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Masters Degrees (Sustainable Food Systems)

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Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Read more

MSc Food Technology

Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. The programme focuses on aspects of production, composition and design of food products.

Programme summary

The Food Technology programme at Wageningen University has been in place for more than 50 years and is considered one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Wageningen University offers high-level courses and research in all areas of food science; ranging from advanced technical fields, such as Process Engineering or Chemistry, to fields with a more economic or sociological focus, such as Marketing and Gastronomy.

The Wageningen Food Science faculty is larger than that of any other European university. It includes professors and lecturers from a wide range of departments: Food Chemistry, Food Physics, Food Microbiology, Food Quality and Design, and Food Process Engineering. Food Technology covers nearly all aspects of food science and technology. As a result of being a very broad field, students are required to choose one of the specialisations offered.

Specialisations

Within the programme Food Technology you can choose your own specialisation that meets your personal interests.

Ingredient Functionality
This specialisation focuses on the composition of food, especially, on the role of various components, ingredients or structures in the quality and functionality of the final product. It deals with sensory, nutritive and textural aspects of foods in relation to their components. You major in Food Chemistry or Food Physics.

Product Design
While many new products are launched, not all succeed. This specialisation deals with the design and development of new or improved products. The focus is on the processes used in Food Technology, the design of new products from a consumer perspective and on modelling new product concepts/processes and predictive quality control. You major in Food Process Engineering or Food Quality and Design.

Food Innovation and Management
This specialisation combines courses in Food Technology with courses in Management Studies. It is intended for students who wish to work on product development in small businesses or who plan to start their own business. You will do a thesis in Management Studies and an internship in one of the Food Technology groups.

Food Biotechnology and Biorefining
This specialisation focuses on using micro-organisms or enzymes in food production. During this specialisation, you will learn about processes that can be used for biorefinery or agricultural raw materials. The focus is on biotechnological food production. You major in Food Microbiology, Food Chemistry, Food Process Engineering.

Dairy Science and Technology
This specialisation focuses on the dairy production chain. Its core programme consists of dairy-related courses and several additional courses, such as Food Components and Health, Advanced Fermentation Science and Predicting Food Quality. During the second year, you complete a dairy-related thesis research project and internship.

Sustainable Food Process Engineering
This specialisation focuses on the development of processes that are more efficient in their use of resources. Thesis can be carried out under the supervision of one of the following groups: Food Process Engineering; Operations Research and Logistics; Biobased Chemistry and Technology; or Food Quality and Design.

European Masters Degree in Food Studies
This international specialisation is developed in cooperation with the universities of Cork (Ireland), Lund (Sweden) and Agro-Paris Tech (Paris, France) as well as with ten large industrial partners. For more information see: http://www.eurmscfood.nl.

Gastronomy
This specialisation focuses on the molecular science behind products and dishes used in small scale settings. Scientific insights are used to develop improved food preparation techniques. The cultural aspects of food will also receive attention. You major in Food Chemistry, Food Physics or Rural Sociology.

Sensory Science
This specialisation combines Food Technology with Nutrition and Health. You will work with products and humans in different contexts and study how sensory systems function, how this relates to products and how to analyse these aspects.

Your future career

Graduates find jobs with relative ease, especially in the Netherlands and Western Europe. Recent graduates found positions in the private sector (from small- and medium-sized companies to large multinationals), at Wageningen University or other universities as PhD students, and at research institutes domestically and abroad. Graduates also work in the field of process technology at innovation centres, innovative food companies or government agencies. Most achieve management positions.

Student Harmke Klunder
“It is rich in proteins, unsaturated fats, vitamins and is available in large quantities all over the world. You may conclude, ‘The ideal food ingredient.’ However, would you still think it was ideal if you knew it was made from insects? With three other students, we added insects to a third world food product, thereby winning an international competition from the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists). Malnutrition in Africa could be fought by enriching their daily porridge, sorghumpap, with protein-enhanced termites. As food ingredients technologist, it is possible to look beyond the products found on the shelves of the local supermarkets.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Safety
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. Read more

Food security: a global concern

There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. The Royal Society report Reaping the Benefits: science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture published in October 2009, provided the clearest evidence of the challenge of ensuring global food security during the next 50 years. Crop yields need to rise significantly, but in a manner that requires much lower dependency on chemical intervention and fertilisers.

Meeting the challenge of sustainable agriculture

This programme was developed in collaboration with the agricultural industry, government agencies including Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), and farmers and food manufacturers, to provide a multi-disciplinary training in sustainable agriculture and global food security. Research-led teaching in molecular plant pathology, plant sciences and microbiology is strongly supplemented by Rothamsted Research, North Wyke expertise in grassland management, soil science and sustainable farming systems. Leading social scientists also provide valuable input in rural land use and the rural economy. The combination of expertise in both arable and pastureland systems ensures a truly rounded learning experience.

The curriculum takes account of the key skills shortages in the UK to train highly skilled individuals who can enter government agencies, agriculture and food industries and fulfil very valuable roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security. The programme provides opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences including field trips.

Expert teaching

Teaching is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry. Scientific staff from Fera provide specialist lectures as part of the Crop Security module, members of the Plant Health Inspectorate cover field aspects of plant pathology, and a LEAF1 farmer addresses agricultural systems and the realities of food production using integrated farm management. In addition, teaching staff from the University and BBSRC Rothamsted-North Wyke will draw on material and experiences from their academic research and scientific links with industry.

Industrial and practical experience

All students will have opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences. Teaching visits will be made to the Plant Health Inspectorate in Cornwall to see quarantine management of Phytophthora, and to a local LEAF farm to review the challenges and approaches to food production in integrated farm management systems. You will gain specialised experience in practical science or policy making through a dissertation or project placement with external agencies. Defra and Fera, for example, are offering five dissertation and/or project placements annually.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of modules. The list of modules may include the following; Professional Skills; Research Project; Sustainable Land Use in Grassland Agriculture; Crop Security; Sustainable Livestock and Fisheries; Political Economy of Food and Agriculture and Research and Knowledge Transfer for Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see the website for an up to date list (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/foodsecurity/#Programme-structure)

Addressing a skills shortage to tackle global food security

The MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture curriculum has been designed in collaboration with the agricultural industry to tackle the skills shortage that exists in this vital interdisciplinary area. This programme will provide the highly skilled individuals required in government agencies, agriculture and food industries for critical roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security.

Global horizons

With food security and sustainable agriculture a global concern, opportunities for specialists in the areas of agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant improvement will be worldwide. By combining expertise across the natural, social and political sciences, this programme provides valuable interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in both arable and pastureland systems. Graduates will be prepared to take on the global challenges of food security and sustainable agriculture, being able to adapt to farming systems across the world and identify cross-disciplinary solutions to local agricultural problems.

Learning enhanced by industry

The programme is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry, with specialist lectures, teaching visits to observe the practical application of techniques, and industrial placement opportunities for project work or dissertations in practical science or policy making.

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The food industry is experiencing a skills gap in technical and product development roles, while also taking a leading role in driving a public health agenda and producing safe, tasty food which meet our nutritional needs. Read more

The food industry is experiencing a skills gap in technical and product development roles, while also taking a leading role in driving a public health agenda and producing safe, tasty food which meet our nutritional needs.

This course prepares you for technical and product development roles in the food industry with a strong emphasis on nutrition. It is aimed at students with a background in food science, nutrition, health and wellbeing, exercise science or biological sciences who wish to specialise in food and nutrition and acquire an in-depth understanding of how to apply nutrition principles to food product development and production.

You learn about food production and nutrition in an applied setting, developing core technical skills in our state of the art development kitchens, food and nutrition labs and sensory suite. You apply those practical skills to live briefs with commercial applications provided by our industrial partners such as Morrisons and Cranswick plc.

The course is based on three key strands:

  • a food strand in which you learn about food composition, food legislation and regulations and labelling, product development, food quality management and food technology.
  • a nutrition strand in which you learn about how we metabolise food, our nutritional needs and the impact of nutrition on health and diseases throughout the life cycle.
  • a professional and academic skills development strand in which you apply your learning to both academic research and commercial briefs.

Examples of academic research and commercial projects you work on include developing tasty healthy alternatives, understanding the impact of food labelling on consumer liking, developing a food product for a major food retailer partner (brief varies) or supporting local SMEs with food quality assurance systems. 

Course structure

Full-time without work placement – 12 months

Full-time with work placement – 18 to 24 months

Part time – 12 to 24 months

Core modules

  • developing food concepts and products (30 credits)
  • food processing safety and quality management (15 credits)
  • food chain (15 credits)
  • life-course approach to nutrition (30 credits)
  • nutritional physiology and biochemistry (15 credits)
  • work related learning (15 credits)
  • research methods (15 credits)
  • dissertation (45 credits)

Assessment

  • poster presentation
  • laboratory reports
  • literature reviews
  • product development portfolio
  • technical reports
  • examinations
  • dissertation

Employability

As a graduate from this course, career opportunities include:

  • food product development – in these roles, you liaise with other functions (marketing, technical, chefs) to develop new attractive products meeting specific briefs.
  • nutrition in the food industry – you may inform briefs to develop products which meet specific nutritional requirements or assess the nutritional quality of existing product ranges.
  • food labelling and food regulation – consumers make informed choices about their food consumption based on the information, such as health and nutrition claims, provided on food packages. These are often regulated. You design the food labelling and nutritional information in accordance to current regulations.
  • procurement and food supplier management – you interact and liaise with suppliers to ensure a safe, sustainable, and ethical food chain.
  • food quality management – you work on any aspect of quality assurance, quality control and management systems to ensure that food safety, the number one priority of the food industry, is not compromised.


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MPhil supervision covers a number of topics supported by research active academic staff. We conduct research in all areas of food and society, including subjects which require collaboration between the social and natural sciences, and translate research into policy recommendations. Read more
MPhil supervision covers a number of topics supported by research active academic staff. We conduct research in all areas of food and society, including subjects which require collaboration between the social and natural sciences, and translate research into policy recommendations.

Our research primarily involves food systems, food consumption and food marketing:
-Consumer studies in food, food provisioning and behaviour change
-Perceived risk associated with food and food production
-Food supply chains and territorial development
-International political economy of food and agriculture
-Risk-benefit communication
-Acceptance of novel food and technologies within the value chain

Opportunities are available for postgraduate research in the following areas.

Understanding and measuring societal and individual responses to risks and benefits
-Food, nutrition and healthy dietary choices
-Sustainable consumption and the reduction of food waste
-Food safety and authenticity throughout the supply chain
-Emerging food technologies

Developing new methodologies for assessing socio-economic impacts of food risks and communication strategies and other public health interventions related to food choice
-Systematic review
-Evidence synthesis
-Systems thinking
-Bayesian networks
-Rapid evidence assessment

Employing qualitative and quantitative methodologies to understand attitudes and behaviours related to food
-Microbiological food hazards
-Personalised nutrition
-Food authenticity
-Societal and consumer responses to emerging food production technologies
-Behaviour change in relation to food
-Food waste

Stakeholder analysis and effectiveness of public engagement
-Research agenda setting
-Policy and governance, in the area of emerging food technologies
-Food and agricultural policy issues

Integrating social and natural science into the development of predictive models of food security to provide evidence for policy translation in the agrifood sector.
-Bayesian networks
-Systems thinking

Delivery

We offer a number of different routes to a research degree qualification, including full-time and part-time supervised research projects. We attract postgraduates via non-traditional routes, including mature students and part-time postgraduates undertaking study as part of their continuing professional development. Off-campus (split) research is also offered, which enables you to conduct trials in conditions appropriate to your research programme.

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This course will provide you with an in-depth specialisation in organic farming and food production systems and it is currently the only specialised MSc in organic and ecological farming in England. Read more
This course will provide you with an in-depth specialisation in organic farming and food production systems and it is currently the only specialised MSc in organic and ecological farming in England. You will learn and test the latest approaches in the integrated delivery of soil, crop and livestock, and food supply chain management.

Through a combination of lectures, field trips, seminars, practical classes and research projects you will develop advanced knowledge and skills in:
-Managing organic farming and food production units or businesses in different macroclimatic, agronomic and market contexts
-Agronomic approaches used in organic/biological/ecological/sustainable food production systems
-Underlying principles and standards of organic/biological/ecological/sustainable food production, processing and retailing/marketing systems
-Applied and strategic research underpinning the development of organic and other sustainable farming and food production systems
-A wide range of analytical laboratory methods

You will have the opportunity to attend a 10-day field trip as part of the module on Mediterranean perennial crop production systems in Crete, Greece. The trip is organised in collaboration with ecological farming experts from the Greek National Science Foundation (NAGREF).

As part of your studies you will also undertake a major project, similar to one you might experience in the workplace. You will be supported through training in designing and delivering a laboratory project or field-based investigation. You will collect, analyse and interpret data to produce a thesis reporting your investigation and results in a critical manner.

This research project and thesis may be undertaken at the University, in industry, in Crete as part of existing Nafferton Ecological Farming Group research and development projects, or in another country.

Our staff

You will benefit from being taught by lecturers who are industry experienced and research active. Our research in integrated agricultural production focuses on soil science, plant science and ecology, spanning a range of scales from: pot – plot – farm – landscape.

Strategic research embraces work on:
-Soil quality
-Rhizosphere function
-Plant-soil feedback
-Soil-carbon dynamics
-Nutrient cycling

Applied research addresses issues of:
-Climate change mitigation (including biofuels)
-Ecological (organic) farming systems
-Low-input crop systems
-Agriculture-environment interactions

Professor Carlo Leifert is the Degree Programme Director for MSc in Organic Farming and Food Production Systems. Carlo is a member of the Food Security Network in the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability (NIReS) and is part of the Nafferton Ecological Farming Group (NEFG). He currently manages EU and DEFRA funded projects focused on improving resource efficiency, productivity and food quality and safety in organic and 'low input' crop and livestock production systems.

Delivery

The course is taught in a block format with a six-week block and then two-week teaching blocks.

You will be taught through:
-Lectures
-Seminars
-Practical and field classes
-Tutorials
-Case studies
-Small group discussions

You will be expected to undertake independent study outside of these structured sessions. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed through written examinations, coursework, presentations and your final major project.

You can also study through the Credit Accumulation Transfer Scheme (CATS). This allows us to award postgraduate level qualifications using credit-bearing stand-alone modules as 'building blocks' towards a qualification. This means that the credits from modules undertaken within a five-year period can be 'banked' towards the award of a qualification.

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This MSc combines the principles of sustainable development with an examination of the various systems of food production in the context of providing a secure supply to meet the ever-changing requirements of a growing world population. Read more
This MSc combines the principles of sustainable development with an examination of the various systems of food production in the context of providing a secure supply to meet the ever-changing requirements of a growing world population.

This course is ideal for those looking for a career in production, policy, and sustainable development focusing on food or resource consumption in agriculture.

The principal aim is to enable you to gain the specialised knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to contribute effectively and ethically to strategic decision making, opinion forming and operational management for the sustainable development of agricultural and food supply systems.

The following themes underpin the course:
• Human exploitation of the Earth's resources and the global implications of human development
• The ecological basis for sustainable natural resource utilisation, including agriculture
• The role and function of local, national and global institutions, policies and conventions in relation to development, resource exploitation, social, cultural, ethical and inter-generation considerations
• The application of development paradigms, models and tools to build capacity within communities, institutions and individuals

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two years.

You will study five core modules and three elective modules, followed by the Research Project on a topic related to one of the key themes of the course. The Research Project is introduced in January to be carried out over the summer and submitted at the end of September. It will be presented as a review of the topic and as a research paper.

In addition to lectures, you will participate in case studies, seminars and management projects. This approach fosters teamwork and complements individual study and student learning.

You will gain a broader understanding of relevant issues through knowledge acquisition, intellectual enquiry, debate, and team/individual research. The course will provide a learning environment that encourages you to explore factors influencing sustainability while at the same time reflecting on your own actions and attitudes, and those of others. Furthermore, several team projects are developed throughout the course, which include: production of a magazine or podcast and organisation of a national conference.

There are two entry points to the programme, either in September or in January.

September entry

Students will study four modules in the autumn term followed by four modules in the spring term, and complete their Research Project by the end of September.

January entry

Students will study four modules in the spring term, complete their Research Project by the end of September, and study four modules in the autumn term.

Modules

• 4038a Integrated Agricultural Systems
• 4040 Sustainable Management of Soil and Water
• 4075 Research Project
• 4080 Development Project Management
• 4081 Agricultural and Rural Policy
• 4201 Poverty and Food Security

Plus choice of THREE elective modules:

• 4202 Sustainable Agricultural Intensification
• 4203 Small Scale Farming and Local Food Supply
• 4082 Natural Resource Management
• 4083 Climate Change and Development
• 4084 Tourism and Development
• 4238 Integrated Organic Systems

Modules will be taught in 10 week blocks.

Career prospects

MSc Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security graduates have gone on to enter production, policy, and research and consultancy careers in the agricultural and food quality sector, within:

• International organisations
• Government departments
• NGOs
• Research institutes
• Universities
• Commercial companies worldwide

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The Sustainable Smart Cities Dual Master’s program from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (USA) and Staffordshire University (UK) is a unique professional postgraduate program that provides an inter-disciplinary grounding in the principles, application and key technologies required to develop sustainable smart cities. Read more
The Sustainable Smart Cities Dual Master’s program from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (USA) and Staffordshire University (UK) is a unique professional postgraduate program that provides an inter-disciplinary grounding in the principles, application and key technologies required to develop sustainable smart cities.

Delivered by experienced faculty at both UAB and Staffordshire University, this genuinely international course will equip you with the knowledge, skills and critical thinking to assess, design and implement sustainable smart cities strategies across the globe.

Get two Master's degrees

As a Dual Award you will receive two Master’s degrees, one from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and one from Staffordshire University. Upon successful completion of the Master’s programme you will be awarded the following degrees:

MEng Sustainable Smart Cities (UAB)

MSc Sustainable Smart Cities (SU)

The course offers a broad curriculum covering sustainability theory, sustainable urban development, low carbon and renewable energy systems, green infrastructure, natural resource management, health and liveability, transport and mobility, big data analytics and smart technologies.

Course content

The Dual Master's in Sustainable Smart Cities is delivered via ten modules:

Principles of Sustainable Development (UAB)
Drivers of sustainable smart cities (i.e. climate change, population growth, resource scarcity, etc) and the principles of sustainable development.

Introduction to Sustainable Smart Cities (SU)
Sustainable urban planning and smart growth, engaging with smart citizens, sustainable governance and creating sustainable economic development.

Low Carbon and Renewable Energy Systems (SU)
Low carbon and renewable energy technologies, renewable energy integration and smart grids.

Managing Natural Resources and Sustainable Smart Cities (SU)
Water, waste and carbon management, pollution prevention, climate adaptation and resilience and integrated environmental systems management.

Green Infrastructure and Transportation (UAB)
Public and open space design, principles of urban design and smart sustainable mobility and transportation.

Green Buildings (UAB)
Smart buildings and infrastructure, principles of sustainable construction, sustainable building materials, building and energy management systems and standards and rating systems.

Health & Liveability (UAB)
Genomics, health informatics, designing for well-being:, environmental justice and food smart cities.

Smart Technologies for Cities & Buildings (SU)
Internet of things, remote sensing and communication technologies at individual building, neighbourhood and city-scale.

Big Data & Smart Cities (SU)
Big data platforms and cloud computing, urban informatics, GIS and spatial analysis, measuring impact and data visualization.

Research Methods & Project Planning (UAB & SU)
Introduction to research methods and the principles of project planning to enable students to plan for their capstone project.

Capstone Research Project (UAB & SU)
You will design and implement a piece of research that will enable you to reflect on the knowledge and skills which you have learned during your taught modules and apply them to a real world problem or issue. This research may draw on the practical and work-related experiences of the student.

You will have an opportunity to present their capstone project findings at the annual Sustainable Smart Cities Research Symposium hosted by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Staffordshire University.

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Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Read more

Introduction

Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Seafood products are provided by both aquaculture and capture fisheries and are one of the most highly traded food products globally. Including seafood in our daily diet provides an affordable source of macro and micronutrients required for optimal human health and development.
This course is designed to introduce the global issues affecting seafood production and trading, and will promote an understanding of the key factors affecting aquatic food production, post-harvest protocols, post-mortem metabolic events and microbial/chemical processes key for food safety and quality. Sensory assessment and shelf-life extension technologies will also be covered. The course will also examine other key issues in seafood trading such as traceability systems, certifications as well as the impact of governance and legislation on the global seafood sector.
This is the only aquatic food security MSc currently available in the UK. It will comprehensively follow the food chain from production through to consumer health and welfare.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Rachel Norman

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

This course shares some modules with the MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture and there is flexibility within the system to change the degree title depending on what advanced modules are taken. The course is divided into four taught modules, containing 18 subject areas or topics, and a single Research Project module.

Delivery and assessment

In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both supervisors and an external examiner.

Modes of study

The course is available on a block-release basis (by selecting individual or a series of modules) over a period not exceeding five academic years.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

This MSc brings a unique perspective to the expertise that already exists in Stirling on global seafood production. It is the only MSc in the UK that focusses on how seafood can contribute to global food security.
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries and this will provide students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector.
We also have links within Asia and Europe which will allow the opportunity to undertake the Research Project overseas.

Academic strengths

The Institute of Aquaculture has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and reducing the environmental impact of these activities. In addition, we have recently invested in new posts in Aquatic Food Security whose activities also include research into food safety and quality post harvest, aquatic animal nutrition, as well as developing mathematical models of production systems. We therefore have expertise that covers the whole production cycle from farm to fork.
The Institute of Aquaculture is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and is one of only a handful of institutions devoted to aquatic food security. The goal is to develop and promote aquatic food security building on the Institute staff expertise in sustainable aquatic animal production.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Demand for well qualified postgraduates to contribute to food production and the supply chain will continue to increase in line with demand to double food production over the coming decades. This course provides each student with the appropriate knowledge and practical experience important for a career in aquatic food security. The course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Employability
This course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Industry connections
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries which provides students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector. We also have links within Asia and Europe which allows the opportunity to undertake the research project overseas.

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This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. Read more
This course embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of food authenticity and sustainability within an increasingly globalised food industry. You will gain an in-depth understanding of regional, national, and international standards in regulatory processes, and the role of public institutions and policy makers in delivering safe, quality foods to consumers.

This course is designed for graduates and those working in the agri-food industries who are seeking to advance their knowledge and understanding of food safety and quality management, and progress their professional careers.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two years.

You will study eight modules, followed by the Research Project, carried out over the summer to be submitted in September. It will be presented as a review paper and as a research paper.

If you do not wish to undertake the Research Project may choose to take a Postgraduate Diploma following successful completion of eight modules.

You will learn through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, group workshops and seminars, case studies, individual and student-led research, group projects, and field studies

Students are encouraged to participate in the RAU Enterprise Scheme where they can develop their entrepreneurial skills towards starting their own business.

This course is available to start in either September or January.

September entry

Students will study four modules in the autumn term followed by four modules in the spring term, and complete their Research Project by the end of September.

January entry

Students will study four modules in the spring term, complete their Research Project by the end of September, and study four modules in the autumn term.

Modules

• 4014 Food Chain
• 4075 Research Project
• 4206 Fundamentals of Food Science
• 4207 Systems for Food Safety Management
• 4209 Sustainability and the Food industry
• 4228 New Product Development (NPD) in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4237 The Politics and Policies of Food Assurance

Plus choice of TWO modules, selected from:

• 4040 Sustainable Management of Soil and Water
• 4084 Tourism and Development
• 4110 Fisheries and Aquaculture Management
• 4201 Poverty and Food Security
• 4211 Global Red Meat Chains
• 4212 Global White Meat Chains
• 4213 Global Dairy Food Chain
• 4238 Integrated Organic Systems

Modules will be taught in 10 week blocks.

Assessment

Modules are assessed through written examinations and coursework, including case study analysis, essay writing, oral and poster presentations, and assessed seminars. For the new product development (NPD) module, students are assessed against a food product which they develop and produce in small teams. To complete this module, students are given training in the CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety for Manufacturing, which is beneficial to them post-graduation.

Career prospects

Graduates will be equipped with the education and industry experience to progress their career and become food safety and quality management professionals within:

• An international institution – UN (World Food Programme), IFAD, FAO, IFPRI etc.
• Government and statutory bodies – Defra, DflD, FSA etc.
• Business and industry – major agricultural and food supply companies, consultancy
• NGOs – local food associations, aid and development organisations
• Academia and research – lecturer, PhD

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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NEW PROGRAMME. The Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) is excited to announce the launch of a new programme entitled. Read more

NEW PROGRAMME

The Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) is excited to announce the launch of a new programme entitled MSc Agroecology, Water and Food Sovereignty (title subject to validation), which will commence in September 2018. The programme will encompass enhanced knowledge from our now larger team of experts and will be informed by recent research. This will replace the MSc in Agroecology and Food Security which will run for the last time in the September 2017-18 academic year. Please check our website for details which will be published very soon.

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Food security is of critical concern globally, and the development of food systems that provide food of high quality and quantity in a sustainable way, is now a research and policy priority.

The MSc in Agroecology and Food Security is designed to equip professionals and graduates with the knowledge to critically analyse and assess the relationships between agroecological food production and management, farming systems, climate change economics and the environment.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Run by Coventry University's Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) whose mission is to create resilient food systems worldwide, the course:

-Draws on the outstanding range of academic and practical expertise of CAWR staff plus world-renowned guest lecturers

-Is designed for students from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and from the natural and social sciences (e.g. previous experience of agriculture not necessary)

-Provides unique content in terms of its cutting edge focus on transforming the food system through alternative paradigms, concepts, and methodologies to enable real and equitable change

-Is based at the UK’s national centre for organic horticulture in 10 acres of organic gardens.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course will provide you with the knowledge of the major agricultural production systems found in different parts of the world and the main theoretical approaches to understanding contemporary food systems.

The course covers a range of subject areas including:

  • Food security; 
  • agroecological production systems; 
  • clean energy, climate and carbon; 
  • agroecological techniques and practices; 
  • stabilisation agriculture;
  • gender, food systems and natural resources; 
  • environmental impact assessment; 
  • ecological management and assessment;
  • international environmental law;
  • remote sensing and digital image analysis; 
  • project management.

For each module, teaching normally takes the form of weekly 'face-to-face' contact at the University (including lectures, workshops, seminars and exercises) throughout each semester, with associated directed and self directed study, which may be undertaken off-campus.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

All students undertake an individual research project, which may be associated with an appropriate organisation or company in the UK or overseas. Equipped with a detailed understanding of food systems and a range of appropriate practical skills your potential for employment will be strong.

Opportunities present themselves in national and international government agencies, non governmental policy, research and development organisations, the private sector including food companies and the farming sector.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.



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Students can choose to start in September, May or January. About the course. This Sustainable and Efficient Food Production postgraduate course centres on increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impact within the extensive pasture-based production sector. Read more

Students can choose to start in September, May or January

About the course

This Sustainable and Efficient Food Production postgraduate course centres on increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impact within the extensive pasture-based production sector. The programme provides flexible, accessible, postgraduate level training for people employed in the agri-food sector. Training comprises distance learning modules and work-based research projects. These are accessible as CPD or as credit-bearing units, which can be built towards a range of postgraduate qualifications.

Taught by experts at both Aberystwyth University (AU) and Bangor University (BU), the Sustainable and Efficient Food Production course offers you a highly vocational option. In the most recent joint submission to the Research Excellence Framework assessment (2014), the department was placed in the top 10 universities in the UK for research intensity and 78% of our research was world-leading or internationally excellent.

To achieve an MSc students must complete five optional modules (including up to three from BU) plus Research Methods and a Dissertation.

Course structure and content

Two to five years to complete a full MSc. 14 weeks for one module by distance learning Three intakes per year (January, May, September). Students will be eligible for a UK Student Loan if the course is completed in 3 years.

Core modules:

Dissertation

Research Methods

Optional modules - Choose any 5 from:

Contact Time

We have designed our training to be as accessible as possible, particularly for those in full time employment. Each topic comprises a 12-14 week distance learning module worth 20 credits which can be taken for your own continuing professional development or interest; or built towards a postgraduate qualification. The research elements of our qualifications are carried out in your work place with regular academic supervision. The training is web-based which means that as long as you have access to a reasonable broadband connection (i.e. are able to stream videos such as on YouTube), you can study where and when best suits you. Learning material includes podcast lectures, e-group projects, guided reading, interactive workbooks and discussion forums, as well as assignments and e-tutorials. By signing a re-registration form each year you will have access to e-journals and library resources for the full five years.

Assessment

There are no exams within this programme. Taught modules are assessed via course work and forum discussion.



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**Accredited by the Institute of Food Science & Technology (IFST), the leading qualifying body for food professionals in Europe.**. Read more
**Accredited by the Institute of Food Science & Technology (IFST), the leading qualifying body for food professionals in Europe.**

This programme provides graduates with an insight into measures that are required to provide a supply of safe and wholesome food to consumers globally. A wide spectrum of food safety and quality management issues are addressed following the farm to fork approach.

Topics covered include: good governance and national control systems; food inspection and testing services; legislation and private standards; and management of food safety and quality within the supply chain as well as in hotels and restaurants.

Students also acquire a knowledge of the design and management of safety and quality management systems based upon risk analysis, e.g. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP), ISO 9001:2008 designed to meet the requirements of national and international legislation and private standards. Students sit the Royal Society for Public Health Level 3 Award in HACCP for Food Manufacturing and are also given membership of the Institute of Food Science and Technology.

Individual courses are offered on a stand-alone basis. These are attended by professionals working in the food industry. Lectures are also delivered by experts currently working in the food sector. This gives our postgraduate students the opportunity to interact with and learn from a range of practitioners.

Students have the opportunity to apply for short placements in the food sector, which provides them with the all important experience that they need to demonstrate when applying for jobs.

The aims of the programme are:

- To prepare graduates for careers in the national and international food chain, e.g. food businesses, consultancy, research and development

- To equip graduates with the knowledge and skills that will enhance their employability

- To enrich graduates understanding of the dynamics of food safety and quality management systems and the context under which they operate at national and international levels.

Visit the website http://www.gre.ac.uk/pg/engsci/foodsaf

Food and Agricultural Sciences

The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) has an internationally-recognised academic reputation and provides taught postgraduate courses in a wonderful environment for students.

NRI provide research, consultancy, training and advisory services to underpin sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction. The majority of our activities focus on the harnessing of natural and human capital for the benefit of developing countries, though much of our expertise has proved to be of growing relevance to industrialised nations.

What you'll study

- Food Safety (30 credits)
- Food Safety and Quality Management (30 credits)
- Research Methods (15 credits)
- Research Project (MSc only) (60 credits)
- Two or three optional courses chosen from a range of themes running across the programme (45 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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- Compulsory modules. Read more

MSc in Sustainable Development Energy

- Compulsory modules
Interrogating Sustainable Development – This module will introduce you to, or develop your knowledge across, areas such as the history and genesis of sustainable development, an understanding of earth systems science, the social and economic systems that shape humanity and impact on the environment, and an understanding of how these systems interact.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Sciences – This module will introduce you to various quantitative and statistical approaches used to analyse social processes and phenomena and how to apply these in sustainable development.

Master Class in Sustainable Development – This module will enable an in-depth study of a number of areas. These areas will be investigated via group work with the research being initiated by invited lecturers from the appropriate areas.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Sciences – This module will provide you with the necessary skills of dealing with qualitative data from interviews, participant observations, questionnaires and other sources.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Help others directly through development or aid work.

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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UCC have developed a Masters in Engineering Science in Sustainable Energy, in recognition of the growing international market for sustainable energy systems and the shortage of qualified engineers. Read more
UCC have developed a Masters in Engineering Science in Sustainable Energy, in recognition of the growing international market for sustainable energy systems and the shortage of qualified engineers. This programme is open to Engineering graduates of all disciplines with an 8 month programme option leading to a Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Energy.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr26/

Course Details

In Part I students take modules to the value of 50 credits and a Preliminary Research Report in Sustainable Energy (NE6008) to the value of 10 credits. Part II consists of a Dissertation in Sustainable Energy (NE6009) to the value of 30 credits which is completed over the summer months.

Part I

Students take 50 credits as follows:

NE3002 Energy in Buildings (5 credits)
EE3011 Power Electronic Systems (5 credits)
EE4010 Electrical Power Systems (5 credits)
NE3003 Sustainable Energy (5 credits)
NE4006 Energy Systems in Buildings (5 credits)
NE6003 Wind Energy (5 credits)
NE6004 Biomass Energy (5 credits)
NE6005 Ocean Energy (5 credits)
NE6006 Solar and Geothermal Energy (5 credits)
NE6007 Energy Systems Modelling (5 credits)

Depending on the background of the student, the Programme Coordinator may decide to replace some of the above taught modules from the following list of modules up to a maximum of 20 credits:

CE4001 The Engineer in Society (Law, Architecture and Planning) (5 credits)
EE3012 Electromechanical Energy Conversion (5 credits)
EE4001 Power Electronics, Drives and Energy Conversion (5 credits)
EE4002 Control Engineering (5 credits)
EE6107 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives (5 credits)
ME6007 Mechanical Systems (5 credits)
NE4008 Photovoltaic Systems (5 credits)
PE6003 Process Validation and Quality (5 credits)

In addition, all students must take 10 credits as follows:

NE6008 Preliminary Research Report in Sustainable Energy (10 credits)

Part II

NE6009* Dissertation in Sustainable Energy (30 credits)

*must be submitted on a date in September as specified by the Department

Detailed Entry Requirements

Candidates must have a BE(Hons) or BEng (Hons) Degree or equivalent engineering qualification, with a minimum grade 2H2. However, candidates with equivalent academic qualifications and suitable experience may be accepted subject to the approval of College of Science, Engineering and Food Science. In all cases, the course of study for each candidate must be approved by the Programme Coordinator.
Candidates, for whom English is not their primary language, should possess an IELTS of 6.5 (or TOEFL equivalent) with no less than 6.0 in each individual category.

Candidates from Grandes Écoles Colleges are also eligible to apply if they are studying a cognate discipline in an ENSEA or EFREI Graduate School and are eligible to enter the final year (M2) of their programme.

Assessment

- Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Energy -

Students who pass but fail to achieve the requisite grade of 50% across the taught modules and the Preliminary Research Report will be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Energy. Candidates passing Part I of the programme who do not wish to proceed to Part II may opt to be conferred with a Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Energy.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century. Read more

Graduates will be equipped with the analytical and communication skills to contribute to humanity’s efforts to achieve and sustain food security during the 21st century.

This programme is not suitable for applicants pursuing a career in food science or food safety/hygiene or related areas. Please read the programme description and ensure you understand the nature of the programme before you apply. Applicants who do not show a clear understanding of the programme will not be accepted.

Food security has become a critically important issue for societies around the globe. Interactions between demographics, changes in diet, trade liberalisation, an increased focus on conservation, technological innovations including GM crops, the impact of climate change and new responses to climate change resource limitations (particularly in terms of energy, water and nutrients) all affect food security.

With such a rapid growth in this area, there is an increasing demand for qualified experts to contribute to policy creation and legislation in food production and the supply chain.

This unique MSc offers students the scope and multidisciplinary approach to address all of these issues, as well as an understanding of the technical, agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC).

Applicants who applied after 12 December 2016 receiving an offer of admission, either unconditional or conditional, may be required to pay a tuition fee deposit. Please see the fees and costs section for more information.

Programme structure

This MSc programme consists of six taught courses over two semesters, and an individual dissertation project of about 12,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically will be:

  • Frameworks to Assess Food Security
  • Sustainability of Food Production
  • Interrelationships in Food Systems
  • Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses.

  • Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
  • Ecosystem Services 1: Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
  • Foundations in Ecological Economics
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • Integrated Resource Management
  • Principles of Environmental Sustainability
  • Soil Protection and Management
  • Understanding Environment and Development
  • Marine Systems and Policies
  • Applications in Ecological Economics
  • Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
  • Integrated Resource Planning
  • Interrelationships in Food Systems
  • Land Use/Environmental Interactions
  • Case Studies in Sustainable Development
  • Ecosystem Services 2: Ecosystem Values and Management
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Soil Science Concepts and Application

Field trip

The programme typically includes a field trip providing an opportunity to apply some of the principles of food security to real world scenarios. In previous years, the tour has taken place in locations such as Italy, Morocco and Kenya.

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to:

  • provide a broad understanding of agronomic, environmental, economic and socio-political factors that influence food security
  • apply scientific information and methods in the analysis of complex problems
  • formulate a research problem and independently carry out the research needed to produce an appropriate solution in a range of scientific or policy contexts
  • enhance their skills in specialist topics related to food security

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme typically go on to work in government and non-governmental agencies as well as international bodies and businesses where they can utilise the invaluable, and highly prized, skills they have acquired on the programme, such as food security assessment.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.



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