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Masters Degrees (Radiation Oncology)

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The Department of Physics and Astronomy is one of the oldest departments at the University of Calgary, and since its establishment it has excelled in both research and teaching. Read more
The Department of Physics and Astronomy is one of the oldest departments at the University of Calgary, and since its establishment it has excelled in both research and teaching.

Master's (MSc) Thesis-based

This degree must be completed on a full-time basis.

Program Requirements
1. The student must choose one of five broad areas of specialization: Astrophysics, Physics, Radiation Oncology Physics, Space Physics, and Medical Imaging (interdisciplinary).

2. All students must have a supervisor. When admitted to our graduate program, you are assigned an interim supervisor to assist you with your course selection, registration, etc., however this may not be your final supervisory. You have a maximum of four months from the time your program begins (either September or January) to finalize your supervisor. Your supervisor is then responsible for directing the research component of your degree, as well as for some fraction of your financial support package.

3. Course requirements:
-For students specializing in Astrophysics, Physics, or Space Physics, four half-course equivalents, including at least two of PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613, and PHYS 615, plus two elective courses at the 500- or 600-level, as approved by the Graduate Chair.
-For students specializing in Radiation Oncology Physics, eight half-course equivalents. Six of which are MDPH 623, MDPH 625, MDPH 633, MDPH 637, MDPH 639, MDSC 689.01, then two Physics graduate core courses such as PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613 or PHYS 615.
-In addition, all students are required to take a minimum of three terms of the Graduate Seminar, although the normal load is four terms, and additional terms may be required of students on an as need basis.

4. Thesis submission and defense

Master's (MSc) Course-based

This program may be done part time or full time, and in fact we encourage professionals in the field to consider doing this program as a part-time, professional development student.

Suitable for students not necessarily oriented towards research activity.

Program Requirements
1. The student must choose one of three broad areas of specialization: Astrophysics, Physics, or Space Physics. The Radiation Oncology Physics specialization is not available as a course-based degree.

2. All graduate students must have a supervisor. For a course-based MSc program, this is quite straightforward, as the graduate chair acts as supervisor for all course-based MSc students.

3. The student must complete ten half-course equivalents, made up of:
All six of the core experimental and theoretical physics courses: PHYS 603, PHYS 605, PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613, PHYS 615. Plus four half course equivalents determined by the specialization area:
-Astrophysics - ASPH 699 plus three half-course equivalents labeled ASPH (two of these may be at the 500-level). PHYS 629 and SPPH 679 may be taken instead of ASPH courses
-Physics - PHYS 699, one half-course equivalent labeled PHYS, at the 600-level or above, and two half-course equivalents labeled ASPH, PHYS, or SPPH (these may be at the 500 level)
-Space Physics - SPPH 699, plus three half-course equivalents labeled SPPH at the 600-level or above. PHYS 509 may replace a SPPH course

4. A comprehensive examination with a written and oral component.

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The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences course and its four specialised pathways is designed to enable you to enhance your current knowledge and understanding in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic radiography and give you opportunities to challenge and critically evaluate your professional practice. Read more

About the course

The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences course and its four specialised pathways is designed to enable you to enhance your current knowledge and understanding in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic radiography and give you opportunities to challenge and critically evaluate your professional practice. The aim is to advance your skills as a professional and develop your career so that you can practice safely, effectively and legally.

The Radiotherapy and Oncology pathway specialises in the field of radiotherapeutic practice. Many of the options develop competencies for advanced practice such as in the palliative care and breast localisation modules.

See the website http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/msc-medical-imaging-and-radiation-sciences-oncological-sciences

Course structure

The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences: radiotherapy and oncology pathway is modular in structure. If you wish to collect credits towards and award or a qualification see below the award and credit requirements:
- Postgraduate certificate - 60 credits
- Postgraduate diploma - 120 credits
- Masters degree - 180 credits

To complete a Masters degree award for this course you need to collect the following credits:
- Research modules - 60 credits
- Oncological sciences modules - minimum 30 credits
- Optional interprofessional modules - maximum 90 credits

Teaching methods

Modules are facilitated by a variety of experienced lecturers from the University as well as external lecturers.

Delivery of modules incorporates blended learning which aims to combine e-learning activities with campus based learning. You need to have access to a suitable personal computer and a good reliable Internet connection (broadband recommended). Most modern PCs or Macs (less than 3 years old) should be suitable. If you have any queries or need any additional support with IT skills, the School employs an e-learning technologist who will be pleased to help and advise you. Please contact the module lead for details.

Assessment methods include objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), clinical portfolios, case study presentations, oral presentations and written presentations.

Work Placement

The University cannot offer to provide clinical placements for students.

Professional Accreditations

Accredited by the College of Radiographers

Find out how to apply here http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/msc-medical-imaging-and-radiation-sciences-oncological-sciences#how-to-apply

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.herts.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-funding/scholarships/postgraduate

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The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences course and its four specialised pathways is designed to enable you to enhance your current knowledge and understanding in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic radiography and give you opportunities to challenge and critically evaluate your professional practice. Read more
The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences course and its four specialised pathways is designed to enable you to enhance your current knowledge and understanding in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic radiography and give you opportunities to challenge and critically evaluate your professional practice. The aim is to advance your skills as a professional and develop your career so that you can practice safely, effectively and legally.

The Radiotherapy and Oncology pathway specialises in the field of radiotherapeutic practice. Many of the options develop competencies for advanced practice such as in the palliative care and breast localisation modules.

Course structure

The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences: radiotherapy and oncology pathway is modular in structure. If you wish to collect credits towards and award or a qualification see below the award and credit requirements:
-Postgraduate certificate - 60 credits
-Postgraduate diploma - 120 credits
-Masters degree - 180 credits

Why choose this course?

-It gives you the opportunity to share ideas with other health professions in order to develop intellectual abilities and assist in the advancement of health care
-It offers you flexible study options based on a modular structure
-It includes interprofessional learning
-The teaching is done by experienced staff and visiting external specialists
-Accredited by the College of Radiographers

Professional Accreditations

Accredited by the College of Radiographers.

Teaching methods

Modules are facilitated by a variety of experienced lecturers from the University as well as external lecturers.
Delivery of modules incorporates blended learning which aims to combine e-learning activities with campus based learning. You need to have access to a suitable personal computer and a good reliable Internet connection (broadband recommended). Most modern PCs or Macs (less than 3 years old) should be suitable. If you have any queries or need any additional support with IT skills, the School employs an e-learning technologist who will be pleased to help and advise you. Please contact the module lead for details.

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This one-year, full-time, taught MSc in Radiation Biology leads to an MSc awarded by the University of Oxford. It consists of. a 5 month core theoretical course covering the emerging areas of fundamental biology for oncology and its treatment by radiotherapy. Read more
This one-year, full-time, taught MSc in Radiation Biology leads to an MSc awarded by the University of Oxford. It consists of:

• a 5 month core theoretical course covering the emerging areas of fundamental biology for oncology and its treatment by radiotherapy

• a 6 month high-quality basic and clinically-applied research project

MSc Course Handbook - http://www.oncology.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/MSc%20in%20Radiation%20Biology%20Course%20Booklet%202016-17.pdf

The MSc in Radiation Biology forms the first year of training for students enrolled on the DPhil in Radiation Oncology (1+3). It will also provide a MSc degree for individuals who wish to continue in academic research in radiation biology at other Universities, or to start a career in other professions that require knowledge of radiation biology e.g. academic personnel associated with radiation protection issues.
Educational Training Bursaries to study for the MSc in Radiation Biology are avaliable from the CRUK Oxford Centre (http://www.cancercentre.ox.ac.uk/). These are for Clinicians and allied health professionals.

MSc Course Structure

Modular Structure -

Fundamental radiation biological science and laboratory methods/practical skills are taught in the first term (Michaelmas) and the first half of Hilary term, over a series of 12 modules. Each module is delivered over a period of one or two weeks and together the 12 modules comprise the ‘core content’ of the course.

Lectures will be given by local, national and international experts, with additional tutorials and practical sessions given by local staff. Sessions using distance learning material will complement these, and give students a wide knowledge and understanding of radiation biology.

Demonstration and practical sessions will enable students to learn particular techniques that are used in this speciality subject area.

The remaining 6 months is allowed for a high quality laboratory research project.

Assessments -

Six short essays and a series of laboratory reports will be assessed to provide formative assessment of student progress. Students also sit a qualifying examination in week 9 based upon Modules 1 – 6. This will normally be in an MCQ format. A second examination comprising short questions and essays is sat in week 9 of Hilary term. Students will submit an assignment and the research dissertation of approximately 10,000 words based upon their project and will be examined by research dissertation, by oral presentation and by a short viva voce.

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Therapeutic radiographers play an important role for cancer patients as they are appropriately trained to plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment while ensuring each patient receives care and support and is treated as an individual. Read more
Therapeutic radiographers play an important role for cancer patients as they are appropriately trained to plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment while ensuring each patient receives care and support and is treated as an individual. This programme has been developed to accelerate graduates into the radiotherapy workforce with the essential technical, communication and caring skills that are required in the NHS or private radiotherapy departments.

Key benefits

This course is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and on successful completion, you can apply to register with them for the protected title of Therapeutic Radiographer.

This course is also accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers (SCoR).

Course detail

We are recognised nationally and internationally as one of the leading education and training centres for Radiotherapy and Oncology, and are proud to have produced the Society and College of Radiographers national student of the year in 2013 (BSc Radiotherapy and Oncology). A recent Radiotherapy MSc graduate also obtained the UWE Santander Master's Bursary for research or work experience. He used the money to gain experience at the Peter Mac RT department in SABR and HEARTSPARE (treatment techniques) in Australia.

Our teaching staff are known for their exceptional knowledge, clinical experience and student support, while our national student survey rank proves our continually high standards when it comes to learning experience and employability.

Our academic team's research-based approach to teaching led to them being chosen to host the inaugural VERT International Users Conference in 2010.

Year 1

In your first year you'll study a range of modules that allow you to build on your existing graduate skills. You will learn the fundamentals of radiotherapy and oncology linking with the relevant anatomy and associated physiology. You will also be introduced to applied physics relating to the radiation and technology in order to receive the underpinning knowledge required for the first clinical placement.

• Principles of Radiotherapy and Oncology (15 credit)
• Science and Technology in Radiotherapy (15 credits)
• Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice (15 credits including Practice Placement 1)
• Research methods in Radiotherapy (15 credits)
• Radiotherapy and Oncology theory and Practice (30 credits including Practice Placement 2)
• Dissertation (45 credits)

Year 2

In your second year, you'll build on the knowledge and skills you learned in Year 1 to explore more complex aspects of Radiotherapy and Oncology practice.

• Communication Skills in Cancer and Palliative Care (15 credits)
• Complex issues in radiotherapy and oncology (30 credits including Placement 3)

Placements

We have excellent industry links in the South West, with placements possible in nine different NHS hospitals from Cheltenham to Truro. You'll take part in three 14-week placements over the two years, where you'll learn on the job while carrying out primary research towards your final dissertation.

Format

Based on our health-focused Glenside campus, this course begins in January and involves classroom-based modules and clinical placements where you gain your clinical competence and undertake research. It's an excellent mix of study and professional experience. The focus is on using your graduate skills to be an independent learner and manage your workload effectively.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods throughout the programme, including written assignments, exams, presentations, interactive online assessment, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and continuous practice assessment in a clinical environment.

The course is assessed according to the University Academic Regulations and Procedures, and we expect full attendance at all times. You must take your professional practice placements in order, and you'll need to pass each placement before being allowed to start the next. There is always at least one external examiner.

Careers / Further study

Students graduating from this course are highly employable, and there are lots of career opportunities and areas for role extension in therapeutic radiography, including planning and dosimetry. Once qualified you will be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professionals Council.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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If you are a non-radiotherapy graduate who would like to become a registered therapeutic radiographer, this postgraduate course in radiotherapy and oncology will prepare you to become one. Read more
If you are a non-radiotherapy graduate who would like to become a registered therapeutic radiographer, this postgraduate course in radiotherapy and oncology will prepare you to become one. By graduating from this course, you are allowed to register for this role through the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

By qualifying in this area you are able to respond to the increasing demand for therapeutic radiographers in the health service. Medical, technological and professional advances in radiotherapy mean the role of the therapeutic radiographer is ever changing.

Your on-campus training is based at the £13 million purpose-built Robert Winston Building. Here you use the state-of-the-art virtual environment for radiotherapy training (VERT). It creates a life-size 3D replica of a clinical environment. We also have 20 networked eclipse planning computers and 10 image review licences with specialist staff on hand to teach you radiotherapy planning and image matching. We are one of the only universities outside of the USA that can offer these facilities.

You get real insights into all aspects of radiography with our professionally approved teaching programme. You learn from a lecturing team who are all qualified radiographers involved in research at a national level.

In addition to this expertise, we invite guest lecturers to teach that are leaders in their field. You also meet and hear from ex-patients who share their experiences of treatment.

As part of the course, you gain important clinical experience in one of our nine participating hospitals. This gives you the knowledge, skills and confidence to undertake and develop your professional role.

Clinical placements may be taken in:
-St James' Hospital, Leeds.
-Royal Derby Hospital.
-James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough.
-Leicester Royal Infirmary.
-Lincoln County Hospital.
-The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle.
-Nottingham City Hospital.
-Castle Hill Hospital, Hull.
-Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield.

To begin with, your studies focus on the theoretical knowledge you need for your clinical experience. We encourage you to question and analyse, not simply accept the theory wholesale. You also learn to look at the complete picture from the view of the: patient; healthcare team; associated scientific principles.

You gradually learn to apply theory to practice and tailor treatment to each patient by accurately targeting high dose radiation beams and sparing surrounding normal tissues.

Your studies enable you to develop and adapt your clinical expertise through reflective practice. You learn to analyse and evaluate your experience as you gain and develop new skills and competencies and to look for areas that need changing.

The course is designed in response to recent government initiatives to: modernise healthcare education; increase recruitment into the health service; improve cancer care services.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/pgdip-radiotherapy-and-oncology-in-practice

Radiotherapy open days

Find out more about a radiotherapy career by attending an open day at a radiotherapy department.
-Leicester Royal Infirmary – Thursday 26 November.
-Leeds Radiotherapy Department – Friday 9 and Saturday 10 October.

CPD online

CPD Online, part of our CPD Anywhere™ framework, is being offered free to new graduates of this course for 12 months, as part of our commitment to support your lifelong learning.

CPD Online is an online learning environment which provides information to help your transition into the workplace. It can enhance your employability and provide opportunities to take part in and evidence continuing professional development to help meet professional body and statutory requirements.

For further information, visit the CPD Anywhere™ website at: http://www.shu.ac.uk/faculties/hwb/cpd/anywhere

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the College of Radiographers. This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Graduates are eligible to apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and apply to become members of the Society and College of Radiographers. You must be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in order to practise as a therapeutic radiographer in the UK.

Course structure

Full time – 2 years. Starts September.

Year One modules
-Fundamentals of radiotherapy and oncology
-Radiotherapy and oncology principles 1
-Principles of physics and technology
-Application of radiotherapy and oncology practice
-Competence for practice

Year Two modules
-Radiotherapy and oncology principles 2 and 3
-Imaging, planning treatment and delivery
-Application of radiotherapy and oncology practice 2
-Competence for practice 2

Assessment: individual assignments; personal and professional development portfolio; clinical assessment and appraisal; case studies; formatively assessed learning packages; placement reports; viva.

Other admission requirements

*GCSE maths and English equivalent
-Equivalency test from: http://www.equivalencytesting.co.uk

*GCSE science equivalents
-OCR science level 2
-Science units gained on a level 3 BTEC or OCR National Diploma or Extended Diploma Qualification
-Science credits gained on Access to Higher Education Diplomas (at least 12 credits gained at level 2 or 6 credits gained at level 3)
-Science equivalency test from: http://www.equivalencytesting.co.uk

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This course will allow individuals to retrain in the area of radiotherapy and oncology. It is not suitable for people already holding a qualification in therapeutic radiography. Read more
This course will allow individuals to retrain in the area of radiotherapy and oncology. It is not suitable for people already holding a qualification in therapeutic radiography.

Students normally complete a PgDip in two years. Some choose to return to progress to an MSc on a part-time basis.

Radiography is a caring profession that calls for technological expertise. Therapeutic radiographers use radiation to give radiotherapy treatment to patients with cancer. If you are considering this career move, it is essential that you have good interpersonal skills as radiographers have to interact with other healthcare professionals as well as with patients and their families, many of whom may need considerable reassurance.

This course will focus on the professional elements required of a therapeutic radiographer. The aim of the course is to further develop the analytical, theoretical and practical skills of an honours graduate so that they can demonstrate the necessary attributes required for a registered therapeutic radiographer. This will enable employment within the UK.

Teaching, learning and assessment

This course uses a wide range of learning and teaching methods, based on a problem-based learning approach with students working independently and collaboratively. The teaching and learning strategies are designed to enable independent progress within a supportive framework.

Clinical work-based learning will be undertaken, on a rotational basis, within regional cancer centres in hospitals in Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Inverness, and your personal performance will be assessed. These placements will take place over May to September. In general, you will be assessed by a variety of methods including case studies, essays and presentations. Normally there are fewer than 15 students on this course, this ensures individuals receive excellent support and guidance.
Joint teaching with other courses is utilised within this course. This allows individuals to benefit from a shared teaching and learning approach where discussion and experiences between students can occur.

Teaching hours and attendance

.
All academic modules will be studied on campus where you will be required to attend classes and carry out independent work. The number of classes on campus along with required independent study will depend on size of the module. Both work based learning modules will be undertaken whilst on clinical placement in any of the five cancer centres in Scotland. In Year One clinical placement runs for 16 weeks May-Aug. In Year Two placement lasts for 20 weeks, May-Sept.

Links with industry/professional bodies

You can become a member of the College of Radiographers as a student and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) on graduation. The course leads to eligibility to register as a therapeutic radiographer with the HCPC.

Modules

15 credits: Preparing for Practice as an Allied Health Professional/ Radiotherapy Science/ Research Methods for Health Professionals

30 credits: Introduction to Cancer and its Management/ Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice One/ Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice 2

10 credits: Introduction to the Human Body / Science and Technology

50 credits: Work-Based learning 1/ Work-Based Learning 2

If progressing to MSc, you will also complete a research project (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates are eligible to apply for registration with the HCPC and to work as therapeutic radiographers with the NHS in the UK. Currently, graduates from QMU have a 100% employment record.

Many graduates have worked abroad. However, although HCPC is recognised in many overseas countries, you may have to apply to the registration body of the country in which you wish to work.

Quick Facts

- A starting salary of £21,176 with excellent opportunity for career progression up to consultant level.
- A professional career in which you are eligible to register within just two years.
- A caring profession that calls for technological expertise in the rapid developing area of cancer treatment.

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Apply your physics background. A career in medical physics offers you the opportunity to use your physics background to provide people with life-changing options every day. Read more
Apply your physics background
A career in medical physics offers you the opportunity to use your physics background to provide people with life-changing options every day. Medical physicists play a critical role at the cutting-edge of patient healthcare, overseeing effective radiation treatment, ensuring that instruments are working safely, and researching, developing and implementing new therapeutic techniques.

The Medical Physics Programs at the University of Pennsylvania prepare students to bridge physics and clinical medicine, overseeing clinical applications of radiation and creating the cutting-edge medical technologies of tomorrow. The master’s degree and post-graduate certificate programs combine the resources of one of the world’s top research universities and most prestigious medical schools, offering you unmatched opportunities to shape your own path.

Unsurpassed resources and a rich array of options
Access to Penn’s outstanding facilities creates a unique opportunity for you to sample four subspecialties of medical physics, including radiation oncology, diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and health physics. Whether you enter a residency, seek employment directly after the program, go on to a PhD, earn an MBA or change career directions with your PhD, you’ll have the resources at your fingertips to build the career most compelling to you.

Our research facilities—all of which are located on campus, within a 10-minute walk—include the state-of-the art Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine; the Roberts Proton Therapy Center, the largest and most advanced facility in the world for this form of cancer radiation; and the Smilow Center for Translational Research, which brings Penn scientists and physicians together to collaborate on research projects.

Preparation for professional success
Our programs, accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP), are grounded in providing the highest standard of patient care. Our students have numerous opportunities to gain hands-on experience at some of the most advanced medical imaging and therapy facilities in the world, through part-time clinical work, residencies, practicum training and much more. It is for this reason that our degree and certificate programs enjoy a high placement rate for our students, year after year. Faculty from Penn’s CAMPEP-accredited residency program participate in professional development to make our students competitive for medical physics residency programs.

We welcome you to contact a member of our program team to learn more about the possibilities that await you in the Medical Physics Programs at Penn.

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This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills. Read more

Programme Aims

This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills.

The award in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science is specially designed for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy and has the following aims.

A. Advancement in Knowledge and Skill
‌•To provide professionals in Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy, as well as others interested in health technology, with the opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills;
‌•To develop specialists in their respective professional disciplines and enhance their career paths;
‌•To broaden students' exposure to a wider field of health science and technology to enable them to cope with the ever-changing demands of work;
‌•To provide a laboratory environment for testing problems encountered at work;
‌•To equip students with an advanced knowledge base in a chosen area of specialisation in medical imaging or radiotherapy to enable them to meet the changing needs of their disciplines and contribute to the development of medical imaging or radiation oncology practice in Hong ‌Kong; and
‌•To develop critical and analytical abilities and skills in the areas of specialisation that are relevant to the professional discipline to improve professional competence.

B. Professional Development
‌•To develop students' ability in critical analysis and evaluation in their professional practices;
‌•To cultivate within healthcare professionals the qualities and attributes that are expected of them;
‌•To acquire a higher level of awareness and reflection within the profession and the healthcare industry to improve the quality of healthcare services; and
‌•To develop students' ability to assume a managerial level of practice.

C. Evidence-based Practice
‌•To equip students with the necessary skill in research to enable them to perform evidence-based practice in the delivery of healthcare service and industry.

D. Personal Development
‌•To provide channels through which practising professionals can continuously develop themselves while at work; and
‌•To allow graduates to develop themselves further after graduation.

Programme Characteristics

The Medical Imaging and Radiation Science award offers channels for specialization and the broadening of knowledge for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy. It will appeal to students who are eager to become specialists or managers in their areas of practice. Clinical experience and practice in medical imaging and radiotherapy are integrated into the curriculum to encourage more reflective observation and active experimentation.

Programme Structure

The Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology consists of the following awards:
‌•MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science
‌•MSc in Medical Laboratory Science

A range of subjects that are specific to Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, and a variety of subjects of common interest and value to all healthcare professionals, are offered. In general, each subject requires attendance on one evening per week over a 13-week semester.

Award Requirements

Students must complete 1 Compulsory Subject (Research Methods & Biostatistics), 4 Core Specialism Specific Subjects, 2 Elective subjects (from any subjects within the Scheme) and a research-based Dissertation or 3 other subjects from the Scheme. They are encouraged to select a dissertation topic that is relevant to their professional and personal interests. Students who have successfully completed 30 credits, but who have taken fewer than the required 4 Core Specialism Specific Subjects, will be awarded a generic MSc in Health Technology without a specialism award.

Students who have successfully completed 18 credits, but who decide not to continue with the course of MSc study, may request to be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) as follows:
PgD in a specialism if 1 Compulsory Subject, 4 Core Subjects and 1 Elective Subject are successfully completed; or
PgD in Health Technology (Generic) if 1 Compulsory Subject and any other 4 subjects within the Scheme are successfully completed.

Core Areas of Study

The following is a list of Core Subjects. Some subjects are offered in alternate years.

‌•Multiplanar Anatomy
‌•Advanced Radiotherapy Planning & Dosimetry
‌•Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Computed Tomography
‌•Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging
‌•Advanced Topics in Health Technology
‌•Advanced Ultrasonography
‌•Computed Tomography (CT): Practicum
‌•Digital Imaging & PACS
‌•Imaging Pathology

Having selected the requisite number of subjects from the Core list, students can choose the remaining Core Subjects or other subjects available in this Scheme as Elective Subjects.

The two awards within the Scheme share a similar programme structure, and students can take subjects across disciplines. For subjects offered within the Scheme by the other discipline of study, please refer to the information on the MSc in Medical Laboratory Science.

English Language Requirements

If you are not a native speaker of English, and your Bachelor's degree or equivalent qualification is awarded by institutions where the medium of instruction is not English, you are expected to fulfil the University’s minimum English language requirement for admission purpose. Please refer to the "Admission Requirements" http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg/admissions-requirements section for details.

‌•Additional Document Required
‌•Employer's Recommendation
‌•Personal Statement
‌•Transcript / Certificate

How to Apply

For latest admission, please visit [email protected] http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg and eAdmission http://www.polyu.edu.hk/admission

Enquiries

For further information, please contact:
Telephone: (852) 3400 8653
Fax: (852) 2362 4365
E-mail:

For more details of the programme, please visit [email protected] website http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg/2016/55005-rmf-rmp

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The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy programs in Medical Science are available in a wide range of basic sciences, clinical sciences, and population health research. Read more
The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy programs in Medical Science are available in a wide range of basic sciences, clinical sciences, and population health research. Under the mentorship of a faculty member, a student receives specialized training and exposure to Toronto's finest multidisciplinary research. Students conduct research in one of six fields:
-Biomedical Science
-Clinical Science
-Population Health/Health Services
-Bioethics
-Health Professions Education
-Radiation Oncology

The full-time MSc and PhD programs emphasize hands-on research, rather than coursework. Faculty conduct research in the following areas: cardiovascular sciences, bioethics, neuroscience, membrane biology, respiratory medicine, and psychosomatic medicine. The Institute of Medical Science (IMS) is the graduate unit of choice for MDs seeking training as clinician investigators, and graduates may seek positions as academics and health care professionals in universities, government, and industry. The IMS participates in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Clinical Investigator Program (CIP).

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Therapeutic radiographers are at the forefront of cancer care, having a vital role in the delivery of Radiotherapy services. They treat cancer patients with x-rays using highly sophisticated equipment. Read more
Therapeutic radiographers are at the forefront of cancer care, having a vital role in the delivery of Radiotherapy services. They treat cancer patients with x-rays using highly sophisticated equipment. They are also responsible for ensuring that treatment planning and delivery is achieved with absolute precision.

In the treatment of cancer, accuracy is paramount and a variety of highly specialised equipment is available within Radiotherapy Departments to achieve this. Computerised Tomography (CT) simulators employ the latest technology to localise tumours.

Technological advances

Technological advances in linear accelerator design ensure that treatment conforms to patients needs with pinpoint accuracy. Treatment units housing radioactive sources also play a useful role in patient management, as do 3D planning systems.

London South Bank University has invested heavily to ensure that students have access to the best learning tools and staff. There are two dedicated fully equipped skill labs that enable Dosimetry (Radiotherapy treatment planning) and a state of the art virtual environment of a radiotherapy treatment room (VERT).

Communication and care

Alongside the technology, the importance of high standards of communication and care of cancer patients cannot be overestimated. Cancer patients are treated by a multidisciplinary team in which the therapeutic radiographer plays a major role in reducing the sense of vulnerability and promoting patients autonomy.

As a graduate, you'll be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Radiographer .

PgDip programme

The PgDip programme is an accelerated programme over two years, for graduate students who already have a Level 6 qualification. Building on graduate skills you'll develop an enquiring, reflective, critical and innovative approach to Therapeutic Radiography within the context of the rapid changes occurring in the health service.

Top-up to MSc

By adding the research element of a dissertation (an extended and independent piece of written research), you'll be able to graduate with a Masters-level qualification.

Modules

On this programme we'll develop you as confident and competent practitioner who practices autonomously, compassionately, skilfully and safely. The programme comprises of five compulsory modules instilling a range of academic knowledge from health sciences to profession specific radiotherapy and oncology practice. And, add a dissertation for the award of a Masters.

Year 1

Radiation science and technology
Applied biological sciences
Radiotherapy theory and practice 1

Year 2

Patient care and resource management in radiotherapy
Radiotherapy theory and practice 2
Dissertation (MSc only)

Teaching and learning

Academic theoretical knowledge is gained through taught session led by lecturers and experts in the field, supported by blended learning and self-study activities.

Practical skills are normally developed through practical skills based sessions using VERT and dosimetry software, problem-based approaches and clinical placement.

Types of learning activities include:

• Lectures
• Seminars
• Enquiry-based learning
• Tutorials
• Formative assessments
• E discussions
• Observation and demonstration of practices within clinical placements.

Placements

Clinical placements are an essential element of the course. You will spend 50% of your time involved in academic study and 50% in clinical practice within a broad variety of healthcare settings. A clinical practice placement allows you to put theory into practice by working with a range of health professionals in clinical situations to develop the skills, knowledge and experience required to become a competent radiographer. Although sometimes initially challenging, practice learning is one of the most interesting and exciting aspects of learning to be a radiographer.

Clinical settings

At LSBU you will experience a variety of clinical settings such as NHS Trusts and the independent sector.

Placements for Therapeutic Radiography include:

• Brighton and Sussex University Hospital: Sussex Cancer Centre
• Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust: Kent Oncology Centre
• Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
• Royal Surrey Hospital
• Queens Hospital, Romford.

Structure of placements

Placements are spread over two years.

The first clinical placement; approximately seven weeks after the start of the course, gives a real taster of the role of the radiotherapy radiographer in the radiotherapy treatment process. It gives you an opportunity to confirm correct choice of career early within the course. Thereafter clinical placements follow the same pattern throughout the course.

Support from a mentor

An identified Link Lecturer and Personal Tutor from the University will be the person you can contact during working day hours whilst on placement with any concerns or questions you are unable to solve otherwise. As there is a close relationship between LSBU and the clinical placement; the Link Lecturer will pay regular scheduled visits to the different sites to meet up with students.

Professional links

The programme is validated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers.

Radiotherapy as a career

On successful completion of the course you'll be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a therapeutic radiographer.

From helping plan and administering treatment, to explaining it to patients and assessing their responses, therapeutic radiographers are involved in every stage of the treatment process.

Therapeutic radiographers work closely with professionals from other disciplines, are involved in the care and support of the cancer patient and their families through all parts of the patient pathway from the initial referral through to treatment review and follow-up stages. They are predominantly responsible for treatment for the accurate localisation, planning and delivery of ionising radiation.

Therapeutic radiographers need excellent interpersonal skills and emotional resilience as they deal with patients and their families at very difficult and emotional times. Making patients feel comfortable and guiding them through the process can be as important as the technical skills required for this role.

Career progression

Through the acquisition of a wide range of transferable skills such as psychosocial, organisational, management, technical and scientific skills, individuals are well prepared to work in any situation that best suits their individual expertise and interest.Working as a consultant practitioner is one common career path as well as management, research, clinical work and teaching.

After qualification, clinically experienced therapeutic radiographers may gain additional specialist skills and expertise through the postgraduate, post-registration and continuing professional development frameworks.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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If you are a therapeutic radiographer, dosimetrist or other healthcare professional working in radiotherapy and oncology, this course can help you develop your knowledge of radiotherapy planning. Read more
If you are a therapeutic radiographer, dosimetrist or other healthcare professional working in radiotherapy and oncology, this course can help you develop your knowledge of radiotherapy planning. It’s a highly focused course that gives you a thorough understanding of the key practices surrounding simulating and evaluating radiation doses for radiotherapy.

You gain an in-depth understanding of current and future radiotherapy planning issues and, crucially, develop the ability to apply critical thinking skills to practice. You gain general critical thinking and literature skills as well as more specific planning theory and plan evaluation skills.

Your studies cover core modules involving fundamental planning theories, plan evaluation, advanced planning and image guided radiotherapy. We also introduce you to research skills, which you use to produce a final dissertation.

The course is delivered using our virtual learning environment, known as Blackboard. You don't need to attend the university and you can study via the web in your own time, which means you can fit the course around your clinical work. The web-based learning materials are designed to help improve your radiotherapy knowledge, as well as share experiences with other students through our e-based discussion forum. If you are not confident with computers, help and support is available.

For some modules there is a requirement to produce a plan for the course and you must have access to a clinical radiotherapy planning environment. This helps support the demands of your postgraduate work.

You may be eligible to apply for accreditation of work-based projects and prior certificated learning, which will count towards your final award.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mscpgdippgcert-radiotherapy-planning

Study individual modules

You can study individual modules from our courses and gain academic credit towards a qualification. Visit our continuing professional development website for detailed information about the modules we offer.

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the College of Radiographers.

Course structure

Distance learning – typically 3 years. Starts September and January.

Course structure
The Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.
The Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits.
The Masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

Postgraduate Certificate core modules
-Fundamentals of radiotherapy planning (30 credits)
-Image guided radiotherapy (15 credits)
-Plus a further 15 credits from the optional modules list below.

Postgraduate Diploma core modules
-Advanced radiotherapy planning (30 credits)
-Research methods for practice (15 credits)
-Plus a further 15 credits from optional module list below.

Masters
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modules
-Personalised study module or work-based learning for service development (15 credits)
-Technical advances in radiotherapy (15 credits)
-Breast cancer radiotherapy (15 credits)
-Prostate cancer (15 credits)
-Head and neck cancer (15 credits)
-Expert practice (30 credits)
-Brachytherapy: principles to practice (15 credits)
-Fundamentals of radiotherapy and oncology practice (15 credits)

Assessment
We use various assessment methods, supporting the development of both your academic and professional skills. Short online activities are used to promote engagement with the distance learning materials, provide support for the final assignment and facilitate online discussion with fellow peers. Other methods of assessment include: essays; business cases or journal article; project and research work; poster and PowerPoint presentation; case studies; service improvement proposal and plans; critical evaluations; profiles of evidence; planning portfolio.

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The course will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in fundamental and applied cancer biology, and focused training in laboratory research and associated methodology. Read more
The course will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in fundamental and applied cancer biology, and focused training in laboratory research and associated methodology.

Why study Cancer Biology at Dundee?

The MRes Cancer Biology is a research-centred taught Masters programme providing a focused training in molecular cancer research. It covers both the fundamental and translational science of carcinogenesis, cancer biology, diagnosis and therapy.

The programme delivers outstanding research-focused teaching from internationally-renowned scientists and clinicians.

Dundee University is internationally renowned for the quality of its cancer research and has over 50 cancer research groups: current funding for cancer research is about £40 million from research councils and charities. In 2009 the university became the first Scottish university to be awarded Cancer Centre status by the CRUK.

What's so good about studying Cancer Biology at Dundee?

The MRes Cancer Biology has been developed from the innovative collaboration between the College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing and the School of Life Sciences, and it complements the establishment of the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Centre here in Dundee.

The Dundee Cancer Centre aims to enhance cancer research and apply discoveries to improve patient care. Key to this is training the next generation of cancer researchers.

Areas of particular strength at the University of Dundee are in surgical oncology for breast and colon cancer, radiation biology and clinical oncology, skin cancer and pharmacogenomics. Areas of strength in basic cancer biology are DNA replication, chromosome biology and the cell cycle, cell signalling and targets for drug discovery.

Teaching and Assessment

This course is taught by staff based in the College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing and the School of Life Sciences.

The MRes will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures, tutorials, discussion group work and journal clubs, self-directed study and supervised laboratory research.

What you will study

The MRes degree course is taught full-time over three semesters.

The first semester provides in-depth teaching and directed study on the molecular biology of cancer, and covers:

Basic cell and molecular biology, and introduction to cancer biology
Cell proliferation, cell signalling and cancer
Cancer cell biology
Carcinogenesis, cancer treatment and prevention
Specific training in research methodology and critical analysis

Students will also be required to take part in a journal club to further develop their critical review skills.

In semesters two and three students will be individually guided to focus on a specific cancer research topic which will be the subject of a literature review and associated laboratory research project. The research project is based in laboratories with state-of-the-art facilities, and under the leadership of world-class researchers.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Places on the course are limited, so early applications are strongly encouraged.
Apply early to avoid disappointment.
Follow us on Twitter to keep up with news from the MRes Cancer Biology @Mrescancerbiol

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The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Read more
The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Whilst these treatment have served well and new drugs will continue to be designed, clinical trials over the last five years have shown that boosting the body’s immune system, whose main task is to deal with invading pathogens, can help our immune system to destroy tumour cells. Many of the new immunotherapies may be tested in combination with more conventional treatments or tested alone, but investigators and oncologists now believe immunotherapy, initially combined with pharmacological treatments, will soon provide curative therapies and certainly give many patients a new lease of life.

More about this course

Worldwide the incidence of cancer is increasing, and is expected to reach 22 million new cases per year by 2030. In addition to treatments such as radiotherapy and surgery, chemotherapy has a vital role to play in prolonging the lives of patients.

The aims of the Cancer Immunotherapy MSc are to:
-Provide an in-depth understanding of the molecular targets at which the different classes of anticancer drugs are aimed, and of how drug therapies are evolving
-Review the biology of cancer with respect to genetics, pathological considerations, and the molecular changes within cells which are associated with the progression of the disease
-Enhance intellectual and practical skills necessary for the collection, analysis, interpretation and understanding of scientific data
-Deliver a programme of advanced study to equip students for a future career in anti-cancer drug and immunotherapy development
-Cover new areas in immunotherapy (some of which may enhance existing pharmacological therapies including: History of immunotherapy and review of immune system; Monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy and prevention; DNA vaccines against cancer; Adoptive T cell therapy; Dendritic cell vaccines; Antibodies that stimulate immunity; Adjuvant development for vaccines; Epigenetics and cancer: improving immunotherapy; Immuno-chemotherapy: integration of therapies; Exosomes and Microvesicles (EMVs) in cancer therapy and diagnosis; Dendritic cell vaccine development and Pox virus cancer vaccine vectors; Microbial causes of cancer and vaccination

Students will have access to highly qualified researchers and teachers in pharmacology and immunology, including those at the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Research Centre. Skills gained from research projects are therefore likely to be highly marketable in industry, academia and in the NHS. Students will be encouraged to join the British Society of Immunology and the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles.

Assessment is a combination of coursework, which includes tests and essays, the research project and its oral defence and examination.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Immunology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Immunotherapy (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Pharmacology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer: Diagnosis and Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Molecular Oncology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Frameworks for Research (core, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will have many opportunities to work in industry. There are established industries working hard to develop cancer immunotherapies including Bristol-Myers Squibbs, MERCK, AstraZeneca and Roche. There are also an innumerate number of start-up companies appearing including Omnis Pharma, UNUM Therapeutics and Alpine Immune Sciences.

Students will also have ample opportunity for future postgraduate study either within the School of Human Sciences and the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Centre at the MPhil/PhD level or beyond, even with some of our research partners within the UK, Europe and beyond.

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