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Masters Degrees (Social Pedagogy)

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IN BRIEF. Social pedagogy offers new approaches to working with communities across the lifespan. Develop knowledge and skills to integrate learning, relationships and community participation. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Social pedagogy offers new approaches to working with communities across the lifespan
  • Develop knowledge and skills to integrate learning, relationships and community participation
  • Experiential learning, undertaking projects within the community
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Social pedagogy is a strengths based approach that connects learning to care and solving social problems. Its philosophy originates from Northern Europe but is increasingly influential in the UK. This course equips you to contribute within community, social care, health and educational occupational settings across the life course. You will be able to model approaches to learning and apply principles and values; increasing the capacity of individuals and communities.

You will participate in the co-production of the teaching, which promotes self-directed, experiential and group based learning. You will explore the contribution of positive activities including art and games. This course will model approaches to learning, participation and relationship based work. At the core of social pedagogy is a commitment to ethics, values and the uniqueness of every individual. These dilemmas will be explored drawing on an understanding of self, relationships and reflection.

You will draw upon an integrated understanding of key themes and disciplines, including sociology, philosophy, social theories of learning and anthropology.

You will benefit from strong collaboration with related disciplines within the University. You will also benefit from opportunities and pathways that have are being established with community partners. There are also possible placement opportunities being identified to complement and deepen learning.

COURSE DETAILS

The course requires the completion of five modules and attendance in all three semesters between September 2017 and the beginning of September 2018.

Semester 1

Philosophy and Theory of Social Pedagogy 

Approaches and Practices within Social Pedagogy

Semester 2

Engagement and Experiential Learning

Research Methods for Social Pedagogy

Semester 3

Research Dissertation

COURSE STRUCTURE

The course provides integrated content with an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary focus. You will be required to integrate learning from vocational and professional settings. There is also the opportunity for you to experience placement settings and study visits to organizations within the UK and Europe who we have created links with.

TEACHING

As far as possible learning approaches and content will be co-produced with students.

These may include:

  • Lectures and presentations
  • Workshops within community settings
  • Seminars
  • Group work
  • Experiential learning
  • Independent and self-directed study
  • Activities/games
  • Tutorials
  • Supervision in respect of experiential learning and research dissertation

ASSESSMENT

  • Written assignments
  • Plan and delivery of workshop
  • Research proposal
  • Evaluation of experiential learning
  • Production of consultation
  • Presentation

CAREER PROSPECTS

Social Pedagogy is increasing its profile and application within the UK. In the past ten years it has been increasingly applied within residential settings and foster care provision for looked after children. It has also been applied within adult social care settings such as the Camphill learning disability communities in Scotland. Its emphasis on participation, collaboration and co-production means that it is well placed to inform approaches that seek to build, social capital and capabilities of individuals. The above means that it offers applicable skills for those working within, care, and community development, early years, young people’s provision, educational and heath settings. The course will equip those involved in the strategic and policy roles, manager and professionals working within these disciplines.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

We have established partnerships with four local housing trusts. These are all involved in developing participation and community projects across the lifespan. We also have links with Salford Children’s Trust. Discussions have also taken place with services for looked after children and care leavers in the region. These will provide possibilities for students to engage with communities as part of experiential learning and to undertake work experience placements where they contribute to social pedagogically informed practice.

FURTHER STUDY

On completion of this degree, students would be able to apply to do a PhD in Social Policy, or a related subject area at the University of Salford, or another university within the UK or abroad.



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Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Read more
Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people.

A range of modules are available to enhance your knowledge, develop skills and further your CPD. Credits can be gained on a standalone modular basis or used to achieve one of the School of Social Work, Care and Community’s CPD target awards.

COURSE OUTLINE

The module adopts an experiential learning approach which gives students the opportunity to participate in shared reflective activities through a variety of methods such as group problem-solving tasks.

Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Students will be supported to consider how a focus on the social relations between and among staff and service users; and how the use of dialogue and critical reflection can help us understand events and interactions in practice. The module will also enable students to explore the value of practical and creative approaches to engage with service users.

The module covers topics including:
-Relationships
-Social learning
-Social justice
-Practical and creative approaches
-Developing risk competence
-Reflection
-The history of social pedagogy

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:
-Critically appraise concepts of social pedagogy and how they are relevant to social care and social work
-Consider critically the benefits of adopting a social pedagogical approach to working with people
-Demonstrate an ability to apply social pedagogy’s core values and skills in their work
-Critically explain how the theoretical approaches taught can be applied to the understanding of individuals
-Critically consider how ideas about, and understanding of social pedagogy can be used to inform practice with different service user groups.

INDUSTRY LINKS & PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

We have great links with employers including household names such as Sony, BAE Systems and Apple. We also have links with the smaller companies in the region and offer help and assistance to more than 1,000 of these – with many of our graduates staying in the region it is important we develop these relationships.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.

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Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level. 

Socio-legal studies pathway:

The School of Law and Politics has a well established reputation for outstanding research across the range of legal studies which makes a vital contribution to scholarship and the development of the law. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework recognised the School as a leading legal research institution, with most activity classed as world-leading or internationally excellent.

This pathway builds on our long established reputation for scholarship in the area of socio-legal studies is focused on the newly established Centre for Law and Society and the Journal of Law and Society which the School founded and has hosted for almost 40 years. It is enriched by extensive collaboration with the Department of Politics and International Relations, as well as other Schools in the University and beyond.  

Structure

• PGDip:

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-pgdip

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-pgdip-part-time

• MSc:

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in three years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module. In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. You will choose your dissertation topic in agreement with your supervisor.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-msc-part-time

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Career Prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.
It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

Read less
Our MSc or PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc or PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level.

International Relations pathway:

The Postgraduate Diploma in Social Science Research Methods (International Relations) aims to provide advanced training in research methods. This programme will offer you an opportunity to develop analytical skills, an interdisciplinary knowledge base, and a practical understanding of research in International Relations.

This programme will provide you with:

• A thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies.
• Information on the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist.
• The principal methods of analysing social scientific data.

You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

In order to have meaningful contact with research being conducted by staff in the School, you will be linked to a research group. The Politics and International Relations pathways are closely associated with the operation of the School’s research units and centres. The International Relations pathway is closely associated with the research activities of the International Studies Research Unit (ISRU) which encompasses a wide range of areas.

Distinctive features

You will be supervised by academic staff with considerable expertise in their chosen fields. These staff members are actively involved in disseminating research via publications in academic and practitioner journals, books and presentations to conferences. Many staff members are involved in editing or reviewing for scholarly management journals.

Structure

• PGDip

The PGDip can be completed in one year with full-time study and in two years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-international-relations-pgdip

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-international-relations-pgdip-part-time

• MSc

The MSc can be completed in one year with full-time study and in three years by part-time study.

The requirements are the same as the PGDip PLUS you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words following successful completion of the taught component, The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. You will choose your dissertation topic in agreement with your supervisor.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-international-relations-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-international-relations-msc-part-time

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Career Prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.

It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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How do we resist impulses (such as greed and appetite) to promote human cooperation and maintain a healthy lifestyle? How do we cope with social and health-related threats in order to prevent or recover from stress and anxiety? How does money affect our social and work life?. Read more

How do we resist impulses (such as greed and appetite) to promote human cooperation and maintain a healthy lifestyle? How do we cope with social and health-related threats in order to prevent or recover from stress and anxiety? How does money affect our social and work life?

The Master’s programme in Social and Health Psychology will equip you with the tools and knowledge to analyse topics related to the control of human behaviour for the benefit of social interaction and health. During your studies, you will explore leading theories and concepts and their interconnections with various fields of study. You will also learn to use and develop cutting-edge research methods through participation in ongoing projects, where you will gain research experience in the study of behavioural regulation.

Multiple perspectives

The two-year curriculum involves multiple perspectives ranging from concrete (neuroscientific and social cognitive perspectives) to global perspectives (relationships, welfare, and health). Considerable attention is paid to misregulation and underregulation (dysregulation) of behaviour in the context of social and health-related issues.

International orientation

The Master’s programme has an international character that offers you multiple benefits:

  • International networks and connections: Our staff includes lecturers who are from abroad or have international positions. We also collaborate with researchers abroad, enabling you to arrange research or teaching visits outside of the Netherlands and improving your research and career opportunities.
  • Global perspectives on course topics: Numerous international students bring regional and global perspectives to discussions on the course content and related topics. From these interactions, you’ll gain a diverse outlook on social and health psychology issues.
  • Advanced English-language skills: The programme is entirely taught in English, and we encourage our students to visit symposia, seminars, and conferences in the Netherlands (in English) to further develop their subject-specific vocabulary and expand their global network.

Education built on research

The Social and Health Psychology programme is supported by two fields of research:

  • Department of Clinical Psychology (stress and self-regulation, and trauma, grief, and anxiety-related disorders)
  • Department of Social, Health & Organizational Psychology (social-cognitive and interpersonal determinants of behaviour and occupational health psychology)

Programme objectives

Through this Master’s programme, you will develop into a qualified psychological scientist who is ready for a PhD position or a research career outside academia. You will have the training and tools to use multiple research methods to investigate social and health-related issues related to behavioural regulation.  



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Our MSc/PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc/PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level.

Environmental Planning pathway:

This program provides the opportunity to acquire generic research skills required by all social science researchers, as well as the subject-specific requirements of the ESRC’s Environmental Planning Subject Area Panel.

Structure

Students can complete either a PGDip or MSc in Social Science Research Methods (Environmental Planning). Both routes can be completed in one year by full-time study. For part-time study, the PGDip can be completed in two years and the MSc can be completed in three years.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

• PGDip

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-environmental-planning-pgdip

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-environmental-planning-pgdip-part-time

• MSc

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-environmental-planning-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-environmental-planning-msc-part-time

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Assessment

You will have to successfully complete the taught component which comprises of 120 credits.

For the MSc, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words

Career Prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.

It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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Why study at Roehampton. All modules are taught in the evening. Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • All modules are taught in the evening
  • Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives
  • Tailor the programme to your own needs and interests
  • Gain the Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing accredited by the British Psychological Society (optional) as part of the programme or as a stand-alone module

Course summary

The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Our programme is founded upon a commitment to forms of education which enable the participation, learning and development of all.

Students studying on the programme engage with aspects of theory, policy and practice relevant to international and local contexts. With its international profile, this programme brings together teachers and other professionals working directly with children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages, as well as policy-makers and managers in areas of SEN and Inclusive Education.

On the MA Special Educational Needs, students choose between two distinct pathways, Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives, which reflect different theoretical traditions and approaches to practice, provision and policy within the field of special educational needs, disability and inclusion. Both pathways are relevant to mainstream and special education contexts.

The Inclusive Perspectives pathway emphasises the application of inclusive and person-centred values and critical educational analysis. Concepts and theories such as person-centred education; participation and ‘voice’; the social model of disability and difference; and human rights and equalities are used to consider educational practice, provision, policy and systems relating to pupils experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

The Psychological Perspectives pathway emphasises the use and application of psychological theories. Concepts and theories of cognition, educational testing, and social and emotional development are central in developing psychologically informed understandings of children and young people experiencing difficulties in educational settings. 

Students greatly benefit from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of other course members, from a diverse range of contexts and backgrounds. The combination of their own experiences, insights gained from others on the course and the theoretical resources offered by learning within the modules, enables students to deepen their understanding of, and to be able to challenge, the barriers that hinder the learning, development and participation of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages.

The teaching provided on modules is informed by active research and scholarship in the field of Inclusive Education and SEN practice and policy. All lecturers leading modules on the programme have high level specialist qualifications, teaching and leadership experience in the field of Education, SEN and Inclusive Education.

Content

All students complete a common module which takes a broad view of key perspectives and issues in SEN, it also introduces the psychological and inclusive perspectives. From here, students undertake specialist modules within the programme, depending on their chosen pathway.

Inclusive Perspectives Pathway content: Students critically explore the issues involved in children’s behaviour using sociological approaches. You will reflect on your own and society's beliefs about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ behaviour, which often relate to medical and psychological foundations of schools’ policies and practices. The social pedagogical approach is also explored as a basis for inclusive teaching and learning. A critical analysis of instrumentalist/functionalist approaches to teaching is developed with a view to enhancing holistic development and the participation of pupils as a means of addressing barriers to the inclusivity of the classroom. 

Psychological Perspectives Pathway content: On this route students engage with the idea that socially and emotionally well-adjusted students perform better at school, whilst social and emotional aspects of learning have become marginalised in a highly competitive education system. The use of psychometric testing is covered, with an exploration of its appropriate uses (students can gain a Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing, accredited by the British Psychological Society, from successfully undertaking this module). 

Optional modules are available to students on both pathways which focus on Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty and on Autism in Education. Students also have an option, instead of taking a taught optional module, to take a (non-taught) Independent Study module to learn about a specific issue relevant to their pathway and interests, which is not taught about in the programme.

The final module is an independent research-based enquiry (either a Dissertation or Practice-Based Research Project), which is founded upon the pathway perspective chosen, but is also subject to the student’s choice of topic.

Modules

Required modules for both routes

  • Perspectives in SEN and Inclusion
  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research
  • Dissertation OR 
  • Practice-based Research Project

Inclusive Perspectives

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality

Psychological Perspectives

  • Assessment and Intervention in Education
  • Social and Emotional Dimensions of Learning

Optional modules 

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality
  • Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty
  • Autism: Principles, Practices and Perspectives
  • Assessment and Intervention in Education

Career options

The Programme supports and enables:

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership: teaching, advisory work, SEN coordination, inclusion management, support assistance.
  • Careers in policy-making, implementation and development of inclusion and SEN provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the inclusion and SEN workforce in further and higher education.

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Developed within the Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (CELCIS), this programme has a fresh, engaging curriculum that covers globalised childhoods, international policy contexts, the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), bringing up children and research methods. Read more

Why this course?

Developed within the Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (CELCIS), this programme has a fresh, engaging curriculum that covers globalised childhoods, international policy contexts, the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), bringing up children and research methods.

The programme is aimed at students with an interest in developing positive strategies for affirming and developing the professional identity of child and youth care practice. It draws from a variety of disciplines and approaches including child and youth care, social pedagogy, sociology, psychology, health, education, social work and social policy.

You'll develop theoretically informed, practice-based understanding of issues related to the social, political and cultural contexts of children and youth.

The programme considers and examines theoretical and policy contexts, child development in the lifespace, management and leadership, intervention methods, critical reflection, relational practice and research methods.

The role of the state, non-governmental agencies and private organisations in the provision of child welfare services will be examined along with the internationalisation of child welfare policy through developments such as UNCRC.

A range of approaches and traditions of child care practice will be considered, including child and youth care, social pedagogy, residential child care and social work.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/childandyouthcarestudies/

You'll study

The course is made up of different modules and you’re expected to complete the six taught modules over a 16-month period. A further eight months is allowed for completion of a practice-based dissertation.

Core modules include Globalised Childhoods: Theoretical and Policy Contexts; Child Development in the Lifespace; Management and Leadership; Critical Reflection and Relational Practice; Interventions; and Research Methods. 

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The programme is delivered entirely online with no attendance required.

Modules involve a range of individual and group tasks in addition to live online sessions where the student group will participate in online seminars.

You’ll require:
- access to a reliable computer with sufficient processing capability
- an excellent broadband connection
- the ability to run applications such as Adobe Connect, Adobe Reader, Flash Player, Java and Windows Media Player

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level.

Politics pathway:

The Politics pathway is closely involved in the activities of the European Governance, Identities and Public Policy research unit and the Wales Governance Centre.​

Distinctive features

You will be supervised by academic staff with considerable expertise in their chosen fields. These staff members are actively involved in disseminating research via publications in academic and practitioner journals, books and presentations to conferences. Many staff members are involved in editing or reviewing for scholarly management journals.

Structure

• PGDip

The PGDip can be completed in one year with full-time study and in two years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-politics-pgdip

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-politics-pgdip-part-time

• MSc

The MSc can be completed in one year with full-time study and in three years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. You will choose your dissertation topic in agreement with your supervisor.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-politics-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-politics-msc-part-time

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Career Prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.

It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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This Postgraduate Certificate is for teachers and others involved in education who are interested in exploring the social and emotional dimensions of learning. Read more

This Postgraduate Certificate is for teachers and others involved in education who are interested in exploring the social and emotional dimensions of learning. The course involves developing a creative, nurturing and reflective approach to your professional practice and exploring practical issues and developing effective responses in your own setting. You will be supported in improving your critical and leadership skills in working with children and families with diverse needs, in the context of current political and organisational priorities. This pathway is an exciting development supported by our partnership with the Family Links charity that works extensively with professionals and parents to improve the social and emotional climate within schools, classrooms and families.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/social-and-emotional-learning.aspx

Course detail

You will gain a postgraduate certificate (60 Masters level credits) which can be transferred if you undertake further Masters study.

In module 1, you will engage critically with the theory, rationale and practice of social and emotional learning, focussing particularly on schools. The module draws on critical exploration, application and evaluation of the approaches of the Family Links Nurturing Programme, as a case study in the broader context of a range of theoretical and professional perspectives.

In module 2 you will reflect deeply and authentically on your own experiences of emotions in education as a teacher and as a learner.

In module 3, you will explore creative approaches to empowering the social and emotional development within your school community or other education setting; and engage critically with issues of leadership in curriculum, pedagogy, classroom environment and lesson design.

Assessment

You will be required to submit three assignments of 4000 words each. These will include:

• Written exploration of a selected theme arising from taught sessions

• Reflective journal

• Small-scale action research project.

What can I do next?

The course is written to support you in developing your career as a teacher or other educational professional who can offer specialist knowledge and support others in aspects of social and emotional learning in a range of educational settings and through partnerships with families.

After completing the postgraduate certificate you will have the option to transfer the credits and complete the MA in Education.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Fees and Funding

See our postgraduate fees and funding page to discover the loans, scholarships and bursaries available.

View https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/fees-and-funding/postgraduate-fees-funding/postgraduate-funding.aspx



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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This programme is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency for pay and qualification purposes.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellermann (Department of Anthropology)or Dr Kalbir Shukra (Department of Social and Therapeutic Studies)

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Read more

This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. You will have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical, theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives and will address issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night-time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, prison and punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. You will also study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

You will take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. You will also undertake a module on research design which enables you to develop a research proposal for your dissertation.

Core Modules

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice.

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)

  • Introduction to social scientific research
  • Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
  • Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research.

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)

  • Formulating research questions
  • Ethical review procedures
  • Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
  • Conversational analysis in practice
  • Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)

  • A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules

You may choose modules to the value of 60 credits. 

In previous years, typical modules offered were:

  • Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
  • Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
  • Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
  • Cybercrime and cybersecurity (30 credits)
  • Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
  • Prisons, Crime and Criminal Justice (Inside-Out prison exchange programme) (30 credits)
  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
  • Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
  • Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits).

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. You are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the undergraduate term. Depending on module choice you may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals. Prisons, Crime and Criminal Justice is an innovative module that emphasises transformative education. It is taught within a prison each week using the Inside-Out dialogical pedagogy whereby university students learn together with prisoners, completing the same readings and assessments, as well as group work and group projects (please see the website for further details). For this module you will need to undertake security clearance and mandatory prison training before being allowed to enter the prison.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field. You will subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of your choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. You will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.



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Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. Read more

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the heart of what Goldsmiths is all about.

This MA, launched in 2015, is the third of three related pathways. The first, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, was started in 1992 and is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification.

A second pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development, was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an NYA qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development.

This third pathway has been created in response to a growing number of applicants with an arts background and arts interests, and is aimed at students who wish to work in community arts. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development and community arts, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork are attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment. We also encourage you to audit courses run by the Art, Music and Cultural Studies departments, and in general to make the most of all the wonderful political and arts events organised by Goldsmiths staff and students every week.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, normally in community arts settings, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations.

The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork 1: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community arts. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community arts are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community arts practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in community arts practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 140 hours plus 20 hours observations) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community arts and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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The Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights MA will introduce students to a range of contemporary social theories about childhood and children's rights, critically explore social constructions of childhood, and consider the implications these have for professional practice and research with children and young people. Read more

The Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights MA will introduce students to a range of contemporary social theories about childhood and children's rights, critically explore social constructions of childhood, and consider the implications these have for professional practice and research with children and young people.

About this degree

This programme provides students with the opportunity to gain an understanding of sociological theories and concepts of childhood and children’s rights, including a recognition of the varied childhoods experienced by children in richer and poorer contexts and how these are shifting in a globalising world. It also helps students develop their critical analytical skills and improve their theoretical understanding and professional practice when working with, and for, children.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Theories of Childhood and Society
  • Children's Rights in Practice
  • Social Theory and the Study of Contemporary Social Problems

Optional modules

Researching Childhood is the recommended optional module to help prepare for the MA SCCR dissertation.

  • Researching Childhood
  • Understanding Research

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Theories of Childhood & Society and Researching Childhood run in the evenings. Children's rights in Practice runs over a one-week intensive block. Social Theory and the Study of Contemporary Social Problems runs in the afternoon or online.

Face-to-face teaching includes lectures, discussions and debates, as well as providing students the opportunity to discuss readings, case studies, images, and films. An online environment is provided for readings and activities between teaching sessions. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their own personal, academic and/or professional experiences during sessions.

Each core module is assessed by a 5,000-word written assignment. In addition there are tutorials for essay preparation and seminars to support dissertation research.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights MA

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as international NGO staff, children's charity workers, child advocacy workers and policy advisors. Graduates are also working as teachers and early years practitioners, while others have jobs as university and college lecturers and researchers.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Charlton Athletic Community Trust
  • Project Worker, Barnado's
  • Research Advocacy Officer, Approach Ltd

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA explores cutting-edge research and theorising about young people's experiences and their social status in varied global contexts. It is unique in its sociological attention to childhood, children's rights, and children and young people's participation in society.

Students are introduced to internationally-renowned academic experts and international children's organisations and have the opportunity to explore their own areas of interest or professional practice.

The MA is based in UCL Social Science which houses three prestigious, research intensive units. Together they provide a foundation for world-leading work in childhood studies, social work, social pedagogy, families and health-related studies with a strong professional dimension.



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