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The Gender Without Borders MA is an interdisciplinary masters, taught across three core subjects, English, philosophy and sociology, while also allowing you to take options in other disciplines, according to your interests. Read more
The Gender Without Borders MA is an interdisciplinary masters, taught across three core subjects, English, philosophy and sociology, while also allowing you to take options in other disciplines, according to your interests. It explores gender as it intersects with race, class, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and disability. The course is taught in a seminar style that is student led by a team of experts that combines international reputations with dynamic, research-led teaching.

This course considers gender across disciplinary borders in a self-consciously transdisciplinary way, interrogating assumptions of both the humanities and social sciences. Its focus is not exclusively on women, but it conceives of gender in a fluid way, across the borders of the traditional divide between genders, by taking transgender seriously. It also incorporates transnational perspectives, reflecting upon the invisible whiteness that is normatively stipulated by discourses that present themselves as neutral with regard to race, while in fact privileging Eurocentric and post-colonial biases.

Two fully funded scholarships are available on a competitive basis.

What will you study?

The course is designed to allow you to reflect critically upon a range of intersecting differences, race, gender, class, sexuality, and disability in such a way as to resist the scripts of white, heteronormative, ableist privilege that tend to invisibly structure discourse unless a concerted effort is made not to allow default social scripts to circulate unchallenged.

The central and organising question of the two core modules is how different sites of privilege, discrimination and marginalisation intersect with one another, and whether and how the discourse of intersectionality adequately theorises the way in which divergent aspects of identity relate to one another. You will engage with texts and debates in a rigorous, critical and transdisciplinary manner, interrogating the relation between theory and practice in creative ways. You will develop the skills necessary to be able to conduct sustained, independent and original research. You will also have the opportunity to pursue you own disciplinary interests by pursuing optional modules in a range of disciplines.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation.

Course structure
Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Advanced Interdisciplinary Critical Skills
-Gender Without Borders Dissertation
-Interrogating Intersectional Differences: Gender, Race, Sexuality, Class

Optional modules
-Diffractive Creativities, Transversal Practices
-Gender and Sexuality
-Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Cinema
-Gender, Race and Class
-Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

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Accountancy and Finance professionals have central roles in all types and sizes of organisations, and these skills have become essential for those seeking senior roles. Read more
Accountancy and Finance professionals have central roles in all types and sizes of organisations, and these skills have become essential for those seeking senior roles. You will have opportunities to engage with analysis and evaluation of many of the accounting issues present in modern business. On completion, you will be conversant with theoretical issues in accountancy and finance, and be able to apply accounting theory and practice to real issues faced in day-to-day operations.

This programme examines current accounting issues and how they relate to the wider social, technical and economic challenges that businesses face. It also offers the opportunity to study a specialist interest. The programme assumes that students will enter with a good deal of technical accounting knowledge, having either studied accounting at undergraduate or professional level.

The programme consists of taught modules, research methods and a supervised dissertation. Students can also enrol to take ACCA or CIMA professional modules at a reduced rate.

Our online learning programmes are flexible and designed so you can balance study with your commitments at work and home. The programme structure and learning materials enable you to study at your own convenience and develop your own study schedule while offering opportunities for you to engage with your peers.

Northampton Integrated Learning Environment (NILE) is a dedicated online university learning space for students. Your tutors will use NILE to engage with you, and you will use NILE to access course materials, assessment information, virtual classrooms and discussion boards. Your assessed work will be submitted and graded online, so you will be able to see your grades and feedback wherever you are in the world. The system that underpins NILE is Blackboard and access to this system is through the direct web link nile.northampton.ac.uk. We also have a mobile app so you can stay connected to the University of Northampton wherever you are; iNorthampton is available for Android and Apple mobile devices.

Course content

Core learning will be delivered electronically and you will be encouraged to engage with your fellow students and tutors online. Studying online will give you the flexibility to study at your convenience* without the need to travel or physically attend classes, whilst enhancing your employment opportunities. You will be supported throughout the process by our great teaching staff that are professionally qualified and have industry and academic experience to share with you.

*Modules are delivered within trimester periods so you will need to complete in specified times.

What you will study

This programme is 30 months in duration. The academic year is split into trimesters. For a September start you will study as follows;
Trimester one – September to December
Trimester two – January to April
Trimester three – May to July

Year One
Trimester one – September to December
You will study one module: Financial and Business Strategy
Trimester two – January to April
You will study one module: Corporate Reporting
Trimester three – May to July
You will study one module: Global Financial Strategy

Year Two
Trimester four – September to December
You will study one module: Strategic Audit
Trimester five – January to April
You will study two modules: ‘Social Responsibility and Governance’ and ‘Dissertation and Research Methods’. You will then commence work on your Dissertation.
Trimester six – May to July
You will study two modules: Investment Analysis and ‘Dissertation and Research Methods’. You will continue to work on your Dissertation.
Trimester seven – September to December
You will study one module: ‘Dissertation and Research Methods’. You will complete your Dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-Corporate Reporting 1
-Global Financial Strategy
-Financial and Business Strategy
-Strategic Audit
-Investment Analyst
-Social Responsibility and Governance
-Dissertation and Research Methods

Methods of Learning

Per module you should expect to spend between ten to 20 hours per week engaging with online activities and study through NILE as well as self-directed study time. Typical time to completion is 30 months.

Assessments

The course has a combination of assessment involving reports, case studies, time constrained tests and your dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Flexible study which is delivered online wherever you are.
-Full support from professionally qualified staff and engagement with fellow students.
-Opportunity to undertake ACCA or CIMA professional modules at a reduced rate.
-Check out this case study and overview from the Subject Leader for Accounting and Finance: https://nile.northampton.ac.uk/webapps/blackboard/content/listContentEditable.jsp?content_id=_1255734_1&course_id=_31642_1&mode=reset

Careers

Excellent career opportunities exist in accounting and finance. Recent graduates have secured positions in accounting firms, industry, banking, finance and commerce.

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Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains. Read more
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains.

This course is taught by staff with extensive crime scene experience who regularly work on a range of operations and are at the forefront of the professional development of the discipline.

The course will:
-Provide you with advanced practical, analytical and interpretative skills in forensic archaeology
-Provide training in discipline skills to enable graduates to pursue careers in Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
-Prepare students for careers in non-cognate fields through emphasis on team working and application of a wide knowledge base to problem solving

This course combines approaches from different disciplines to provide students with a comprehensive forensic skill set.

It is essential that forensic archaeologists are able to appreciate their role within a wider police investigation and have a detailed understanding of crime scene management procedures. Forensic Archaeology in the United Kingdom is rapidly developing and recognised as a distinct discipline by the Home Office Forensic Science Regulator. Bradford staff have been actively involved in defining skills matrices for use by the Institute for Archaeologists as part of the process of professional regulation.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/forensic-archaeology-crime-scene-investigation-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-The course is underpinned by modules on English Law delivered by University of Bradford School of Law
-The course provides hands-on experience utilising simulated complex, multi-scene crime scene scenarios and is based upon direct case experience by the principal tutors working with UK police forces
-Flexible design means that the MSc award can include either a substantial research dissertation or a period of enhanced professional training
-The course can be studied full-time over 12 months or by flexible study up to 5 years

Modules

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Crime Scene Management (10 Credits)
-English Legal System and Criminal Law for Non-Lawyers (Law 1) (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Anthropology for Crime Scene Investigators (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits)
-Recording Crime Scenes: the use of photographic and survey techniques (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (70 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Research Skills (10 Credits)
-Research and Brief Writing (10 Credits)
-Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (20 Credits)
-Elements of Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits)
-Law of Evidence for Non-Lawyers (Law 2) (10 Credits)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits)

The MSc award can be obtained with enhanced professional training (MSc without dissertation) in which case, the following modules are taken instead of the Dissertation:
-Advanced Fieldwork Programme for CSI (30 Credits)
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 1 (10 Credits )
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 2 (20 Credits)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in law enforcement (both as Police Officers and Scene of Crime/Scientific Support), Forensic Science as well as commercial archaeology with enhanced skill sets.

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This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/. Read more
This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/

Increasingly, no matter how we live, we know this 'world' primarily through the experience of living within and between cities. These cities continuously produce new challenges for their inhabitants and administrators. In doing so, they also produce opportunities for understanding the constraints and potentials of both human and non-human life.

The MA Cities and Society is a research and training programme designed to support strategic interventions in urban governance, design, institution-building and change, as well as social-spatial development. Distinguished by it's theoretical rigour, integrity and amenability to experimental empirical research, the programme focuses particularly on:

The organisation of contemporary urban economies, including the production of built and virtual environments, physical and social infrastructure
The ways in which different forms of economic accumulation and economic practices impact upon cities, and how any city reflects a particular set of constraints and possibilities
The proliferation of technical systems, media, and practices of interpretation and organisation that change our notions about the ‘proper’ use of things and bodies
The intersections of finance, governance, ecology, and culture in producing multiple forms for assessing urban futures; particularly calculations of risk, sustainability, productivity and creativity
This programme covers the following disciplines: geography, anthropology, architecture, cultural studies, fine arts, media and communications.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Alex Rhys-Taylor.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

-Three core modules
-A specialist option module taken from the department's extensive list, or from the departments of Anthropology, Media and Communications, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Music, Educational Studies or the Centre for Cultural Studies
-A dissertation

Dissertation (60 credits)
In the summer term you complete a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff. 
The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Teaching

One hour lectures address the core themes of each module, followed by one hour seminars in small groups (under 20). You'll be encouraged to attend dissertation classes that train you in the basic principles of dissertation preparation, research and writing. You are also assigned a dissertation supervisor who will be available when you are writing the dissertation (approximately one hour contact time per month).

The main aim of the program is thus to explore new approaches to thinking about and researching the city formation and urban life. This can be broken down into three inter-related aims:

To promote an appreciation of the relevance of the social, sociological knowledge and ways of knowing in the understanding of cities, urban economy, culture and politics, and the management of social change, and to encourage critical understanding of interrelated concepts, debates and themes.
To enable students critically to engage sociological and geographical theories and methodologies relevant to the studies of cities and urbanities, controversies and social change, and conduct an intellectually informed sustained investigation.
To expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the Sociology and related departments and centres to provide a catalyst for independent thought and study.

Expert walks and seminars

The course is also accompanied by a series of expert 'London walks' spread across the year. These are led by a range of researchers from within the Centre for Urban and Community Research, as well as project managers and planners from organisations such as the Greater London Authority, and take students through the sites of that their work focuses on. The Centre for Urban Community research also holds regular seminars with a range of urban professionals, architects and academics from outside the university, giving the MA Cities and Society a spaces to join in with the Centre’s intellectual community.

Asssessment

Essays and dissertation.

MA granted on the completion of 180 CATS (all coursework and dissertation); Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education granted on the completion of 120 CATS (all coursework without dissertation); Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education granted on the completion of 60 CATS (the completion of two core modules).

Skills

Analytical and research skills that intersect basic sociological knowledge with that of architecture, the built environment, cultural and postcolonial theory, geography, planning, digital communications, and ethnography as they apply to the study of cities across the world.

Careers

The training in this programme is applicable to work in multilateral institutions, NGOs, urban research institutes, municipal government, cultural and policy institutions, urban design firms, and universities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our MRes in Social Science Research Methods offers subject routes in Criminology, Education, Gerontology, Health Policy, Management, Social Work and Sociology. Read more

Overview

Our MRes in Social Science Research Methods offers subject routes in Criminology, Education, Gerontology, Health Policy, Management, Social Work and Sociology. The programme is designed to provide training in a range of research skills and methodologies essential to the systematic research practice demanded in many professional environments, or to pave the way to further postgraduate study. As such the programme is open to graduates looking to pursue an academic or research related career and those seeking to enhance their practical social research skills for professional purposes. Modules are taught by experts in their field and will introduce concepts and skills that will enable you to pursue an independent research project of your choice.

The MRes programme requires satisfactory completion of 180 credits, comprised of modules up to 120 credits, plus a 15,000 to 20,000 word dissertation worth 60 credits. Taught modules consist of face to face contact between staff and students, supported by online content, while the independent subject specific training modules and the dissertation are supported by regular individual supervision. There are a broad range of assessment methods to evaluate your analytical abilities and your critical engagement with relevant debates, approaches, theories, scholarship and evidence. These include portfolios, essays, research proposals, reviews, reports, exams, learning plans, pilot studies and the dissertation. Written assignments for taught modules vary in length from 1,500 word reports to 5,000 word personal development portfolios.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/mressocialscienceresearchmethods/

Course Aims

The general aims of the programme are as follows:
- To equip participants with a ‘toolkit’ for research design, consisting of a range of social science research methods and strategies
- To explore in detail the philosophical assumptions underlying contemporary research in the social sciences
- To develop the qualities needed to evaluate critically social science research
- To provide practice in a range of transferable skills, improve existing skills and enhance employability, whether in an academic context or beyond
- To apply more general methods and philosophies to the student’s own discipline and to gain an in-depth understanding of the current issues related to that discipline

Course Content

Those taking taught modules only, without producing a dissertation, may qualify for a postgraduate

award (30 credits), a post graduate certificate (60) credits or a postgraduate diploma (120 credits).

You will study the following core modules:

• Research Skills and Researcher Development
• Principles of Social Science Research
• Quantitative Research and Data Analysis
• Qualitative Research Methods
• Subject-Specific Training I
• Dissertation

The following is a list of indicative elective modules:

• Subject-Specific Training II
• Advanced Quantitative Data Analysis
• Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
• Ethnographic Research

The University offers this social science MRes in the following disciplines:
- Criminology
- Education
- Geography
- Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations
- Management
- Sociology
- Social Policy
- Social Work

Teaching & Assessment

The programme is assessed through a broad range of methods of assessment, including: portfolio, essay, research proposal, review, report, exam, learning plan, pilot study and dissertation. These enable assessment of the student’s analytical abilities, and of the student’s evaluation of particular debates, material and evidence. The research proposal, the review, the pilot study and the dissertation facilitate assessment of the student’s ability to select, apply and evaluate appropriate research methodologies in their chosen field of studies. The written assignments vary in length from 1,500 word reports through to 5,000 word personal development portfolios. Students must pass all the taught modules before they may proceed to the dissertation, which involves writing a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post-graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The world’s long-term economic development depends on the existence of efficient, innovative and creative energy and resources industries. Read more

Why Energy Studies without Specialisation at Dundee?

The world’s long-term economic development depends on the existence of efficient, innovative and creative energy and resources industries. These in turn rely on individuals who possess a sound grasp of their legal, economic, technical and policy backgrounds.
Energy Studies is at the heart of these issues and provides the best in advanced education in its field, preparing its graduates to meet the challenges posed by the evolving global economy.

This MSc is aimed at graduates and other professionals, both in government and industry, who wish to gain an in-depth understanding of the energy industry and general international impacts of policy and procedure. The position of this programme at the Centre provides the student a unique opportunity to combine studies in general energy management with international Economic policy and specialized courses in the energy/resources industries. This intensive professional and academic training, provided by internationally leading practitioners and professors in this field, leads to a distinctive and reputed advanced academic qualification based on academic excellence and professional relevance.

What's great about Energy Studies without Specialisation Dundee?

Throughout its history, the Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy as part of the Graduate School of Natural Resources Law, Policy and Management at the University of Dundee has achieved continuous growth and has established international pre-eminence in its core activities. Scholarly performance, high level academic research, strategic consultancy and top-quality executive education. Currently, we have over 500 registered postgraduate students from more than 50 countries world-wide.

Our interdisciplinary approach to teaching, research and consultancy gives us a unique perspective on how governments and businesses operate. We offer flexible courses delivered by the best in the field, devised and continually updated in line with the Centre’s unique combination of professional expertise and academic excellence.

This provides a rigorous training for graduate students and working professionals. Full-time and part-time degrees, intensive training programmes tailor-made for individuals or companies and short-term professional seminars are all on offer.

We will teach you the practical and professional skills you need to mastermind complex commercial and financial transactions in the international workplace, and we will expose you to many varied and exciting opportunities.

How you will be taught

The MSc is made up of compulsory and elective modules with this taught component being followed by either:
A dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved by an academic supervisor

An Internship report - students who choose this option are required to source an organisation willing to offer a 3-month work placement, approved by an academic supervisor

An extended PhD Proposal - students who propose to follow up the LLM with a PhD may, with the approval of an academic supervisor, submit a 10,000 word PhD proposal

What you will study

Compulsory Modules:
• Natural Resources Sectors: A Multidisciplinary Introduction
• Project Report or Internship
Core Modules:
Core Compulsory Modules:
• Energy Economics: The Issues
• Energy Economics: The Tools
Core Specialist Modules:
• Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development - Economics and Policy Issues
• Financial and Project Analysis of Natural Resources and Energy Ventures
• Legal Framework for International Project Finance
• Petroleum Policy and Economics

Elective Modules: Candidates are advised to choose additional modules from what is available on the academic timetable subject to any restrictions that may apply.

How you will be assessed

Each course is assessed by a combination of examinations and a research paper.

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All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. Read more
All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of the Asia Pacific Region, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of the Asia Pacific Region.

The objectives of the programme are:

- To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy with reference to the Asia Pacific Region
- To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists
- To enable practising professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge
- To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research

Students will benefit from studying with experts on the economics of the Asia Pacific Region within the Department. More broadly, a large number of open lectures on topics relating to the Asia Pacific Region will be available in various departments of the School throughout the year.

All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. For further information about this course including a timetable please see here: Preliminary maths and Statistics Course (https://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html)

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconpac/

Structure

The MSc Economics is taught within a structured programme rather than being obtained mainly by research and dissertation. It consists of eight course modules delivered through lectures, classes, and tutorials and an 8,000-word dissertation. The degree is awarded on the basis of course work, examinations written in May/June, and a dissertation which is submitted in September.

The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. To see a list of courses being offered please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Please note that some courses may be taught in other departments of the School.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 58kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconpac/file39831.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation.

The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation.

The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Pre Entry Reading

- Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course

Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs.

Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing (http://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html). The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to the Middle East from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise and understanding of the Middle East. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability.

Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to the Middle East have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

SOAS MSc graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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This programme combines environmental concerns with development economics and political economy. It draws on the specific strengths of SOAS, namely expertise in development economics, multi-disciplinary environmental focus, and area specialisations in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Read more
This programme combines environmental concerns with development economics and political economy. It draws on the specific strengths of SOAS, namely expertise in development economics, multi-disciplinary environmental focus, and area specialisations in Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

The MSc in Economics with reference to Environment and Development provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of economics. The effects of development on the environment and access to resources is one of the most challenging fields that has grown over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of study. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense and the scope of courses offered includes various areas such as natural resources, agriculture, economic development, finance, and regionally - specialised courses.

All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. For further information about this course including a timetable please see here: Preliminary maths and Statistics Course (https://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html)

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconenvdev/

Structure

The MSc Environment and Development is taught within a structured programme rather than being obtained mainly by research and dissertation. It consists of eight course modules delivered through lectures, classes, and tutorials and an 8,000-word dissertation. The degree is awarded on the basis of course work, examinations written in May/June, and a dissertation which is submitted in September.

The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. To see a list of courses being offered please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Please note that some courses may be taught in other departments of the School.

Programme Specification

MSc Economics with reference to Environment and Development programme specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 63kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconenvdev/file77570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation.

The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation.

The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation
Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Pre Entry Reading

- Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course

Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs.

Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to Environment and Development from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates of this programme will develop a specialised understanding of the environmental and development concerns. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability.

Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to Environment and Development have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in
national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a
body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

Graduates of Masters programmes in the Department of Economics at SOAS have followed successful careers in international banking and finance, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-governmental organisations. Graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies.

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS.

The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’.

Topics and themes include:

Sedentarism and the study of migration
Polities & economies of migration
Colonialism
Nations, states and territory
Globalisation
(Illegal) workers in the global economy
Place and emplacement
Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination
Transnational migrants & mobile lives
Trafficking
Development and migration
Diasporas and development
Refugees and internally displaced persons
Development-induced displacement
Environment and refugees/displacement
Climate change-related migration
Policy responses to migration
Transformations North and South

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Migration, Mobility and Development. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students work together in small groups to produce a migration related research report. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 78kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/file101784.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars, collaborative research projects and supervised individual study projects.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Dissertation work requires students to make use of theoretical and empirical material and relate this to a migration related topic.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. Read more
The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, environment-development issues. A good first degree in a social science is preferred.

This programme takes a critical political ecology frame and examines environmental policy and its intersections with development from a social justice angle. It is taught and convened by leading political ecologists and offers a critical analysis of key issues including water, forestry, climate, fisheries, agricultural production, biodiversity, conflicts and energy supply.

The masters asks important questions including:

- How does the environment intersect with global poverty, wealth and questions of inequality?
- Can Carbon trading offer a solution to managing climate change?
- How does access to water intersect with dynamics of wealth and poverty?
- Is wildlife conservation implicated in social injustices?
- What role can and do environmental movements play in development?
- Is there a link between environmental change and violent conflict?
- What is the political ecology of forests?

The MSc programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the Department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The MSc Environment, Politics and Development has four components: two compulsory modules; one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words. Please see Postgraduate Modules (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/pgcourses/) for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscenvironpoldev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Ecology of Development. They then select one of four further core modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development; or Law and Natural Resources. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of environment, politics and development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 15/16 (pdf; 85kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscenvironpoldev/file101710.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.5 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures
Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Health psychologists are interested in the psychological processes underlying health, illness and health care. Read more
Health psychologists are interested in the psychological processes underlying health, illness and health care.

They seek to understand these processes and develop interventions that enable people to maintain good health and avoid illness, as well as improve outcomes for people with health conditions and improve the experience of undergoing diagnostic and health care processes.

Our MSc in Health Psychology is designed for students interested in a career in health psychology and has been accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

On successful completion of a BPS accredited MSc in Health Psychology, students who hold BPS Graduate Basis for Chartership can continue to Stage 2 training to become Psychologists with the BPS and to become registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as Health Psychologists.

Our course will provide a strong grounding in:
-Key theories in health psychology and how to apply them
-Current approaches to changing health-related behaviour at individual, population and regulatory levels
-The interaction between psychological processes (cognitions, emotions, behaviour) and disease and illness
-The ways in which social-cultural factors contribute to health
-Advanced research methods and analysis techniques in both quantitative and qualitative research
-The role and scope of health psychology within academic and health care settings

The University of Manchester has recently formed the Manchester Centre for Health Psychology , with the appointment of new staff adding to the already strong group of health psychologists at the University.

Teaching and learning

Teaching on the course is largely delivered through face-to-face interactive sessions consisting of some lecture material with discussions and group work, as well as with a range of audio-visual stimuli.

All course units are supported by the use of Blackboard (a virtual learning environment) on which staff post lecture slides, reading lists and other accompanying material.

Each course unit on Blackboard also has its own discussion board, where students can post questions and interact with staff and other students on the course.

A significant amount of teaching and learning will take place through the dissertation module (60 credits), where students will be expected to take a lead role in developing a research project with regular support, input, and mentorship from their project supervisor.

Coursework and assessment

A wide range of assessments are used in this programme, including:
-The dissertation (in the format of a paper prepared for publication in a scientific journal)
-Oral presentation (unit: Health Behaviour Change)
-Poster presentation (Dissertation)
-Systematic review (Illness and Health Care)
-Case report (Facilitating Change 1)
-Portfolio of tasks (Health and Society)
-Research poster and writing for a lay audience (Dissertation)
-Essays, and examinations
-A reflective log, in which you will reflect on your learning and development as you progress along the course (Professional Issues)
-You will also be required to prepare a CV and application for a job or further training, providing you with the opportunity to gain feedback on the way you present yourself to maximise employability or progression to further training at the end of the course (Professional Issues)

Course unit details

Full-time students will take four 15-credit taught units in each of Semester 1 and Semester 2. Two of these units will be taught on Mondays, the other two on Thursdays. Part-time students will take two taught units each year of their studying (such that they will be expected to attend classes on one day of the week each year).

In addition, all students will be allocated a supervisor for the dissertation (60 credits), a unit that runs for the full year (students are also expected to work on the dissertation over the summer). The dissertation consists of an independent piece of research.

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The MSc in Public Policy and Global Health examines public policy, health and inequality issues and locates these discussions within a wider health systems context. Read more
The MSc in Public Policy and Global Health examines public policy, health and inequality issues and locates these discussions within a wider health systems context.

Course structure

There are no optional modules in the degree, in 2015 modules available were:
-Global Health Issues and Governance (15 credits)
-Public Policy, Health and Health Inequalities (15 credits)
-Health Systems Analysis and Comparison (15 credits)
-The Dynamics of Evidence Informed Policy (15 credits)
-Gender, Sex, Health and Politics (15 credits)
-Qualitative Methods Applied to Policy and Health Research (15 credits)
-Epidemiology and Statistics (15 credits)
-Placement in Public Policy and Global Health (15 credits)
-Dissertation in Public Policy and Global Health (60 credits)

The MSc is aimed at students, public health practitioners and managers in the publicly funded health organisations and systems (especially but not solely the NHS), local government bodies, regional agencies, and the voluntary and community sectors. Although intended to appeal to practitioners, the course emphasis is on policy implementation and decision making. It will develop critical judgement in health and policy analysis, hone your research skills and extend your capability to plan, undertake and excel in research in these areas.

A Postgraduate Diploma in Public Policy and Health (comprised of the taught MSc modules without the dissertation) is also available, as is a Postgraduate Certificate.

Learning and Teaching

Each Masters programme in The Integrated Health Sciences Suite is structured as four core modules (common to all component masters), four subject specific and optional modules, and a dissertation which is equivalent in weight to four taught modules.

The taught modules are mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Typically lectures provide the key concepts and theories whilst tutorials and seminars allow students to work through application of concepts to practice in more detail promoting analysis of theory and reflection on its application. Dependent on the learning objectives of particular modules, case studies, role plays and simulation games are also cooperated to provide experiential based learning. The aim here is to assist students to arrive at new insights into the practical applications of theory. All taught modules also include an expectation that students will learn through structured reading thus obtaining greater familiarity with key texts and a deeper understanding of the subject knowledge generally. Within the seminar/tutorial format of the modules students are required to make oral presentations. These provide opportunities to develop oral and written skills in communicating clearly in an interprofessional manner.

The precise time allocation between lectures, seminars and tutorials is partially dependent on the student numbers in individual modules. Modules with smaller student numbers will tend towards greater reliance seminar formats than modules with larger student numbers (i.e. in modules with small student numbers lecture formats will be interspersed with more interactive and participative forms of learning). All taught modules within the Integrated Health Sciences Suite are taught over 10 weeks with a minimum of two hours of face-to-face contact per module per week. All modules within the master suite are research-based and the importance of research in each programme is emphasised in the additional face to face time given to the health research methods modules which are structured for three hours of direct teaching per week per module. Certain subject specific modules within the suite are structured for 2.5 hours of face-to-face teaching per week.

The dissertation module is primarily taught through independent study, research (including library research) and analysis which allows the student to conduct, as an individual initiative, a substantial piece of academic work in their chosen academic field, write it up and present it in a scholarly fashion. This provides students with the opportunity to engage with academic issues at the forefront of research and promotes independent lifelong learning skills from a variety of sources. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three or four one-to-one supervisory meetings, students personalised and detailed academic study results in a significant piece of independent research of relevance to their intended future or current work. Students’ contact time with supervisors is jointly agreed between students and supervisors, and will vary according to this stage of the dissertation and the progress being made. However there is an expectation that students will have access to supervisors at least once every three weeks for the duration of the dissertation for a maximum of two hours at a time.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet with their adviser two to three times a year.

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The MRes is an advanced historical research programme, and students specialize in ancient, medieval, early modern or modern history under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field of research. Read more
The MRes is an advanced historical research programme, and students specialize in ancient, medieval, early modern or modern history under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field of research. Students receive training in historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study and develop their knowledge of the period they choose to focus on.

Key benefits

- One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2015).

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK.

- Ideal preparation for doctoral study, with advanced training in research skills combined with an extended dissertation.

- Specialise in Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern or Modern History.

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-mres.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MRes History programme provides students with the opportunity to engage in advanced historical research and appropriate research training tailored to students’ particular research interests. At its heart is the 30,000 word dissertation, delivered through a series of intensive one-to-one supervisions with tutors expert in the students’ fields of research. Through its taught training modules, the programme offers students the chance to engage at an advanced level with disciplinary and methodological debates, as well as conduct training work preliminary to writing the dissertation. These modules, combined with the dissertation, provide students with the ability to conduct large-scale independent research projects.

- Pathways -

Students on the MRes History follow one of four pathways, best suited to their research interests:

Ancient History – this pathway draws on the great strength of ancient history research in the University of London, which has the largest number of ancient historians in post anywhere in the world. The compulsory Sources & Methods in Ancient History is an intercollegiate module, involving most of the ancient historians in London, who take seminar sessions on their own specialist areas. Students are also required to study Greek and/or Latin for Research, Epigraphy or Papyrology.

Medieval History – this pathway builds on the popular MA in Medieval History at King’s, which has an outstanding track record for training medievalists for doctoral research. Students take the compulsory module Materials and Methods, which introduces methodological problems that medieval historians confront when handling source materials and when engaging with historical methods or schools of thought, as well as compulsory training in Palaeography and Latin for Graduates.

Early Modern History – this pathway enables each student to put together a tailor-made programme best suited to his or her research interests, providing an excellent basis for the research dissertation. Students choose between two core modules that focus on historiography (Approaches to Early Modern History) or practical skills (Advanced Skills for Historians). Optional modules cover topics including the history of religion, power, ritual, bodies, science, cities, knowledge, images and objects.

Modern History – students focus either on British and European history since the French Revolution, or on the history of global interaction since the 16th century. All students choose between two core modules that focus on historiography (Transnational History) or practical skills (Historical Methods). In addition, students are permitted to choose from a very wide range of taught optional modules.

- Course purpose -

Both to provide training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for further study, and also to deepen your knowledge of the period studied. Suitable both for potential academics and for personal interest for those with a clear research focus.

- Course format and assessment -

We will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you undertake at least 17 hours of independent study. If you are a part-time student, this will only apply during your first year. For your dissertation, we will provide 12 hours of one-to-one supervision and we will expect you to undertake 1,118 hours of independent study.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. It is also highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work in international NGOs, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups in the areas of rights, humanitarian assistance and transitional justice. It also looks more broadly at the future of global human rights in a world where, many claim, the influence of the West is declining and asks critical questions about the legitimacy and effectiveness of transitional justice mechanisms and humanitarian intervention.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/

Programme Specification

MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights & Justice Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 117kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/file80043.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Knowledge:
Learning outcomes acquired in the following ways:

1. Students are required to attend all classes (lectures and seminars), study extensively on their own and prepare assessed as well as non-assessed work regularly.
2. Through core course lectures and seminars as well as through assessed work including group discussions.
3. Through teaching in core and optional courses

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. These are fostered in all courses offered in the program where the information students receive needs to be assessed critically and conflicting interpretations arising from the same information discussed.
2. Students are encouraged not simply to summarise evidence and arguments but through application of critical questioning to develop their own assessments of the relative value of a range of arguments/sources of evidence.
3. Through the structure and content of the core course in conflict, rights and justice and other program and optional courses.
4. Students will prepare class presentations on topics selected from the core course and options reading lists.
5. They also carry out individual, independent dissertation work, including refining a broad ‘topic’ into a narrower, manageable and more precise research question/hypothesis.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Subject-based practical skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through independent work for dissertations and preparation for class presentations.
2. Through work on own, departmental dissertation guidance notes and meetings, meetings with supervisor.
3. Through required regular readings for weekly seminar discussions.
4. Through demonstration in lectures, through discussion in seminars, through questions in exams.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation..

Transferable skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through seminar presentations, discussions, group work and essays.
2. Through essays, project and dissertation
3. Through group project work.
4. Through classroom participation in seminars

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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