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Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Read more
Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Against a background of intensifying economic, political, cultural and military globalisation, there is now a heightened awareness of terrorism and international crime as threats to global security.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree identifies the features of these respective threats and explores the challenges to national and global governance, human rights and ethics, criminality and regionalism. This course examines the character of these contemporary global threats, considers specific case studies, and contributes to the debate over how to respond intellectually and in practical policy to these major threats to global security in the post-9/11 world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-Provides learners with an integrated security perspective
-Combines traditional militarised security concerns with contemporary threats of terrorism, international crime, and non-traditional security
-Provides the opportunity to develop the necessary analytical tools to critically explore the global security environment of the new century
-Among the first course of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying the increasingly prevalent themes of terrorism, international crime and global security
-You will obtain a critical awareness of the complex and inter-connected diplomatic, legal and economic dimensions of these threats, as well as an understanding of counter-terrorist and counter-crime policies, strategies and operational responses at local, national and global levels

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

This dynamic and innovative course is aimed at both UK and international students and offers the opportunity to be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Field trips are an integral part of the course, which will include visits to EU agencies and international NGOs.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree course is among the first of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying terrorism, international crime and global security. UK and International Competitive internships will be offered to the most motivated students.

The course comprises three mandatory topics designed to establish the core agenda of the course in terrorism, international crime and global security, and six core-option subjects from which you must study at least two.

The topics included in the course are delivered as interactive and multimedia workshops. They blend case studies, practical illustrations and theoretical analysis. Each session is designed to encourage interaction and debate. This concept is equally applicable to the numerous extra-curricular activities organised to complement the subjects.

Within all sessions, we draw on our own research experience and this ensures some lively debates and reassurance that there is no ‘right way’ of undertaking research. The course team ensures that you have extensive tutorial access to discuss your relationship with the course’s subject matter and their own intellectual development and to provide structure to their studies.

The key themes of this Masters degree are addressed in courses three core subjects:
-International organized crime
-International terrorism
-Threats to global security

You then have the opportunity to supplement these compulsory subjects with optional units, broadening your understanding of the concept of global security. Typical choices include:
-Counter crime and terrorism (study trip)
-Governance for security in the developing world
-Post-colonial African politics
-Gender and international human rights
-Case study: analysing primary sources
-Trafficking in human beings

In parallel to studying the above subjects, students also design, research and write a 15,000 word Masters dissertation addressing a topic of their own choice.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security is designed for those seeking to put current security debates into some sort of academic context. In terms of career advancement, the course offers generic skills and professional development that have seen past graduates go on to jobs within:
-International NGOs
-Civil service
-Private sector
-Management
-Journalism

In this sense, the degree is not designed to promote any one specific vocation. However, the issues studied would be of particular interest to those wishing to start, or advance, a career in:
-The armed forces
-The police force
-International agencies such as the United Nations or the European Union
-Other international NGOs

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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This masters degree explores new perspectives and ways of thinking about crime, harm and justice. It is concerned with examining problematic areas of social life, transgression, ‘crime’, social harm and justice in an increasingly global world. Read more

MA in Crime and Justice

This masters degree explores new perspectives and ways of thinking about crime, harm and justice. It is concerned with examining problematic areas of social life, transgression, ‘crime’, social harm and justice in an increasingly global world. You will consider the significance of power, social structure, and economic and social inequalities in understanding ‘crime’, processes of criminalisation, and ideas about justice.

The qualification will enhance your ability to construct clear, logical and theoretically informed arguments about problems of criminological interest. The skills you will develop include the ability to think differently about problems of crime, social harm and the delivery of justice. You will also hone your skills in identifying, assessing and authoritatively debating and presenting arguments and evidence.

Key features of the course

•Develops your expertise and authoritative command of topics and problems related to the investigation, exploration and contested terrain of crime, and social harm
•Extends skills and insights concerned with the criminal justice system, victim protection and support, civil liberties, human rights, security, safety and social justice
•Ideal preparation for work where analytical, nuanced and careful decision making is required, and where independence and initiative are valued.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

This 180-credit qualification comprises one standard and one long module. This weighting is reflected in the fees, the time expected to complete and the credits.

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

Compulsory modules

• Principles of social and psychological inquiry (DD801)
• Crime and global justice (DD804) planned for October 2018

Using real world examples, this module provides innovative insights into the complex interplay between local and global dimensions of crime, harm and justice.

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

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In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. Read more
In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. We draw on state-of-the-art research to address key critical issues surrounding organised criminality and terrorism in contemporary society.

We involve multi-level analyses of organised crime as a concept, alongside the impacts of urbanisation, migration and globalisation upon both the practice of crime and the ways in which we understand them. You address cutting-edge critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues relating to organised crime and terrorism. You explore topics including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of terrorism
-Globalisation and organised crime
-Security and the state
-The hacker ethic
-Human rights

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Employment opportunities for graduates of this course include careers in security, policing, research, intelligence and justice professions.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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Part of our comprehensive range of LLM programmes, the LLM in International Trade and Economic Law will equip you with the legal knowledge and capability to engage with trade and businesses at a global level. Read more
Part of our comprehensive range of LLM programmes, the LLM in International Trade and Economic Law will equip you with the legal knowledge and capability to engage with trade and businesses at a global level.

The volume of international trade has increased substantially in the post-war period, and most rapidly in the last decade. You will study the institutions of international economic law that shape today's global economy, and the role and regulation of multinational corporations giving you the skills required to work in this significant and complex area of law.

Course detail

Pursuing an LLM allows you to focus in on a particular area of law by delving deep into the subject and undertaking independent research and learning. The modules available cover a diverse range of legal topics, making it possible to tailor the course towards the specific areas of law you wish to explore further.

The School has a thriving research culture and most tutors on our LLMs are active researchers, publishing in leading journals. At the same time, the quality of teaching at Bristol Law School has been recognised by the Quality Assurance Agency as 'excellent'. You can therefore expect to participate in carefully-planned, lively and highly informative sessions designed to give you a deep and thorough grounding in your chosen area of law.

Structure

The LLM in International Trade and Economic Law consists of nine modules in total, including a dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

To gain the Postgraduate Certificate, you will study three compulsory modules (Research Methods, Globalisation and the Law and International Contracts or World Trade Organisation Law) and one optional module.

To gain the Postgraduate Diploma, you will complete the necessary modules to gain the Certificate (as above) and another four optional modules.

To achieve the LLM, you will complete the necessary modules to gain the Diploma (as above) and also write a dissertation.

Modules

- Core modules:

• Research Methods
• Globalisation and the Law
• International Contracts
or
• World Trade Organisation Law

- Option modules:

You will then choose either one optional module (for the Certificate) or five optional modules (for the Diploma or LLM), from the following list:*
• Natural Resources Law
• International Law and Institutions
• International Employment Law
• Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility
• Information Technology Law
• International Commercial Disputes
• International Intellectual Property Law
• International Environmental Law
• International Banking and Finance Law
• International Competition Law and Policy
• Shipping Law
• International Financial Crime

Or one option*, not listed above, offered on any of the other LLM courses.

Finally, if you are undertaking the full LLM, you will need to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Format

The flexible nature of the course allows you to study with us full or part time. The course involves both extensive independent research and discussion in the context of workshops, designed to encourage the development of your critical, analytical and reflective skills. You will be expected to prepare for each workshop and to participate actively in discussion with your tutors and peers.

Assessment

Taught modules on the LLM International Trade and Economic Law course are assessed through a combination of written coursework assignments and oral presentations. The culmination of the course is a dissertation of up to 15,000 words, which constitutes an original contribution to the corpus of legal knowledge within an area of international trade and economic law.

Careers / Further study

Studying for an LLM provides an ideal opportunity to develop specialist skills that will be favoured by employers, both in the legal world and beyond. It opens up a range of career opportunities and gives our students the edge over other graduates.

The in-depth knowledge you will acquire in a particular area of law will give you a thorough grounding in the subject area and raise your employability prospects, enabling you to become a specialist within your organisation. It is for this reason that many of our LLM graduates choose to go on to complete a PhD or go into teaching and research.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation. Read more
You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation.

You will explore the different methods of criminological research before completing an independent dissertation.

You will study a range of interesting, innovative and challenging modules, taught by world-leading experts who are actively engaged in publication and research. Our teaching staff includes Professor Colin Webster, renowned for his work on ethnicity and crime.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/criminology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The course will further your career prospects across a range of crime and criminal justice related fields including youth justice, the police and prison system, probation service, victim support, child protection, crime prevention and other statutory, private and voluntary sector agencies.

- Police Officer
- Prison Officer
- Probation Officer
- Community Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has been designed in consultation with statutory, charitable and voluntary crime related agencies in the region. It therefore reflects the ongoing need for agencies to upgrade the knowledge and skills of professionals and practitioners. We also introduce advanced criminological knowledge to graduates who wish to further their knowledge or interests.

Our course is taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field who are actively engaged in scholarship, publication and research funded by national bodies such as the Home Office, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Research Councils. Among others teaching the course, Professor Terry Thomas is renowned for his work on Violent and Sexual Offending, and Professor Colin Webster is renowned for his work on Youth Crime and Justice, and Ethnicity and Crime.

Modules

Rethinking Policing
Gain an understanding of the social, historical and economic development of policing within national and international contexts.

Race, Ethniticy and Justice
Develop a critical understanding of theories about race, ethnicity and criminal justice, focusing specifically on the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and class.

Understanding the Sex Industry
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, from men who buy sex, to women who work as sex workers, third parties that own and manage businesses, and those who are exploited through unregulated markets.

Dissertation
Specialise in a chosen area of advanced criminological research through workshops and independent study, resulting in a 15,000 word dissertation.

Mental Health and Crime

Engendering Criminology
Explore major topics and debates relating to gender, crime and victimisation by undertaking an in-depth analysis of the development of feminist criminology.

War, Crime and Violence
Explore acts of war, political violence and crimes of aggression through the lens of criminological discourse, looking at war and its relationship with 'crime'.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Research profile. The MSc by Research in Economic & Social History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Economic & Social History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

The programme provides structured research training while at the same time enabling you to pursue a research project that you design yourself, in consultation with supervisors. It serves as both a self-contained research degree and a preparation for further study for the PhD degree.

Economic and social history addresses the historical processes underlying the evolution of modern society by employing a range of insights and approaches from the social sciences, including economics, sociology and social anthropology.

Edinburgh has a large and distinguished group of academics in this research area. Their specialist fields provide students with an outstanding range of options, both in terms of historical period and areas of the world.

Facilities

Our home is the William Robertson Wing, an A-listed building on the southern edge of Edinburgh’s Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Designed by the distinguished 19th-century architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, the building – part of the University’s Old Medical School – has recently been refurbished to an exceptional standard, providing state-of-the-art facilities for research, teaching and study.

Graduate students are able to use two further large School study and resource rooms, which are open to all staff and students. There is access to lockers equipped with laptop charging facilities as well as standard lockers.

The building is wireless enabled and includes state of the art teaching rooms, meeting rooms, a common room, a refreshment area, and open social/breakout areas.

Programme structure

The programme combines lectures, seminars, tutorials, and computer-lab sessions. The skills and theory imparted in the research-training courses, along with many of the assignments, are designed to feed directly into the final dissertation work.

You will be examined through coursework and a dissertation totalling approximately 30,000 words.

The programme focuses on civil society, material culture, youth, gender, crime, cinema, economic growth and energy policy in a variety of historical contexts.

You take four compulsory courses and complete a dissertation. Each course is assessed by essays, usually of around 2,500 words.

Compulsory courses:

Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Historical Methodology and Historiography

Economic and Social Theory for Historical Analysis

Supervised Reading Course

Option courses may include:

Culture and Society in Early Modern Britain

Material Culture of Gender in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Cinema and Society in Britain

Slavery in the Atlantic World

British at War: 1939–45

Cinema and Society in South Asia

Clothing and Culture in Comparative Historical Contexts

Career opportunities

This programme is specifically designed for students who anticipate progressing to a doctoral programme, but it can also function as excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.



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This programme introduces the theoretical and conceptual resources relevant to the study of crime, criminal justice and crime policy. Read more
This programme introduces the theoretical and conceptual resources relevant to the study of crime, criminal justice and crime policy. It provides advanced training in social research methods.

Why this programme

-This MRes will prepare you for a career as a researcher or for undertaking a PhD in criminological or criminal justice research. It is recognised for an Economic and Social Research Council 1+3 award through the Scottish Doctoral Training Centre.
-You will be benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the Scottish Centre for Crime & Justice Research who are based at the University.
-The breadth and diversity of expertise represented within the teaching team is a key strength of the programme.
-There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars throughout, with high-calibre speakers from the UK and abroad.
-You will have the opportunity to link up with a criminal justice organisation for your dissertation work.
-This degree is taught alongside two MSc degrees: Criminology & Criminal Justice and Transnational Crime, Justice & Security. They have a stronger subject focus and less emphasis on research training.

Programme structure

The four core courses and two optional courses provide you with in-depth knowledge of current criminological issues and refine your social research abilities. For the MRes you will apply your analytical and research skills to a specialised topic and produce a dissertation.

Core courses
-Understanding and explaining crime and social control
-Research and enquiry in crime and criminal justice
-Social science statistics 1
-Qualitative research methods

Optional courses - At least one must be taken from the following:
-Criminal justice: global challenges
-Rehabilitation and desistance from crime
-Penology and punishment
-Crime, media and popular culture
-Crime and community safety
-Criminological perspectives on security
-The global criminal economy

Career prospects

The MRes is an ideal pathway towards a PhD and a career in academia. It will also prepare you for a career in research or policy development; especially with those public agencies and voluntary organisations concerned with crime prevention and community safety.

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The LLM in Banking and Finance Law provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of international finance and financial services law, covering local and international developments from practical, regulatory and policy perspectives. Read more
The LLM in Banking and Finance Law provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of international finance and financial services law, covering local and international developments from practical, regulatory and policy perspectives. A wide range of regulatory and transactional areas are covered including, monetary law, banking law, financial regulation, central banking, securities law, secured transactions, corporate finance and M&As, insolvency cross-border insolvency, electronic banking, financing of developing economies, EU financial law and business ethics. You can choose from a wide selection of modules to design a programme of study that best facilitates your interests.

Our academics are engaged in current banking and finance policy making and legal regulatory reforms. In light of the recent economic global crisis and the ensuing new regulations, modules have been developed to reflect these changes, for example ‘Islamic Finance and Commercial Law’ and ‘Ethics in Business and in Finance’. This has led to the creation of a seminar series, featuring prominent figures from both industry and academia.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM Law and Economics programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Networking opportunities

On many of our modules, you will have the opportunity to hear from and discuss with prominent figures from leading institutions, including the Bank of England, the World Bank, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the European Central Bank, the Bank for International Settlements, the International Monetary Fund, as well as partners in law firms from across the world.

Taught modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the same field of law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.
QLLM007 Banking Law


◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM084 Secured Financing in Commercial Transactions (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM156 Introduction to Insurance Regulation (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM195 Transfer Pricing (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM310 Compliance in Global Contexts (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM357 Chinese Banking and Finance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM364 Law and Finance in Emerging Economies (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM367 International Financial Regulation (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM374 Law and Ethics in Finance (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM375 Corporate Governance and Responsibility in Finance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law. Read more
The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law.

LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law deals with the global and regional regulation of international trade, structuring and managing international business transactions, and the economic foundations of trade and corporate law.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Students on the LLM programme who take both the QLLM136 Ethics in Business and in Finance and QLLM007 Banking Law modules will be eligible for exemption from the Chartered Banker Diploma compulsory module: Professionalism Regulation and Ethics.

Taught modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Commercial and Corporate Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of available LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change.

Please refer the toe QMUL Law website for a full list and information on the modules for this programme.

Below is an example of some of the modules for this programme .
◦◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM120 Business Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM305 Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM306 Competition enforcement: From investigation to sanctions (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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The LLM in International Business Law offers a comprehensive range of modules relevant to international trade law, business law, competition law, corporate governance, intellectual property and market regulation. Read more
The LLM in International Business Law offers a comprehensive range of modules relevant to international trade law, business law, competition law, corporate governance, intellectual property and market regulation.

Taught Modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of International Business Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.
◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM013 Comparative Commercial Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM044 International and Comparative Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM094 UK Competition Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM156 Introduction to Insurance Regulation (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM183 / QLLG005 Protection and Indemnity Clubs: Law and Practice (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM184 US Comparative Corporate Law (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM367 International Financial Regulation (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM374 Law and Ethics in Finance (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM375 Corporate Governance and Responsibility in Finance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Read more
The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Questions of international Law are increasingly an important part of domestic litigation in almost all jurisdictions. The modules are designed to equip you for a career in private legal practice, diplomatic service, or work with non-governmental organisations. All courses are taught by top class academics with extensive experience in the study and application of international law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Public International Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM071 Law of Treaties (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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The Fraud Investigation Management MSc course was developed in association with professionals leading the way in economic crime and fraud investigation in the UK and worldwide. Read more
The Fraud Investigation Management MSc course was developed in association with professionals leading the way in economic crime and fraud investigation in the UK and worldwide.

The MSc Fraud Investigation Management with Professional Experience, is an extended full-time Masters programme with a substantive professional experience component. Within the professional experience modules, students have the option of undertaking an internship with a host organisation or, alternatively, campus-based professional experience.

Internships are subject to a competitive application and selection process and the host organisation may include the University. Internships may be paid or unpaid, and this will depend on what is being offered and agreed with the host organisation.

Students who do not wish to undertake an internship or are not successful in securing an internship will undertake campus-based professional experience, which will deliver similar learning outcomes through supervised projects and activities designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate theory with an understanding of professional practice.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

If you are involved in fraud investigation or would like to be, this course can help you develop the skills, knowledge and understanding of current issues in fraud investigation, that you will need to better plan and deal with the potential fraud risk in your organisation. The course will focus students on the associated policy and procedures needed to be able to take a fraud case from inception right the way through to prosecution.

The UK has long been one of a small number of global leaders in the field of investigations, with UK Police officers currently involved in cases of national and international importance overseas. UK Police officers have developed a globally acknowledged reputation for professionalism and efficiency. It is this experience and practice which underpins the Coventry University Masters degree (MSc) in Fraud Investigation Management.

The Forensic Investigation group maintain close links with fraud investigation departments within financial institutions. Fraud investigation is a growing area and successful Coventry University graduates should be well placed to capitalise on this shift in the employment market.

The key driver for developing this course was the 2006 Fraud Review by Lord Goldsmith, which stated that a more strategic approach to the investigation of fraud by financial institutions and the Police was needed. Ultimately, graduates from the MSc in Fraud Investigation Management could be able to contribute to the professionalisation agenda for the role of fraud investigator and to effectively manage the fraud investigation function for their organisations.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

All areas of investigation are undergoing a professionalisation process. In addition to vocational qualifications organisations with an investigative role are increasingly looking for employees and candidates with higher level nationally recognised qualifications. It is more and more likely that having relevant higher level qualifications will be an important part of any professional profile including when seeking advancement in a fraud or investigatory career.

WORK PLACEMENTS

The extended full-time Masters programme has a substantive professional experience component. The professional experience modules gives students the option of undertaking an internship with a host organisation or, alternatively, campus-based professional experience.

Internships are subject to a competitive application and selection process and the host organisation may include the University.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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The LLM in Criminal Justice programme will allow you to gain an in depth knowledge of criminal justice systems at international, supranational and domestic levels. Read more
The LLM in Criminal Justice programme will allow you to gain an in depth knowledge of criminal justice systems at international, supranational and domestic levels. The programme aims to foster an understanding of the challenges criminal justice is facing at national, EU and international levels and in a comparative context; and to provide a potential route to post-graduate research in the area of criminal justice.

Criminal Justice Centre at Queen Mary University of London

The Criminal Justice Centre (CJC) provides a forum for research and learning in all aspects of criminal justice, with members are drawn from both the legal profession and academia. The centre provides advice and training to the legal profession, governments and judiciaries, author key publications on criminal justice, engage with the media, undertake collaborative research, supervise post-graduate research and regularly host seminars, lectures, workshops and conferences.


To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Criminal Justice (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM078 Mental Health Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM169 Punishment in England 1750-1950 (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM311 Policing in Local and Global Contexts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM312 Comparative Criminal Justice (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM313 Criminal Justice and Surveillance Technologies (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)

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How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. Read more
How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. On our course you explore the nature of crime, criminal justice and punishment within wider social contexts.

Criminology at Essex builds on strong sociological foundations and reflects the diversity of staff interests, including leading contributors to studies of women, young people and criminal justice, prostitution, homicide, victimisation, visual criminology and media, organised crime and law enforcement, terrorism and surveillance, environmental crime and more. Our courses provide critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of crimes and harms, from the local to the global.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues covered by cutting-edge criminology. You explore a wide range of topics, including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of crime
-Globalisation and various forms of crime
-Security and the state
-New criminological theory
-Terrorism, counter-terrorism, surveillance and human rights

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

You are taught by a team of award-winning internationally renowned scholars widely regarded as leading experts in their fields.

Criminology at Essex is led by Professor Eamonn Carrabine, Professor Pamela Cox, Dr Isabel Crowhurst, Professor Pete Fussey, Dr Anna Sergi, Professor Nigel South, Dr Darren Thiel and Dr Jackie Turton.

All staff are actively engaged in research at the cutting edge of their respective fields of interest and specialism and bring the very latest developments and findings into the classroom. All are prominent writers and the criminology team collectively author the best-selling criminology textbook, Criminology: A Sociological Introduction (now in its 3rd edition), used on undergraduate courses across the country.

Our staff have worked at local, national and international level with bodies from local councils and the Home Office, to Amnesty International and the United Nations.

Specialist facilities

-Our Centre for Criminology hosts expert speakers and practitioners
-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities through a unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society is a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and research organisations.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Formative Debates in Criminology
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)

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