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Masters Degrees (Coursework Only)

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Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. Read more
Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. The aim of the MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) programme is to provide advanced coursework with options for a research element or industrial element, and additional professional development coursework. Students choose from a range of courses in Analogue, Mixed Signal, and RF Integrated Circuit Design, VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. A range of electives for the coursework-only stream includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr47/

Course Details

The MEngSc (EEE) has three Streams which include coursework only, coursework with a research project, or coursework with an industrial placement. Students following Stream 1 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out a Minor Research Project to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 2 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out an Industrial Placement to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 3 take course modules to the value of 90 credits, up to 20 credits of which can be in topics such as business, law, and innovation.

Format

In all Streams, students take five core modules from the following range of courses: Advanced Analogue and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced RF Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, and Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. In addition, students following Stream 1 (Research Project) and Stream 2 (Industry Placement) carry out a Research Report. Following successful completion of the coursework and Research Report, students in Streams 1 and 2 carry out a research project or industry placement over the summer months.

Students who choose the coursework-only option, Stream 3, take additional courses in lieu of the project or placement. These can be chosen from a range of electives that includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship.

Assessment

Part I consists of coursework modules and mini-project to the value of 60 credits. These are assessed using a combination of written examinations and continuous assessment. Successful completion of the initial tranche of coursework modules qualifies the student to progress to Part II, the research project, industrial placement, or additional coursework to the value of 30 credits in the cases of Streams 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

Placement and Study Abroad Information

For students following Streams 1 and 2, research projects and industrial placements are normally in Ireland. Where the opportunity arises, a research project or work placement may be carried out outside Ireland.

Careers

MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) graduates will have a competitive advantage in the jobs market by virtue of having completed advanced coursework in Electrical and Electronic Engineering and, in the case of Streams 1 and 2, having completed a significant research project or work placement.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Who is it for?. A Cass master's degree is your gateway to a real estate career. You may be a recent graduate with any previous degree, have a job in finance or real estate but wish to upgrade your skills and/or knowledge of real estate, or are intending a career switch from another industry. Read more

Who is it for?

A Cass master's degree is your gateway to a real estate career. You may be a recent graduate with any previous degree, have a job in finance or real estate but wish to upgrade your skills and/or knowledge of real estate, or are intending a career switch from another industry.

Four key features make us market leaders in Real Estate Masters programmes:

  • Track record: Established 20 years ago, and accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), our degrees are widely recognised and highly valued by major employers; you will find Cass Real Estate graduates at all levels in leading real estate firms around the world.
  • Capability: You will be taught by highly qualified real estate staff, all with at least 10 years’ experience in teaching in senior roles in the industry – a lot of them with both. And we draw on London’s unmatched pool of industry professionals to act as visiting lecturers and guest speakers.
  • Focus: Cass only offers Real Estate courses on a postgraduate level – so you have the exclusive attention of our staff - and has specialised in courses which blend the professional, financial and practical skills in high demand across the real estate industry.
  • Location: We are the only Business School to offer real estate programmes in London, with the opportunity to network in a global real estate hub, neighbouring both the City’s financial core and the new tech belt centred on Silicon Roundabout.

Cass Real Estate courses:

  • Equip you with the core skills required by the industry embracing valuation, financial modelling, development appraisal, market analysis and cash flow modelling.
  • Are set in a framework of robust quantitative methods, financial and economic theory.
  • Have an emphasis on up to date industry techniques and practical tools taught hands-on in computer labs.

Structure

The programme starts with two induction weeks, focused on:

  • An introduction to the real estate industry and the careers it offers, including a dedicated real estate careers day with briefings form the RICS and a range of employers and a Careers Fair with over 20 leading firms.
  • Foundation courses in the principles of finance, financial mathematics and quantitative methods to introduce the key concepts and methods you will use through the year.

In our first term, you get the portfolio of core real estate professional skills – taking in quantitative methods, valuation and investment appraisal methods, asset management and understanding real estate markets.

In the second term, module choices provide two learning “pathways”.

If you aim to join the graduate entry programme of the major UK real estate employers and take the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence you can pick modules that tilt toward UK-specific topics in law, tax and applied valuation. If you aim to work in fund management, finance or outside the UK, you can tilt toward advance financial modelling and international markets. Either way, your choice will not pre-determine the jobs available to you.

Assessment methods

All core modules in Term 1 and Term 2 are assessed by sight-unseen examinations (in January and April) plus coursework set and delivered in Term time. Elective modules are assessed by coursework only.

Your coursework will take a range of forms - essays, modelling projects, presentations, class tests. Some are done individually, others in self-selected or allocated groups of up to four. The mix of assignments is designed to develop the general and soft skills employers expect – time management, team working, report production and presentations.

Overall your final masters mark will be assessed on 50% exams and 50% coursework.

Career pathways

The largest proportion of our students go on to the graduate entry schemes of major firms of chartered surveyors in the UK, going through the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence to become qualified professionals.

The others go into a very wide range of employers and roles – with smaller niche agencies, fund managers, developers, investment banks, lending banks, public agencies, rating agencies, research companies, not to mention setting up their own businesses. Many will go on to professional qualifications outside real estate, such as Chartered Financial Analyst Institute.

Around half our students come from outside the UK, many of them take up jobs in other countries with the boost that a degree from Cass, accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, is a widely recognised and highly valued qualification world-wide. And they will generally find Cass real estate alumni already there to form the base of their professional network.



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Who is it for?. A Cass Masters degree is your gateway to a real estate career. Four key features make us market leaders in Real Estate Masters programmes. Read more

Who is it for?

A Cass Masters degree is your gateway to a real estate career.

Four key features make us market leaders in Real Estate Masters programmes:

  • Track record: Established 20 years ago, and accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), our degrees are widely recognised and highly valued by major employers; you will find Cass Real Estate graduates at all levels in leading real estate firms around the world.
  • Capability: you will be taught by highly qualified real estate staff, all with at least 10 years’ experience in teaching in senior roles in the industry – a lot of them with both. And we draw on London’s unmatched pool of industry professionals to act as visiting lecturers and guest speakers.
  • Focus: Cass only offers Real Estate courses on a postgraduate level – so you have the exclusive attention of our staff - and has specialised in courses which blend the professional, financial and practical skills in high demand across the real estate industry.
  • Location: we are the only Business School to offer real estate programmes in London, with the opportunity to network in a global real estate hub, neighbouring both the City’s financial core and the new tech belt centred on Silicon Roundabout.

Cass Real Estate courses:

  • Equip you with the core skills required by the industry embracing valuation, financial modelling, development appraisal, market analysis and cash flow modelling.
  • Are set in a framework of robust quantitative methods, financial and economic theory.
  • Have an emphasis on up to date industry techniques and practical tools taught hands-on in computer labs.

Structure

Overall the MSc Real Estate Investment could be labelled as a degree in finance which is focussed on real estate. Since the topics and methods you study are of interest to all real estate businesses, including the mainstream employers like chartered surveyors, the MSc Real Estate Investment may give you a wider choice of the role you play but it does not pre-determine what sort of firm you work for.

Term 1 gives you a grounding in the core skills of the real estate professional. You cover basic appraisal methods applied to valuation, development and financing of investments, plus a quantitative methods module incorporates econometric modelling. Those techniques are put in a wider context through a module on real estate economics and an investment markets module which ranges across all asset classes and financial instruments

Term 2 is more about applications of those core skills and principles. In Capital Markets you cover the different forms of indirect real estate – REITS, core and opportunistic funds, and derivatives. In Debt Markets you take in mortgage lending, mezzanine finance, mortgage-backed securities.  In Term 2 you also look in more detail at the financial instruments based on real estate – REITs, Mortgage Backed Securities, derivatives. Portfolio risk management deals with the role of real estate in investment portfolios and the mix of assets within real estate portfolios.

Assessment methods

All core modules in Term 1 and Term 2 are assessed by sight-unseen examinations (in January and April) plus courseworks set and delivered in Term time. Elective modules are assessed by coursework only.

Your courseworks will take a range of forms - essays, modelling projects, presentations, class tests. Some are done individually, others in self-selected or allocated groups of up to four coursework. The mix of assignments is designed to develop the general and soft skills employers expect – time management, team working, report production and presentations.

Overall your final Masters mark will be assessed on 50% exams and 50% coursework.

Career pathways

Graduates from the MSc Real Estate Investment go into a wide spread of firms and roles – some into the graduate entry schemes of the chartered surveyors in the UK or abroad. Most are best suited to analyst, strategy or research positions major fund management houses and investment banks, or smaller private-equity type real estate funds, rating agencies and specialist research firms. Many will go on to professional qualifications outside real estate, such as Chartered Financial Analyst Institute.

Connecting with employers

  • From week one, we host recruitment visits from all the largest real estate employers – like CBRE, JLL, Cushman Wakefield, Savills – plus other firms in real estate fund management, development, finance.
  • Our real estate specialists in the Cass Careers Service hold contacts with businesses across the industry, and will notify you of job opportunities as they come in through the year.
  • You will have un-matched opportunities to network with professionals and employers across London’s vibrant real estate industry at seminars and an annual conference run by our students’ Real Estate Club, and through our mentoring scheme which matches you up with a Cass graduate, and through industry events outside Cass,


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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This is the only MA programme in History and Philosophy of Art offered by a British university in Paris and taught in English. Read more
This is the only MA programme in History and Philosophy of Art offered by a British university in Paris and taught in English.

It provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art and is intended for graduates in art history, philosophy and related subjects, such as fine art. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level and within an interdisciplinary context, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

You spend the entire year in the French capital, which allows you to participate in excursions to prominent cultural locations and make use of research resources that are only available in Paris. You have the unique opportunity to study the arts at postgraduate level within the context of a city that has been at the very centre of many crucial artistic and art theoretical developments in the past few centuries.

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History of Art Department within the School of Arts provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, the history and philosophy of portraiture, the historiography of art and the Cold War, biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Studying art as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise and participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Modules

The programme will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. The core compulsory modules are:

- Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art
- Modern Art in Paris
- Dissertation

In order to allow you to explore other subject areas that interest you will have the option to take one of the modules from other programmes that are on offer at the Paris campus:

- From the Idea of a City to Philosophies of Urban Design
- Architecture and Cities 1840s-1960s
- Modernism and Paris
- Film and Modernity
- Paris and the European Enlightenment
- Identity, Trauma and Sexuality in Modern French Literature
- Paris: Reality and Representation
- Best of Enemies: Images of Britain and France in the 19th and 20th Centuries
- Religion and European Thought

HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA841 - Modern Art in Paris (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only.


This programme is also available at Canterbury only or split site between Canterbury and Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/search/subject_category/Arts

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About the course. The MA Literature and Culture offers a suite of innovative and diverse modules. You will complete three 30-credit modules, two 15-credit research methods modules, plus a dissertation (equivalent to four 15-credit modules). Read more

About the course

The MA Literature and Culture offers a suite of innovative and diverse modules. You will complete three 30-credit modules, two 15-credit research methods modules, plus a dissertation (equivalent to four 15-credit modules).

Each 30-credit module explores – through the study of very different texts and writers – how literature both shapes and responds to the cultural moment of its production. Topics of study may include:

  • contemporary U.S. culture and the #BlackLivesMatter movement;
  • the development of literary modernism in relation to networks of communication, transport and culture;
  • the connections between literature, place and the environment;
  • the representation and significance of the figure of the vampire.

In 2018-19 the programme has a special focus on identity, gender and difference.

The English Literature subject group organises a range of literary activities including visits from influential speakers, a postgraduate research forum and conference, and a number of highly successful international conferences, in which postgraduate students have played key roles as co-organisers and presenters.

For details about the planned suite of modules please contact the Literature MA Programme leader, Dr Sam George on .

Take a look at the MA Literature and Culture course booklet.

Why choose this course?

  • A fresh, unique range of modules focusing on both canonical texts and more unusual or contemporary works
  • Research-informed teaching by experts in their field
  • Provides training in research methodology and theoretical approaches to the study of literature
  • All assessment is by coursework
  • Available to study in one year (full-time) or two years (part-time)
  • Offers outstanding online support via StudyNet, our virtual learning environment
  • Convenient location for access to major research libraries and activities in Central London

Careers

The advanced research skills the programme gives you are of value in a wide range of careers.

Teaching methods

Assessment is normally by coursework only. Taught modules require either two pieces of coursework of approximately 2-3,000 words, or one piece of coursework of 4-5,000 words.

The dissertation is an extended piece of research, normally 15,000 words in length.



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Who is it for?. Read more

Who is it for?

You want to develop a successful career in insurance or risk management; or you already work in one of these fields and want to expand your knowledge and enhance your career potential.  At Cass, you will study both applied and theoretical aspects of insurance and risk management to an advanced level.

Objectives

Our MSc Insurance and Risk Management programme will equip you with the all-round knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in the constantly evolving fields of insurance, risk and risk management.

You will work through a balanced programme which combines a practical approach with sound theory to create a learning environment that is both challenging and stimulating.  You will emerge with a well-regarded and flexible postgraduate degree, solidly positioned to build a successful career in an exciting an increasing complex business world –see ‘Career Pathways’ for testimonials from our past students.

Structure

There are three ways of taking our MSc Insurance and Risk Management programme.

  • A one year full-time course
  • A two year part-time course
  • An exempt route (‘fast track’) course for CII Advanced Diploma holders (8 months full-time or 20 months part-time)

In each case you will

  • Acquire comprehensive knowledge of the theory, principles and practices of insurance and risk management
  • Develop a wide range of technical and conceptual skills
  • Network with your peers and senior finance industry professionals in the City of London
  • Enjoy an enriching environment as part of an international student body
  • Acquire a flexible qualification to prepare you for wide range of roles in insurance, risk management or finance

Assessment

To satisfy the requirements of the degree students must complete:

  • Eight Core courses (15 credits each) (or five Core courses for Exempt Route students)
  • Three Elective courses (10 credits each) and a Business Research Project (40 credits).

Assessment of Core courses on the MSc in Insurance & Risk Management is by means of coursework and unseen examination in most cases.  Elective courses are generally assessed by coursework only.  Coursework may consist of standard essays, individual or group presentations, group reports, classwork, unseen tests or problem sets.  Group work may include an element of peer assessment.

We review all our courses regularly to keep them up-to-date on issues of both theory and practice.

Career pathways

Our MSc Insurance and Risk Management is a long-established course, and we are very proud of the career progression of our many hundreds of past graduates.  They now work in a wide range of organisations around the world, including major global insurance and reinsurance companies, international insurance broking firms, investment and retail banks, leading accountancy firms and management consultants, risk management departments of major corporations, regulatory authorities and many other fields.

Some graduates have pursued further studies (such as PhD) after leaving Cass and embarked on academic careers, others have become successful entrepreneurs and built their own businesses.



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Power system engineering is about keeping things in balance. Not just the balance between generation and load or between production and consumption of reactive power. Read more

Power system engineering is about keeping things in balance. Not just the balance between generation and load or between production and consumption of reactive power. It is also about the balance between the cost of energy and its environmental impact or the balance between the reliability of the supply and the investments needed to develop the system. This course will teach you how to quantify both sides of these equations and then how to improve the balances through technological advances and the implementation of sophisticated computing techniques.

In the first semester you learn how power systems are designed and operated. This involves studying not only the characteristics of the various components (generators, lines, cables, transformers and power electronics devices) but also how these components interact. Through lectures and computer based exercises you become familiar with power flow and fault calculations and you learn how the techniques used to study the behaviour of large systems. Experiments in our high voltage laboratory give you an appreciation for the challenges of insulation co-ordination.

During the second semester the course units explore in more depth the 'operation' and the 'plant' aspects of power systems. For example, you will study how renewable generation is integrated in a power system or how to assess and remedy power quality problems.

Prior to your summer break a preliminary study and the outline of your MSc dissertation project is completed, this is fully developed throughout the second year of the course. The yearlong enhanced individual research provides you great opportunities to develop advanced research skills and to explore in depth some of the topics discussed during the course. This includes training in research methods, and advanced simulation and experimental techniques in power systems and high voltage engineering as well as academic paper writing and poster and paper presentation.

Aims

  • Provide an advanced education in electrical power engineering.
  • Give graduates the education, the knowledge and the skills they need to make sound decisions in a rapidly changing electricity supply industry.
  • Give a sound understanding of the principles and techniques of electrical power engineering.
  • Give a broad knowledge of the issues and problems faced by electrical power engineers.
  • Give a solid working knowledge of the techniques used to solve these problems.
  • Educate students with advanced research skills necessary to address current and future technological advancements.

Coursework and assessment

You are required to take seven examinations. In addition, course work (eg lab reports) accounts for typically 20% of the mark for each course unit. One course units is assessed on the basis of coursework only.

The enhanced research project is assessed on the basis of a research poster, an extended abstract, a research papers and a dissertation of about 70 pages.

Course unit details

Course units typically include:

  • Electrical Power Fundamentals
  • Analysis of Electrical Power and Energy Conversion Systems
  • Power System Plant, Asset Management and Condition Monitoring
  • Power System Operation and Economics
  • Power System Dynamics and Quality of Supply
  • Power System Protection
  • Smart Grids and Sustainable Electricity Systems
  • Techniques for Research and Industry

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Over the last thirty years, hundreds of students from around the world have come to the University to obtain an MSc in Electrical Power Engineering or similar. After graduation, they went on to work for electric utilities, equipment manufacturers, specialised software houses, universities and consultancy companies.

This course also provides the students with additional research skills necessary for starting a PhD degree or entering an industrial research and development career. 



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Who is it for?. This online course is suitable for those looking to develop a career in international business or law. Read more

Who is it for?

This online course is suitable for those looking to develop a career in international business or law.

Applicants to the course are likely to be recent graduates seeking to improve career prospects in international business and law or professionals working in international business, finance or international business law seeking to develop their expertise. As the emphasis of the programme is on the practical and problem solving aspects of the law, it will also help those who may not possess a legal background.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their advanced legal studies by enrolling on the PhD or MPhil programmes offered by The City Law School.

The nature of the LLM as a distance learning programme means there is no requirement to enter the UK, so you do not require a visa if you are an overseas student.

Objectives

The International Business Law LLM programme is designed with one aim in mind: flexibility. As the programme is delivered online, students have the freedom to study in their own working environment and at their individual pace. Technology-enhanced learning environments support the student experience and students also have access to City's extensive range of legal databases, including e-journals and e-books.

This flexible, part-time LLM is designed to provide you with specialist knowledge and help to broaden your existing knowledge of the legal rules which impact on international business. You will acquire legal and research skills to help enhance your career prospects as an international business professional or legal practitioner.

On successful completion of the LLM International Business Law by distance learning, you will have gained specialist knowledge in the key areas of law from an international business perspective and will have acquired transferable skills essential to understanding and succeeding in international business.

Teaching and learning

The programme provides you with interactive learning opportunities, combining a range of learning technologies. Whilst it is in essence a self-directed study course, there is also an emphasis on interactive engagement, using learning activities such as discussion forums and chat rooms to help you extend your learning and work collaboratively with your colleagues.

Learning will be facilitated by:

  • Virtual learning environment (VLE) as e-learning platform
  • High quality module learning packs written by our experts and available online
  • Online academic support and personal tutoring (e.g. via email or webchats)
  • Interactive multimedia content
  • Virtual classroom environment (e.g. via discussion boards or Adobe Connect)
  • 24-hour IT support
  • Online access to our extensive library resource database.

Each module is facilitated by an e-tutor who will offer academic and technical support as required.

To enrol on the programme, you are required to have easy access to a computer or laptop that has a minimum technical specification and good internet access. We will provide you with an email account and secure access to your virtual learning environment. You are expected to regularly submit work online and engage in online activities.

Assessment

On a weekly basis, you will receive feedback via the discussion board per each discussion thread. The Learning Packs will contain self-assessment questions, and tutors will provide formative feedback on your responses to these questions. Participation on taught modules is a pre-requisite for sitting the final assessment. Participation is mandatory and is therefore assessed as a pass/fail summative assessment. The activity requiring participation may vary from module to module, however, a standard will be maintained across all modules. For instance, if a module requires participation vis-à-vis posting messages/responses on a module discussion board and there are eight weekly opportunities to do so, you will be required to submit four posts (50%) for assessment. Each post must be sufficient in length (i.e. approximately 500 words). You are expected to participate in all online activities.

Summative assessment of the taught modules that comprise the degree will be by coursework only (3,500 words). It is considered that you will obtain the  greatest academic benefit and satisfaction from researching a topic, reflecting on it and providing considered arguments in relation to it, as well as affording the opportunity to explore particular topics in greater depth. All coursework must be submitted via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Email submissions will not be accepted.

You will be offered a range of assessment titles in each subject. Additional titles may be added to reflect any developments in the subject occurring during the teaching of the module, enabling you to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary issues and to respond to the most up-to-date information available.

Modules

The distance learning LLM in International Business Law programme consists of taught modules of 150 credits (five modules at 30 credits each) and a compulsory Dissertation module of 30 credits.

In the first academic term, all students are required to take the Core module, Foundations of Law in International  Business (30 credits).

Upon successful completion of the Core module, you will select any further four taught modules from the range of available subjects. Students are free to take one or two modules each academic term.

All modules run over a period of 10 weeks (10 units). Each module requires approximately 300 hours of study and students will normally spend between 25 and 30 hours a week on each module, comprised mainly of self-directed and on-line hours.

Typically, once all taught modules have been successfully completed, students proceed to the Dissertation (30 credits).

Career prospects

By the end of the programme, you will not only have gained specialist knowledge in key areas of law from an international business perspective but will have also acquired transferable skills  essential  to understanding,  and  succeeding in,  the  world of International Business Law. With this sound basis, you will be well placed for developing a career in international business or law.



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The Doctorate in Forensic Psychology is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and is the only British Psychological Society accredited programme in Wales. Read more

Course Overview

The Doctorate in Forensic Psychology is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and is the only British Psychological Society accredited programme in Wales. Upon completion, the programme provides students with eligibility to apply to the register to practice as Forensic Psychologists in the UK, and to gain Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The intake for Top-Up Doctorate takes place in January and September each year. The Top-Up Doctorate is designed for qualified Forensic Psychologists who would like to undertake a research project on an aspect of specialism. The intake for the Full Doctorate programme takes place in September each year, and we would encourage applicants to apply before June of the year they would like to commence studies.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology-Doctorate.aspx

​Course Content​​

Flexibility is the essence of our approach to student learning. The Doctorate Programme facilitates students entering and exiting at different places within the Programme depending on the individual needs of the student. Thus, the full Doctorate programme comprises:
- MSc in Forensic Psychology
- Postgraduate Diploma in Practitioner Forensic Psychology
- ‘Top-Up’ doctorate, which is the higher level research component.

The Top-Up Doctorate will be available to registered practitioners who are seeking to formalise their research and clinical skills in an area of specialism. Applicants completing the Top-Up Doctorate will submit a research thesis reporting a significantly large piece of research.

Applicants to the Doctorate Programme may apply for the Full Programme, or for the MSc or PG Diploma, depending on their own individual needs and career progression. Applicants who apply for the MSc may (on successful completion) later apply for the PG Diploma and ‘Top-Up’ Doctorate. Students, who progress through the course on individual programmes will, after successful completion of all the component programmes, be awarded the Doctorate in Forensic Psychology.

In this way, within one programme and its flexible entry and exit points, we hope to provide a full range of higher-level academic study, further training and higher level research. We are not currently accepting applications for the full Doctorate programme in its entirety.

Applicants who are unsure whether to apply for the full programme, or individual component programmes, are encouraged to ring or email the programme directors to discuss their individual needs in more detail. ​

Learning & Teaching​

​For the learning and teaching mechanisms on the component programmes, please see those specific web pages:
- MSc in Forensic Psychology
- Postgraduate Diploma in Practitioner Forensic Psychology

For the Top Up Doctorate, the thesis will be a large piece of independent research study. Each student will be assigned a supervision team who will be responsible for supporting and supervising the student during their research. At least 6 supervision meetings will be held each year, and a thorough review of training needs will be established and reviewed each year. The individual needs of the student will be met through either higher level Research Methods teaching at Cardiff Metropolitan University, or specialised external training. It is anticipated that many students on the Top Up component may be based some distant from Cardiff and in those cases the supervision team will support meetings through Skype or video conferencing. However, where additional training requires students to attend the university, it is expected that the student will factor this into their time commitments.

Assessment

The programme is assessed at the MSc programme by coursework assessment; and in the work-based practice by supervision reviews, and by coursework only, there are no exams. Examples of assessments include: case study exemplars, reflective reports, supervision and practice logs. See the specifics details on the component programme pages:
- MSc in Forensic Psychology
- Postgraduate Diploma in Practitioner Forensic Psychology

The research thesis is assessed by viva voce examination.

Employability & Careers​

A Doctorate in Forensic Psychology incorporates both Stage 1 and Stage 2 training as set out by the British Psychological Society. The Doctorate enables graduates to gain Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Registered Practitioner status with the Health Care Professionals Council (HCPC)​.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Fast-track your career in policy. Policy-makers create strategic and operational policies that make life better—locally, nationally and internationally. Read more

Fast-track your career in policy

Policy-makers create strategic and operational policies that make life better—locally, nationally and internationally.

Give yourself the opportunity to get a high-level overview of the latest public sector developments and insights. You'll develop your abilities, broaden your perspective, deepen your understanding, challenge your thinking—and increase your employability.

You'll study at the School of Government, learning to help decision makers get the best outcomes in environmental, economic and social areas. Find out about the machinery of government and get the skills to design, evaluate and put in place strategic and operational policies that improve our lives.

Well connected

Victoria is the only New Zealand university that is connected to the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG)—so you know your qualification is of the highest standard.

Our lecturers are actively involved in the public sector, exchanging ideas on key policy and management issues. They're connected to decision makers from local, regional and national government, giving you the opportunity to meet and learn from those in the know.

We're also associated with important public and volunteer sector organisations like the Society of Local Government Managers (SOLGM), Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ), the NZ Council of Social Services (NZCOSS) and Hui E! Community Aotearoa.

International students, global insights

Be part of a school that attracts not only local professionals but a talented group of international students—many highly experienced employees of government organisations in their own countries. Take advantage of the diverse experience in public policy and public management these students take to the classroom—providing valuable insights and bringing the comparative perspective alive.

Qualification family structure

  • Master of Public Policy
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Public Policy
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Public Policy

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.If you are initially accepted for a certificate or diploma, you can apply to transfer to the Master’s degree at a later stage. Both your performance in the programme and your professional work experience will be taken into account when looking at your application.

If you're working towards a Master of Public Policy and illness, promotion or other reasons for leaving your studies come up, you may still be able to graduate with a certificate or diploma.

What you'll study

You'll take a mixture of foundation and core courses that will give you the skills and capability to design, implement and evaluate policy for a range of different outcomes.

Learn about the theory and practice of policy making and examine the role of government and others in policy creation and implementation. Understand the issues at play in different policy areas like local government, health or development. If you're working while you study, you can apply what you learn to your own workplace policy challenges immediately.

MPP students should also take a research paper as part of their qualification. This could be a research topic that is relevant to your workplace. If you want to complete your Master's by coursework only, you need to get approval from the Master's Programme Director.

How you'll learn

Most classes are delivered on-campus in a block format. That means you'll need to attend day-long classes on three different days each semester, each of these separated by about six weeks. You'll also need to complete an additional six hours of structured class work, which may be face-to-face or online.

Some classes are delivered in a weekly or intensive format. Intensive courses are structured as one-off blocks of four days, or two blocks of two days separated by six weeks. Classes for weekly courses usually take place in the evening during the standard university trimesters.

Whatever format your course is delivered in, you'll need to attend all of the classes to pass and to get the most out of your study.

Study while you work

Because of the block format of the classes, you can fit your study commitments around your work and home life. And if you're struggling at any time, just let us know—we want your study to be a success.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MPP can be completed in three years part-time, or in two years of full-time study.

Top locations

Surrounded by Parliament Buildings, government offices and corporate headquarters, you'll benefit from the strong links the School of Government maintains with the industry.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

There will be opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions. You'll also have access to the postgraduate student workspace on the 2nd floor of Rutherford House—make use of the spacious computer lab, meeting rooms, printer and kitchen.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

Skilled-policy makers are in demand both in and outside of government, due to their technical and creative skills and commitment to solving society's challenges.

You might find work in central, local or regional government, a Crown entity or a not-for-profit organisation, or a private consultancy or corporation active in policy-making and implementation processes.



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What is GIS?. GISc, Geographic Information Science, is the science that underlies Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their use. Read more

What is GIS?

GISc, Geographic Information Science, is the science that underlies Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their use. GIS, as they are traditionally known, capture, store, manage, analyse and visualise spatial data in one software environment. Or, GIS, taken in the broadest sense of the term, are information systems that work with spatial data, be they spatial databases or location based services available on your iPhone. Our MGIS teaches both the standalone GIS software, such as ArcGIS, as well as a wider array of spatially aware applications.

About the programme

The MGIS and PGDipGIS programmes provide full time and part time opportunities for students with an interest and background in Geographic Information Science. Students must be resident in either Christchurch, Wellington or Auckland, New Zealand, in order to attend classes at either Canterbury University, Victoria University of Wellington or Auckland University of Technology. 

The programme aims to provide a model for exceptional collaborative teaching and research, using new technology and media to enhance the learning experience for students. The program will use a blended learning approach, involving synchronous seminars and labs (via the KAREN network), residential intensive sessions, and online synchronous and asynchronous learning support. Once a year, students will be brought together for a one week gathering, which will serve to introduce the programme and enable a week of intensive teaching for the ‘GIS401 Foundations of GI Science’ course.

The current programme has two qualifications on offer: a Postgraduate Diploma of Geographic Information Science (PGDipGIS) and a Masters in Geographic Information Science (MGIS). The qualifications provided include a range of courses covering geoinformation processing, analysis, visualisation and applications, as well as the one week intensive course at the field station in Kaikoura.

Please note: This programme is currently NOT offered via distance learning. Students must be present at one of the three participating institutions.

PGDipGIS

The PGDipGIS is a one year (full time) or two year (part time) postgraduate diploma which is comprised of coursework only. To complete the PGDipGIS, students need to successfully complete at least 8 of the courses offered in the course schedule. 

MGIS

The MGIS is a two year (full time) or four year (part time) research masters programme, which is comprised of coursework and a research thesis. Students need to complete the coursework as per the PGDipGIS, as well as an additional masters thesis (GISC690) in the second half of their study.

GIS Careers

There is currently a shortage of qualified GIS specialists in New Zealand and more widely. Organisations in many areas need GIS professionals who can integrate GIS with their core business. As a result, there are many exciting opportunities for graduates, in a growing field that allows you to have an interesting career and make a difference.



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Who is it for?. This course is for professional engineers who want to specialise in structural engineering or move into this area of expertise to advance their career. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for professional engineers who want to specialise in structural engineering or move into this area of expertise to advance their career. Normally students have an undergraduate degree in engineering or a related discipline. Students who don’t have qualifications in civil engineering usually have relevant work experience in civil engineering structures so they are familiar with working within the specific technical domain.

Objectives

From analysing how carbon nanofibers can reduce the effect of corrosion in concrete to gaining insight from experts developing the new Forth Bridge, this MSc in Civil Engineering Structures has been designed to be broad in scope so you can develop your own area of structural engineering expertise.

As a department, we have broad interests from defining new structural forms to practical application of new materials. We believe civil engineering is a creative and collaborative profession, as much as a technical one. This course gives you the tools to immerse yourself in both the analytical and experimental side of the subject, so you can investigate diverse problems to generate your own structural solutions.

The Civil Engineering Structures MSc mirrors industry practice, so you will work in groups with your peers from the first term onwards and learn from a group of world-leading engineers with diverse research strengths. From earthquake engineering to sustainable construction, you have the opportunity to learn in breadth and depth using high-end industry software to develop safe solutions for real-world projects.

Accreditation

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired a partial CEng accredited undergraduate first degree. the JBM website for further information.

Academic facilities

There is a large dedicated lab on site equipped with facilities to investigate different structures and construction materials from concrete to timber. You also have access to other workshops where you can liaise with mechanical or electrical engineers to develop innovative scale models. There is access to specialist soil labs and large-scale equipment including wind tunnels.

We have an extensive library housing all the references, journals and codes of practice that you will need during your studies.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught by the staff team within the School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering and also from visiting industry experts from around the world.

Teaching mainly takes the form of lectures, but IT sessions and seminars also form part of the Masters degree. Modules are shared between two ten-week teaching terms running from October to December and January to March. Although work for the MSc dissertation starts during the second term, you will conduct most of the research work during the summer months.

The length of the full-time degree is 12 months. A part-time route is also available where you can spend either two or three years completing the programme. If you follow the two-year part-time study route, you will need to attend lectures for up to two days each week. Alternatively, you can complete the degree over three years by attending a single day each week. The timetable has been designed to offer flexibility for part-time students.

In the first term you will consider core technical topics and be introduced to new concepts such as structural reliability. In the second term you will begin to focus your studies by selecting your dissertation topic and by selecting options getting involved in a specific areas of your own interest. Spread over the year you will have design presentations, class tests and reports.

If you select an experimental dissertation you will have the opportunity to use a range of materials. Skilled technical support is available in the workshop and you have access to recently refurbished facilities, including specialist geotechnical labs which accommodate a large flexible laboratory space used for centrifuge model preparation and testing. Adjacent to this you have concrete mixing and casting facilities, a temperature-controlled soil element testing laboratory and a concrete durability laboratory.

Assessment

For the theoretical modules, you will be assessed through a combination of examinations and coursework. Examinations are shared between the January and April/May examination periods. For the design-oriented modules you are normally assessed by coursework only, where you will work both in groups and individually on challenging projects.

Modules

There are six core modules which give you a strong technical foundation and three elective modules from which you can choose two. These reflect the specialist expertise on offer within the academic team. These modules will give you unique insight into computer analysis of structures for blast and fire, bridge engineering, and earthquake analysis where you may look at techniques for analysing structures and safe design. In the final part of the programme you undertake a dissertation in which you can explore an area of interest from a proposed list of themes, some of which are industry-related.

Core modules

  • EPM717: Advanced Structural Analysis and Stability (20 credits)
  • EPM707: Finite Element Methods (15 credits)
  • EPM704: Dynamics of Structures (15 credits)
  • EPM719: Structural Reliability and Risk (10 credits)
  • EPM711: Design of Concrete Structures (15 credits)
  • EPM712: Design of Steel and Composite Structures (15 credits)
  • EPM949: Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules

You will be able to study two of the following elective modules:

  • EPM720: Earthquake Analysis of Structures (15 credits)
  • EPM718: Analysis of Steel and Concrete Structures for Blast and Fire Exposure (15 credits)
  • EPM715: Bridge Engineering (15 credits).

Career prospects

Graduates have secured employment with leading civil engineering consultants, research institutes and government agencies and pursued doctoral studies both in the UK and internationally. The cohort of 2015 have moved on to jobs and further study working within the following organisations:

  • Arup
  • Gant
  • Kier
  • Robert Bird Group
  • Skanska


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The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics. Read more

The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse and conversation analysis, typology, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, computational and corpus linguistics, field linguistics, and the documentation and description of endangered languages. The academic staff teaching on the programme work on various practical applications of linguistics (e.g. language codification and language policy, institutional language, language in the community) and have expertise in a wide range of languages, including English and its varieties, Germanic, Latin and Romance, Russian, Polish, Kurdish and other Iranian languages, Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, and several languages spoken in the Americas (e.g. Huave, Quechua, Ulwa), Australia (e.g. Jamingjung), and beyond.

All students receive a solid foundation for linguistic study in three core modules (of which at least two are compulsory): 

  • Grammatical Theory
  • Semantics and Pragmatics
  • Phonetics and Phonology

The remainder of the programme allows the students to make the most of what the staff have to offer. Students can either take a variety of course units in different areas including the new Forensic Linguistics unit, or specialise in one of the following pathways: Phonetics and Phonology, Sociolinguistics, Syntax and Semantics, Typology or Romani Linguistics.

Aims

The course aims to give students a grounding in breadth and depth in Linguistics, by exploring the central features of linguistic theory: its history, objectives, principal theoretical frameworks, methodologies, contested areas and uncontested results. Students will gain experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the School is also home to world-leading research in Linguistics.

Teaching and learning

Teaching takes on a variety of forms. Core course units and other MA specific course units are typically taught as seminars, in a small group, combining lectures with discussion. Many of them have practical tutorials as well which will help students prepare for individual research projects. Directed Readings involve individual or small group meetings during which pre-set readings on a particular topic are discussed. The enhanced Level 3 undergraduate course units combine lectures or seminars, depending on the aim of the course unit, with more optional tutorials. The aim across all teaching forms is to create the opportunity for intensive scholarly work, with areas of focus determined by the participants and their individual interests, which can be investigated in considerable depth.

If you wish to discover more about the academic staff in the department, please visit:http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/about/people/staff-directory/linguistics-english-language-staff/

Coursework and assessment

Course units are assessed at the end of the semester during which they are offered. All taught course units except Introduction to Grammatical Theory and Phonetics and Phonology are assessed by examined coursework only. All course units include formative assessments to ensure interim feedback during the semester.

Deadlines for assessments are stated in the MA in Linguistics and English Language 2016-2017 Programme Handbook .

Course unit details

The Linguistics MA consists of the following elements:

  • At least two of the following compulsory core course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory (15 credits), Phonetics and Phonology (15 credits), Semantics and Pragmatics (15 credits)
  • Research Methods I and II (2 x 15 credits)
  • Optional course units (60 credits altogether)
  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Alternatives to the compulsory course units in Introduction to Grammatical Theory and/or Phonetics and Phonology may be chosen if students can provide evidence of having covered comparable material in their undergraduate degree; in borderline cases, students may be asked to take a proficiency test in Welcome Week.

The optional course units can be selected to follow specialised pathways, which include Sociolinguistics, Phonetics and Phonology, Syntax and Semantics, Typology, and Romani Linguistics. One or two course units may take the form of Directed Reading units, which are individual or small group seminars about set readings on a particular topic. These are available after consultation with an appropriated member of staff and the PGT Officer. One or two course units may also be taken from a list of MA course units available in other subject areas within the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, or from a list of enhanced Level-3 undergraduate course units in Linguistics and English Language, which supplement the MA specific course units on offer.

For details of postgraduate course units currently on offer, please refer to the Programme Handbook.

Facilities

All postgraduate students on this programme can make use of the purpose-designed Centre for Graduate Studies within the Ellen Wilkinson Building. The Centre opened in 2014 and provides state-of-the-art facilities for postgraduate study. These include 30 computers, LaserJet printers, `hot-desk' facilities for around 50 students (including workstation facilities for students with disabilities), and 132 secure lockers. The Centre is a meeting place for postgraduate taught and postgraduate research students, and also has several areas to relax, socialise and network.

In addition to the Centre for Graduate Studies, the University has five major computer clusters, together with many smaller clusters. In total there are more than 10,000 PCs and workstations across the campus. All provide access to standard office software as well as specialist programs, and all are connected to the campus network and internet. Every student is registered for email, file storage and internet access. If more demanding computer access is required, our specialist computing division Manchester Computing can provide high-end and specialist computing services.

The University Library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK and is widely recognised as one of the world's greatest research libraries. We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more

The MA Cultural Geography (Research) was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism, exploring the relationships between our physical world, human identity and mobility. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London. 

The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social, Cultural and Historical Geography group with cutting edge teaching.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place, landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go on to work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

The course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees. To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery.

  • Study in a department ranked 2nd in the UK for research by the Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • Enjoy placements and research engagements with top cultural institutions including the V&A Museum, the Museum of London, the British Library, the Natural History Museum, the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and the Royal Geographical Society.
  • Graduate with excellent employability prospects or progress to doctoral study.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Cultural Geographies - Key Ideas
  • Cultural Geographies - Contemporary Debates
  • Social Science Methods for Cultural Geographers
  • GeoHumanities Research Methods for Cultural Geographers
  • Research Training
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Cultural Engagements
  • Cultural Engagements Placement

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

  • Essay 1 and Essay 2 - 5000 words each (20 credits each)
  • Workshop Report 1 and Workshop Report 2 - 5000 words each (20 credits each)
  • Research proposal - 2000 words (20 credits)
  • Dissertation presentation - 20 minutes
  • Dissertation Viva - 1 hour - (0 credits)
  • Blog post (s) - 4000 words - (20 credits)
  • Video/podcast - 10 mins/30 mins
  • Placement Reflection - 5000 words (20 credits)
  • Dissertation - 15000 words (60 credits)

This programme is delivered in a single stage, equating to either one-year of full-time study or up to five years of part-time study.

Your future career

Study Cultural Geography (By Research) at Royal Holloway, University of London and you’ll be well placed to progress to PhD study or to a rewarding career in your chosen field. This research-based programme sees more than 50% of graduates progress to doctoral study.

This programme is structured to maximise graduate employability and further education prospects, with transferable skills sessions, career development sessions and workshops taking place to help graduates you achieve your career ambitions. We help our students to work on their PhD applications, and also help to arrange placements with some of the world’s top cultural institutions – including the V&A Museum, the Museum of London, the British Library, the Natural History Museum, the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and the Royal Geographical Society.

  • 90% of Royal Holloway graduates in work or further education within six months of graduating.
  • More than 50% of Cultural Geography students progress to PhD study.
  • Transferable skills sessions, career development sessions and workshops help you to achieve your career ambitions. 


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