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Masters Degrees (Critical Pedagogy)

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The School of Education provides an online portfolio of Career-long Professional Learning (CPL) programmes for the education workforce, to meet both current and emerging needs associated with the profession and to reflect the increasing importance attached nationally to professional learning, update and practice. Read more
The School of Education provides an online portfolio of Career-long Professional Learning (CPL) programmes for the education workforce, to meet both current and emerging needs associated with the profession and to reflect the increasing importance attached nationally to professional learning, update and practice.

This professionally accredited course is designed for art teachers and others working with art and design within the 3–18 sector in Scotland and across the world.

About the programme

Run in partnership with Glasgow Museums and the National Society for Education in Art and Design (NSEAD), the programme – which is delivered either online or by blended learning – will provide you with the chance for a sustained and serious re-evaluation of your existing art practice within a critical and supportive environment. It will also equip you with the leadership skills to progress the subject of art within the context of curriculum and social change, including Curriculum for Excellence.

Your learning

The Certificate phase comprises three core modules: Visual Arts Practice I; Critical Contexts I; and Critical Pedagogy I.

The Diploma phase comprises three core modules: Visual Arts Practice II; Critical Contexts II; and Critical Pedagogy II.

The Masters phase comprises a dissertation/ exhibition in consultation with the programme leader.

Our Careers Adviser says

An enhanced skills base will broaden your employment opportunities and avenues for future promotion in the UK and internationally. Displaying a diverse and evolving range of creative abilities is an attractive addition to your CV and your personal development.

Professional recognition

The programme is professionally accredited by NSEAD, the principal subject association for art and design education in the UK.

First-class facilities

You’ll have access to a wide range of technology to facilitate your learning. Our libraries are stocked with a vast range of specialist resources to help you in your studies, and you’ll also have access to our extensive electronic library collection (including e-books and academic journals) and the virtual learning environment, Moodle.

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This intellectually demanding professional development MA is designed to support you in becoming a more reflective teacher or youth/ community/performance sports coach, using intensive, compressed teaching time combined with flexible off-site guided learning to fit around your work in a school or youth sport setting. Read more
This intellectually demanding professional development MA is designed to support you in becoming a more reflective teacher or youth/ community/performance sports coach, using intensive, compressed teaching time combined with flexible off-site guided learning to fit around your work in a school or youth sport setting.

It is research-led and research-informed, taught by world-leading academics, grounding the theoretical study of physical education and sport pedagogy in your practical workplace experience.

Intermediate qualifications available:

- Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
- Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/sport-pedagogy#about

Course detail

• Study in a supportive and innovative environment, on a course covering a unique combination of topics designed to integrate with current physical education policy
• Explore opportunities to contribute in an enterprising and creative way to the field and practice of physical education and sport pedagogy
• Develop a high level of understanding of physical education practice and policy providing you with a basis for life-long learning and successful career development in your chosen professional area of physical education and sport pedagogy
• Gain from studying with staff with impressive backgrounds with nationally and internationally recognised research interests, as well as access to state-of-the-art facilities
• Benefit from a course designed to prepare you to work in a range of sport or education contexts, including physical education teaching; sports coaching (elite, performance, development and/or community); physical education teacher education; sport development or educational research and/or continue to further research-based study on MSc by research, MPhil or PhD programmes.

Modules

• Advanced Pedagogy
• Research Methods in Sport
• Occupational socialisation: critical perspectives on PETE
• Sport Pedagogy and Policy: theory in action
• Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Dissertation

Assessment

The programme’s assessment strategy underscores the course team’s concern with the sorts of critical investigations which are increasingly required to understand physical education and sport pedagogy. It places a premium upon research competency and independent critical thinking.

The assessment reflects the pedagogical importance of communication skills and requires students to communicate effectively orally, in writing and using technology. Students will be expected to engage in self and peer feedback in formative and presentation assessments.

Assessment types include:

• essays, reports, projects, dissertation (approx. 85%)
• oral and poster presentations (approx. 15%)

Careers

The course is designed around compressed, intensive contact days at the University and flexible off-site guided learning. This design allows you to gain the necessary experience to apply the theoretical concepts you are examining during your studies in an applied and contextualised manner while also allowing you to gain appropriate experience.

The course is designed to prepare you for work in sport or education sectors. Within these sectors we apply knowledge to a variety of contexts including physical education teaching; sports coaching (elite, performance, development and/or community); physical education teacher education; sport development; educational research

This course will provide the advanced knowledge and research training required for direct access to higher degrees by research (MPhil/ PhD).

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The Master Of Music, Piano Pedagogy is designed for those who can demonstrate appropriate performing ability and possess an appropriate undergraduate degree. Read more
The Master Of Music, Piano Pedagogy is designed for those who can demonstrate appropriate performing ability and possess an appropriate undergraduate degree. Applicants without a degree in piano can be admitted to the piano pedagogy program only if they demonstrate equivalent background in piano and if no more than twelve credits of remediation would be required.

All degree requirements must be completed within six years. A single one-year extension may be granted for cause.

Learning Outcomes

• Perform in a musically expressive manner and demonstrate the proper characteristics involved in, and related to, musical production.
• Demonstrate familiarity with musical literature and stylistic characteristics (NASM, PDE).
• Develop information literacy by displaying critical thinking and listening skills through written critiques of performances concerning artistic expression, performance practice, selection of repertoire, conducting technique, and supportive notes for recitals (NASM, PDE).
• Work in collaboration with other musicians, using proper rehearsal and performance techniques with accompanists and/or instrumental and choral ensembles, and demonstrate conducting skills.
• Be prepared for future career opportunities.

Curriculum

Core modules:

• Music history (MHL) course 1
• Music theory (MTC) course 2
• PIA 578 Piano Pedagogy Private Lesson
• PIA 579 Piano Pedagogy Private Lesson (Including Recital)
• PIA 588 Advanced Lessons
• PIA 589 Advanced Lessons
• PIA 580 Perspectives in Pedagogy IV
• PIA 581 Perspectives in Pedagogy I
• PIA 582 Perspectives in Pedagogy II
• PIA 583 Perspectives in Pedagogy III
• PIA 631 Performance Practicum

Electives (6 credits from the list) :

• PIA 623 Baroque Keyboard Literature
• PIA 624 Classical Piano Literature
• PIA 625 Romantic Piano Literature
• PIA 626 20TH Century Piano Literature

Recital component:

• PIA 695 Recital (Piano Pedagogy)

For detailed information about these modules, please visit the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/school-of-music/applied-music/#coursestext

Further Study

Graduates have gone onto further their musical education at institutions including:

• Curtis Institute of Music
• Eastman School of Music
• Indiana University,
• The Juilliard School and others.

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Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Read more
Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people.

A range of modules are available to enhance your knowledge, develop skills and further your CPD. Credits can be gained on a standalone modular basis or used to achieve one of the School of Social Work, Care and Community’s CPD target awards.

COURSE OUTLINE

The module adopts an experiential learning approach which gives students the opportunity to participate in shared reflective activities through a variety of methods such as group problem-solving tasks.

Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Students will be supported to consider how a focus on the social relations between and among staff and service users; and how the use of dialogue and critical reflection can help us understand events and interactions in practice. The module will also enable students to explore the value of practical and creative approaches to engage with service users.

The module covers topics including:
-Relationships
-Social learning
-Social justice
-Practical and creative approaches
-Developing risk competence
-Reflection
-The history of social pedagogy

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:
-Critically appraise concepts of social pedagogy and how they are relevant to social care and social work
-Consider critically the benefits of adopting a social pedagogical approach to working with people
-Demonstrate an ability to apply social pedagogy’s core values and skills in their work
-Critically explain how the theoretical approaches taught can be applied to the understanding of individuals
-Critically consider how ideas about, and understanding of social pedagogy can be used to inform practice with different service user groups.

INDUSTRY LINKS & PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

We have great links with employers including household names such as Sony, BAE Systems and Apple. We also have links with the smaller companies in the region and offer help and assistance to more than 1,000 of these – with many of our graduates staying in the region it is important we develop these relationships.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.

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The MA Professional Practice in Dance Technique Pedagogy is a highly flexible postgraduate qualification designed for newly qualified or experienced dance teachers working in and beyond schools. Read more
The MA Professional Practice in Dance Technique Pedagogy is a highly flexible postgraduate qualification designed for newly qualified or experienced dance teachers working in and beyond schools. This is a low residency programme using on-line / distance learning, with the opportunity to visit Middlesex University's London campus. The programme has been developed especially to allow you to continue working, integrating your professional expertise with academic learning.

The development of 'self' as a practicing artist/educator is a central focus of this programme, alongside critical reflection on and advancement of one's individual pedagogic practice.

As a core part of the programme you will make a claim for academic credits for your professional experience including Professional Development courses, and / or your professional qualifications, whether credit bearing or not. This then forms the basis for a major project with a focus on dance technique pedagogy.


Why study MA Professional Practice Dance Technique Pedagogy at Middlesex?

As one of the top universities in the UK for dance, we are recognised worldwide for our high calibre of teaching and innovative research. Our department's student satisfaction rating is one of the best in the UK at 94% (NSS, 2013), with academics who are renowned experts in their fields. It is this level of excellence and pioneering approach to the subject of dance that led us to develop the MA Professional Practice in Dance Technique Pedagogy, the first course of its kind in the UK.

Designed to allow you to explore your teaching practice in depth, our course takes dance professionals in the early, middle or later stages of their career and harnesses their experience so that they can evolve their teaching practice with expert guidance from some of the UK's leading dance academics and practitioners.

Developed in collaboration with The Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD), our course begins by reflecting on your prior learning before supporting you to explore a chosen area of dance technique teaching in more depth leading to the development of a major work-based learning project. Delivered part-time through distance learning, we ensure that you are able to develop as a practitioner and maintain your work commitments while you study.

Course highlights:

- Flexibility to shape your studies around your work commitments, individual needs and interests, so you can pursue your ambitions with structured support from experienced practitioners
- You are placed at the centre of your research investigation, making your findings applicable within your own profession and of value to your colleagues, employers and students
- Vibrant dance research culture on campus and online, with influential and internationally respected work in dance pedagogy, contemporary dance technique and choreographic practices and dance fitness.
- Valuable opportunity to make a claim for academic credits against prior formal and informal learning

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The MA in Pedagogy is designed for anyone who is involved in teaching and learning. The MA in Pedagogy is designed for anyone who is involved in teaching and learning. Read more
The MA in Pedagogy is designed for anyone who is involved in teaching and learning.

The MA in Pedagogy is designed for anyone who is involved in teaching and learning. There is a choice of modes of delivery to meet the needs of practitioners in all locations and phases of schooling: face to face, blended (combining elements of intensive face-to-face learning on study days with online learning) or an online programme.

This MA offers teachers and other education professionals - including teaching assistants, mentors and librarians - a choice of pathways related to their practice at all stages in their careers. The programme supports their learning and develops their ability to reflect critically on classroom practice.

The focus throughout the course is on developing pedagogical understanding as reflective practitioners. This degree will give students a wider understanding of key issues in the field of education in which their practice is located.

Throughout, students will develop a critical understanding of research methodology as they plan and conduct a small-scale enquiry into an issue of their choice. This will enable the student to further their own understanding of their practice whilst also having the opportunity to contribute to the wider contexts in which they work.

As they generate new knowledge, students will contribute to pedagogical theory and practice.

Why St Mary's?

Building on our long tradition of excellent practice in teacher education, St Mary's provides a flexible approach to this professional Master’s degree.

In addition to being delivered at the university and as a distance programme, it is also taught in school-centres in partnership with individual schools and groups of schools, offering the opportunity for busy professionals to study in small groups in their own context. The timing of taught sessions and tutorials can be arranged to meet the needs of the students.

The programme offers six distinctive pathways: English, Mathematics, Religious Education, Science, Dyslexia, and Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND).

Course Content

This programme consists of five modules, with a choice of specialist modules allowing students to focus on an area of interest. Students who have achieved 60 credits of Master's award (Level 7) in their ITE qualification are eligible to apply for exemption from two 30 credit modules.

Core Modules
› Investigating Pedagogy
› Research Methods and Evidence-Informed Practice
› Leading Learning: Pedagogical Principles
› Academic Paper and Conference Presentation

Optional Modules - choose one of the following:
› Addressing Literacy across the Curriculum
› Innovation to Enhance Mathematical Learning
› The Values an Virtues of Religious Education
› The Purpose and Value of Science Education
› Dyslexia in the Classroom
› Critical Issues in Inclusion Practice (SEND)
› Pedagogical Issues in Practice

Please note: All information is correct at the time of publication. However, course content is regularly updated and this may result in some changes, which will be communicated to students before their programme begins.

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Diploma MSc is an award-winning provider of online medical education for Postgraduate Diploma and Masters courses. We are now pleased to add the Medical Education Postgraduate Diploma and Masters online courses to our growing range. Read more
Diploma MSc is an award-winning provider of online medical education for Postgraduate Diploma and Masters courses. We are now pleased to add the Medical Education Postgraduate Diploma and Masters online courses to our growing range. Our Medical Education courses are offered in conjunction with our partner, the University of South Wales, who have developed a strong reputation for delivering innovative learning.

Delivered over one year, the online part time distance learning Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Education course is specially developed for busy healthcare professionals who may be expected to teach. The course is worth 120 credits and comprises of 6 modules, each of 6 weeks duration. The course aims to enable graduates to develop a critical knowledge and understanding, and application of medical education.

Our medical education courses will appeal to Doctors, GPs, Healthcare Professionals and those with related undergraduate degrees (e.g. Pharmacists) or equivalent professional qualifications and background experience. Students may apply for the MSc in Medical Education as a two-year course, firstly completing the Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), followed by the MSc (60 credits).

Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Education

Delivered over one year, the online part time distance learning Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Education course is specially developed for busy healthcare professionals who may be expected to teach. The course is worth 120 credits and comprises of 6 modules, each of 6 weeks duration. The course aims to enable graduates to develop a critical knowledge and understanding, and application of medical education.

On completion of the Medical Education Diploma, you will be able to:
- demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and understanding of specific issues at the forefront of theory and practice in medical education.
- critically evaluate medical education theories and principles to inform educational practice.
- demonstrate awareness of advanced knowledge in educational methods and practice
- display a critical understanding of the intricacies of adult pedagogy.

Course Structure

Our 1 year course consists of 6 modules per year, each of 6 weeks duration.

Module 1 - The practice of medical education
Module 2 - Assessment
Module 3 - Evaluation
Module 4 - Media
Module 5 - Leadership
Module 6 - Curriculum

Assessment

The course puts assessment at the heart of learning by using clinical scenarios to facilitate problem-solving, critical analysis and evidence-based care. The scenarios act as both the focus for learning and assessment thus embedding assessment within the learning process.

Each of the 6 modules has the same assessment format. Due to the online nature of the course, students are expected to login and participate in the course regularly throughout the module (ideally on a daily basis).

Students use the skills gained during the lectures to engage with the different activities (see below).

Clinical case scenarios with case based discussion - 40%
Individual learning portfolio - 10%
Group/individual activity - 20%
Case based examination - 30%

Teaching Methods

Each module has the same format. Using an online platform and one tutor per 10-15 students, the self-directed distance learning is guided by tutor stimulated discussion based on clinically rich case scenarios. Group projects are undertaken alongside independent projects. Reflective practice is recorded in a reflective portfolio to help students consider how the learning can be translated into everyday work and practice. Teaching starts with 1 day of introductory lectures. Students may attend these lectures in the UK (Glyntaff campus, University of South Wales). The lecture series are delivered by the faculty and tutors, they are a pre-course organiser, giving students the tools required to undertake the online course such as:

Scientific writing.
Levels of evidence.
Harvard referencing.
Reflective writing.

The lectures series give an opportunity to meet face to face with tutors/other students prior to the online course.

MSc Medical Education

The MSc in Medical Education course offers progression from the Postgraduate Diploma for individuals who are interested in developing a critical knowledge and understanding and application of medical education.

Entry to the 1 year MSc in Medical Education will require the successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Education (120 credits) either from the University of South Wales or from another UK University.

The MSc Medical Education course is the only one of its title that is accessible online and is not offered by any other institution.

On completion of the course, you will be able to demonstrate:
- an in-depth knowledge and understanding of specific issues at the forefront of theory and practice in medical education.
- a critical understanding of medical education theories and principles to inform educational practice.
- an advanced knowledge of educational methods and practice.
- a critical understanding of the intricacies of adult pedagogy.

Course Structure

Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal in Medical Education.
Professional Project: Medical Education.

Teaching Methods

Module 1: Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal - MSc teaching methods for this module are similar to the PG Diploma course modules, however it is run over 12 weeks.
Module 2: Professional Project - To produce the professional project, students continue to use the online course; however much of the work is self-directed.

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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This programme is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency for pay and qualification purposes.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellermann (Department of Anthropology)or Dr Kalbir Shukra (Department of Social and Therapeutic Studies)

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellerman

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. Read more

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the heart of what Goldsmiths is all about.

This MA, launched in 2015, is the third of three related pathways. The first, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, was started in 1992 and is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification.

A second pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development, was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an NYA qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development.

This third pathway has been created in response to a growing number of applicants with an arts background and arts interests, and is aimed at students who wish to work in community arts. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development and community arts, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork are attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment. We also encourage you to audit courses run by the Art, Music and Cultural Studies departments, and in general to make the most of all the wonderful political and arts events organised by Goldsmiths staff and students every week.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, normally in community arts settings, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations.

The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork 1: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community arts. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community arts are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community arts practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in community arts practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 140 hours plus 20 hours observations) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community arts and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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Our MSc offers a pioneering new programme that contributes to youth and community practices that promote equality, human flourishing, participation and social justice. Read more
Our MSc offers a pioneering new programme that contributes to youth and community practices that promote equality, human flourishing, participation and social justice. This MSc brings three interlinked routes to professional qualification and to CPD or International Masters.

Your Learning

Full-time students will normally undertake three modules in each of trimesters 1, 2 and 3 to achieve 180 credits at Level 11, over one 12 -18 month period, as required for the award of Master of Science. A core component of learning is obtained through reflection on practice and through a critical pedagogy stance.

Part-time students will normally undertake one module in each of trimesters 1, 2 and 3 to achieve 180 credits at Level 11, over a period of 24 – 30 months, as required for the award of Master of Science. A core component of learning is obtained through reflection on practice learning.

A Postgraduate Certificate can be taken on successful completion of three modules, either as a discrete programme or as the first step towards a Diploma, which also consists of three modules. Upon successful completion of the Diploma, interested participants can undertake a capstone project or dissertation on a relevant topic.

Modules

Required for the award of PG Certificate in Community Education (CYCS) (CLD Approved Qualification):
Researching Communities (20 Credits) and Community Practice Learning (40 Credits)
Required for the award of PG Certificate in Critical Youth and Community Studies (Non-Qualifying Route):
Researching Communities (20 Credits) and two x (20 credit) Option Modules*1

In addition to the above, the following modules are required for the award of PG Diploma in Critical Youth and Community Studies:
Strategic Leadership (20 Credits) and two x (20 credit) Option Modules*1
In addition to the above, the award of MSc in Critical Youth and Community Studies will be conferred on successful completion of:
One x (60 credit) Capstone Project or Dissertation


Placement/Work-based learning

There is a Practice Learning Component for students engaged in the PG Certificate Route seeking a CLDSC Approved qualification. Students who are not seeking to graduate with a CLD qualification do not need to undertake Practice Learning.

Further Study
Students who successfully complete their Degree can progress to PhD level study.

Key Information
Campus: Hamilton
Delivery: Delivered in English the MSc takes a blended approach to learning (mix of taught on-campus classes/tutorials, and use of virtual learning environment)

Advisement and Support: Students are assigned a faculty member (for the duration of programme) as an advisor for programme support and career advisement (Personal and Professional Planning).
Professional Recognition:
This PG Certificate Level of the MSC in CYCS is recognised as a qualifying programme, approved by the CLD Standards Council for Scotland and is recognised as a lead practitioner qualification.

Career Prospects
This Masters open doors to a range of career prospects in communities across the world.
Youth Work
Community Work
Voluntary and Statutory Sector Interface or Intermediary Organisations
Community Activism
Social Enterprise
Teaching Artists
School-Community work
Creative Industries

Protecting Vulnerable Groups Scheme (PVG)
Successful applicants will be required to join the PVG Scheme, managed and delivered by Disclosure Scotland. Please refer to http://www.scotland.gov.uk

To apply visit

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The Education MA is a flexible course that enables students to pursue their own particular interests in education. It combines interdisciplinary perspectives with the development of analytical and core research skills. Read more

The Education MA is a flexible course that enables students to pursue their own particular interests in education. It combines interdisciplinary perspectives with the development of analytical and core research skills. The course enables students to develop a critical understanding of education policies and practices and promotes capacities for creative thought and action.

Key Benefits

  • Flexible and interdisciplinary study.
  • Supports a range of curriculum specialisms.
  • Draws on contemporary research to develop a critical understanding of education policies and practices.
  • Promotes analytical and research skills to enhance classroom practice.
  • Promotes transferable abilities such as policy analysis and research, communication and presentation skills.
  • Taught by staff with international reputations in their fields.
  • Provides opportunities to build local, national and international networks of teachers, academics and education policy specialists.
  • Suitable for educators across all sectors and others with an interest in education studies.
  • Located in the heart of London.

Description

Hosted in the School of Education, Communication and Society, which is internationally recognised as a centre of research and teaching excellence in the field of education, the Education MA supports students to develop a critical understanding of the social, political and philosophical trends underpinning contemporary developments in education. Students are taught by academics who are world leading in the fields of curriculum studies, critical pedagogy, educational assessment, education policy and sociology and philosophy of education.

The course will enable participants to develop an in-depth understanding of education policies and practices, drawing on UK and international contexts and perspectives, and acquire the skills and contacts that will enable them to progress in their careers. For those who work in education, the course will enable students to critically reflect on their own educational roles and carry out independent research in their workplaces.

The required module, Critical Perspectives on Education, will be delivered on a weekly basis over the autumn term. This combines highly interactive lectures with online blended learning to support learning within and beyond curriculum specialisms, including English, Science, Computing and Modern Languages. The extensive range of optional modules available makes the course highly flexible, enabling students to specialise in a particular area of educational research. 

Further literature

Please contact the Postgraduate Taught Programmes Officer: 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Typically per 30 credit module you can expect 20-30 hours of teaching and 270-290 hours of self-study. For our academic study skills workshops you can expect 10.5 hours of contact time. For the Dissertation module, you can expect 9 hours of individual dissertation supervision and 24 hours of dissertation workshops, in additional to 567 hours of self-study. 

Typically, 1 credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment 

  • The required module is assessed by essay, participation in an online discussion forum and subjectspecific task(s) via a portfolio.
  • Most 30-credit modules are assessed through a 6,000 word essay, although assessment methods may vary depending on the optional modules chosen.
  • The dissertation module will be assessed by a 16,000 word dissertation. The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and will give you a good indication of what to expect.


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