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Masters Degrees (Quantitative Sociology)

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The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. Read more
The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. The programme gives students a firm grounding in the theoretical and empirical analysis of media and culture and enables them to study particular media and cultural forms in depth, examining their transformations over time and their impact on other aspects of social and political life. The programme consists of 4 components:

1. Theories of Culture and Media: all students taking this programme will be expected to follow this course of lectures that will cover some of the major theoretical contributions to the study of media and culture, ranging from Adorno and Habermas to Bourdieu and Becker and from medium theory to Castells and more recent theoretical work on new media and the internet. Students are also strongly encouraged to follow the course of lectures on social theory.

2. Substantive modules: there will be at least three core substantive modules taught by Prof John Thompson, Prof Patrick Baert and Dr Ella McPherson. The modules will be research-led and will reflect the research being undertaken by members of the Department. The content of specific modules may vary from year to year but topics covered will typically include the nature of the digital revolution and its impact on the media and creative industries; the changing nature of news and journalism in the digital age; the role of new media in the development of social movements and new forms of political mobilization and protest; the uses of social media and the internet and their impact on everyday life and culture; the role of ideas, intellectuals and media forms in processes of social and political change. Students in this programme will be expected to take at least three of these modules; they may also take the fourth module in this programme, or they may substitute one of these modules with a module taken from another MPhil programme offered by the Department (Modern Society and Global Transformations, Political and Economic Sociology, Sociology of Reproduction).

3. Research Methods: all students will take a course on research methods which includes sessions on philosophical issues in the social sciences; research design; data collection and analysis in relation to quantitative and qualitative methods; reflection on research ethics and practice; library and computer skills.

4. Dissertation: all students will write a dissertation on a topic of their choice that allows for theoretically informed empirical analysis of some aspect of media or culture in contemporary societies. The choice of dissertation topic is made in consultation with your supervisor, who can advise you on the suitability and feasibility of your proposed research and on research design. A dissertation workshop provides the opportunity to present aspects of your dissertation work and to receive constructive feedback from course teachers and fellow students.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsmc

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words [or prescribed course work] and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Media and Culture) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Big data and quantitative methods are transforming political processes and decisions in everyday life. Read more

Big data and quantitative methods are transforming political processes and decisions in everyday life. Local, national and international administrations are making "open data" available to wide audiences; giant, world-level web organisations are putting more and more "services" in synergy (search, map, data storage, data treatment, trade, etc.); and some private companies or governments are developing strongly ideological projects in relation with big data, which may have major consequence on the means by which we are ruled. All these issues involve data in text, image, numeric and video formats on unprecedented scales. This means there is a growing need for trained specialists who will have the cpacity to compete and/or collaborate with strictly business or technique-oriented actos on the basis of sound knowledge from political and international studies.

Programme content

In contrast to degrees such as Data Science or Data Analytics, where the focus ends up being almost exclusively on data practices and computational tools, the MA in Big Data and Quantitative Methods provides you with a knowledge and understanding of the central and innovative quantitative approaches in political science, the debates they have generated, and the implications of different approaches to issues concerning big data and public policy. The MA also draws on the considerable expertise which Warwick now has in quantitative methods located in PAISSociology, the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies (CIM) and the Q-Step Centre.

Given that a noteworthy part of big data is actually social data, this MA programme seeks to attract students from a variety of social science-related disciplines, including politics, sociology, philosophy and economics; you do not need a background in statistics to be eligible for the course. Students are required to take three core modules: Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods (previously Quantitative Data Analysis and Interpretation); Big Data Research: Hype or Revolution?, and Advanced Quantitative Research, and have a range of optional modules to choose from in PAIS or from other departments across Warwick including Law, Philosophy, Sociology and the CIM. Graduates of this degree will be able both to engage technically with data released at a new scale and to keep a critical expertise on their relevance and quality, skills which are increasingly required in the competitive global job market.

In addition to regular modules, the Warwick Q-Step Centre is offering a range of different masterclasses. Topics include Reproducibility, Quantitative text analysis, Web data collection, Geostatistics, Inferential network analysis, Machine learning, Agent-based simulation and Longitudinal data analysis. All masterclasses are designed as comprehensive but gentle introductions to methods that are not covered at length in core method modules. They are intended to broaden your horizons and provide concepts and tools to be applied in your future research.



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The MSc Sociology and Social Policy is designed to equip postgraduate students with advanced knowledge in the disciplines of sociology and social policy. Read more

The MSc Sociology and Social Policy is designed to equip postgraduate students with advanced knowledge in the disciplines of sociology and social policy. It allows for greater flexibility than either the MSc Sociology and Social Research or the MSc Social Policy and Social Research by enabling you to specialise in quantitative or qualitative methods.

This programme explores contemporary issues in sociology and social policy, such as social inequality and diversity, migration and terrorism, and can be used as a stepping stone for those who wish to pursue careers in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Introducing your course

Do you want to explore the structure of human society? Do you want to investigate why societies pool their resources to pay for social protection how social policy forms society? Enrol on the MSc Sociology and Social Policy degree and conduct social science research to understand the forces behind the construction of policies.

This masters course will open a path a range of fulfilling careers in social research and social policy. It also provides a stepping stone for those who wish to pursue a PhD in sociology and/or social policy.

Overview

The aims of this programme are to provide you with:

  • an in-depth understanding of classical and contemporary themes and debates in sociology and (dependent on your choice of options in semester two) their application in the analysis of selected social issues
  • an in-depth understanding of key conceptual debates in social policy, the capacity to evaluate competing explanatory frameworks and (dependent on your choice of options in semester two) the role of cross-national and comparative perspectives
  • a knowledge of key issues in the philosophy of social science and the ability to apply this knowledge in the design and practice of social research
  • a knowledge of the principal methods of qualitative or quantitative research utilised in the social sciences and an understanding of their application in different contexts, and (dependent on your choice of options in semester two) a knowledge of the techniques of data analysis utilised in the social sciences and their applications
  • the ability to design and conduct independent research in the field of sociology and/or social policy, utilising appropriate research metholodogies, and grounded in an understanding of the process of research management and ethical and legal issues associated with the conduct of social research
  • the capacity to present ideas, arguments and research findings through different means of communication

View the programme specification document for this course



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Explore pressing societal issues. Read more

Explore pressing societal issues

What glues a society together? How can trust and cooperation be promoted and conflict be avoided? What is the role of social networks, social norms and formal institutions in these processes? What causes inequality in general and inequality between men and women in the job market in particular? Why do immigrants have higher unemployment rates and lower-paid jobs? How do environments and institutions shape people’s values, attitudes and behaviours? And how do these individuals’ values, attitudes and behaviours shape society at large?

In the Master’s programme Sociology and Social Research, you will learn how to answer these questions. We will teach you to develop explanations for relevant social phenomena using state-of-the-art theory from Sociology, but also other disciplines such as Economics and Psychology. You will test these explanations using quantitative empirical research methods.

This programme is closely related to the research programme of the Department of Sociology and is embedded in the Interuniversity Centre for Social Science Theory and Methodology. The programme is recognised as a high quality programme and has been awarded high ratings by different organisations in the Netherlands. 

International orientation and individual development

The programme’s international character offers you global perspectives on sociological topics as well as a broad range of research opportunities. About 40% of our students come from abroad and prominent international scholars teach masterclasses. During your electives, you have the opportunity to follow courses or do an internship at another university or research institute in the Netherlands or abroad. You will be able to choose your thesis topic from a broad range of topics.

Programme objective

In this two-year Master’s programme, you will learn to operate as a highly qualified social science researcher. You will integrate social theory and state-of-the-art quantitative empirical research methods. You will have the opportunity to make choices that fit your goals, by choosing to do an internship and by selecting the topic of your thesis from a list of major sociological research questions, provided by our excellent researchers and lecturers who will be your supervisors. Interdisciplinary cooperation and methodical rigor are the basis for a creative addressing of today’s and future societal challenges, and these are the skills that you will acquire in the Master’s programme Sociology and Social Research. Your studies will prepare you for a career that requires strong research skills in the public or private sector, or as a PhD student.



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Applications have closed to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September. Read more

About the course

Applications have closed to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September.

The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. This 21-month programme takes a life-course and multilevel approach, aiming to integrate micro and macro issues in analysing social problems and the causes and consequences of population change.

The MPhil Sociology and Demography will prepare you for doctoral work in sociology and demography and research-intense jobs.

The curriculum emphasises:

• population-level analysis and demographic measures
• a life course approach
• sociological analysis as the key approach to explanation
• advanced quantitative methods.

This emphasis is reflected in the compulsory papers. Optional papers and the thesis will reflect either a more specialised topical study (eg gender, family and fertility, migration and integration of migrants, health and mortality, intergenerational relationships) or methodological work.

The MPhil programme has the following components:

• Sociological Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures and seminars, assessed by an unseen examination
• Demographic Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of examination and assignments
• Life Course Research paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of methods
• Statistical Methods paper taught in the first year through lectures and computer labs, assessed through a combination of a test and assignments
• Research Design paper taught in the first year through lectures, assessed via a combination of methods
• Two optional papers over both years of the MPhil, normally taught through eight weekly classes/seminars for each paper and assessed by unseen examination or appropriate coursework
• Replication project in the second year, comprising a combination of individual and group work and assessed via assignments
• MPhil thesis, a substantial piece of original research (of up to 30,000 words) to be submitted by the end of the second year

Please note that the optional papers available may vary from year to year. For information about the optional papers available in 2016-17 please see http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/course-list?search=course_list&task=search.

Graduate destinations

Graduates often continue with a PhD at Oxford or doctoral studies at highly-ranked US and continental programmes. Others find placement in research-intensive occupations in the public sector (eg national statistical offices, government departments and regional/local authorities), in international organisations, think tanks, and in private sector occupations in which quantitative skills are highly valued (consulting, market research, health research, social research, and insurance companies).

Entry requirements for entry in 2017-18

Academic ability -

Proven and potential academic excellence:

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in a social science subject.

The department will only consider applicants who have an undergraduate degree in arts, humanities or science subjects if they can demonstrate a strong interest in sociology, as taught at Oxford.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

- References/letters of recommendation

Your references will support intellectual ability, academic achievement, motivation, a demonstrable interest in sociology as it is taught at Oxford.

Academic references are preferred, though professional references are acceptable if you have spent a significant amount of time in work.

- Written work produced by the student

Two pieces of written work of no more than 2,000 words are required. The written work must be in English and preferably about a sociological subject. Extracts from longer pieces should be prefaced by a short note which puts them in context.

This will be assessed for comprehensive understanding of the subject area; understanding of problems in the area; ability to construct and defend an argument; powers of analysis; powers of expression.

The work need not be closely related but it should have some sociological content.

- Statement of purpose/personal statement

The personal statement must be in English and should be approximately 750 words in length.

This will be assessed for:

• your reasons for applying
• evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
• the ability to present a reasoned case in English
• commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
• preliminary knowledge of research techniques; capacity for sustained and intense work
• reasoning ability
• ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on your academic record and interests rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations.

English language requirement:

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1#content-tab--3

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available for courses starting in 2016-17. Full scholarships will cover your course and college fees and provide a grant for living costs. Information about the full range of funding available can be found in the Fees and funding section - http://www.ox.ac.uk/node/17098/

For over 70% of Oxford scholarships, nothing more than the standard course application is usually required. If you fulfil the eligibility criteria and apply by the relevant January deadline, you will be automatically considered. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out whether you are eligible for scholarships which require an additional application. If you are, the tool will include links to full details of how to apply - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/fees-funding-and-scholarship-search

Divisional funding opportunities:

Oxford hosts one of 21 Doctoral Training Centres accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In 2016 approximately 65 ESRC studentships are available across the Social Sciences. See the Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre website for details - http://researchtraining.socsci.ox.ac.uk/home-dtc

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2017-18 - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-and-college-fees/fee-status?wssl=1

Home/EU (including Islands) - Tuition fee: £8,715; College fee: £3,021; Total annual fees: £11,736
Overseas - Tuition fee: £16,770; College fee: 3,021; Total annual fees: £19,791

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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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The MRes Sociology. - Reviews systematically, and evaluates critically, alternative approaches, methodologies and paradigms of research in sociology. Read more

Overview

The MRes Sociology:

- Reviews systematically, and evaluates critically, alternative approaches, methodologies and paradigms of research in sociology.
- Reviews systematically, and evaluates critically, the application of these approaches in the specific areas of social enquiry in which students are specialising.
- Supports students, within an active research community, in identifying, investigating and realising their own original research.
- Equips students with the skills to contribute to research projects using any of the main methodologies of the social sciences.

The programme comprises a mix of Faculty-wide research-based units and departmental disciplinary-based specialisations. Programme intake limited to 16 students per year, fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

This programme has a limited intake of students per year, fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

The excellence of the research undertaken within the Department of Social & Policy Sciences has been recognised most recently by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mres-soci/

Programme structure

Core Units

- Short research apprenticeship project (MRes)
- Quantitative methods 1: introduction to quantitative methods
- Long research apprenticeship project
- Theoretical issues in sociology
- Ethical issues in research, policy and practice
- Qualitative methods 1
- Principles & skills of social research
- MRes Dissertation

Optional units

- Quantitative methods 2
- Qualitative methods 2

View Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/sp/sp-proglist-pg.html#I) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of coursework essays, class exercises, projects, oral presentations and examinations.

We also place strong emphasis on developing presentation and discussion/communication skills, which in many units is part of the assessed work.

Careers

The Social & Policy Sciences department is committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their training.

Our graduates generally go on to work in a wide variety of organisations, such as:

- Social research in universities and research institutes, government, business, voluntary organisations and international organisations.
- Public policy analysis at local, national and international levels.
- Public information and campaigning within organisations concerned with wellbeing, sustainability and social justice.

About the department

The Department of Social & Policy Sciences (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/) includes academics from social policy, sociology, social work and international development.

The international excellence of our research (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/) was recognised by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

We are committed to advancing learning and knowledge through teaching and research. Our Department collaborates with a wide range of users at the local, national, European and global levels.

Postgraduate programmes:
We offer a wide range of postgraduate programmes. Our postgraduate teaching strongly reflects our research and our links to policy-makers and development institutions at the national, European and global level.

Our Department also has an active MPhil/PhD research programme. We take great pride in fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

Seminar series:
We run a lively and well attended postgraduate research seminar series. Each of the Research Centres run seminar series and conferences associated with their research activities. The University of Bath also has a Research in the World public lecture series where key national and international academics are invited to speak.

Main areas of research

We are an internationally-recognised research-intensive department with a strong focus on policy and practice and a commitment to contribute to social wellbeing and social justice.

We draw together academic staff with backgrounds in Social Policy, Sociology, Social Work and International Development and work closely with colleagues in Psychology, Economics, and Health.

We also have an active and vibrant community of research students (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) undertaking their own research alongside our academic staff.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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Why are ‘private troubles’ also ‘public issues’? You’ll explore and answer questions just like this on our MA Sociology programme. Read more

Why are ‘private troubles’ also ‘public issues’? You’ll explore and answer questions just like this on our MA Sociology programme. MA Sociology is a lively and engaging programme for students interested in how social life shapes individuals’ experiences of the world around us.

Programme content

Focusing on cutting-edge areas of the discipline, our teaching is carried out by leading, research active sociologists. From across sociology and allied social sciences, you’ll gain a thorough understanding of theories and methodologies. Then, by choosing from our wide range of specialist modules, you’ll tailor your

programme dependent on your own specific interests.

The work you will do during your Masters study will include: examining individuals’ experiences, and encounters with structures and institutions; reading new empirical research; exploring social theories; and assessing innovative methodologies. The skills you will develop in doing this will stand you in good stead as you progress into your career.

The taught modules on this programme provide you with a detailed understanding of a range of traditional and emerging social research methods; you’ll then apply this knowledge to your dissertation. The dissertation is your chance to carry out an independent research project on a topic that inspires you, supervised by one of our academics.

You may have already studied sociology, or perhaps you are considering a new intellectual home. Students from different humanities and social science disciplines, who have an interest in obtaining a deep and complex understanding of the social world, are welcomed on to this programme.

Aside from your core modules, you will also take at least one of these modules:



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Join one of the top sociology departments in the UK and further your understanding of the tensions, interactions and networks that dictate how societies are organised. Read more
Join one of the top sociology departments in the UK and further your understanding of the tensions, interactions and networks that dictate how societies are organised. You contribute to the thinking that guides organisations such as the Home Office, Amnesty International and the United Nations.

You explore some of the most important and significant debates in contemporary social theory, learning to think analytically about theoretical questions. You discover the importance of social theory in developing a politically engaged understanding of concepts such as post-structuralism, feminism and actor-network theory, focusing on topics such as:
-The history of digital piracy
-Sociology of human rights
-Media and criminology
-Gender and sexuality
-Citizenship

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

A good sociology course, especially one from a recognised centre of excellence like Essex, opens many doors.

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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Forge a career as a social researcher, social worker or a consultant in the public or private healthcare and care sectors with a Masters course in Sociology and Social Research. Read more

Forge a career as a social researcher, social worker or a consultant in the public or private healthcare and care sectors with a Masters course in Sociology and Social Research. This programme is recognised by the ESRC as a research training course, is designed to equip postgraduate students with advanced knowledge of both issues and applied methods in sociological analysis.

The programme supports students in developing independent social research skills, and applying them in such contemporary subject areas as work, crime, migration, health, the media and the body. It also engages students in the discussion of issues and perspectives from both classical and contemporary sociological theories. The programme is an excellent grounding if you wish to pursue a PhD in sociology, and can also be a stepping stone for those who wish to pursue a career in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Introducing your course

Do you want to know more about the tools with which we study diverse areas of society, such as work, crime, migration, health, the media or the body? Our masters in Sociology and Social Research supports students in developing independent social research skills, and applying them in contemporary subject areas relevant to societal progress and knowledge.

It engages students in the discussion of issues and perspectives from both classical and contemporary sociological theories. The course provides an excellent grounding if you wish to pursue a PhD in sociology, and can also be a stepping stone for those looking for a career in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Overview

The aims of this programme are to provide you with:

  • an in-depth understanding of classical and contemporary themes and debates in sociology and of their application in the analysis of selected social issues
  • a knowledge of key issues in the philosophy of social science and the ability to apply this knowledge in the design and practice of social research
  • a knowledge of the techniques of data analysis utilised in the social sciences and their application
  • a knowledge of the principal methods of qualitative and quantitative research utilised in the social sciences, and an understanding of their application in different contexts
  • the ability to design and conduct independent research within the field of sociology, utilising appropriate research methodologies, and grounded in an understanding of the process of research management and ethical and legal issues associated with the conduct of social research
  • the capacity to present ideas, arguments and research findings through different means of communication

View the programme specification document for this course



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Our PgDip / MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our PgDip / MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. 

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level. 

Sociology pathway:

Cardiff is a centre of research excellence in Sociology. This research power in Sociology is reflected in the volume and distribution of sociological expertise here and through a number of well-established research centres. We are recognised for our methodological innovation, application and training in both quantitative and qualitative methods. All this takes place in a structured and supportive research environment.

One of the distinctive features of Sociology at Cardiff is the opportunity for postgraduate students to work with a wide range of leading researchers, on a range of themes and drawing on varied approaches and theories. You will have opportunities to attend seminars and data analysis workshops organised by our interdisciplinary research groups, including:

Children and childhood
Gender and sexualities
Health and society
Culture, imagination and practice
Global political economy
Education, culture and society
Ethnography
Culture and interpretive analysis
Our social theory forum.

Colloquia for postgraduate students from across Wales also provide opportunities for you to present your work in a supportive environment and benefit from the input of academic colleagues from partner institutions.

Structure

• PgDip

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.
In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

Modules:

Developing Core Research Skills
Foundations of Social Science Research
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Research Applications
Advanced Concepts in Contemporary Sociology

• MSc

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in three years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module. In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. You will choose your dissertation topic in agreement with your supervisor.

Modules:

Same modules as PgDip PLUS Dissertation.

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Assessment

You will have to successfully complete the taught component which comprises of 120 credits.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words (MSc only).

Career prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.

It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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The master programme Sociology and Social Research consists of 120 ECTS- (European Credit Transfer System) Points and is designed as a 4-semester full-time programme. Read more

Information on the Programme

The master programme Sociology and Social Research consists of 120 ECTS- (European Credit Transfer System) Points and is designed as a 4-semester full-time programme. It is a consecutive master degree based on a bachelor degree within the field of sociology.
The Core and Advanced Section of the master programme Sociology and Social Research includes 27 credit points and covers methodological basics of sociology and social research.
The Specialisation Section contains 39 credit points and consists of a research seminar, in which 15 credits points will be obtained, as well as advanced modules of sociology and social research.
The Supplementary Section serves as an additional section to develop a more specific profile – either by deepening and specialising or by diversifying knowledge. Further modules from business administration as well as from social sciences and economics are available to students. This area will contain two subareas that both require 12 credit points.

Detailed information concerning the curricular design is available on our homepage in the area of “study”.

Only the best for your career

The M.Sc. Sociology and Social Research at the WiSo-faculty of the University of Cologne deepens the knowledge gained in your bachelor studies and makes you an expert in your respective area. For many managing positions of different industries and for certain professions in research and teaching, a master is indispensable.
Possible areas of employment for sociologists can be found within market and opinion research, national and international statistic agencies, in national and international associations that are concerned with social and economic policy, research institutions, the departments of media research within mass media corporations and personnel administration of corporations. Additionally, other areas of employment present in positions of local government e.g. in departments responsible for school-, family-, city- or environmental policy as well as provincial and federal agencies. Graduates possess skills that qualify for the upper grade of civil service and leading positions in social and market research as well as social planning.
Take your professional future into your own hands and benefit from the theoretical and methodical-oriented approach of the WiSo-Faculty, which combines research as well as teaching with practical experience.
Take your professional future into your own hands and profit from the theoretical and methodological approaches taken at the WiSo Faculty, combining research and teaching with practice and thus underscoring our motto: "Innovation for society".

Not international enough?

If this is the case, there is the possibility to apply for a semester abroad at one of our numerous partner universities. Further Information can be found on the homepage of our International Relations Center.

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Based at the Manchester Metropolitan University Q-Step Centre in the Department of Sociology, this MSc approaches the study of quantitative methods in an innovative way, which emphasises career-ready skills that prepare students for work with data and quantitative analysis, or as suitable preparation for doctoral study. Read more

Based at the Manchester Metropolitan University Q-Step Centre in the Department of Sociology, this MSc approaches the study of quantitative methods in an innovative way, which emphasises career-ready skills that prepare students for work with data and quantitative analysis, or as suitable preparation for doctoral study.

The course focuses on the development and application of key quantitative methods and analytical techniques. It focuses on the use of quantitative methods within ‘real world’ contexts and a key aim is to develop graduates’ career-ready skills in this field.

About The Course

A range of quantitative techniques will be covered including multiple regression, multi-level modelling, questionnaire design and psychometric testing, quantitative evaluation, and data management. One unit, ‘Statistics in Practice’ explores knowledge exchange, mobilisation and achieving impact with research. There is a mixture of core units and specialist options. The course culminates in a placement based dissertation, in which students will produce a piece of research on behalf of one of our partner organisations. We will help you source your placement.



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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods. Read more

We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods.

Goldsmiths’ research in sociology covers a range of areas, including:

  • art and literature
  • deviance
  • education
  • the sociology of governance and regulation
  • theories of industrial society
  • health, illness and psychiatry
  • interpersonal relations
  • knowledge
  • politics
  • ‘race’ and ethnicity
  • class
  • religion
  • values in society
  • childhood and youth culture
  • the body and society
  • social aspects of the life sciences and bio-medicine, science and technology
  • the expansion of capitalism on a world scale
  • urban studies
  • gender and the sexual division of labour
  • culture and communications

We emphasise the importance of the relationship between you and your supervisor: we ‘match’ you with a supervisor whose current active research interests and expertise are compatible with your chosen topic of research.

You will be assessed by a thesis and viva voce.

The Sociology MPhil/PhD programme is recognised by the ESRC for excellence in research training.

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths

Skills

You'll develop advanced research training covering a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sociological methods, and an ability to develop advanced and extended forms of written argument and scholarly practice.

Careers

Possible careers cover:

  • Academia
  • Social research in applied areas like health or urban regeneration
  • Research consultancy
  • Practice-orientated work
  • Work in the arts and cultural industries
  • Publishing


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Would you like to learn from leading innovators in research methods?. Do you want to benefit from an outstanding team of educators and well-resourced teaching support materials?. Read more
  • Would you like to learn from leading innovators in research methods?
  • Do you want to benefit from an outstanding team of educators and well-resourced teaching support materials?
  • Would you like the opportunity to study with internationally respected scholars?

Sociology at Manchester is one of the UK's largest and most prestigious centres for the subject, with over 30 academic staff and 60 postgraduate students forming a diverse and rigorous academic community.

The MA programme aims to provide students who have an interest in sociology, the opportunity to extend and deepen their knowledge of the discipline. Our teaching includes all areas of contemporary sociology but we have particular expertise in the fields of socio-cultural change, gender and sexuality, and consumption and sustainability.

We are consistently highly ranked for research, coming first in the UK for the percentage of our research outputs that are judged as `world-leading', and second nationally based on our research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). Our research feeds into all of our postgraduate teaching.

The Sociology MA is the perfect course to develop your analytical and investigative skills, training you in methods of social investigation in order to equip you with the ability for independent thinking, research and analysis, setting you up perfectly for the world of employment.

Contact:

Course Director: Dr Nick Thoburn

Email: 

Tel: +44 (0)161 275 2496

Teaching and learning

Part-time study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is normally by a 3,000 word assessed essay for each unit and, for the MA students, a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words.

Course unit details

You take four core compulsory course units: Social Theory and Cultural Identity; Culture, Modernity and Media; Research Design I and II, together with four options chosen from a wide range of specialist units. Examples of optional course units include: Politics and Culture; Protest and Progress: Understanding Movements for Social and Political Change; Cultures of Digital Play; New Developments in Theories of Gender and Sexuality; Qualitative Research Methods; Introduction to Quantitative Methods; Methodological Issues in Social Research. Students may also negotiate an Independent Studies course unit, linked to their particular research interests, subject to a suitable academic supervisor being available. Students registered for the MA (or who upgrade from the PG Diploma) complete a 12,000 word dissertation, on a research topic of their choice, in addition to the eight taught course units.

Career opportunities

Many MA students go on to take research degrees (PhD), but the skills gained on this programme can be put to use in a variety of career paths. Careers which are most closely related include education, social and community work (related to a range of areas such as welfare advice, working with families or dealing with issues such as homelessness and mental health problems), human resources and working in the media.



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