• Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Bradford Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
"renal" AND "nursing"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Renal Nursing)

  • "renal" AND "nursing" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 19
Order by 
The postgraduate certificate in Renal and Urology Practice enables UK registered healthcare professionals to achieve professional development and gain experience in this specialist area. Read more
The postgraduate certificate in Renal and Urology Practice enables UK registered healthcare professionals to achieve professional development and gain experience in this specialist area.

You will have the opportunity to develop your knowledge, skills and understanding of assessment, planning, delivery and evaluation of care relating to the management of patients with complex care needs being cared for in the renal or urology environment. At Oxford Brookes University you will able to learn by participating in clinical practice activities within your own renal or urology practice area and develop new clinical skills in the process.

Successful completion of this course allows you to exit with the Postgraduate Certificate in Renal and Urology Practice worth 60 CATS credits at Level 7.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/postgraduate-certificate-in-renal-and-urology-practice/

Why choose this course?

- Practitioners are educated to develop a critical understanding of renal and urology practice and by applying evidence based practice, deliver the best outcome of care for the patient and their family.

- There is an emphasis on practice focused learning throughout, with learning and assessments being based around practice and the workplace.

- Identifying the importance of developing practitioner skills for practice ensures the transferability of the programme to direct service provision.

- Curriculum content is informed by relevant national and international research and evidence based literature to help you expand the breadth of your studies and develop a depth of critical analysis and evaluation of practice.

- Importance is placed on the individual's experience within the educational process and your journey of lifelong learning from both a personal and professional perspective.

- Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and maintain excellent practice links with those areas locally or across the region.

This course in detail

This postgraduate certificate consists of two compulsory modules, one single (20 credits at Level 7) and one double (40 credits at Level 7). Both modules are delivered face to face.

- Modules
P44004 Care of the Deteriorating or Acutely Unwell Adult (20 credits)
This single level 7 practice related module provides you with the opportunity to develop a critical problem solving approach to the assessment and management of the deteriorating and acutely unwell adult.

P44005 Renal and Urology Care (40 credits)
This Level 7 double practice module aims to challenge and extend your knowledge and skills as a practitioner working within the complex field of nephrology and urology through evidence based practice, person-centred care and effective team working.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment on the programme reflects its student centred, patient-centred and practice-focused approach. Each module strikes a good balance between structured learning activities and private study. You will have plenty of opportunities for sharing your existing and developing skills, knowledge and experience. A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used to make the most of the range of experience, skills and knowledge within the group.

Approach to assessment

You will be assessed in each of the modules. There are a mixture of assessment strategies chosen for of their appropriateness for an individual module and programme learning outcomes and content, the academic standard expected and the different styles of learning within the group. Assessments are used to give you an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge as well as the critical and reflective analysis required for professional practice.

Assessments will also provide you with an opportunity to experience a range of postgraduate attributes that will prove valuable in your future career.

How this course helps you develop

Teaching, learning and assessment strategies develop a range of core postgraduate attributes encouraging development of critical self-awareness and personal literacy, digital and information literacy and active citizenship within the context of both academic and research literacy.

Careers

Students who have completed similar postgraduate certificate courses at Oxford Brookes have been employed within their speciality both locally and nationally. This course enables you to work through the Agenda for Change grading bands as a practitioner to gain further career progression.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
Constant modernisation of global health services and continued emphasis on extending roles requires healthcare professionals to be flexible, competent practitioners. Read more
Constant modernisation of global health services and continued emphasis on extending roles requires healthcare professionals to be flexible, competent practitioners. They must be able to cope with change and use complex decision making skills whilst employing a broad knowledge base for clinical practice. This course has been designed for international nurses or allied health professionals who wish to study at an advanced level and respond to these changes.

The course aims to develop your professional and clinical knowledge, skills and attributes so that you can contribute to the contemporary health and social care challenges in your home country. The course has been developed to enhance your applied research skills in addition to your professional clinical knowledge and skills. Your enhanced knowledge and skills will enable you to understand and respond to the pathophysiological, psychological and social processes which underlie our patients, clients and communities experience of illness, health and disease.#

What does this programme offer?
This programme will facilitate your personal and professional development by providing opportunities to develop:

Enhanced clinical skills attractive to employers in a range of clinical environments and roles
Knowledge and skills to enhance your leadership qualities
Understanding of research activity and different methods of research applied to your area of specialisation or interest
Higher-level problem solving skills using critical analysis using appropriate forms of evidence or theory and reflection on practice
Your academic skills through broad Masters level education
Knowledge of contemporary global health challenges such as rising chronic illness
Networks with UK registered nurses, allied health professionals and academics to develop your knowledge of the NHS and UK health systems including primary (community) and acute care
What will I study?
In semester one you will study the programme’s core modules:

Physiology and Pathophysiology: developed to enhance the healthcare professional’s knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological processes which, together with social and psychological phenomena, underlie health and disease.
Consultation Skills: focuses on communication and using a medical model for taking a clinical history. The consultation is a private and intimate interaction between and this module aims to challenge practice and highlight issues such as effective engagement and barriers to therapeutic communication.
Physical Examination and Diagnostics: designed to equip practitioners with skills including advanced access in general practice, community home visiting, minor illness surgeries, intermediate care and theory of undertaking minor surgery.
In semester two there is an opportunity to study from a wide menu of optional modules which can tailored to your individual interests or role in addition to the core research methodology module.

Optional modules include; renal nursing, epidemiology, introduction to health economics, leadership, quality, innovation and change, accountability in health and social care, ill adult management, diabetes, nutrition, promoting mental health, fundamental principles of risk management, holistic person-centred counselling skills.##

You will need to successfully complete your research dissertation module to be awarded your MSc.

# This programme does not provide UK professional registration with the NMC or HCPC; this can only be achieved through successful completion of an overseas nursing programme.

## Depending on module availability.

Read less
This course is aimed at busy professionals working in clinical practice and service improvement. It’s designed to provide you with the knowledge and skills you need advance your career. Read more

About the course

This course is aimed at busy professionals working in clinical practice and service improvement. It’s designed to provide you with the knowledge and skills you need advance your career. The modular framework means you can take a flexible approach, studying part time, for up to five years. You can build your own masters degree as you go, focusing on subjects that are relevant to your area and your own personal needs.

The world needs health professionals

And we’re dedicated to educating them. We have strong links with other health departments at the University, including the School for Health and Related Research (ScHARR), the Department of Sociological Studies, the Medical School and the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth.

The school is close to the central University campus, opposite the Royal Hallamshire Hospital. You’ll be at the heart of student life with West Street, Broomhill and the best students’ union in the country on your doorstep.

We teach the skills that matter

Because we work closely with our partners in health and social care, your course will equip you with the skills employers are looking for. All our courses are research-led, shaped by local, national and international policy. They’re designed to be flexible, to meet the demands of a rapidly changing work environment.

We teach the skills you need to establish research and education initiatives in health and social care wherever in the world you are needed. Through our partnerships with other organisations, you’ll get the chance to network and make useful contacts.

Core modules

Evidence-Based Practice; Methods of Inquiry.

Examples of optional modules

Including: Advanced Renal Nursing Practice; Advancing Autonomous Practice; Cancer Pathophysiology and Therapeutics; Care and Management of the Renal Patient; Context and Concepts in Advancing Practice; Living With and Beyond Cancer; Managing Diabetes as a Long-Term Health Condition; Managing Heart Failure as a Long Term Health Condition; Managing Respiratory Disease as a Long-Term Condition; Nurse/Midwifery Independent/Supplementary Prescribing; Recognising and Responding to Patient Deterioration; Relationship-Centred Dementia Care; Theorising Dementia and the UK Policy Context; Palliative and End of Life Care; Preparation of Supervisors of Midwives; Psychosocial Approaches to the Care and Treatment of People with Dementia.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll learn through lectures, seminars, small-group work and clinical instruction, plus specialist sessions with expert speakers.

The dissertation is by supervised tutorial. Each taught unit is assessed by written assignment, OSCE, presentations or examination. The final unit is an extended project or literature review, leading to a dissertation or workplace study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
You study disease processes including altered physiology of respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, renal/metabolic and immune systems, during the acute illness phase. Read more
You study disease processes including altered physiology of respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, renal/metabolic and immune systems, during the acute illness phase. This will include:
-Pain management.
-Alternative airway management and principles of stabilisation.
-Techniques and specialist care relating to conditions which require critical and intensive care nursing.

You also explore the role of the multi-disciplinary team, including breaking bad news, sibling and family care and palliative care.
In addition, you cover ethical concerns and the legal implications of nursing children in acute and critical care situations, alongside stress management and professional development issues.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/pgcert-acute-and-critical-care-of-the-child

Course structure

Part time distance learning. Start date September.

Core modules
-Recognition and management of the acutely ill child
-Enhancing professional practice in children's acute and critical care
-You also take two elective modules.

Assessment: written assignments.

Read less
This programme has been developed to meet the needs and demands of new healthcare graduates and practitioners and their employers. Read more
This programme has been developed to meet the needs and demands of new healthcare graduates and practitioners and their employers. The demand for post graduate education has been increasing as healthcare courses move towards an all graduate profession. This postgraduate certificate is aimed at graduates wanting to specialise in a chosen field of practice, and will provide a progression pathway for those wishing to continue to a full master’s programme.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

If you have recently graduated with a healthcare degree and wish to develop your clinical skills in a specific area of practice, this programme allows you to access clinically focussed modules at Master’s level. It will enable you to manage clinical care competently, compassionately and effectively through leading on that care and leading others in the delivery of care.

Additionally, undertaking this programme will provide you with a clear progression pathway into a full Master’s award (e.g. the MSc Nursing programme) if you wish to continue your studies further.

Routes currently offered within this exciting programme include:
-Renal
-Critical Care
-Mental Health
-Long term conditions
-Cardiac
-Children and Young People
-Aesthetic Care
-Emergency Care

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The benefits to you are:
-The opportunity to expand your knowledge and therapeutic skills in a field of practice beyond initial nursing registration
-Access to learning from subject and clinical experts
-The ability to manage patient/client health needs within frameworks appropriate to the designated field of practice
-The opportunity to lead others in the delivery of quality, effective and compassionate care
-Improved job satisfaction

The benefits to your employer are:
-Achievement of clinical competence within specialist area
-Enhanced ability to challenge practice and embed relevant evidence base to support quality care
_Enhanced ability to innovate and lead clinical practice derived from current policy initiatives
-Increased commitment to achieving and leading quality care service delivery

WORK PLACEMENTS

Students undertaking this programme are expected to be working in the chosen field/route of clinical practice and all clinical practice placement experience will be achieved in their own clinical area.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MPH program has two streams: Nutrition/Dietetics and Population/Public Health. The Nutrition/Dietetics stream involves courses, a research project, and an internship, and can be completed in two years of full-time study. The Population/Public Health stream involves courses and a capstone research project or practicum and can be completed in one year of full-time study.

Read less
This unique course is clinically focused and disease specific. You’ll develop a critical understanding of the research, policies and practice relating to long-term conditions in various organisational contexts. Read more

About the course

This unique course is clinically focused and disease specific. You’ll develop a critical understanding of the research, policies and practice relating to long-term conditions in various organisational contexts. Studying and discussing the difficulties faced by people living with long-term health conditions will enhance your intellectual and practical skills.

The world needs health professionals

And we’re dedicated to educating them. We have strong links with other health departments at the University, including the School for Health and Related Research (ScHARR), the Department of Sociological Studies, the Medical School and the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth.

The school is close to the central University campus, opposite the Royal Hallamshire Hospital. You’ll be at the heart of student life with West Street, Broomhill and the best students’ union in the country on your doorstep.

We teach the skills that matter

Because we work closely with our partners in health and social care, your course will equip you with the skills employers are looking for. All our courses are research-led, shaped by local, national and international policy. They’re designed to be flexible, to meet the demands of a rapidly changing work environment.

We teach the skills you need to establish research and education initiatives in health and social care wherever in the world you are needed. Through our partnerships with other organisations, you’ll get the chance to network and make useful contacts.

Core module

There are no core modules.

Examples of optional modules

Choose four from a range including: Managing Diabetes as a Long-Term Health Condition; Managing Heart Failure as a Long-Term Health Condition; Managing Renal Disease as a Long-Term Health Condition; Palliative and End of Life Care; Identifying the Deteriorating Patient in Primary Care; Relationship-Centred Dementia Care.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminar presentations and small-group work. Sessions are run by either clinical experts or our experienced lecturers. Each module is assessed by a written assignment.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X