect of a larger problem.

You will be encouraged to experiment with new ways of working with objects/scenarios and their integration with technology both creatively and collaboratively, and to apply emerging and existing technological solutions through personal fabrication, research and the experimental application of technology.

The course promotes cross disciplinary thinking as an approach to product design, so that the relationship between interactivity, artefacts, environments and the systems and organisations in which they operate can be re-examined.

By studying the course you will develop your creative design skills to innovate and influence product and interaction design practice and realise the commercial potential of your design proposals.

- Collaborative project
'The Digital Gym' project, which allowed students to research how emerging technologies are applied and user behaviour enhanced to provide a distinct, immersive gym experience on the Greenwich Peninsula.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

Through the Business and Innovation unit you will have the opportunity to explore the generation of innovative new business models that will help to shape your emerging project concept.

The Technology Issues unit encourages you to engage and explore emerging new technologies as well as skills in scripting and coding, first within a group, then as a cross-disciplinary, and finally in an individual project.

Through the Research Process unit, you will explore academic theoretical frameworks and research methodologies and their application within industry practice.

In both the Technology Issues and Concept and Prototyping units, youwill explore the dialogue between product and user, the function, usability and forms, flow and creativity and user experiences.

The course will culminate in your final Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The Clean Technology MSc/PGDip aims to train the Environmental Sustainability Managers of the future. Read more
The Clean Technology MSc/PGDip aims to train the Environmental Sustainability Managers of the future. With a focus on industry and commerce, we look at how companies interact with the environment through the raw materials and utilities they use, the products and services they provide, and their impact on the environment and society.

Based in the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials the course covers a wide field of disciplines and should appeal to any engineer, pure or applied scientist.

A key feature of the course is the involvement of industry and the opportunity to carry out a project based at a local company. This experience is a valuable addition to your CV and has resulted in excellent job opportunities. The use of real life case studies involving group work and role play underpins the course.

You will hear about job opportunities from our Careers Service as well as our extensive network of alumni. The course is broad which makes a variety of career options available.

Examples of roles our recent graduates are now working in include:
-Energy Manager
-Environmental Manager
-Waste Manager
-Health and Safety Managers (public and private sector)
-Sustainability Manager (in industry, public sector, health service, councils, police and universities)
-Officers for the Environment Agency (in areas such as waste, permitting, ecology, air quality)

You will also get involved in making our campus more sustainable. We were recently awarded a 'first' by People and Planet.

The Degree Programme Director, Dr Sue Haile, was awarded the Vice Chancellor's Teaching Award in 2012 and currently holds the RAE ExxonMobil Teaching Fellowship in recognition of her achievements in Sustainability education.

Delivery

The MSc course starts in September and consists of seven months of taught modules followed by a project written up as a dissertation.

Semester one modules are taught across the semester with typically two to three hours of lectures per week, case studies and presentations for each module.

Semester two modules are blocked with each module taking place over an intensive one to two week period.

Placements

We have placed students in over 300 companies (and in several countries) for their dissertation projects. These range from multinationals like Nestle, Procter and Gamble and HSBC to small and medium sized enterprises around the North East.

Projects topics are diverse and have covered:
-Life cycle assessment
-Carbon and water foot printing
-Implementation of Environmental Management Systems
-Energy and waste management
-Pollution impacts and mitigation
-Biodiversity
-Corporate Social Responsibility reporting
-Options for renewable energy

Many of these projects inform our teaching and provide case study material for student workshops.

Facilities

The School occupies five floors in Merz Court where we provide a Student Common Room and a separate Student Study Space.

As a Clean Technology student, you have a dedicated room with material to assist with your course including past dissertations, reference books and posters.

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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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This is your chance to be at the forefront of the latest advances in 3D printing and advanced engineering design. Read more

Overview

This is your chance to be at the forefront of the latest advances in 3D printing and advanced engineering design. Whether you already hold a degree in engineering or have a related physical sciences, design or mathematical background, this course will develop your skills and knowledge in additive manufacturing to meet the demands of industry worldwide.

Covering a range of topics from product design to 3D CAD modelling, additive manufacturing strategy to engineering management, our course equips you with the end to end knowledge required to produce prototypes and products across a range of industries including the biomedical and aviation sectors.

Our impressive facilities will provide you with access to advanced computer based analysis and modelling software, together with leading-edge engineering facilities including 3D printers and a metal direct metal laser sintering machine.

Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the development of problem-solving skills, together with those critical, analytical, interpersonal and computational skills, which are directly applicable to additive manufacturing engineering.

Recognising the importance of teamwork to the success of organisations and projects, the Course includes the development of the knowledge and skills required to effectively lead and manage teams. It also recognises the growing importance of environmental influences and the demands of health and safety.

Careers

Our course will help you develop a career in engineering, or give you an additional skills boost if you’re already working in the industry. You may want to work as a production or research engineer, mechanical designer or technical lead working directly in engineering and design or, use this degree as a step towards a career in operations, project management or consultancy. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your research with our Professional Doctorate in Science and Technology - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/professional-doctorate-in-science-and-technology

Assessment

You’ll be assessed in a variety of ways, including written assignments, portfolios, presentations, analysis reports and an Industry Based Project.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/science-and-technology

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

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Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Read more
Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Our research specialisms include American studies and the literary periods Early Modern, Victorian, and Modern and Contemporary.

Additional areas of expertise include linguistics, Irish studies, drama, and the history of the book. We guarantee all students that each module will include components relating to our stated research specialisms.

Alongside our flagship ‘Research Mentoring’ module—where students work under the mentorship of a range of literary experts, studying the research they are currently undertaking – this allows students to follow a specific specialism through their MA.

Study areas include resources for advanced research, research mentorship, icons and iconoclasts, boundaries and transgressions, texts and technology, and a dissertation.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

Programme modules

This is not a conclusive but typical structure of the programme.

Programme modules:
Semester 1

- Icons and Iconoclasts
This module considers issues in literary history, particularly those of canonisation, the politics of reputation, fashion, and posterity, and the processes by which certain writers and texts become culturally embedded and certain others do not. It also examines ideas of formal and generic convention and reception history. In seminars, students will look at either a single text (which could be ‘iconic’ and canonical, ‘iconoclastic’ and unassimilated by cultural institutions such as universities, or a text which is deemed canonical despite its apparent rejection of convention, respectability, etc., e.g. Ulysses), or pit an ‘iconic’ and an ‘iconoclastic’ text against each other. The module will be driven by authors and texts rather than by overarching theoretical considerations. For example, one could read an H.G. Wells scientific romance' such as The Time Machine (1895) against a less well-known example of Victorian or Edwardian science fiction, or pit a familiar early modern drama alongside one which is less often studied or performed. The course will fashion a series of dialogues between writers, texts, history and audiences. These dialogues will range across historical eras appropriate to the research interests of staff teaching on the module, so coverage may vary from one year to another.

- Resources for Advanced Research
The module aims to introduce students to a range of different research methods; develop their research skills to Master’s level; and enhance their library skills. It also aims to introduce them to different ways of engaging in research cultures appropriate to the focus of their studies; enable them to develop a research profile; and gain skills in the presentation of their research. The module prepares students for the Dissertation module and aims to provide them with skills useful for disseminating the results of their dissertation after they graduate.

- Research Mentorship
From a list of available faculty, students choose four staff members (mentors) to work with in three-week blocks throughout the semester. They study what the staff member is currently researching, giving them a unique insight into current research as it happens. The process is one of mentorship and academic shadowing. The reading is likely to be a mixture of primary and secondary texts, and potentially an introduction to specific research questions and methodologies. Staff will be offered in groups, e.g. for every three weeks, there should be between three to five members of staff to choose from and, as far as possible, there will be a spread of expertise so that students can follow an area of faculty research specialism as much as possible. This may include the early-modern, Victorian, or Modern and Contemporary literary periods, American studies, or Irish Studies.

Semester 2:
- Boundaries and Transgressions
This module aims to identify and explore forms of transgression in a wide range of written texts from the early modern period to the present. Working with members of staff with a variety of research specialisms, students will assess what is at stake – aesthetically, culturally and ideologically – in boundary-crossings of very diverse kinds. ‘Boundaries and Transgressions’ will be issue-led, analysing some of the conceptual, temporal and spatial crossings performed by literary texts. This module offers students an exciting opportunity to consider mutations in literary transgression during some four hundred years. Cultural boundaries will appear as violated rather than safely policed (as when gender divides break down, or the body and the mind mingle promiscuously, or the human is entangled with – not shielded from – the animal). Elsewhere, the module will explore texts that cross periods (writings in which, for example, Victorianism and modernism interweave) or range across plural geographies (American literature, say, that refuses a posture of national autonomy and traverses the Atlantic or the Pacific).

- Texts and Technologies
This module focuses upon how texts and technologies have developed in intertwined manners. As technology changes, so can texts, their modes of distribution, their social and cultural significance and influence, and their manner of being collected, stored, and accessed. The module seeks to explore how texts and technology have influenced each other in different historical periods; to examine the response to communication technology in literary and theoretical texts; and to trace fundamental changes in literature and literary research brought about by radical technological developments such as the printing press, the internet, digital analysis, and digital data storage. How do changes in technology alter the way we experience texts and how we use them?

Summer
- Dissertation
The module enables students to initiate, devise, develop and successfully complete a research-based dissertation, and to further their knowledge and practical experience of research methods and techniques in English Studies. Students will identify an area of study that they would like to develop further. The module will consist of independent research, but students will meet with, and receive oral and written feedback from, an individual supervisor. The supervisor will give guidance on the subject matter, focus, structure and research area of the dissertation. Between Easter and the end of semester they can submit up to 5,000 words in draft form for comment and discuss the development of their chapters with their supervisors. Students will then work independently after the end of the semester to produce a 15,000 word dissertation.

Careers and further study

This programme meets the needs of students seeking to qualify for entry to a research degree, teachers of literature and those wishing to update their knowledge or develop their own research skills.

Why choose Arts, English and Drama at Loughborough?

The School of Arts, English and Drama is renowned as one of the world’s top places for studying the visual, literary and performing arts, offering outstanding opportunities across its wide remit. Each course is designed to inspire talented individuals with the drive and determination to succeed.

We provide many exciting ways to enhance skills, including research-led teaching by recognised international scholars, access to multi-million pound facilities, contact with prominent industry links, and superb entrepreneurial support.

A unique range of post-graduate taught programmes and research opportunities encompass art, design, history, theory, performance, postmedieval literature, linguistics studies.

We offer a unique range of postgraduate taught programmes and research opportunities which encompasses art, design, theory, performance by practice, post-medieval literature, creative writing, linguistics and theatre

- Facilities
Our students have full access to our state-of-the-art facilities, which offer a tantalising number of creative possibilities. They provide industry standard outputs, and you will receive an unparalleled level of professional training in using them.

- Career Prospects
Over 92% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Our students develop excellent transferable skills because of the range of topics studied on our courses and the diversity of teaching and learning methods we use.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

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The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests. Read more
The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests.

Course Overview

MA Textiles within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Masters Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork. Students from the Masters Programme have gone on to many varied careers in teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Lots have continued to practice as artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

The programme has access to well equipped workshops including a resin, plaster, wood, metal and ceramic.
Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suits and workshops in other areas within the art school. 
We currently have two research centres within the faculty.These research centres provide staff with research opportunities and access to high technology resources, they provide students with placement opportunity whilst also developing the creative industries infrastructure in the region, which will benefit graduating students.

CIRIC The Creative Industries Research and Innovation Centre was established in 2005 and is a knowledge transfer centre for projects that support the creative industries in Wales.

Current projects include Moving Image Wales, which supports the digital media industry, the Textiles Technologies Project, which supports the textiles and apparel industries, CIME, which supports business through creative intervention and SATnet, which provides a link between artists and businesses in the science and technology sectors. In addition, IPCRES is also based in CIRIC and is developing and disseminating research about durational and event based practices.

Alongside the numerous projects operating within CIRIC, there is also a Design Bureau, with water jet cutting, laser cutting and fabric printing services.

 The Centre for Lens Arts and Science Interaction is a research centre based within The Dynevor Centre for Art, Design, and Media at Swansea Metropolitan University. CLASI aims to encourage and promote interdisciplinary research projects, which stimulate research, innovation, and experimentation across photographic, digital and electronic arts. A strong emphasis is placed on research strands where the histories, philosophies and practices of art and science intersect. The definition of art and science is intentionally broad and the centre is aligned with SATnet and CIRIC.

Assessment

Our students have access to a diverse range of equipment and resources, which in most cases are sufficient to complete their programme of study. We provide the basic materials necessary for students to develop their practical work within our extensive workshop and studio facilities. However, it is likely that art and design students will incur some additional costs to extend their investigation of their personal practice. For example, purchasing their own specialised materials and equipment, joining in optional study trips, and printing.

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The course philosophy for MA Fine Art - Contemporary Dialogues is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium-specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests. Read more
The course philosophy for MA Fine Art - Contemporary Dialogues is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium-specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests.

Course Overview

MA Fine Art within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

Core Modules
-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Master's Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork. Students from the Master's Programme have gone on to many varied careers in teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Lots have continued to practice as artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

The programme has access to well equipped workshops including a resin, plaster, wood, metal and ceramic.
 Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suites and workshops in other areas within the art school. 
We currently have two research centres within the faculty. These research centres provide staff with research opportunities and access to high technology resources, they provide students with placement opportunities while also developing the creative industries infrastructure in the region, which will benefit graduating students.

The Creative Industries Research and Innovation Centre was established in 2005 and is a knowledge transfer centre for projects that support the creative industries in Wales.

Current projects include Moving Image Wales, which supports the digital media industry, the Textiles Technologies Project, which supports the textiles and apparel industries, CIME, which supports business through creative intervention and SATnet, which provides a link between artists and businesses in the science and technology sectors. In addition, IPCRES is also based in CIRIC and is developing and disseminating research about durational and event-based practices.

Alongside the numerous projects operating within CIRIC, there is also a Design Bureau, with water jet cutting, laser cutting and fabric printing services. The Centre for Lens Arts and Science Interaction is a research centre based within The Dynevor Centre for Art, Design, and Media at University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Swansea (formerly Swansea Metropolitan University). CLASI aims to encourage and promote interdisciplinary research projects, which stimulate research, innovation, and experimentation across photographic, digital and electronic arts. A strong emphasis is placed on research strands where the histories, philosophies and practices of art and science intersect. The definition of art and science is intentionally broad and the centre is aligned with SATnet and CIRIC.

Read less
The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests. Read more
The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests.

Course Overview

The Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Masters Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork. Students from the Masters Programme have gone on to many varied careers in teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Lots have continued to practice as artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

The programme has access to well equipped workshops including a resin, plaster, wood, metal and ceramic.
Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suits and workshops in other areas within the art school. 
We currently have two research centres within the faculty.These research centres provide staff with research opportunities and access to high technology resources, they provide students with placement opportunity whilst also developing the creative industries infrastructure in the region, which will benefit graduating students.

The Creative Industries Research and Innovation Centre was established in 2005 and is a knowledge transfer centre for projects that support the creative industries in Wales.

Current projects include Moving Image Wales, which supports the digital media industry, the Textiles Technologies Project, which supports the textiles and apparel industries, CIME, which supports business through creative intervention and SATnet, which provides a link between artists and businesses in the science and technology sectors. In addition, IPCRES is also based in CIRIC and is developing and disseminating research about durational and event based practices.

Alongside the numerous projects operating within CIRIC, there is also a Design Bureau, with water jet cutting, laser cutting and fabric printing services.

 The Centre for Lens Arts and Science Interaction is a research centre based within The Dynevor Centre for Art, Design, and Media at Swansea Metropolitan University. CLASI aims to encourage and promote interdisciplinary research projects, which stimulate research, innovation, and experimentation across photographic, digital and electronic arts. A strong emphasis is placed on research strands where the histories, philosophies and practices of art and science intersect. The definition of art and science is intentionally broad and the centre is aligned with SATnet and CIRIC.

Read less
Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Read more
Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Recent technological advances provide continuing opportunities for creative application. Its unique properties of transparency and interaction with light gives MA Glass students the opportunity to explore new possibilities and build specialist knowledge as a material for the future.

Course Overview

The MA Glass programme within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Master's Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork.

In this century, glass as a material offers a unique place in design and architecture and there are very few institutions that offer the opportunity to explore this material, with particular reference to its applications in architecture. Swansea glass department has a long established reputation for glass and strong industrial links help underpin the educational experience for students. The history of the department enables a broad spectrum of approaches that draw on the historical, cultural and technological uses of this material. Glass in its many forms; mosaic, glaze, enamel and window façade covers a broad association of surfaces, which offers for the maker a rich and varied pallet. This is a hands-on course!

The main strands of the programme are: design and philosophy, material innovation and glass design. These themes are considered in the context of glass for the environment, to fulfill the need to develop innovative, sustainable and possibly universal solutions for a variety of architectural, public and private spaces.

The programme prides itself in newly equipped workshops that provide excellent specialist facilities including sandblasters, acid etching bay, cold working machinery, screen printing facilities for glass and an extensive range of glass and ceramic kilns for casting and decorative processing. Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suites and workshops in other areas within the art school such as wood, metal, ceramics, 3D printing and water jet and laser cutting.

The teaching team consists of highly experienced glass artists and designers who are either engaged in professional practice or are research active, supported by industrially trained technical staff. This ensures that the course delivers a qualification and experience that is highly relevant to the changing needs of the industry and wider architectural glass community.

The department works closely with the Architectural Glass Centre, which often supports and advises the students on live commissions and commercial work. We also work with the CIRIC research centre within the faculty, with 2 members of this research centre specialising in glass. This provides research opportunities and access to high technology resources giving the students opportunities to link with creative industries infrastructure in the region as a potential starting point for future employment.

With an eighty year history the glass department benefits from strong support from Alumni and the local glass community as well as networks and connections from world-renowned glass artists.

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

Students from the Master's Programme have gone on to many varied careers within the Architectural Glass Industry, Glass Studios, teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Many have continued to practice as designers and artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

Possible career pathways have included:
-Establishing yourself as an artist, designer or maker
-Setting up a studio as a sole supplier or in a partnership with others
-Employed in specialist glass studios
-Engaging in freelance work on architectural and interiors projects
-Designing for industry or working in the glass industry
-Working on private and public commissions
-Working on art projects and community projects
-Other opportunities include arts administration, curating, teaching and mentoring, community work and arts editorial
-Continuation of studies to postgraduate level on our MA programme
-Further academic research leading to MPhil, or PhD is available

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Applied Technologies. Rapid Prototyping and Digital Technologies is a cross-disciplinary programme for creative practitioners interested in research into digital-making and manufacturing. Read more
Applied Technologies: Rapid Prototyping and Digital Technologies is a cross-disciplinary programme for creative practitioners interested in research into digital-making and manufacturing.

The aim of the course is to allow you to evaluate and engage with how emerging technologies such as rapid prototyping, generative design, 3d scanning and multi axis machining are changing creative industries and could help you evolve your personal practice. You will benefit from access to Ravensbourne’s state of the art digital prototyping facilities as well as tuition in computer aided design and manufacture and how these skills can be integrated with traditional making methods.

As well as practical techniques, students will have the opportunity to explore:

- Social impacts of increasingly decentralised & automated manufacturing
- New form and aesthetics
- Material innovation and sustainability
- Intellectual property and authorship
- Potential for new industries or businesses
- Automation of design and making
- Development of new manufacturing platforms
- Future technological scenarios

The course offers the opportunity to develop and manage an individual area of enquiry and creative development in digital manufacturing, culminating in the realisation of a final major project fully informed by professional and industrial contexts and multi-disciplinary perspectives.

You will receive regular support from tutors, peers and subject-specific group tutorials as part of a constant dialogue to help create a professional and critical understanding of your individual creative process.

The course is suitable for those from a range of fields wishing to diversify and deepen their practice’s relationship with technology, including but not limited to; product designers, engineers, model makers, artists and architects. You will benefit from being an integral part of an intellectually supportive and creative postgraduate community, with whom you can interact and collaborate across multiple disciplines.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – Within the technology issues unit, students will engage in 3-5 week project cycles that will allow them to explore 3d printing, 3d scanning and other rapid prototyping. These units are structured to encourage students to engage collaboratively with other students of the same and different disciplines.

2. Business and Innovation – Taught during the term prior to the major project unit this unit helps students develop an understanding of business and innovative practises in creative industries. It supports Applied Technologies students in turning their ideas into viable market propositions and long term business plans.

3. Research Process – This unit provides the grounding for the research and development skills needed for students’ individual projects.

4. Concept and Prototyping – Allows students to further develop their skills. To identify a specialist area related to digital manufacturing and to pursue a single line of enquiry, idea or theory and develop, investigate, challenge and test that concept.

5. Major project - The Major project represents the culmination of the students’ investigation and the final stage of the research strategy. This is a substantial piece of self-managed work that is underpinned by advanced practice based methodologies and processes.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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