• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Dundee Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Dundee Featured Masters Courses
"sonic" AND "arts"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Sonic Arts)

We have 45 Masters Degrees (Sonic Arts)

  • "sonic" AND "arts" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 45
Order by 
Your programme of study. If you enjoy creating sound and experiment with the type of sounds you can make within a musical framework Sonic Arts provides a discipline in which you can explore and develop your knowledge of sonic arts and sound technology. Read more

Your programme of study

If you enjoy creating sound and experiment with the type of sounds you can make within a musical framework Sonic Arts provides a discipline in which you can explore and develop your knowledge of sonic arts and sound technology. Digital music started to make an impression on society in the pop world but it is now increasingly used across all genres of music to augment the experience for audiences worldwide. Creative practitioners can find niche areas of work which they become known for producing or they can work across the genres and become known for their creative ability in producing recordings, re-recording music, finding a novel creative sound and so on.

You can progress your musical knowledge and range directly from studying at undergraduate level or you may have a combination of training and a portfolio of work which you can continue to progress. You get a wide range of opportunities to advance your skills, experimentation and musicology at Aberdeen to then present a wide ranging portfolio of sonic arts creativity. This area of music is a growth area of the industry due to the wide ranging effects which can enhance any type of musical performance across the recording and performance industry, into theatre, outdoor events, and more. Aberdeen provides the type of environment where you can build your portfolio of work and progress your skills whilst refining your creativity.

The programme prepares you for a career in creative industries in artistic, commercial and academic areas where creative approaches to sound are in demand, offering you a comprehensive overview of sonic arts.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Composing with Sound

Optional

  • Music Research Seminar Series
  • Introduction to Visual Culture and Theory
  • Art and Business
  • The Museum Idea
  • Northern Worlds

Semester 2

  • Compulsory
  • Electroacoustic Composition: the Voice and the Machine
  • Sound Design for New Media

Optional

  • Words and Music
  • Contemporary European Opera
  • Locations and Dislocations: the Role of Place in Literature
  • Curating an Exhibition
  • Developing A Theory of Practice: :Learning and Museum
  • Northern People and Cultures
  • Roads: Mobility, Movement, Migration
  • Cultural Property Issues, Law, Art and Museums
  • Oral Traditions

Semester 3

  • Research Project in Sonic Arts

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You study in an excellent music department taught by internationally acclaimed professional musicians
  • You study in a music department with a heritage of music and composition since  Kings College in 1495
  • Graduates from Aberdeen go on to employment in the creative industries globally within film, games, broadcasting, theatre and entertainment

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time 24 Months Part Time
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



Read less
The programme covers multiple aspects of sound, aesthetics and technology and takes advantage of the unique studio and performance facilities at the Sonic Arts Research Centre. Read more
The programme covers multiple aspects of sound, aesthetics and technology and takes advantage of the unique studio and performance facilities at the Sonic Arts Research Centre.

Students gain an insight into the sonic arts alongside a foundation in the artistic and technological components of the field. They can also focus on current developments in sonic arts by choosing one of the following routes: Interaction Design, Sound Design and Composition, Computational Acoustics, Performance and Spatial Audio.

The programme culminates in a double module comprising a dissertation, project or portfolio, where students work one-on-one with a supervisor.

Read less
The MMus in Sonic Arts is an opportunity to explore a wide range of creative approaches to studio-based music, including fixed-media composition, improvisation systems, sound art installation and composition for video/film. Read more

The MMus in Sonic Arts is an opportunity to explore a wide range of creative approaches to studio-based music, including fixed-media composition, improvisation systems, sound art installation and composition for video/film.

You have full access to the Electronic Music Studios, which offers advanced facilities for electro-acoustic composition, multi-channel work and live/interactive performance.

You develop a rigorous conceptual framework for your creative practice, and engage critically with contemporary ideas and debates in sound art and computer music. As part of your studies you may choose from a range of options that encompass interactive/generative music, film music and film-making.

Studio composers taking this pathway may elect to take options in notation-based composition, providing they have the requisite prior experience.

Collaborative and interdisciplinary projects, in conjunction with other academic departments and/or external organisations, are also facilitated and encouraged.

The pathway is particularly useful for students wishing to pursue studio and computer-based research or professionals seeking to develop their expertise in technology-based creative practice.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Option modules

You choose two modules from a selection that currently includes:

Creative project



Read less
About the course. Study with experts at the cutting-edge of technical, creative and theoretical knowledge in this rapidly evolving area of study. Read more

About the course

Study with experts at the cutting-edge of technical, creative and theoretical knowledge in this rapidly evolving area of study. The course focuses upon the relationship between technology and creative practice, training musical students to use software tools and enabling students with a solid music technology background to investigate creative opportunities.

Initial intensive training in the knowledge and methods of the field at the start of the course is followed by opportunities for increasingly independent research and exploration.

We take a broad and inclusive view of the sonic arts; embracing anything from sound installations to free-improvised performances, computer programming through to fine art practice, art in which sound is the medium through to that in which sound plays a supporting role.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

Adrian Moore and Adam Stansbie are both highly experienced and internationally recognised composers whose work is widely performed, published and prized.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

The course is informed by new technologies and methods of working. There are seminars, laboratory-based demonstrations and individual tutorials.

Assessment takes a variety of forms such as problem-based assignments and the completion of a creative portfolio.



Read less
Develop your theoretical understanding, technical skills and creative practice in the emerging field of sonic arts on a course that aims to challenge preconceptions surrounding musical composition, performance and sound art. Read more

Develop your theoretical understanding, technical skills and creative practice in the emerging field of sonic arts on a course that aims to challenge preconceptions surrounding musical composition, performance and sound art.

You will explore varied approaches to sound practice through exposure to cutting edge ideas and techniques in the areas of electro-acoustic music, spatial sound, contemporary music thinking and sound interactivity. You will have the chance to investigate new software and hardware tools, inquire into the ideas and practical work of the most influential contemporary music thinkers, such as John Cage, Pierre Schaeffer and Brian Eno, and produce a variety of creative artefacts to begin building your own music and sound repertoire.

The course is delivered through a series of lectures, seminars and workshops by a team of internationally acclaimed practitioners dedicated to helping you achieve your goals in this field.

Course Benefits

You will be taught by subject experts such as composer Dr Nikos Stavropoulos, whose work is regularly awarded at international competitions and who has presented around the world, and Kingsley Ash, whose live performances and interactive installations feature at international events and major exhibition spaces around the country.

As well as working directly with your tutors, you will have the opportunity to interact with established artists through guest lectures and workshops and our artist in residence programme. Previous visiting artists have included BBC sound recordist, electronic music group UTAH Saints amd Twin Peaks sound designer Kim Cascone.

You will also have access to a suite of high quality, professional music studios, approved by JAMES - the accrediting body of the Music Producers' Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services.

Core Modules

  • Electro-Acoustic Music
  • Interfaces & Interactivity
  • Audio Cultures
  • Negotiated Skills Development
  • Audio-Visual Practice
  • Spatial Audio
  • Research Practice
  • Final Individual Project

Job Prospects

You will develop a broad range of technical and creative skills preparing you to enter a diverse variety of careers in the music and sound industry. You could work as a music and sound artist creating original tracks and multichannel installations or as a composer and sound designer for film, TV and interactive games.

  • Studio Composer
  • Sound Designer
  • Sound Artist
  • Performer


Read less
Music has a long history at the University of Calgary. Our faculty has always been actively engaged locally, nationally and internationally in a wide range of research interests and creative practices including. Read more
Music has a long history at the University of Calgary. Our faculty has always been actively engaged locally, nationally and internationally in a wide range of research interests and creative practices including: theory, composition, performance, conducting, electroacoustic media, musicology, music history, multimedia and sound spatialization, sonic arts and more. The School of Creative and Performing Arts holds over 80 concerts per year and boasts one of the premiere recital facilities in Western Canada: the Rozsa Centre`s Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall. The following graduate programs are offered in Music at the School of Creative and Performing Arts:

Composition MMus

This program emphasizes the development of an individual composition craft and a comprehensive knowledge of 20th and 21st century and contemporary techniques and repertoire. Students are encouraged to compose for various genres, ranging from chamber to interactive and electroacoustic music. In addition, candidates for the degree are expected to engage scholarly material in writing and public presentations.

Musicology MA

Our programs are research-based, leading to advanced work in both historical and systematic musicology. From critical theory to analysis, the study of genres, composers and styles, our program allows for narrowly focused research as well as the critical investigation of broad themes.

Sonic Arts MMus, PhD

Core skills in Sonic Arts are hands-on knowledge and expertise in the electroacoustic studio, involving audio, audio software and programming, and knowledge and understanding of the aesthetic basis of sonic arts, encompassing its history, repertoire and creative practice. Sonic Arts takes a multi-faceted approach, integrating aspects of composition, improvisation, performance, audio programming, sound design and theory.

Read less
Build on your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma and get the high-level music skills and critical perspective you need for a career in music or a related field. Read more

Build on your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma and get the high-level music skills and critical perspective you need for a career in music or a related field. This one-year Master's programme will further your knowledge in either composition, sonic arts or performance and is also designed to prepare you for the Doctor of Musical Arts.

Study at New Zealand's most prestigious music school and learn from world-class musicians and academics who are leaders in their fields.

Available subjects

Coursework

Choose 30 points worth of courses at 400 or 500 level. You'll need to select topics that explore critical perspectives relating to your creative work, such as aesthetics, performance practice and critical analysis. Your courses must contain substantial written components.

Thesis

You'll complete a 90-point creative research thesis on an approved topic of your choice.

Composition students will complete a portfolio of compositions or sound-based works, and a written report of between 10,000 and 20,000 words.

Performance students will express their research through one or two public recitals, and a written report of around 10,000 to 20,000 words.

Research proposal

You'll need to submit a research proposal within one month of enrolment for approval by the NZSM Postgraduate Committee. Performance students will express their research through one or two public recitals, and a written report of between 10,000 and 20,000 words.

Workload and duration

You'll normally complete your MMA within one year, but may take up to a year and six months from first enrolling. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete it.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week.



Read less
Study areas currently offered. Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music. The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film. Read more
Study areas currently offered:

Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music
The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at compositional techniques and approaches as a whole (through the core module in Composition).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in a chosen area of composition. Another aspect of the same area or a different approach to composition will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Additionally students will attend a core module in composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

Focuses on studies in composition and/or electroacoustic composition and/or sonic art.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MMus):

Consists of a portfolio comprising at least one substantial composition (with or without electroacoustics) or work of sonic art.

(Total of 60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Principal Subject Module: either Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts or Composing for Film (60 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Concepts of Composition (30 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Independent Special Study in either Composition, Composing for Film or Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts (20 credits)

Read less
MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation. Read more
MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation.

This programme is enhanced by a group of internationally active sound artists, composers and field recordists who curate and participate in the activities of the SARU (Sonic Art Research Unit) and the annual festival Audiograft. The weekly Listening Group complements the core provision and introduces you to the vibrant research culture around Sound Arts.

You will develop individual and collaborative practice-based work in a stimulating environment that encourages dialogue and growth as part of a reflective community. This is a good basis for the intensive, fascinating and challenging work that thrives in this supportive, innovative and creative context.

Why choose this course?

The School of Arts offers state-of-the-art technical facilities for Sound Arts and 24-hour studio access. This course is taught by leading Sound Arts practitioners creating ‘world-leading’ research as defined by the REF2014 (Research Excellence Framework). You will have access to expertise in sound art, field recording, electroacoustic composition, site-based practice, experimental composition and improvisation. Sound Arts is situated in an interdisicplinary context and you will work with students from Art & Design and Music.

The Sonic Art research Unit (SARU) and the annual ACE funded audiograft festival provide a stimulating environment for innovation and experimentation in your creative practice. Many of our Arts MA students progress to PhD study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include:
-Lectures and seminars held by staff on specialised topics.
-Team teaching in group seminars involving generic issues in research methodologies for practice based research.
-Feedback from staff during group feedback sessions, where staff make comments and provide you with constructive criticism and analysis of your work.
-Staff led group discussions arising out of your practical work presentations.
-Individual tutorials that address your individual research concerns.
-Specialised introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice based work.

Careers and professional development

Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practicing sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration.

Read less
The Musicology Masters at Glasgow presents a broad, multi-dimensional approach to Music as a key component of numerous contemporary cultural practices. Read more

The Musicology Masters at Glasgow presents a broad, multi-dimensional approach to Music as a key component of numerous contemporary cultural practices. Building on a thorough grounding in the methodological roots, you’ll be able to specialise in professional fields such as Sound and Music for Screen Media, Historically Informed Performance Practice, Popular Music Studies, Sonic Arts, and Creative Practice Research. A team of world-leading researchers collaborate to provide an up-to-date, interdisciplinary exploration of historiographical, analytical, sociological, and critical approaches, opening opportunities for reflection on a broad range of musical traditions, performing styles and recording media.

Why this programme

  • As a UNESCO City of Music, Glasgow is a unique centre of creative activity, from legendary music venues to classical orchestras and ensembles (e.g. Scottish Opera, BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra). Several of these ensembles contribute to our courses.
  • You’ll be taught by a highly diverse team of academics who collaborate closely across their distinct specialisms (i.e. History, Composition, Sonic Arts, Performance) in order to offer the most multi-dimensional critical approach to music in all its forms.
  • The School of Culture and Creative Arts, which also features world-leading research and practice in Film and TV Studies, Theatre Studies and History of Art, actively encourages interdisciplinary work, and offers numerous opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration. The School is also home to the Centre for Cultural Policy Research, known for world-leading research in creative industries and cultural policy.
  • Our facilities include a Concert Hall, three studios, an audio lab and several practice rooms. We have an excellent collection of modern and historical keyboard instruments including two Steinway Model D grand pianos, an 1840s Broadwood grand piano, a Classical forte-piano, and two harpsichords. Other instruments include a selection of percussion instruments, a consort of viols, Baroque strings, recorders, crumhorns and other wind instruments.
  • The Musicology programme offers you the chance to undertake a work placement in a musical, cultural or arts organisation.

Programme structure

TYou’ll take:

  • Three core courses
  • Three optional courses

You’ll also write a dissertation and have the chance to take a work placement in a music or arts organisation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Research Skills and Digital Musicology
  • Introduction to Musicology
  • Optional course

Semester 2: January to March

  • Current Issues in Musicology 
  • Optional course
  • Optional course

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Career prospects

This programme prepares students for careers in the music and creative industries as well as related fields, such as media and broadcasting. Additionally, this programme provides the necessary foundation for pursuing further research in musicology in the form of a PhD.



Read less
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

Read less
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

Read less
IN BRIEF. Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus. Enjoy excellent job prospects in a growing field. Tap into the expertise of world-class audio-engineering and acoustics researchers. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus
  • Enjoy excellent job prospects in a growing field
  • Tap into the expertise of world-class audio-engineering and acoustics researchers
  • Part-time study option
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

On this course, you’ll gain practical, theoretical and creative experience of sound engineering, music production and audio technology.

You’ll explore the design, manipulation and production of audio across many platforms, using our state-of-the-art audio-post recording, radio and TV studios to study a mix of sound engineering and theory modules.

The aim of the course is to develop the skills that you’ll need to create and deliver professional audio, whilst under pinning these skills with a sound theoretical background.

94% of our postgraduates go on to employment and/or further study within six months of graduating.DLHE 2009 and 2010

COURSE DETAILS

This course entails both practical based and theory modules. The modules are delivered in the recording studios, the audio technology suite, audio post production suite and lecture theatres.

DURATION

September start

MSc (one year full-time or up to three years part-time)

PgDip (nine months full-time or 18 months part-time)

January start

MSc (16 months full-time)

PgDip (one year full-time or up to two years part-time)

TEACHING

Teaching and learning involves a mix of lectures and practical sound engineering work, involving individual and group learning, There is an emphasis on motivated students' self-study.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment involves a mixture of practical work, report writing and project work. By the end of the course students will have built up a substantial portfolio of audio, video and new media work.

Assessment is approximately divided across the course as follows:

  • Practical work (30%)
  • Report/Assignment (35%)
  • Presentation (5%)
  • Dissertation - that may entail practical elements (30%)

FACILITIES

This degree is based in MediaCityUK,the new home for the BBC, ITV, Coronation Street and parts of the University of Salford. MediaCityUK is located at Salford Quays on the banks of Manchester's historic ship canal. The University has the first four floors of a new, purpose built facility that looks over the water to The Lowry theatre, Imperial War Museum North and the new Coronation Street set. ITV occupy the floors above us, with the three BBC buildings on one side of us and Peel Media Studios on the other.

A number of BBC departments are based at MediaCityUK, having moved from London, including BBC Breakfast, BBC Children's, BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC Future Media and Technology, BBC Learning, BBC Sport and BBC Academy. All of the BBC Manchester operations have also moved to MediaCityUK, including BBC Religion and Ethics, Current Affairs and the BBC Philharmonic.

For more information, check out the Salford MediaCityUK site and the main MediaCityUK site.

Here is a summary of our relevant facilities at MediaCityUK:

  • Audio Post Production and Audio Suite - Mac-based suites that run a range of audio software, including Pro Tools, Reason, Cubase and Reaktor. The Post Production suite has a Digidesign Icon D-command desk running Pro Tools.
  • TV Studios - full professional specification studios. Studio A has separate vision and audio control rooms. Studio B allows for a full 3D virtual studio.
  • Radio Studios - two radio studios, including a small studio space.
  • Computer Suites - a range of Mac and PC based computer rooms for general computer work.

On the main campus, we also have a Pro Tools equipped studio recording complex consisting of four control rooms and recording areas. Please see this brochure for more detailed information brochure.

EMPLOYABILITY

The wide range of skills provided on this course will enhance your employability. Possible career paths include: audio manufacturer research and design, broadcast engineer in audio for radio or TV, audio and visual design and installation, education, interactive media and sonic arts.

Possible career paths include:

  • Audio manufacturer research and design
  • Broadcast engineer in audio for radio or TV
  • Recording studio, live sound engineer, music production
  • Music technology retail
  • Theatre or film audio engineer
  • Musical instrument technology
  • Audio and visual design and installation
  • Education
  • Interactive Media
  • Sonic arts

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Staff have strong links with industry either through collaborative R&D projects with industry through the Acoustics Research Centre and our commercial test laboratories.  Our research department is a Centre of Excellence for BBC Research.

FURTHER STUDY

Some students could go on to study a PhD at our world-class Acoustics Research Centre. We have been carrying out acoustics and audio research for over 30 years. Our research is funded by research councils, government bodies, and industry. It has fed into audio products that companies make and sell worldwide, as well as regulations and standards used in the UK, Europe and beyond. We are also involved in public engagement - getting more people aware of and interested in acoustic science and engineering.



Read less
Goldsmiths’ Department of Music has a lively and varied research base, large postgraduate community, active performing tradition, and offers proximity to London’s resources. Read more

Goldsmiths’ Department of Music has a lively and varied research base, large postgraduate community, active performing tradition, and offers proximity to London’s resources.

Staff research interests are correspondingly diverse and wide-ranging, and we offer research supervision in any of these areas of specialism.

Our MPhil pathways

You can register for any one of the following:

  • Written thesis of up to 100,000 words (MPhil: 60,000 words). We offer supervision in many areas of music studies.
  • Composition. Examined by portfolio of compositions, together with a 20,000 word commentary (MPhil: 12,000 words).
  • Performance. Examined by a full-length recital, together with a related 50,000-word thesis (MPhil: 30,000 words).
  • Sonic Arts: Examined by portfolio of practice, and a 40,000-60,000 word commentary (MPhil: 20,000-30,000 words). Portfolios may include recordings, documentation of installation work, or other sonic arts work.
  • Practice-Based Research in Music: Examined by portfolio of practice, and a 30,000-60,000 word written element. Portfolios may include recordings of composition; documentation of performance; ethnographic film; web-based and digital humanities projects; documentation of installation; other practice-based research.

Research supervision

You are assigned members of staff qualified to supervise your research throughout your period of registration. Supervision involves regular meetings throughout the period of study, and involves the development of an intensive intellectual relationship between you and your supervisor.

Facilities

You have access to Goldsmiths’ Graduate School, containing an open-access computer room, a student common room and seminar room for use by postgraduate research students. 

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths

Structure

You can study full-time or part-time. The programme normally begins in September, but applications for entry in January and April may be considered.

Supervision is available in any of the areas of specialism outlined above or covered by staff research interests.

Research students are strongly encouraged to contribute to the Department’s research culture. You will have regular opportunities to present papers at seminars and conferences.

Composers can have pieces performed or recorded by Goldsmiths ensembles, including the Sinfonia, or by the Ensembles-in-Residence.

Performers are encouraged to take part in departmental concerts, and may audition for concerto appearances.



Read less
As computer and media technologies continue to converge and develop, the creation of music and sound has become increasingly more sophisticated. Read more

As computer and media technologies continue to converge and develop, the creation of music and sound has become increasingly more sophisticated. This course will immerse you in the technical and creative aspects of the latest emerging music technology.

You will explore the skills, techniques and theory behind the tools and technologies used in the production and performance of electronic music and sonic art. We will encourage you to investigate a range of creative areas, including contemporary music, performing arts, visual arts and live installations.

You will create interactive systems using Max/MSP, explore sensor-based interfaces and develop your expertise in sound creation, manipulation and composition. We have designed this course for those with an academic or professional background in the field, as well as those experimenting with sound through composition, sonic art or technology.

Our high-quality facilities and equipment, regular guest speakers from the industry and our links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations will help you get the most from the course.

Research Excellence Framework 2014

Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including in music, drama, dance and performing arts.

Course Benefits

You will have access to a suite of high quality, professional music studios, approved by JAMES, the accrediting body of the Music Producers' Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services. This, combined with visiting speakers from the music industry and our links to local and national music, arts and festival organisations, ensures that you get the most from your course.

Artist in Residence Programme

The Artist in Residence programme gives our students an opportunity to work with professional artists and gives them a taste of what is it like to work on a professional music project. So far we have welcomed artists Chris T-T, Ian Prowse, I Monster, Tom Williams and Utah Saints.

Core modules

  • Live Performance Technologies
  • Interfaces & Interactivity
  • Collaborative Practice
  • Audio Visual Practice
  • Research Practice
  • Negotiated Skills Development
  • Final Individual Project

Option modules

  • Electro-acoustic Music
  • Orchestration, Arrangement & Programming
  • Sound, Music & Image

Job prospects

Your course will equip you with the skills needed for a career in music technology, interactive media or sonic arts practice, research or education. It also integrates well with the wider music and audio industries and will give you the confidence to get ahead in these competitive fields.

  • Music Technician
  • Sound Engineer
  • Music Producer


Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X