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Masters Degrees (Refugee Law)

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With globalisation, international law is becoming increasingly important and this course prepares you for a future career in the international arena. Read more

With globalisation, international law is becoming increasingly important and this course prepares you for a future career in the international arena. Our LLM is one of the oldest and most popular courses in international law in London. It attracts students from every nationality and background, not only those who have previously studied law, but also those with a degree in political science, international relations, or other relevant discipline. This creates a uniquely vibrant and stimulating learning environment in which to study international Law.

The LLM International Law at Westminster Law School is taught in our central London campus, just a short distance from most major British institutions and international organisations. The Course can be taken full-time or part-time, and we have both a September and a January start each year.

Our teaching team is composed of world-renowned scholars that are leading the way in their respective subjects, including - but not limited to - international human rights law, the law of armed conflict, development law, energy and climate change law, international cyber security law, refugee law, the law of the sea, international courts and tribunals. In past years, the teaching team organised study visits to international organisations and to international courts in London and The Hague.

We also have a Research Group, International Law at Westminster, which conducts important research projects on topical international law issues. These projects have received external funding because of their importance and their potential impact. The Group also regularly organises events in which students are invited to participate.

Westminster Law School hosts the local Chapter of the International Law Students Association (ILSA), of which interested students can become members. The Chapter organises events in close collaboration with the International Law at Westminster research group.

Every year, the Oxford University Press Prize is awarded to the best LLM International Law student.

The course will enhance your understanding of the key principles of public international law, the main developments within the public international law framework and the process of globalisation and its significance for international law.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Please note that option modules are subject to student demand and staffing availability, therefore not all modules will necessarily be offered in the same academic year.

Core modules

Option modules

Career path

LLM International Law graduates have worked for organisations such as Amnesty International, the United Nations, EU organisations, law and consultancy firms such as Deloitte, professional associations like the European Banking Federation, or in legal departments within governments.

After being awarded the LLM, some graduates have undertaken further academic study by doing a research (PhD) degree.



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The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at the School of Law, University College Cork is a new programme which brings together the best legal expertise in the field in Ireland. Read more

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at the School of Law, University College Cork is a new programme which brings together the best legal expertise in the field in Ireland. It covers a range of legal topics from purely Shipping and Maritime Law to Marine Environmental Protection and International Law of the Sea. The programme gives the opportunity to students to work with the best Maritime and Marine Lawyers in the country, under the academic overview of a highly reputable and internationally acclaimed law school. The LLM integrates theoretical and practical learning of the law, and connects module contents with marine and maritime activities taking place in Cork, such as marine environmental research, marine renewables, law enforcement at sea, fisheries management, shipping and port activities. It is a programme based on flexible workload arrangements, and suitable to law graduates and marine and maritime professionals alike. 

Diploma Option

Applicants for the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Marine and Maritime Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law Law). The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact  for application details. 

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduating with a Masters in Law (LLM).   

The Diploma Fee is €5,300 Full-time €2,650 part-time

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) offers a wide choice of options, allowing students to either specialise in their preferred area of marine or maritime law, or to take a broad range of diverse modules.  

Credits

Students must take 60 credits of taught modules, and complete a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words worth 30 credits. 

The programme modules include:

  • Admiralty Law
  • Climate Change and Energy Law
  • Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea
  • Ship Finance
  • Introduction to Law of the Sea
  • Global Maritime Security
  • Marine Environmental Law
  • Port Law
  • Natural Resources Law
  • International Environmental Law
  • Method of Environmental Law 

clinical module on Law of the Sea in Practice give students the opportunity to understand the practice of law enforcement at sea, and includes access to the Naval Service at Cork. 

The practical aspect to marine law is also available through science-based, non-law modules on GIS, Remote Sensing and Characteristics of the Marine Environment. 

Also, students will have access to certain non-programme but complementary modules, such as:

  • Planning Law
  • Heritage Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • Enforcement and Sanctions in Antitrust Law
  • EU Competition Law
  • International Criminal Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Cybercrime
  • e-Commerce Law

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) in the School of Law, UCC builds on the expertise and reputation of researchers and professionals in Cork and in Ireland to offer a world-class education in Marine Law and in Maritime Law. Whether students are law graduates or marine/maritime professionals, the programme provides them with an in-depth theoretical and practical knowledge and analysis of Marine and Maritime Law. 

Please visit the School of Law website here for up to date information on the programme.

Programme regulations are available in the College Calendar 

Please see the Book of Modules for a more detailed description of programme modules.

Additional Teaching Mode Information

The part-time option will be taught during weekdays working hours over 2 years.

Course Practicalities

The course involves a combination of lectures and directed study, and clinical learning. Programme modules are scheduled on Fridays and Saturdays in order to facilitate a flexible workload programme to students, particularly those with a professional career. Non-programme modules are available throughout the week, and where available through digital recording.

Assessment 

Generally students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed in the Book of Modules 

Who teaches this course

This is what makes this course unique. Teachers on the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) are both from within and from outside the School of Law, so that the programme benefits from nation-wide expertise in the field. The UCC School of Law collaborates closely with the Irish Maritime and Energy Resource Cluster (MarEI and the Naval Service) and Maritime Law practitioners. See the School of Law website to see the Programme Team.

Why choose this course

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at UCC connects in a single hub the leading marine and maritime research and practice in Ireland. Students have the unique opportunity to learn from internationally acclaimed researchers and practitioners. The programme puts the law in practice in the fields of shipping and marine environmental research. Through a clinical module, students have the opportunity to learn about law enforcement at sea, including through access to a naval ship at Cork. The programme is built on what Ireland does best in the marine and maritime world, and from there it reaches international excellence.

Skills and Careers Information

The course allows students to acquire an education in Marine Law, or in purely commercial Maritime Law. The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) prepares them to access professions with the following bodies:

  • Legal professions
  • Governmental and regulatory agencies
  • Local government
  • Industry
  • Utilities
  • Infrastructure developers
  • Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • Marine, maritime and Environmental consultancy
  • International organisations / secretariats
  • Academia


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The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) is a new programme which takes advantage of a concentration of legal expertise in the field at the School of Law, University College Cork. Read more

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) is a new programme which takes advantage of a concentration of legal expertise in the field at the School of Law, University College Cork. Academic staff at the Law School currently hold advisory roles with a wide range of Irish and international agencies and organisations, including the European Environment Agency, the Environmental Protection Agency, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, an Bord Pleanála (Irish Planning Board), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Aquaculture Licences Appeals Board, etc. The LLM programme offers a wide variety of legal topics ranging across traditional areas of environmental law, policy and regulation, as well as planning and land-use law, heritage protection, international environmental law, marine environmental law, natural resources law and human rights law. It aims to prepare graduates for a variety of careers in the broader environmental regulatory space, including in the legal professions, governmental and regulatory agencies, environmental NGOs, compliance roles in industry, academia and environmental consultancy. The LLM seeks to integrate theoretical and practical aspects of the application of environmental and natural resources law, and to connect module content with legal and regulatory frameworks operating locally, nationally, regionally and globally. To the greatest degree possible, the programme is based on flexible workload arrangements, to suit recent law graduates and environmental professionals alike. 

Applicants for the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental and Natural Resources Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law). The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact  for application details. 

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduating with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) offers a wide choice of options, allowing students to take a broad range of diverse modules.  

Students must take 60 credits of taught modules, and complete a dissertation of 15,000 words worth 30 credits. 

The programme modules include:

  • Climate Change and Energy Law
  • Method in Environmental Law
  • Environmental Law in Practice
  • International Environmental Law
  • Introduction to Planning Law
  • Legal Concepts for Heritage and Environment
  • Marine Environmental Law
  • Natural Resources Law 

Exposure to technical aspects of the application of environmental and natural resources law to marine law is also available to students through optional science-based, non-law modules on GIS, Remote Sensing and Characteristics of the Marine Environment. 

In addition, students will have access to selected non-programme but complementary modules, covering such areas as Law of the Sea, International and European Human Rights Law, Corporate Insolvency Law, EU Competition Law, International Refugee Law, International Criminal Law, etc. 

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) builds on the expertise and reputation of a cohort of dedicated academic researchers in Cork to offer a world-class education in this field. Whether students are (recent) law graduates or other environmental professionals, the programme will provide them with a critical, in-depth theoretical and practical understanding of the key issues arising in environmental and natural resources law, policy and regulation. 

Please visit the School of Law website here for up to date information on the programme.

Programme regulations are available in the College Calendar 

Please see the Book of Modules for a more detailed description of programme modules.

Additional Teaching Mode Information

The part-time option will be taught during weekday working hours over 2 years.

Course Practicalities

The course involves a combination of lectures and directed study. Some programme modules (those offered in conjunction with the LLM Marine and Maritime Law, i.e. Marine Environmental Law, Natural Resources Law, International Environmental Law) are scheduled on Fridays and Saturdays, in order to facilitate a flexible workload programme to students, particularly those with a professional career. Others will run on various days of the week throughout the Semester, but will employ Panopto lecture-capture technology (digital recordings made available via Blackboard) in order to maximise workload flexibility and accessibility to students, particularly those with a professional career. Non-programme modules will mainly run throughout the semester and, where possible, will be available through digital recording.

Assessment

Individual module assessments can be viewed in the Book of Modules. Most programme and non-programme modules are assessed by way of continuous assessment (essays).

Who teaches this course

The teaching staff at UCC specialising in environmental and natural resources law is one of the programmes key strengths. UCC teaching staff on the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) include: Prof Owen McIntyre, Dr Áine Ryall, Dr Bénédicte Sage-Fuller, Dr Phyllis Comerford, Dr Anne-Marie O’Hagan, Prof Irene Lynch-Fannon, Dr. Bjorn-Oliver Magsig and Dr. Eva Barrett. As a national programme, modules will also have contributions from other Irish academics in the field. UCC School of Law benefits from strong links with key environmental agencies and organisations at the national and international levels, upon which we expect to rely for a full programme of guest speakers. For a full list of school members see the School of Law website here  

Why choose this course

This programme aims to equip graduates to participate and excel in any aspect of professional engagement with environmental and natural resources law, policy or regulation, and to develop a rewarding career in this field with, for example, the legal professions, governmental and regulatory agencies, industry, NGOs or academia. The programme adopts a global perspective, with a focus on international and comparative law and on the techniques of environmental regulation, which are universal in their application and relevance.    



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The LLB degree is a postgraduate law degree offering distinct pathway to two different types of candidates. . Read more

The LLB degree is a postgraduate law degree offering distinct pathway to two different types of candidates. 

For students who have already been awarded a law degree the LLB degree offers an opportunity to expand their portfolio of legal knowledge across a wider area of law in preparation for specific practice or for further study. The one year full-time course includes a wide choice of modules which would allow you to choose a combination that best suits your interests. In particular, it offers you an opportunity to study additional fields of law, such as medical law, environmental law or human rights law, which may not have been available to you at undergraduate level. 

For students who are graduates from a non-law discipline the LLB is a two-year postgraduate law degree which offers you sufficient core and optional law modules to undertake, should you wish, professional legal training at the end of the degree. It is designed to ensure that graduates will have a strong legal training at the end of their two years study (full time) along with suitable critical understanding of core legal issues. Beyond preparing you for legal professional qualifications, the LLB is also suitable for students who wish to pursue a career in a variety of areas such as business, journalism, the civil service/government and human rights.

The LLB offers alternative pathways to two different types of candidates.

It offers an opportunity to Law Graduates to further develop and deepen both their knowledge and skills base. As a student with substantial legal knowledge already, you will be required to take 60 credits during your degree. Only Law of Property is compulsory leaving you with 50 elective credits. However, if you have already studied Property Law, or an equivalent module, you will be free to take the full 60 credits as electives. In addition, you may also seek to study up to 10 credits of LLM modules; permission of the Programme Director and relevant LLM Module coordinator will be required.

As a law graduate, if you choose to study for the LLB you will have the opportunity to widen and/deepen your legal knowledge into areas such as:

  • Commercial Law
  • Corporate and Financial Services Law
  • Consumer Law
  • Immigration and Refugee Law
  • Human Rights Law
  • Welfare Law
  • Medical Law
  • Employment Law 
  • Environmental Law 

For non-law graduates, the LLB offers an opportunity to convert to a career in law. As a result the two year LLB places an emphasis on developing not just legal knowledge but also your skills base. You will be required to take 60 credits in each academic year, which will include a combination of compulsory and elective modules and a skills module.   

While we recognise our primary responsibility is to provide legal knowledge, we also aim to ensure that you develop advocacy skills, experience team work and gain expertise in legal research, as well as gaining a range of transferable skills.  

As a non-law graduate, if you choose to study for the LLB you will take core modules which are the foundation topics required for the professional exams – FE1s and Kings Inn exams. These include 

  • Criminal Law
  • Constitutional Law
  • Contract Law
  • EU Law

In addition you will also have options which would allow you to study subjects such as 

  • Human Rights Law
  • Employment Law
  • Environmental Law 
  • Corporate and Financial Services Law
  • Commercial Law

Please visit the School of Law website here  for up to date information on the programme. 

Programme regulations are available in the College Calendar.     

Please see the Book of Modules for a more detailed description of modules.

Why choose this course

The LLB is a postgraduate law degree designed for law graduates seeking to deepen their knowledge of the law, professionals working in the legal area who would like to improve their skills and knowledge, and non-law graduates who are thinking of a career in law or a related area. The programme is tailored to fit the needs of a diverse range of students. It offers flexibility in the delivery of modules, allows graduates to qualify with professional subject exemptions in two years, and provides law graduates with a wide range of options including the opportunity to combine undergraduate and postgraduate modules.

Placement or Study Abroad Information

For information on the Law School vacation placements programme,see the School of Law Student Placements

Skills and Careers Information

This is a challenging and highly rewarding postgraduate degree course which allows graduates from both law or other disciplines to develop strong legal knowledge and skills in a one or two year period. The majority of students continue from the LLB degree into the legal profession or to more specialised study on one of our LLM programmes and at doctoral level. Our LLB graduates enter a wide variety of careers including the legal profession, academia, banking, public service, the regulatory sector, management and journalism.



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The LLM in Immigration Law will provide you with the opportunity to study legal responses to the global phenomenon of immigration at international, supranational and domestic levels and to understand the rationale and operation of the law in context. Read more

Overview

The LLM in Immigration Law will provide you with the opportunity to study legal responses to the global phenomenon of immigration at international, supranational and domestic levels and to understand the rationale and operation of the law in context.

This Master of Laws programme offers a comprehensive overview of the major legal and theoretical issues concerning immigration law and policy from a domestic, comparative, European and international perspective. Modules include international migration and refugee law, European migration law, comparative immigration law, cultural diversity and the law, and migration and security. This LLM is unique globally as it is taught by leading academics in the field and you will be exposed to insights from legal practitioners, international organisations and NGOs.

The East End of London is a historic site of migration and displays the interplay between migration and human rights, on the one hand, and migration and security, on the other hand, as well as the transnational nature of the phenomenon of human mobility across borders in a globalised world. The programme adds to the existing expertise offered by the School of Law in human rights, public law, legal theory, and public international law. Our academics are engaged in leading research into the areas covered within the programme.

This programme will:
◦Allow you to gain the most up to date knowledge of developments in the area of international and comparative immigration and refugee law.
◦Deliver knowledge and analysis of a range of concerns of relevance to professional communities involved in the field.
◦Enable you to understand the formal legal dimensions of your subjects as well as the more contextual political, historical and socio-legal dimensions.
◦Give you exposure to an array of experts who have research as well as policy led focus on the issues at stake.

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Immigration Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM172 Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM193 Free Movement of Persons in the European Union (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM321 Ethics of Migration and Asylum (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)

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This new LLM is the only programme of its kind to teach core legal courses from a distinctly transnational perspective. Read more

This new LLM is the only programme of its kind to teach core legal courses from a distinctly transnational perspective. With the globalisation of law at its centre, it prepares graduates for a career in a fast-changing global context, teaching competence to analyse complex legal problems through solid legal doctrine, training in transnational legal cultures, lawyerly practice, legal theory, and law’s global socio-economics.

Key benefits

  • Taught by world leaders in their fields with a strong emphasis on rigorous analysis combined with ‘thinking outside the box’.
  • A foundational core module on ‘Transnational Law and Global Governance’ and a ‘Transnational Law Colloquium’ featuring intensive interaction with experts from legal London and global practice and academia.
  • Covering key areas in public law from a transnational law perspective, including human rights, development, refugee law, criminal law, policing & security and the interplay between domestic and international organizations.
  • Covering key areas in transnational private law, including corporate governance, corporate restructuring, commercial arbitration, labour law, business & human rights, and family law.
  • Modules will investigate through an inter-disciplinary lens the co-existence of different normative orders and discuss issues of jurisdiction, legal pluralism, indigenous law and the tension between ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ law with a view to addressing urgent transnational legal problems of poverty, climate change, financial governance and post-conflict justice.

 Description

The pathway will feature a foundational core module on ‘transnational law and global governance’ and a ‘transnational law colloquium’ featuring intensive interaction with experts from legal London and global practice and academia. 

It will cover key areas in public law from a transnational law perspective, including human rights, development, refugee law, criminal law, policing & security and the interplay between domestic and international organizations. 

With view to transnational private law, it covers corporate governance, corporate restructuring, commercial arbitration, labour law, business & human rights, and family law. It will also offer a module in transnational legal theory and legal sociology, 'film and transnational law' as well as a module on law's treatment of global piracy.

The leader of this pathway is Professor Peer Zumbansen.

Course purpose

This new pathway provides an in-depth engagement with core areas of transnational law today, it offers an unprecedented opportunity for students preparing for a career in global private practice, as in-house counsel or international public service, the non-profit sector or an international organisation or with adjudicatory bodies, agencies and networks.

Course format and assessment

In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. 

Please see further details for each individual module in the LLM module list that can be found by clicking here

Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations.

Career destinations

In a competitive world we can give you the competitive edge to take your career to the next level. That’s why you’ll find our LLM programme is supplemented by opportunities to develop your skills and professional networks.

The result is that students are presented with a wide range of employment destinations when they leave; from positions at the European Central Bank, European Commission and UN to commercial roles as investment bank analysts, tax or public affairs advisers, as well as careers in the legal profession; accountancy; management consultancy; human rights organisations and other voluntary bodies; academia.

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The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Read more
The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Questions of international Law are increasingly an important part of domestic litigation in almost all jurisdictions. The modules are designed to equip you for a career in private legal practice, diplomatic service, or work with non-governmental organisations. All courses are taught by top class academics with extensive experience in the study and application of international law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Public International Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM071 Law of Treaties (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field. Read more
Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field.

You will develop advanced professional skills and knowledge, enhancing your specialist career within non-government organisations, government sectors, community groups or human rights-related organisations such as international development agencies. You will also gain an understanding of the Australian legal system and will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

As one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia we offer this course at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers choice from a broad range of human rights law areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such discrimination, international refugee law, advocacy, genocide and the law, human trafficking, humanitarian law and children's rights —to name a few, you will gain specialist knowledge and understanding of recent developments in areas of human rights law and the practice of human rights law. It provides the flexibility to tailor a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study allows to you to continue to work and meet personal commitments while you study.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Human Rights law knowledge and Part B Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Human rights law knowledge
These studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas human rights law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of human rights law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to human rights law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Today’s Europe demands lawyers who possess a thorough mastery of European law. The European Union increasingly affects all areas of law and the national legal systems of its member states have reached a high level of integration. Read more

Today’s Europe demands lawyers who possess a thorough mastery of European law. The European Union increasingly affects all areas of law and the national legal systems of its member states have reached a high level of integration.

EU law teaches a great deal about the relationship between law and economics, history, politics and international relations. This makes EU law of interest not only to lawyers but also to anyone trying to understand one of the most ambitious attempts to get different states work together.

Our LLM programme in European Law, taught entirely in English, will immerse you in this challenging and dynamic field while opening up many new opportunities to you both during and after the programme. It provides a thorough grounding in European law, covering areas such as internal market law, competition law, social law, judicial protection, refugee law, criminal law and public law.

TWO TRACKS

You can choose from two distinctive tracks within the European Law programme: 

Our unique programme will help you build both substantive and institutional knowledge of European law. What is the EU banking union, for example? Why do they say that the EU features democratic deficit and how can we enhance democracy and the rule of law in the EU? Our programme also gives you an opportunity to analyse European law in relation to the legal systems of the member states. How is legal protection afforded in cases where decisions are made by both EU and national enforcement authorities? The flexibility of this programme means that you will be able to focus on areas of personal interest. For example, you may choose to take a specialisation (track) or courses from our other Master’s programmes to create a custom minor and during the third period you can choose from Capital Selecta Modules covering different areas of EU law.

This programme is taught by a team of renowned scholars with extensive professional experience in the field of European law. It is also highly international and welcomes students from all over the world each year.

THE PROGRAMME

Learning by doing is key to this programme and, as such, knowledge and understanding gained through theoretical modules is complemented by training in legal analysis, argumentation and research. 

Your professors take a supportive role in this self-created, individualised approach to your studies. In the Capita Selecta modules and in your own specialisation, you will be trained in essential skills, such as quickly deepening your knowledge in a current, specialised legal topic. From the very beginning, you will also take part in the Research and Thesis Training that prepares you to write your master’s thesis, the culmination of your LLM programme.

If you have the drive to go the extra mile in your studies, there is – the LLM's Honours Programme – an additional honours programme for the best and most highly motivated students. 

Master’s programmes within Utrecht University’s School of Law are based on multidisciplinary research conducted by the Faculty of Law, Economics and Governance. This research takes into account socioeconomic and sociopolitical perspectives, as well as the impact of European law on national laws.

PREPARATION FOR A WIDE RANGE OF WORK ENVIRONMENTS

The Master’s in European Law is a rigorous, customisable programme of study that will enable you to develop your academic, practical, writing, and oral skills through a combination of case studies, moot courts, research and visits to European legal and professional organisations. By the end of the programme, you will be able to reflect critically on legal issues and to recognise, understand and analyse the relationship between the laws of member states and the wider European Union. You will gain an excellent foundation for your career of choice, whether you aim to build a career in a law firm or major multinational company or work for a European institution, an international organization or a local or national government.



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The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. Read more
The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/maintlaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM in Human Rights Law programme is designed to enable students to form an advanced conceptual understanding of international law relating to the promotion and protection of human rights at the international, regional and domestic levels. Read more
The LLM in Human Rights Law programme is designed to enable students to form an advanced conceptual understanding of international law relating to the promotion and protection of human rights at the international, regional and domestic levels.

Human Rights Collegium at Queen Mary

The Human Rights Collegium is the first association between a university and a non-governmental organisation established to provide scholarly expertise, research and teaching on national and international human rights. The Human Rights Collegium is based at Queen Mary, University of London and is a consortium of members of the School of Law and the British Institute of Human Rights. The collegium's aim is to focus on areas that are at the forefront of human rights to help contribute to its progressive development and to benefit the community. These rights include socio-economic rights; rights of women; international child rights and the rights of other vulnerable groups.

Internships

Queen Mary LLM students have the opportunity to apply for three summer internships with the British Institute of Human Rights (BIHR).

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Human Rights Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM035 Gender, Law and the State: Current Legal Issues (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM038 Human Rights of Women (45 credits)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM078 Mental Health Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM172 Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM326 The Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (sem 1)
◦ QLLM327 European Union Human Rights Law (Sem 2) (Not Running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM355 Celebrity Privacy, the Media and the Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM359 Cyberspace Law: Protecting the Online Persona: Digital Rights in Cyberspace (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)

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Gain an understanding of issues that arise in the interrelations between domestic, regional, and international legal frameworks. Develop expertise in EU law, refugee law, and global governance. Read more
  • Gain an understanding of issues that arise in the interrelations between domestic, regional, and international legal frameworks
  • Develop expertise in EU law, refugee law, and global governance
  • Critically reflect on the role of institutions and global actors

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • The European Union in the world
  • Human rights law, policy and practice
  • International dispute settlement
  • International refugee law

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information

What career can you have?

A postgraduate law degree will open many doors for you, not only in specialised areas of employment, such as law firms, European and intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations (NGOs), but also in academia (with further postgraduate study), the media (journalism and broadcasting), the civil service, and other branches of public service.

Graduates from our LLM programmes have gone on to work for a range of national and international law firms, as lawyers and as in-house legal counsel for large multinational companies in the UK and abroad, as well as international organisations and NGOs.



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The Birkbeck School of Law has an excellent reputation. Its body of research students has grown dramatically over the last few years, and competition for places is high. Read more
The Birkbeck School of Law has an excellent reputation. Its body of research students has grown dramatically over the last few years, and competition for places is high. Our research community now comprises people from around the globe, researching in diverse legal areas and with different methodologies. We encourage and assist researchers to publish articles. Many of our graduates have become professional academics after, and even during, their studies here.

MPhil/PhD students benefit from the supervision of internationally renowned experts and secondary supervisors, classes in legal theory and research and presentation skills, seminars and extensive library facilities. Moreover, we offer financial assistance for conference attendance where appropriate, a comprehensive programme of independent monitoring of each student's yearly progress, and postgraduate student representation on the School board. In addition, our present body of researchers constitutes a vibrant community that organises, with the support of the School, a series of workshops, reading groups and a work-in-progress group, as well as frequent social events.

We encourage applications for research in the areas listed below, but it is important to stress that we can only offer supervision in areas where members of the School are actively working.

Areas of research interest include: legal theory; public law; language and law; law and literature; law and film; law and development; gender, sexuality and law; socio-legal studies; environmental law; company law; legal history; medical law and ethics; criminology; European law; intellectual property; insurance law; media law; law and bioethics; constitutional theory and national identity; human rights; criminal justice; feminist legal theory; post-colonial theory; legal aesthetics; law and political economy; race and law; child law; access to justice; international economic law; international refugee law; law and multinational corporations.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Research students in the School of Law are an important part of our research culture. We have succeeded in recruiting very high-quality research students and the number of UK and overseas PhD students has increased fivefold since 2001. This reflects the School's growing reputation as a training ground for early-career academics working from critical and socio-legal perspectives.
The PhD programme is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the UK's leading research council addressing economic and social concerns. The PhD is tailored to students' needs and can include generic modules from our postgraduate Master's programmes such as Research Frameworks and Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods. In-house seminars, the Bloomsbury Postgraduate Skills Network and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Interdisciplinary Research Training Network also provide additional training. Students have received awards from the AHRC, British Academy, Overseas Research Students Awards, ESRC, Natural Environment Research Council and internal Birkbeck and Law School Studentships.
Reading groups are encouraged, focusing on particular writers such as Agamben, Foucault and Deleuze as well as issues such as critical international law, feminist theory, Latin American culture and politics and Continental philosophy. There is an informal doctoral 'work-in-progress group' open to staff and research students, allowing the latter to develop their presentation skills and invite general comment on projects. There are a number of other events designed to support research students. Additionally, an annual postgraduate conference is held to showcase current doctoral research. The upgrade viva examination, whereby students progress from MPhil to PhD registration, gives students experience of a more formal arena in which they have to defend their work to academic staff.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

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The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. Read more
The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/mahumrightslaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Human Rights specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World – 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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