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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. The Postgraduate Certificate in Practical Science Communication, linked to the world-class MSc Science Communication course, and also designed by the Science Communication Unit, is aimed at students seeking an additional qualification. It is an opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, the course gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course focuses on practical skills development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs, with visiting specialists helping you to understand what they seek in future employees.

Depending on the options you take, you will develop skills in science writing, cutting-edge science communication techniques, and the abilities you'll need to develop and run science communication projects. This includes devising and managing projects, evaluations and funding.

Modules

You will choose two from these three modules (30 credits each):

• Science on Air and on Screen - Build your radio, TV and digital skills by critically exploring the role of broadcast media in the communication of science. You'll also make an 'as live' radio magazine programme about science, and a short film.

• Science in Public Spaces - Develop your own science communication initiative in this hands-on module from developing a creative concept, to seeking funding, and managing and evaluating a project. You'll explore a range of innovative approaches from sci-art, to museums, festivals to theatre.

• Writing Science - Develop journalistic and other writing styles, including writing for news media, public relations and educational purposes, with a view to developing a portfolio, as well as working on a magazine project.

Format

The course comprises short, intensive teaching blocks of three days (Thursday to Saturday) and you'll most likely need to attend three teaching sessions for each 30-credit module. Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, and tutorials.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways, to reflect the practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations - all of which you can use to attract prospective employers.

Careers / Further study

Practical science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to develop the professional skills that will help you secure employment or research positions in science communication, or to combine it with your existing career.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Our MSc Science Communication course is an excellent opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, our MSc programme gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course combines a solid theoretical background with practical skill development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs. Visiting specialists also help you understand what they are looking for in future employees.

Introductory modules provide a broad theoretical foundation in issues such as the rationale for public engagement with science, understanding the audience, the role of the media in society, communication theory and models of informal learning. You'll then have the opportunity to specialise by choosing from modules that cover practical skills related to taking science directly to the public, as well as new approaches to science communication such as digital media. This allows you to hone your practical skills and develop a portfolio that shows your expertise as a science communicator. In the final year, you may choose to further develop your portfolio, for example by mounting a practical science communication project, or take on a more theoretical or research-based project, perhaps with an external science communication organisation.

Modules

You will take the following three modules:
• Science and Society
• Science, the Public and Media

You then choose two from these three modules:
• Science on Air and on Screen
• Science in Public Spaces
• Writing Science

Format

Unlike most Master's courses in this area, the MSc Science Communication addresses the needs of working students. There are short, intensive teaching blocks of three to five days, and you can expect to attend three teaching sessions for each 30 credit module.

If you study this programme part-time, you'll take two 30 credit modules each for two academic years. It's possible to complete the part-time course in two years by finishing your project during the summer of the second year, or you may prefer to take a third year. Full-time students take four taught modules and complete the project in 14 months.

Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, tutorials and mentoring.

Assessment

The modules are assessed in a variety of ways, to reflect the theoretical concepts, knowledge and practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations all of which you can use to attract prospective employers. The ability to evaluate your own work and others' is critical to success in the workplace, and several assessments are designed to help you acquire these skills.

Careers / Further study

Science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, we'll encourage you to develop the professional skills to help you secure employment or research positions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. Read more

Programme description

The fields of science communication and public engagement are currently enjoying unprecedented growth. This is being driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for science to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy decisions. Many career opportunities are emerging at the interface between science and various stakeholder groups and ever more creative methodologies for science engagement are being explored.

Our part-time online distance learning programme provides an opportunity to gain a formal qualification in science communication without having to leave your job or move to a different location. You may elect to begin with the Post-Graduate Certificate in the first instance and then decide to study for a Diploma and/or a Master’s degree. You will engage with other students from around the world, from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and you will enjoy a rich learning experience while studying on the programme.

You will experience a variety of science communication and public engagement methodologies and issues. In the process, you will develop critical thinking and self-evaluation skills through reflective practice. Your learning in individual courses is transferable, ensuring interconnection across the programme, thus providing opportunities for deeper learning and for the application of key principles in different contexts.

The programme attracts students from across the globe, from a range of academic and professional backgrounds and provides a formal qualification for those working in science communication and public engagement or a conversion route for those interested in moving into this field.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

The programme can be studied to PG Certificate, PG Diploma or Masters level – if you are interested, in a formal qualification in science communication then sign up for our Post Graduate Certificate. You can then opt to continue to the Diploma and the Masters degree.

Year 1 (Certificate) - courses currently on offer include:

* Introduction to Science Communication and Public Engagement
* Science and Society A
* Science and Society B
* Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science
* Science Education
* The Role of Social Media in Science Communication

Year 2 (Diploma) - courses currently on offer include:

* Dialogue for Science Communication and Public Engagement
* Science, Policy and Practice
* Science and the Media
* Effective Exhibit and Programme Development
* Creative Arts in Science Engagement
* Principles and Practice in Public Engagement with Science

Year 3 (Masters)
* Dissertation project.

Career opportunities

To address the need for effective science communication and public engagement with science, there has been a significant rise in opportunities available for professionals with the specialist knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to pursue roles at the interface between scientific research and public.

These roles can be found in, for example, Higher Education Institutions, Research Centres, Museums, Science Centres, Learned Societies and consultancies for democratic decision-making. Examples of specific roles are engagement managers, information and education officers, policy and knowledge brokers, in addition to the traditional science communicator role.

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This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. Read more

Description

This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. The course will show you how to balance the excitement of scientific discovery and development of innovative delivery methods with an accurate representation of the facts and data that underpin it.

The taught aspects of the course combine practical skills of science journalism, medical writing and SciArt, (the interdisciplinary study of science and art), with theoretical learning about the history and philosophy of science and the study of science communication as an academic discipline.

You will also have the opportunity to work on live science communication projects with external organisations. The programme will give you the necessary analytical and communication skills to be a successful science communicator – in person as well as in writing.

Core units

- Live Project
- Practical Science Communication
- Science and Society
- Science Communication as an Academic Discipline

Option units

- Science Journalism
- Medical Writing
- SciArt

Career prospects

The academic team uses information gained from alumni, graduate destinations and also from industry regarding graduate prospects for science communication students. This information is used to inform curriculum design, e.g. in the development of the curriculum for employability. The programme provides the foundations for future study or advancement on to a variety of professional pathways, including working in outreach or public engagement. In particular, this MSc in Science Communication can lead to career opportunities in medical communications, science journalism, science communication research, science advocacy, and scientific publishing.

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The field of science communication and public engagement with science is currently enjoying unprecedented growth. This is driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for research to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy. Read more

Programme description

The field of science communication and public engagement with science is currently enjoying unprecedented growth.

This is driven by a greater need to demonstrate the impact of publicly funded research, the need for research to be valued, increased government scrutiny and a desire for a stronger evidence base for policy.

Many career opportunities are emerging at the interface between scientific research and various public groups.

You will experience a variety of science communication and public engagement issues and methodologies. In the process, you will develop critical thinking skills and self-evaluation skills through reflective practice.

The learning gained from one course is transferable to other courses, thus ensuring interconnection across the programme.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Academies.

Programme structure

This MSc is a twelve-month programme, divided into three semesters. The final semester consists of a choice of research-or practice-based project. Students also complete placements in an organisational setting.

Teaching methods contain a blend of lectures, individual and small-group activities, and practice-based sessions. Teaching styles will be designed to ‘model’ the practices in science communication and public engagement.

Compulsory courses

-Science and Society
-Principles and Practice in Science Communication and Public Engagement
-The Role of Social Media in Science Communication
-Science Education
-Dialogue for Science Communication and Public Engagement
-Science Policy and Practice

Placements

Students will also complete two placements in public engagement workplaces.

The University of Edinburgh has excellent links with many organisations and placement opportunities include: National Museum Scotland, Edinburgh International Science Festival and placements in policy and education.

Career opportunities

There has been a significant rise in opportunities available for scientists with the specialist knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to pursue roles at the interface between scientific research and the public.

These roles can be found in, for example, higher education institutions, museums, science centres, learned societies and consultancies for democratic decision-making.

Examples of specific roles include Engagement Managers, Information and Education Officers, Policy and Knowledge Brokers.

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The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. Read more

About the course

The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. A major part of your studies will be writing for the media. In our newsroom, you’ll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling. You’ll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

Your career

The MSc puts you in an enviable position. Employers in science and technology, the medical and pharmaceutical industries, cultural industries, the science policy sector, education and the media will see your potential.

If you decide on a research career in science, your masters will enable you to communicate your own research effectively.

The course is now five years old. Our graduates have already gone on to careers in the pharmaceutical industry, with medical and educational charities, in a variety of science communication roles.

About us

This course is taught by experts from the faculties of science, social science and medicine, giving you access to world-leading scientists and media practitioners in the field of science communication and journalism. They include fertility expert Professor Allan Pacey who has considerable experience of TV and film, and Dr Louise Robson, a biomedical scientist who works with schools.

Our combined experience covers science communication via newspapers and magazines, radio and television, websites and social networks as well as writing articles and books.

Facilities

You’ll be based in the Science Communication Lab on the main University campus. Much of the practical work is done there and in the Department of Journalism Studies where you’ll have access to all the latest equipment for print, web and broadcast journalism.

Our print facilities include networked computers with Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. For broadcasting we have access to radio and TV studios, digital TV editing suites and DV and HD camcorders. We also have multimedia and web authoring software including Dreamweaver and Adobe Premiere.

Core modules

Developing Communication Skills; Topical Science; Dissertation; Ethics and Regulation; Writing for the Media; Communicating with the Media; Online Journalism Studies; Research Methods.

Teaching and assessment

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching. There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You’ll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. You’re assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

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Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. Read more
Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. It is increasingly important that developments in science, medicine and technology are effectively communicated so as to allow individuals to have an informed opinion on controversial issues.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/93/science-communication-society

Course detail

The Kent MSc in Science, Communication and Society gives experienced, practical, professional and critical perspectives on science communication. Students will explore how journalists, documentary makers, lobbyists, museum curators, politicians and government research bodies enter into scientific dialogue with the public. The course evaluates different strategies for tailoring science to particular audiences, and is illustrated by specific historical examples and present day issues and controversies. It provides training in practical transferable skills pivotal to communicating science across a range of professional settings, making appropriate use traditional modes of communication alongside current and developing technologies.

Purpose

It is intended primarily, though not exclusively, for the following:

• Science graduates intending to pursue a career in media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Practising scientists wanting a career change into media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Continuing professional development for scientists or teachers of science;
• Humanities graduates with an interest in history of science, technology or medicine.

Format and assessment

The MSc has been developed by the School of Biosciences, a leading school in teaching, research and science communication, and the School of History, which has a dedicated research centre in the History of the Sciences. It integrates current theory and practice in communicating science with insights from historical and ethical perspectives. Two core modules have a case study-driven approach to science communication, learning from key scientific moments in history and from science communicators who work in a variety of different professions (eg, media, politics, education, journalism).

Two optional modules allow you to specialise in a particular area relevant to science communication, based on your interests and experience, focusing on either practical/scientific or humanities-based approaches to the study of science communication. An extended research project allows you to take a practical approach to science communication, or to do in-depth research on a historical or contemporary episode in science.

In some cases, these projects may be undertaken in conjunction with external partners, such as Research Councils, charities and NGOs.

You can opt to take only the core modules, resulting in a postgraduate certificate, or to take the compulsory plus two optional modules, leading to a postgraduate diploma.

Continuous assessment throughout the year is diverse, innovative and context-driven, from short pieces of writing to longer essays, and from the development and evaluation of science communication activities to mock professional reports and grant applications. The aim of each assessment is not only to monitor understanding, but also to integrate information across modules and give you practical experience in a range of transferable skills for future employability.

Careers

The opportunities for careers in science communication are significant as professional science organisations recognise the increasing importance of public engagement. Graduates of this MSc bring together skills drawn from both sciences and humanities, and the programme is designed to build a portfolio of outputs that can be used in subsequent applications, including blogs, funding applications and the development of specific science communication events. Graduates from the programme have moved into roles in museums, medical writing agencies, research funding councils, public engagement roles in professional science organisations, as well as PhD positions in science communication.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/93

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Dunedin is a UNESCO City of Literature, supports an International Science Festival, and is the wildlife capital of New Zealand, with colonies of seals, albatross and penguins in the city's boundaries. Read more
Dunedin is a UNESCO City of Literature, supports an International Science Festival, and is the wildlife capital of New Zealand, with colonies of seals, albatross and penguins in the city's boundaries. It is perhaps no accident, therefore, that it has also become a hub for natural history filmmaking. The outstanding natural environment and dynamic cultural environment provide an excellent setting for the University of Otago’s Centre for Science Communication, the home of story-telling and science. Three Science Communication endorsements are available in the MSciComm: Creative Non-Fiction Writing in Science, Science and Natural History Filmmaking, and Science in Society. Students in each endorsement produce a thesis comprising a creative component (e.g. film, book, exhibition etc.) and original research.

Structure of the Programme

-Every programme of study shall be as prescribed for one of the options listed above.
-A candidate may be exempted from some or all of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.
-A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in the thesis, secure the approval of the Director of the Centre for Science Communication for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.
-A candidate may not present a thesis or other material which has previously been accepted for another degree.
-For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.

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Science Communication MSc is delivered jointly by Northumbria University and the Centre for Life. This high profile partnership will provide a balanced technical and theoretical programme aimed at maximising outreach and public engagement work in science. Read more
Science Communication MSc is delivered jointly by Northumbria University and the Centre for Life. This high profile partnership will provide a balanced technical and theoretical programme aimed at maximising outreach and public engagement work in science.

Expertise, resources and contacts are pooled in this unique collaboration to deliver a Science Communication Masters course that offers unrivalled professional development opportunities.

Taught by university academics and utilising the expertise and experience of professional staff from the Centre for Life, the MSc in Science Communication will foster your skills in intellectual analysis through a range of modules, culminating in an investigative research project.

It is increasingly important that developments in science, medicine and technology are effectively communicated to enable individuals to form an informed opinion. Employment opportunities are diverse and as a graduate of this course you will be in demand in both the private and public sector, in community outreach, clinical research and consultancy, as educational information officers, engagement managers and in a range of workplaces such as academic institutions, science centres, research councils and health related charities.

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This course prepares students for a wide range of professional science communication careers in print, broadcast and new media journalism, science policy, public relations, and exhibition and design work. Read more
This course prepares students for a wide range of professional science communication careers in print, broadcast and new media journalism, science policy, public relations, and exhibition and design work.

It is both academic and practical, and fosters skills of intellectual analysis and independent investigation.

Through both academic and practical courses we encourage you to develop your creative and imaginative abilities, and to produce ideas and undertake work that will communicate science, technology and medicine in fresh and more effective ways.

The course develops skills in technical practice in several communication areas through a programme of practical options.

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MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career. Read more

Course description

MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career. This MSc is appropriate for students from a range of backgrounds. It functions both as an advanced study course for experienced practitioners, and as a conversion route from other backgrounds such as undergraduate science, social policy, and non-science public engagement roles.

Developed by academic staff from The University of Manchester's Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM) and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, the programme will feature masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in print, broadcast and online journalism, museums and science centres, public policy and advocacy, specialist public relations and editorial services, project and event management, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

See the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM) website.
http://www.chstm.manchester.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/

The Manchester Institute of Innovation Research
http://www.research.mbs.ac.uk/innovation

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If you are interested in the use of communication to improve the quality of life, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the MSc programme Applied Communication Science students learn to integrate communication science with problem solving and innovation in the domain of the life sciences, such as nature, environment, water, nutrition and health, biotechnology and food production. Read more

MSc Applied Communication Science

If you are interested in the use of communication to improve the quality of life, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the MSc programme Applied Communication Science students learn to integrate communication science with problem solving and innovation in the domain of the life sciences, such as nature, environment, water, nutrition and health, biotechnology and food production. Not only in the Netherlands, but in the whole world!

Programme summary

In this programme students learn to analyse and critically reflect on the role of communication in complex dynamic processes. They also learn to design communication strategies and programmes that are relevant to societal problem solving and innovation.

Specialisations

There are two specialisations that students can choose from:

Communication in Innovation
Students learn to analyse and strategically apply communication to deal with current societal issues, problems and challenges in life science domains such as nature conservation, nutrition and health, water management, environment and food production. Our students are trained to adopt an integrative approach that involves social science and technical innovations, fulfilling an intermediary role to enhance multidisciplinarity and interactive cooperation.

Communication is a basic element of change. Complex processes of change involve different perspectives and perceptions of the various people involved. Societal processes like climate change, poverty, disease or ecological degradation require appropriate solutions that integrate insights from all kinds of disciplines and stakeholders. Opportunities for enhancing mutual understanding and collaboration between science disciplines and society are explored. Special attention is paid to everyday life situations and how people actively deal with common issues related to the domains of the life sciences. There are no pre-defined thesis tracks.

Students compile their own thesis tracks by choosing, besides the compulsory communication science courses, a combination of closely linked courses; including a minor in a life sciences domain. An internship introduces students to professional practice. The major thesis allows them to become experts in a specific area within communication that is closely linked to their personal interests and future career.

In the thesis track of their choice, students link Communication Science to, for example, Nature Conservation, Nutrition and Health, Animal Production Systems, Ecology and Environment, Forestry and Rural Development, Land Use Planning, Organic Agriculture, Product Design and Quality Management, Food Technology or Water Management.

Health and Society
More information on this specialisation is available here: http://www.findamasters.com/search/masters-degree/i883d5908c20425/msc-health-and-society-specialisation

Your future career

Graduates are specialised in building bridges between various stakeholders, such as governments and citizens or laymen and experts. They work for communication consultancy organisations, government departments, hospitals, development agencies, commercial organisations, media and institutes of knowledge. Career prospects are: communication consultant (advising organisations on how to improve their communication processes); policymaker (formulating policy in cooperation with groups in society); process facilitator (managing conflict, negotiation and change); communication manager (organising internal and external communication processes of an organisation); project manager (managing the communication and collaboration between parties throughout the entire project lifespan); journalist (making scientific knowledge accessible to a broader public); communication researcher (making a systematic analysis of a communication issue).

Alumna Bette Harms.
"At 'International Union for Conservation of Nature' (IUCN) I am part of a booming platform called 'Leaders for Nature' where over twenty multinationals meet and learn to incorporate natural capital into their core business processes. I am the coordinator of the Leaders for Nature Academy where I develop and deliver training models to our network members. In my daily job I actively seek to develop cooperation between Non Governmental Organisations (NGO's), the government and private sector. The Master Applied Communication Science has given me the capacity to translate ecology into valuable and understandable knowledge for a range of professionals working in the private sector."

Related programmes:
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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The MSc has been developed by the School of Biosciences and the School of History. It integrates current theory and practice in communicating science with insights from historical and ethical perspectives. Read more
The MSc has been developed by the School of Biosciences and the School of History. It integrates current theory and practice in communicating science with insights from historical and ethical perspectives. Two core modules have a case study-driven approach to science communication, learning from key scientific moments in history and from science communicators who work in a variety of different professions.

Two optional modules allow you to specialise in a particular area relevant to science communication, focusing on either practical/scientific or humanities-based approaches to the study of science communication.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

Science at Work
Science Communication and Society Project
History of Science and Communication

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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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