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Masters Degrees (Particle Physics)

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What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena. Read more
What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena.

With the expertise in basic research that you will gain in the programme, you can pursue a career in research. You will also acquire proficiency in the use of mathematical methods, IT tools and/or experimental equipment, as well as strong problem-solving and logical deduction skills. These will qualify you for a wide range of positions in the private sector.

After completing the programme, you will:
-Have wide-ranging knowledge of particle physics and/or astrophysical phenomena.
-Have good analytical, deductive and computational skills.
-Be able to apply theoretical, computational and/or experimental methods to the analysis and understanding of various phenomena.
-Be able to generalize your knowledge of particle physics and astrophysical phenomena as well as identify their interconnections.
-Be able to formulate hypotheses and test them based your knowledge.

The teaching in particle physics and astrophysical sciences is largely based on the basic research. Basic research conducted at the University of Helsinki has received top ratings in international university rankings. The in-depth learning offered by international research groups will form a solid foundation for your lifelong learning.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The understanding of the microscopic structure of matter, astronomical phenomena and the dynamics of the universe is at the forefront of basic research today. The advancement of such research in the future will require increasingly sophisticated theoretical, computational and experimental methods.

The study track in elementary particle physics and cosmology focuses on experimental or theoretical particle physics or cosmology. The theories that form our current understanding of these issues must be continuously re-evaluated in the light of new experimental results. In addition to analytical computation skills, this requires thorough mastery of numerical analysis methods. In experimental particle physics, the main challenges pertain to the management and processing of continuously increasing amount of data.

The study track in astrophysical sciences focuses on observational or theoretical astronomy or space physics. Our understanding of space, ranging from near Earth space all the way to structure of the universe, is being continuously redefined because of improved experimental equipment located both in space and on the Earth’s surface. Several probes are also carrying out direct measurements of planets, moons and interplanetary plasma in our solar system. Another key discipline is theoretical astrophysics which, with the help of increasingly efficient supercomputers, enables us to create in-depth models of various phenomena in the universe in general and the field of space physics in particular. Finally, plasma physics is an important tool in both space physics and astronomy research.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme includes two study tracks:
-Particle physics and cosmology
-Astrophysical sciences

Courses in the programme have been compiled into modules. Both study tracks contain a mandatory core module that includes a research seminar. The study tracks are divided into specialisations that focus on astronomy, space physics, particle physics or cosmology. Courses typically include lectures, exercises, group work and research literature and end in examinations and/or final assignments. In addition, some studies can be completed as book examinations.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master’s programme is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be completed in two years. The degree consists of:
-90 credits of Master’s studies, including a Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-30 credits of other studies from the Master’s programme or other degree programmes.

In addition, your studies include a personal study plan as well as career orientation and planning. You might also take part in a traineeship, elective studies offered by the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, or studies offered by other degree programmes.

Career Prospects

A Master’s degree in elementary particle physics or astrophysical sciences provides you with excellent qualifications for postgraduate education in research or for a career in diverse positions both in Finland and abroad. As a Master’s graduate you could begin a career in research and development in industry as well as in universities and other research institutes that enable you to conduct independent research on a topic that interests you.

Potential employers and career opportunities include:
-Research institutes in Finland and abroad (basic scientific research).
-Universities and universities of applied sciences (teaching).
-Industry, particularly high technology companies (applied research and development, managerial duties).
-Software production, e.g., the game sector.
-Diverse planning and consulting positions.

Master’s graduates from equivalent study tracks under the previous degree system have embarked on careers in:
-Research and teaching positions in Finnish universities and research institutes.
-Research and teaching positions abroad, for example at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research), ESA (the European Space Agency), ESO (the European Southern Observatory), and NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration).
-Administrative positions, for example at the Academy of Finland or the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation (Tekes).
-The business sector.

The strong theoretical and analytical skills you will acquire in the programme are in great demand in fields such as:
-Data analysis (industry, media companies, game companies, financing).
-Industrial research, development and consulting (at, e.g., Nokia, Ericsson, Apple, Sanoma, Spinverse, Supercell, Nielsen, Valo -Research and Trading, Planmeca, Reaktor, Comptel, and Goldman Sachs).

Internationalization

Our multilingual Master’s programme is highly international. The Department hosts a large number of international students and staff members. In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science provide many opportunities for international engagement:
-Student exchange at one of the destinations available through the Faculty or the University.
-International traineeships.
-English-language teaching offered by the Faculty.
-Master’s thesis project as a member of one of the international research groups operating under the programme.
-Cooperation with international students enrolled in the programme.
-International duties in subject-specific student organisations or the Student Union of the University of Helsinki.
-Language courses organised by the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki.

The Faculty of Science is a top research institute in its fields among European universities. Its partners include many leading international research institutes, such as the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

As a student at the Faculty of Science, you will have the opportunity to complete a research traineeship period at, for example, CERN in Geneva. By completing a traineeship at one of the internationally active research groups on campus you will be able to acquaint yourself and network with the international scientific community during your Master’s studies. The international student exchange programmes available at the University provide numerous opportunities to complete part of your degree at a university abroad.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Particle Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Theoretical Particle Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of Theoretical Particle Physics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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This masters course reflects the University of Sheffield's exceptional expertise in particle physics. Our researchers were part of the Higgs boson discovery and they continue to work on projects at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which some of our students get the chance to visit. Read more
This masters course reflects the University of Sheffield's exceptional expertise in particle physics. Our researchers were part of the Higgs boson discovery and they continue to work on projects at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which some of our students get the chance to visit. Sheffield is also home to researchers who are leading the way in, for example:

neutrino detection as part of the T2K collaboration
gravitational waves detection as part of the Advanced LIGO collaboration
dark matter experiments as part of the LUK-Zeplin experiment at Sanford Underground Research Facility and the DRIFT programme at Boulby Underground Laboratory
Our staff are supported by the UK Science and Technology Facility Council, the European Research Council, the Royal Society and Innovate-UK.

This one-year research degree is your chance to join us in unravelling some of the greatest mysteries in modern physics.

Core modules

Further Quantum Mechanics
Advanced Electromagnetism
Dark Matter and the Universe
The Development of Particle Physics
Research Skills in Physics
Research Project in Physics – this accounts for half of your final grade

Examples of optional modules

Advanced Particle Physics
Introduction to General Relativity
Particle Astrophysics
Advanced Quantum Mechanics
Physics in an Enterprise Culture
Semiconductor Physics and Technology
Statistical Physics

Teaching

Teaching is through lectures, research seminars, small group tutorials and oral presentation.

Your supervisor will help you develop your research skills and support you as you work on your research project.

Assessment

Assessment includes: a project report, literature review, oral presentations, including a viva, formal examinations and short reports and essays.

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Explore modern experimental and theoretical particle physics. This course – delivered by our expert faculty – gives you a sound footing for further studies in this field. Read more
Explore modern experimental and theoretical particle physics.

This course – delivered by our expert faculty – gives you a sound footing for further studies in this field. You can take this MSc in an experimental or theoretical mode.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through lectures, seminars and personal supervision. Assessment is split equally between the project and modules. Your project culminates in a dissertation (with a contribution from a research talk).

The modules are assessed by problem sets, with either open-notes tests or unseen examinations. You’ll attend research seminars and contribute to your group’s discussions of the latest journal papers.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options.

Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates go on to doctoral study (theoretical or experimental), or take up employment in a range of industries in fields such as:
-Business/data analysis
-Computer programming
-Software development
-Teaching
-Research and teaching technical support

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics
Condensed Matter and Material Physics
Analytical Laser Spectroscopy
Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence
Lattice gauge theories, QCD
Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory
Field Theory in curved spacetime
Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Antimatter Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Antimatter Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Antimatter Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Antimatter Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.
The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group (AMQP) at Swansea University comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources.

The Particle Physics Theory Group (PPT) has fourteen members of staff, as well as postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, the Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Lattice Gauge Theory enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Lattice Gauge Theory programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of Lattice Gauge Theory programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Quantum Fields and String enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Quantum Fields & String programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Quantum Fields and String you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Quantum Fields and String programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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Particle physics deals with the building blocks of matter and the forces between them. The programme offers courses on all aspects of the Standard Model of Particle Physics, including Nuclear Physics. Read more

Experimental Physics

Particle physics deals with the building blocks of matter and the forces between them. The programme offers courses on all aspects of the Standard Model of Particle Physics, including Nuclear Physics.

Particle physics is one of the strong areas within Experimental Physics in Utrecht. The slightly broader field of Subatomic Physics (including also Nuclear Physics) has a long tradition of excellence at Utrecht University, recently Utrecht has concentrated more on high profile research on elementary particles.

The research is performed in international collaborations at research centers in the USA and in Europe. Nationally, the group cooperates in the Nikhef consortium. For the teaching programme in the MSc there is a strong cooperation with the Amsterdam universities.

Utrecht is the only Dutch university to contribute to ALICE, one of the large experiments at the new accelerator LHC at CERN in Geneva. The research has an intimate connection to different areas of theoretical physics (Quantum Field Theory, Relativistic Hydrodynamics and even String Theory) and is of relevance also for Astrophysics. It uses state-of-the-art technologies in particle detection, electronics and computing.

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The Masters in Physics. Energy & the Environment provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with emphasis on their application to global challenges in sustainable energy, climate change and the environment, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Energy & the Environment provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with emphasis on their application to global challenges in sustainable energy, climate change and the environment, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014 the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
-You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
-You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Energy and the Environment include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the areas of energy and the environment.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Energy and environment
-Nuclear power reactors
-Research skills
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Advanced electromagnetic theory
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Detectors and imaging
-Environmental radioactivity
-Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years, starting 2015–16)
-Statistical mechanics

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-The School plays a world-leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The Masters in Physics. Global Security provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to interdisciplinary challenges in the area of global security, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Global Security provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to interdisciplinary challenges in the area of global security, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014, the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
-You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
-You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Global Security include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of global security.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Research skills
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Advanced electromagnetic theory
-Applied optics
-Detectors and imaging
-Environmental radioactivity
-Nuclear power reactors
-Quantum information
-Statistical mechanics

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-The School plays a world-leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The Masters in Theoretical Physics provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on the theoretical aspects of the subject, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Theoretical Physics provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on the theoretical aspects of the subject, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014, the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-You will gain the theoretical and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
-You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Theoretical Physics include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of theoretical physics.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Quantum information
-Quantum theory
-Research skills
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Advanced electromagnetic theory
-Advanced mathematical methods
-Applied optics
-Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
-General relativity and gravitation (alternate years, offered 2016-17)
-Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years, offered 2015-16)
-Relativistic quantum fields
-Statistical mechanics

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or… Read more
Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or astronomy? Develop valuable new knowledge and skills? Prepare for a research career, or embark on a completely new path? Whatever your motivation, a postgraduate degree from the School of Physics and Astronomy can help you achieve your ambitions.

The MSc Physics is available in three different pathways: Particle Physic, Theoretical Physics and Condensed Matter Physics. The School of Physics and Astronomy also offers an MSc in Astrophysics and a PGCert in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Programme outcomes

The aim of the programme is to deepen your understanding of contemporary theoretical physics, covering advanced concepts and techniques, leaving you well prepared for further doctoral level study and research. The programme will also enable you to develop skills transferable to a wide range of other careers.

This programme will:

Teach you the fundamental laws and physical principles, along with their applications, in your chosen area of physics.
Introduce you to research methodology, and how to manage your own research, making use of journal articles and other primary sources.
Allow you to communicate complex scientific ideas, concisely, accurately and informatively.
Instruct you how to use mathematical analysis to model physical behaviour and interpret the mathematical descriptions of physical phenomena.

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Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects. Read more
Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects .

Would you rather specialise in pure physics or discover the interface between physics and astronomy, mathematics, chemistry or biology? The choice is yours. At Radboud University, you can choose from six specialisations and within each specialisation you’ll have plenty of room to customise your programme. We guarantee the highest quality for all specialisation programmes, resulting in number one rates by the Dutch ‘Keuzegids Masters’ for three years running.

In your internship(s), you can dive into theoretical physics or perform your own experiments: discover new material properties in Europe’s highest magnetic fields or with unique free electron lasers, study space objects with the telescopes on top of the Huygens Building or unravel brain activity with MRIs. It’s all possible on the Radboud campus. That’s why many international physicists come here to perform their experiments. Take Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, who revealed the amazing properties of graphene in our High Field Magnet Laboratory. In 2010, they received the Nobel Prize in Physics for those discoveries.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

Specialisations of Physics and Astronomy

- Particle and Astrophysics
In this Master’s specialisation you’ll unravel questions like: What are the most elementary particles that the universe consists of? What did our universe look like in the earliest stages of its existence? And how will it evolve? One of the topics is the Higgs particle, which is partially a Nijmegen discovery.

- Physics of Molecules and Materials
This specialisation focuses on the structure and properties of materials. You’ll work at the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum and classical physics, which is of great importance for designing next-generation materials and devices.

- Neuroscience
In this specialisation you’ll use your physics background to understand the communication between neurons in the brain. This fundamental knowledge can be applied in all kinds of devices, including hearing aids or Google glasses.

- Science in Society
This specialisation will equip you with the tools and skills to become a professional intermediary between science and society. You’ll learn to analyse (governmental) science communication and connect scientific knowledge with divergent perspectives and interests of various stakeholders.

- Science, Management and Innovation
This specialisation will teach you what is happening in the world of business and public administration, how innovation is managed in company strategies, how government designs policy and how that interacts with societal challenges.

- Science and Education (in Dutch)
Do you want to become a secondary school teacher in the Netherlands? In this Dutch-taught specialisation you’ll get the necessary didactic background and extensive experience in the classroom.

Why study Physics and Astronomy at Radboud University?

- It’s the best Master’s programme of its kind in the Netherlands, according to the Keuzegids Masters.
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups. This ensures that at Radboud University you’ll get plenty of one-on-one time with your internship supervisor.
- We have a multidisciplinary approach: you not only can specialise in Physics, but also in astrophysics, biophysics, mathematical physics, chemical physics or materials science.
- You’ll spend one year on research, and thus get an extensive experience in scientific methods.
- Radboud University hosts multiple state-of-the-art research facilities, such as the High Field Magnet Laboratory , FELIX laser laboratory, Nanolab and neuroimaging facilities (MRI, MEG, EEG, TMS). We also participate in the LHC particle accelerator in Geneva, the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina and various other large-scale research projects.
- On average, our graduates find a job within 2 months after graduating. A majority of these jobs are PhD positions at universities in the Netherlands and abroad.

Quality label

For the third time in a row, this programme was rated number one in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

All specialisations of this Master’s programme are an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university, at an institute or at a company. However, many of our students end up in other business or government positions as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:
- Think in an abstract way
- Solve complex problems
- Make accurate approximations
- Combine theory and experiments

PhD positions

If you would like to have a career in science, it’s possible to apply for a PhD position at Radboud University. Of course, you can also apply at any other university anywhere in the world.

Positions in business or governmental organisations

To get an idea the various career opportunities, a sample of jobs performed by our alumni:
- Actuarial trainee at Talent & Pro
- Consultant at Accenture
- ECO Operations Manager at Ofgem
- Scientist at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research
- Technology strategy Manager at Accenture
- Consultant Billing at KPN
- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
- Systems analysis engineer at Thales
- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security
- Business analyst at Capgemini

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

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