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Masters Degrees (Political Risk Analysis)

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This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. Read more

This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. The Department of Geography is especially well-suited to examine these in relation to environmental hazards, climate change and security-related risk, but students are encouraged to develop their thinking in relation to any aspect of risk research, including broader environmental change, disaster risk reduction, financial risk, risk and insurance, risk and health, risk and migration, risk and social policy, risk and governance, borders and terrorism. The MA programme foregrounds the existence of multiple ways of understanding risk, from risk as an objective phenomenon managed through scientific tools (e.g. in the case of environmental hazards) to risk as a social construct and a political technique (e.g. in the case of risk and security).

For students interested in security-related risk, the MA programme offers in-depth and advanced understanding of geo-political security challenges and politics, including the ways in which society is governed increasingly through the prism of risk. Dealing with risks as a function of both the natural and social environments we live in, the course responds to the growing realisation that many risks are being created through social processes bound to questions of security, including the ways that risk techniques are emerging and being employed as a means of securing uncertain futures.

Course Structure

Students take the following core modules, and a selection of elective modules, which, when combined, add up to 180 credits:

Core Modules: 

  • Understanding Risk (30 Credits)
  • Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience (30 Credits)
  • Risk Frontiers (15 Credits)
  • Using Geographical Skills and Techniques (15 Credits)
  • Dissertation by Research (or) Vocational Dissertation (60 Credits)

Elective Modules available in previous years include:

  • Hydrological Hazards (30 Credits)
  • Risk, Science and Communication (15 Credits)
  • Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Hazard (30 Credits)
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East (15 Credits)
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis (15 Credits)
  • European Security (15 Credits)
  • Social Policy and Society (30 Credits). 

Course Learning and Teaching

Understanding and managing risk is ultimately about choice. All elements of society, from individuals to governments, must make decisions – conscious or not – about the ways in which they perceive, interpret, balance, and mitigate risk. Risk permeates our day-to-day lives in ways that are now recognised to be much more complex than the hazard-vulnerability paradigm, which dominated risk research until the 1990s, recognised. A deeper understanding of the nature of risk, its emergence, and its interface and position within societies, has emphasised the need to take a much more complex view in which a general understanding of the ways in which risk is generated, experienced and managed needs to be combined with a specific understanding of particular science or policy areas.

The primary aim of this Masters programme is to equip students with a general understanding of risk; whilst simultaneously providing specific training in elements of risk-related research. The MA supports students in developing a strong social science perspective on risk. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary framework for understanding risk from a variety of perspectives. Students will learn theoretical and practical approaches to identifying and framing risk, as well as the underlying physical and social mechanisms that generate it. They will also examine the relationship of risk to knowledge and policy, and will be made aware of the array of advanced tools and techniques to assess the physical and social dimensions of risk under conditions of uncertainty. They will also be trained in the substance and methods associated with a range of science, social science and policy areas, and be expected to demonstrate that they can combine their general training in risk with their specific understanding of the substance and method associated with the chosen area, through either a research-based or a vocational dissertation.

All students will undertake a suite of core modules (150 credits) which provide students with a range of skills and knowledge which result in a unique focus in risk combined with training in interdisciplinary research methods. These modules are: Understanding Risk, Using Geographical Skills and Techniques, Risk Frontiers, Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience, and the Dissertation.

Students then also select a suite of elective modules (another 30 credits). Students can choose to receive specialised scientific training in:

  • international relations, geopolitics and security, and/or
  • scientific perspectives on environmental hazards
  • a combination of approaches to risk.

Electives can be selected from: Strategic Asia, European Security, International Relations in the Middle East, Social Policy and Society and Risk, Science and Communication. 

The Risk Masters (both in its MA and MSc forms) is taught jointly between Durham University’s Geography Department, the School of Government & International Affairs, and the School of Applied Social Sciences. The programme’s interdisciplinary approach encourages students to combine science and social science perspectives. Students have a broad range of modules to choose from, and in this way develop an individualized set of professional skills that, depending on the student’s preferences, speak more to either the natural sciences (e.g. via scientific modelling, GIS or science and communication) or the social sciences (e.g. via social science research methodologies and engagements with social policy and international relations). The programme is delivered in close collaboration with Durham University’s Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience (IHRR), and through IHRR’s activities students get permanent exposure to both practitioner and academic perspectives at the forefront of risk thinking and practice.



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The global business environment is more complex and interconnected than ever before. Major shifts can happen in a day. The pace of change keeps increasing. Read more

The global business environment is more complex and interconnected than ever before. Major shifts can happen in a day. The pace of change keeps increasing.

The MSc Risk Management at GCU is designed for today - and industry recognises this. Double-accredited by the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII) and the Institute of Risk Management (IRM), the MSc Risk Management is available in both Glasgow and London.

As a student, you'll gain the cutting-edge knowledge and practical skillset to navigate the complexities and challenges of risk management in today's world.

  • Build skills in establishing risk policy and structures
  • Master the design and review processes for risk management
  • Practise building processes for risk response
  • Learn how to develop contingency and business continuity programmes

GCU is a global leader in risk management education and research. Our experts pursue high-impact research and investigate real-world problems in risk management. For example, we conducted a recent government-funded study assessing the risks associated with private finance in the construction industry and produced a recent report on the risks associated with e-commerce.

Our staff publish on subjects like insurance risk regulation, occupational health and safety, healthcare risk management, financial risk management and more - contributing to public knowledge and the common good.

In our thriving GCU community, we encourage every student and graduate to help build the common good as well. That means exploring ways to make a positive impact, whatever you do, wherever you go.

What you will study

Enterprise Risk and Modelling

You will gain an understanding of the theory involved in contemporary risk management processes and practices. Providing you with an understanding of the building techniques required to assemble a risk analysis model.

Global Perspectives on Risk

You will learn how to critically analyse a wide range of risks, including managerial, cultural, political, ethical and economic factors impacting on international businesses. You will also evaluate a range of risk management strategies and tactics available to international businesses.

Risk Financing and Insurance

You will learn the basic principles of risk finance, examine insurance theory and undertake a critical evaluation of insurance practice. Alternative risk financing methods such as options, futures, swaps and securitisation will also be analysed.

Business Continuity and Crisis Management

You will examine the relationship between risk management and business continuity management, study the key drivers of Business Continuity and the strategies involved when an organisation faces a crisis situation.

Ethics and Corporate Governance

This module explores the key issues in corporate governance and the extent to which the arrangements currently in place secure corporate accountability.

Personal and Professional Development

Enables you to identify, understand, develop and articulate your personal abilities in the context of your future career aspirations.

Research Methods

This module develops advanced skills related to a range of research methods needed for academic and practical research at Masters level.

Dissertation

The final element of the programme is the dissertation, which provides you with an opportunity to design and undertake a piece of research in a selective area of risk management.

Teaching Methods

Assessment will be continuous through a combination of formative and summativeassessment. Assessment is by a varietyof means such as case studies, portfolios,essays and reports.

Professional Accreditation

Accredited by the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII) and the Institute of Risk Management (IRM), this programme is designed to provide you with the skills to excel in a role as a risk manager, risk and insurance manager or risk analyst or clinical risk manager within a variety of organisations and sectors.

Your career

Our graduates are highly competitive candidates for job opportunities in the UK and across the world. Graduates find successful roles in risk management, risk analysis, risk co-ordination, insurance and business continuity management and more in a wide range of industry sectors including banking, insurance, consultancy, oil and gas, transport, and construction.



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The global business environment is more complex and interconnected than ever before. Major shifts can happen in a day. The pace of change keeps increasing. Read more

The global business environment is more complex and interconnected than ever before. Major shifts can happen in a day. The pace of change keeps increasing.

The MSc Risk Management at GCU is designed for today - and industry recognises this. Double-accredited by the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII) and the Institute of Risk Management (IRM)

As a student, you'll gain the cutting-edge knowledge and practical skillset to navigate the complexities and challenges of risk management in today's world.

  • Build skills in establishing risk policy and structures
  • Master the design and review processes for risk management
  • Practise building processes for risk response
  • Learn how to develop contingency and business continuity programmes

GCU is a global leader in risk management education and research. Our experts pursue high-impact research and investigate real-world problems in risk management. For example, we conducted a recent government-funded study assessing the risks associated with private finance in the construction industry and produced a recent report on the risks associated with e-commerce.

Our staff publish on subjects like insurance risk regulation, occupational health and safety, healthcare risk management, financial risk management and more - contributing to public knowledge and the common good.

In our thriving GCU community, we encourage every student and graduate to help build the common good as well. That means exploring ways to make a positive impact, whatever you do, wherever you go.

What you will study

Enterprise Risk and Modelling

You will gain an understanding of the theory involved in contemporary risk management processes and practices; providing you with an understanding of the building techniques required to assemble a risk analysis model.

Global Perspectives on Risk

You will learn how to critically analyse a wide range of risks, including managerial, cultural, political, ethical and economic factors impacting on international businesses. You will also evaluate a range of risk management strategies and tactics available to international businesses.

Risk Financing and Insurance

You will learn the basic principles of risk finance, examine insurance theory and undertake a critical evaluation of insurance practice. Alternative risk financing methods such as options, futures, swaps and securitisation will also be analysed.

Business Continuity and Crisis Management

You will examine the relationship between risk management and business continuity management, study the key drivers of Business Continuity and the strategies involved when an organisation faces a crisis situation.

Ethics and Corporate Governance

This module explores the key issues in corporate governance and the extent to which the arrangements currently in place secure corporate accountability.

Personal and Professional Development

Enables you to identify, understand, develop and articulate your personal abilities in the context of your future career aspirations.

Research Methods

This module develops advanced skills related to a range of research methods needed for academic and practical research at masters level.

Dissertation

The final element of the programme is the dissertation, which provides you with an opportunity to design and undertake a piece of research in a selective area of risk management.

Your career

Our graduates are highly competitive candidates for job opportunities in the UK and across the world. Graduates find successful roles in risk management, risk analysis, risk co-ordination, insurance and business continuity management and more in a wide range of industry sectors including banking, insurance, consultancy, oil and gas, transport, and construction.



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Our Risk Analysis MA, MSc has a unique focus on the societal, health, safety and environmental aspects of risk – rather than the financial aspects. Read more

Our Risk Analysis MA, MSc has a unique focus on the societal, health, safety and environmental aspects of risk – rather than the financial aspects. We will provide you with a deep knowledge and understanding of social science theories, concepts, techniques and organisational approaches to risk assessment, management, governance and communication.

Key benefits

  • Access to experts in the field of risk analysis.
  • Potential for three-week internship with leading public and private sector organisations.
  • Close links with, and speakers from, government and industry, which will give you up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

Description

In recent years, the ideas, concepts and tools of risk analysis have come to dominate the way in which we conceive and respond to an ever-expanding range of societal threats to the environment, health, security, prosperity or even lifestyle. However, how we assess, manage, govern and communicate risk is regularly the source of political conflict, and this poses dilemmas for policymakers, public and private sector organisations and individuals alike. It is

increasingly recognised that such issues –evident in crises from food safety to banking – cannot be addressed by simple technical ‘know-how’ alone. They require understanding of the political, organisational and social contexts in which decisions are made.

Our course draws together a unique combination of risk scholarship from across the social sciences, including psychology, political science and sociology, to provide an advanced academic foundation in risk studies. In doing so, it will equip you to critically analyse risk issues in a wide range of public policy, organisational and societal settings, to evaluate the dynamics of risk governance and management options, and to develop reflexive communication strategies.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, and you will typically have 20 hours of this per module. We also expect you to undertake 180 hours of independent study for each module. For your 12,000 word dissertation, we will provide four workshops and five hours of one-toone supervision to complement your 587 hours of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

Performance on taught modules in the Geography Department is normally assessed through essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career prospects

This course will enable you to undertake further doctoral research or enter careers as risk specialists. Our graduates work in industry, consultancies, governmental and nongovernmental agencies. Past graduates have used the skills they developed with us to enter and excel in a variety of positions including the World Bank, European Commission, HM Government, UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, UK Food Standards Agency, US Department of Homeland Security, Medical Research Council, Pricewaterhouse Coopers, KPMG, SwissRe, Ernst and Young, Marsh Risk Consulting, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Total, L’Oreal, Network Rail, Sainsburys and ING.



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Learn about both the technical and the business issues that can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk. Read more
Learn about both the technical and the business issues that can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk.

Who is it for?

This Masters course is aimed at IT professionals with approximately five years’ experience and is intended to provide them with the skills that they need to progress to a management role in information security and risk. The course will appeal to companies and professionals that need to develop or improve their capability in managing IT-related security, in order to enter markets with higher demands of dependability and security, comply with new regulations, or re-qualify for new roles.

Objectives

Concerns about cyber security and information risk have led to a growing market for technical specialists, but there is also a need for more senior professionals with an awareness of both the technical and the business issues who can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk.

On this Management of Information Security and Risk MSc programme you will learn about both the technical and the business issues that can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk.

Understand how to communicate these risks to both the technical staff and the executive business team (CEO, CIO, CFO and COO) in a language they share. Focus on human-machine interaction and decision making within today's increasingly complex Political-Economical-Socio-Technical (PEST) systems.

Find out about latest industry and government standards, legislation and best practice from leading technical experts and network with your peers to compare and contrast best practices from different industries.

Teaching and learning

The modules are taught by academics at the Centre for Software Reliability, within the School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, and also by visiting lecturers from industry. We also have invited speakers from academia and industry in most modules. Teaching takes place via seminars, lectures, group work and tutorials. The assessment is through coursework only – this consists of written work (individual and group), presentations and peer review.

The modules will be delivered in block mode, with students taking two modules per term. Each module consists of two blocks as follows:
-Thursday evening: 5pm - 9pm
-Friday: 9am-5pm
-Saturday: 9am-5pm

In summary, assuming attendance at the Thursday evening sessions can be done without having to take any time off from work, the students are expected to take eight Fridays off from work in a calendar year (though some employers may allow their employees to take these times off as study leave), and they will need to also attend classes for a further eight Saturdays (i.e. two Fridays and two Saturdays per module). Timetables are for guidance only and are subject to change.

Modules

The course covers the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in senior roles in information security and risk.

The course supports the extra breadth of knowledge required by people with professional experience to help them progress towards target roles in management or consulting on security, assurance and risk.

Applicants can also apply to enrol on individual modules as CPDs. It will then be possible for you to gradually build credits for the MSc should you wish to take this route. City, University of London is also an approved MoD Enhanced Learning Credits (ELC) scheme provider (ID-1538).

Modules providing Professional Skills
-Information Leadership (15 credits)
-Executive Development (15 credits)
-Socio-Technical Systems (15 credits)
-IT Risk Management for effective performance and the prevention of fraud, error and disaster (15 credits)

Specialised Security and Risk Modules
-Information Security Management (15 credits)
-IT Risk and Resilience (15 credits)
-Quantitative Risk Analysis (15 credits)
-Assurance Cases (15 credits)

Career prospects

This course will appeal to companies and professionals that need to develop or improve their capability in managing IT-related security, in order to enter markets with higher demands of dependability and security, comply with new regulations, or re-qualify for new roles. Graduates should be suitable for consideration as the CSO or Security Architects and Senior Information Risk Managers and would also greatly help them in information security Consultancy and Auditing roles.

Our previous and existing cohort of students have all been employed full-time in a wide range of companies, including multi-billion pound turnover internationals in the aviation industry, global auditing companies (e.g. KPMG), media companies (e.g. Sky and Sony), financial services companies (e.g. Deutsche Bank) in the City of London, small and medium enterprises (SMEs), government departments and NHS trusts. The programme helps students build a strong network with their peers and maintain it as part of their career development.

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The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. Read more
The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. The Risk and Disaster Science MSc aims to meet the growing need for experts trained in disaster science in sectors ranging from finance to humanitarian response.

Degree information

In a science-led programme, students will explore the characterisation of risk from a fundamental understanding of hazard, statistical modelling, appreciation of causes of vulnerability, and quantifying exposure to the management and reduction of disaster risks. There is an emphasis on scientific analysis and statistical methods. Students will enjoy a wide range of taught modules covering scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, six core modules and two optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules
-Decision and Risk Statistics
-Earthquake Hazard Risk
-Emergency and Crisis Management
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
-The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks

Optional modules - choose options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:
-Climate Risks to Hydro-ecological Systems
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Seismic Risk Assessment
-Statistical Computing

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, practicals, field visits, directed reading and problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in industry and commerce, research, research communication and public policy including insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, business continuity, humanitarian assistance, engineering and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities forum for students; this has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, and headhunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction.

Employability
This is a new programme and no information on graduate destinations is currently available. Career destinations of recent IRDR graduates include: a London-based international economic consultancy in the field of micro-finance; a consultancy role in disaster risk for an insurance company; a PhD studentship; the World Food Programme; and Rescue Global - an NGO based in London. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across twelve departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with non-governmental organisations, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policymakers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

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All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken by local emergency management professionals, international trends show that the economic and social impact of disaster has increased around the world. Read more
All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken by local emergency management professionals, international trends show that the economic and social impact of disaster has increased around the world. This is especially true in the developing world, where large-scale disasters can result in enormous loss of life as well as considerable economic damage.

The MSc in International Disaster Management is designed for participants who want to increase both theoretical and practical management skills in enhancing resilience to disasters through prevention, preparedness, response and recovery from natural and man-made disaster events. Within the HCRI, this will take place through multidisciplinary study focusing on the critical analysis of current trends in global policies, particularly those related to international disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, climate change adaptation and humanitarian action tools commonly used by disaster risk reduction professionals. To this end, the core curriculum brings together the realms of disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, climate change adaptation and humanitarian action. The interdisciplinary team of researchers at the HCRI will also support academic study through practical applications of theory to disaster resilience, prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.

In this way, the MSc in International Disaster Management is unique as it incorporates a wide variety of available course units from history, politics, development studies, the arts and medicine. This results in a course that is suitable as a way to development initial skills in disaster risk reduction or support continuing education for disaster risk reduction professionals.

Aims

On completion of the course, you should be able to show a critical understanding of:
1. Key issues and debates related to the theory and practices of disaster risk reduction. Students will show familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of polices at international and national levels, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, Sustainable Development Goals, 21 st Conference of Parties on Climate Change (COP21) and the outcomes of the World Humanitarian Summit.
2. The range of environmental, health and social science topics which influence disaster risk reduction and management (including political, historical, anthropological understandings). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.
3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of disaster risk reduction including environmental/geological studies, emergency management structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGO's and other civil institutions.
4. An understanding of common approaches to disaster risk reduction (i.e. risk matrices, disaster typologies), including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with disaster prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in both industrialized and developing countries.
5. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferable skills through both independent and group-based work.
6. A detailed understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of disaster risk reduction along with implications and limitations of research findings on this subject, and of how to produce an original piece of academic research. Delivered via a dissertation.

Special features

HCRI also offers bespoke training in International Disaster Management and Continuing Professional Development courses.

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Teaching and learning

Delivery of the course will be done through face-to-face teaching at the University of Manchester. This will be supported by streamed lectures, discussion boards and other e-learning elements.

Coursework and assessment

Graduation requirements will be the completion of 180 credits. A total of 120 credits of module coursework will be required for students to move on to dissertation writing. A passing dissertation will lead to the final 60 credits needed for MA completion.

Career opportunities

Students completing this programme may consider a wide range of career choices, including careers with:
-Civil Service (working within various government ministries, including the foreign office, international development office and local resilience forums)
-International Institutions (such as the UN Peacebuilding Commission, Department of Peacekeeping Operations and regional bodies such as the European Union, African Union, Organization of American States)
-NGO's (local and international) working on peacebuilding initiatives
-Academia/Research Institutes/Think-Tanks

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Summary. Taught by leading researchers in risk taking, decision making and finance, this MSc will prepare you for a broad range of career paths. Read more

Summary

Taught by leading researchers in risk taking, decision making and finance, this MSc will prepare you for a broad range of career paths. You could choose to use your skills in the financial sector, for example as a stockbroker, investment banker, financial analyst, risk officer or fund manager, or work for an insurance company. The course includes specialist modules in insurance and credit scoring rarely found on degrees of this type, so you can opt to develop your skills to progress in this growing sector.

Modules

Introduction to Finance; Principles of Risk Management; Behavioural Finance; Risk-taking and Decision-making; Management of Financial Risk; Quantitative and Qualitative Research. Optional modules: Simulation; Quantitative Methods; Stock Market Analysis; Corporate Risk Management Processes; Business Ethics; Problem Structuring; Project Risk Management; Insurance; Credit Scoring and Data Mining.

Visit our website for further information.



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Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Read more

Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Changes in customer requirements, technology, competitive conditions and regulation create the need for managers, traders and analysts to make rapid and often far-reaching decisions about their short term operations and long term strategies. The MSc and MA in Banking and Finance degree courses at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial services, and to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in this vitally important and dynamic sector of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MA/MSc Banking and Finance degree programme include:

Why are the banking systems in different countries (such as the UK, Germany, Japan and the US) so diverse?

What determines the structure, performance and efficiency of banking and financial markets?

Why do banks and financial intermediaries exist?

What are the main theories of the banking firm?

How relevant are financial intermediaries in a world of increasing securitization and with the evolution of virtual banking?

How do banks optimally allocate capital?

Does bank regulation increase or decrease risks?

How do we measure the risks undertaken by banks?

Can regulators reduce the likelihood of systemic (system-wide) risk?

What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?

Can market risk be priced accurately? Can credit risk be priced accurately?

How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?

How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?

How do banks use futures, options, derivatives and swaps to manage their balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?

What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?

How do banks manage their business so as to maintain customer relationships, improve operational efficiency and add shareholder value?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Banking and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to banking, finance and capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Banking and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Banking and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Optional modules

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business.



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Issues you will study as part of your MSc or MA Management and Finance degree programme include. How can organisations ensure their own survival in a rapidly changing competitive environment?. Read more
Issues you will study as part of your MSc or MA Management and Finance degree programme include:

How can organisations ensure their own survival in a rapidly changing competitive environment?
What are the key strategic management problems facing organisations?
Are organisations as complex as they seem?
How can you analyse the strategy process, evaluate the strategic choices that may be made and place a value on the strategic options that are available?
How would you recognise effective approaches to HRM?
What are the costs and benefits of the alternatives?
Do contemporary employment practices lessen conflicts and tensions in the employment relationship?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment? Can market risk be priced accurately?
Can credit risk be priced accurately?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
Can futures, options, derivatives and swaps be used to manage the risks involved?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Management and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants not only with an insight into organisational behaviour and strategic choices in HRM and marketing, but also with an understanding of theoretical developments relating to corporate finance and the capital markets, and competence in the techniques required to assess the consequences for business management. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of business management and financial techniques in a real-world setting.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Business and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods:This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Optional module (choose 2):

Islamic Finance: This module provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the module examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing, and highlights financial engineering and risk management features of this type of business.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts in contemporary management theory and practice. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance. You will examine the principles underlying inter-firm comparison (comparing the performance of one firm with another) and trend analysis (comparing the performance of the same firm over different periods).

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Public Sector Management: This module identifies the distinctive characteristics of the public sector in a competitive market-driven environment. Organisational forms in the public sector are reviewed, in the light of the changing culture of public services, competition, best value and public expectations.

Behavioural Finance: This module provides in-depth coverage of behavioural finance, which replaces the "rationality" assumption with behavioural biases that have been documented by psychologists.

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This programme combines a sound basis of advanced knowledge and understanding in the broader and more disparate field of International Studies with the opportunity to choose optional specialist areas of study from among those offered in the School, and other schools such as Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more

This programme combines a sound basis of advanced knowledge and understanding in the broader and more disparate field of International Studies with the opportunity to choose optional specialist areas of study from among those offered in the School, and other schools such as Modern Languages and Cultures. The particular interests reflected in the choice of options may then be developed through the researching and writing of a dissertation.

Through the programme, you will gain advanced knowledge and understanding of:

  • The extent to which an international community has developed and the driving forces shaping its development
  • Factors determining humanitarian interventions
  • The processes of globalisation in the political, economic, cultural and scientific fields
  • The governance role of international organisations
  • How the degree of integration of countries into the international political and economic system varies and the determinants of those variations
  • Historical and/or contemporary issues and debates in the politics and political economy of specific states and/or areas and/or international institutions and organisations
  • Regime analysis and the concept of soft power governance
  • An appropriate topic in international politics of their choice

Course Structure

Students will take four core modules to the value of 135 credits and optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules:

  • Research Methods and Dissertation Production
  • Model United Nations
  • International Relations Theory
  • Dissertation

Optional Modules:

Optional modules in previous years have included:

  • European Institutions and the Policy Process
  • The European Union as a Global Actor
  • German Foreign Policy
  • Collective Memory and Identity in Post-War Europe
  • Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain Since 1850
  • Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
  • European Security
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East
  • Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
  • Just War in Political Theory and Practice
  • The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
  • The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
  • America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
  • Region, Nation and Citizen in SE Asia
  • Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
  • Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
  • Human Rights
  • Political Ideology
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
  • Theories of Capitalism
  • A module offered by the School of Modern Languages.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into three core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



Read less
This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. Read more

This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. It enables you to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion concepts, theories and paradigms within the broad field of international relations, drawing lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations.

Students are able to develop their ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship. Each study route aims to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, including cultural and local political and ideological factors, which shape the contemporary international relations of the area.

The course also provides an opportunity for studying international relations and in comparative and historical perspective taking account of regional specific political and economic factors.

Course Structure

Students will take five core modules to the value of 150 credits and optional modules to the value of 30 credits, 15 of which must be from the regional module list.

Core Modules:

  • International Relations Theory
  • Model United Nations
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Production
  • Dissertation.

European Route Core Module:

  • European Security.

Regional Modules:

  • European Institutions and the Policy Process
  • The European Union as a Global Actor
  • Collective Memory & Identity in Post War Europe.

Non-regional Modules:

In previous years these have included:

  • German Foreign Policy
  • Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain
  • Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East
  • The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
  • America and the World: The Making of the US Foreign Policy
  • Human Rights
  • Political Ideology
  • Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
  • Just War in Political Theory and Practice
  • Nationalism Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
  • Political Economy and Development of Chinese Business
  • Political Ideology
  • Region, Nation and Citizen in Southeast Asia
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
  • The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
  • A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into four core and two optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



Read less
This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. Read more

This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. It enables you to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion concepts, theories and paradigms within the broad field of international relations, drawing lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations.

Students are able to develop their ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship. Each study route aims to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, including cultural and local political and ideological factors, which shape the contemporary international relations of the area.

The course also provides an opportunity for studying international relations and in comparative and historical perspective taking account of regional specific political and economic factors.

Course Structure

Students will take five core modules to the value of 150 credits and optional modules to the value of 30 credits, 15 of which must be from the regional module list.

Core Modules:

  • International Relations Theory
  • Model United Nations
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Production
  • Dissertation.

East Asia Route Core Module:

  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis

Regional Modules:

  • Region, Nation and Citizen in SE Asia
  • Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
  • Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China.

Non-regional Modules:

In previous years these have included:

  • European Institutions and the Policy Process
  • The European Union as a Global Actor
  • German Foreign Policy
  • Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain
  • Collective Memory and Identity in Post-War Europe
  • Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
  • European Security
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East
  • The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
  • The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
  • America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
  • Human Rights
  • Political Ideology
  • Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
  • Just War in Political Theory and Practice
  • Political Ideology
  • A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into four core and two optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



Read less
This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. Read more

This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. It enables you to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion concepts, theories and paradigms within the broad field of international relations, drawing lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations.

Students are able to develop their ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship. Each study route aims to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, including cultural and local political and ideological factors, which shape the contemporary international relations of the area.

The course also provides an opportunity for studying international relations and in comparative and historical perspective taking account of regional specific political and economic factors.

Course Structure

Students will take five core modules to the value of 150 credits and optional modules to the value of 30 credits, 15 of which must be from the regional module list.

Core Modules:

  • International Relations Theory
  • Model United Nations
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Production
  • Dissertation.

Middle East Route Core Module:

  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East

Regional Modules:

  • Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
  • The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
  • The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East.

Non-regional Modules:

In previous years these have included:

  • German Foreign Policy
  • European Security
  • Collective Memory and Identity in Post-War Europe
  • European Institutions and the Policy Process
  • The European Union as a Global Actor
  • Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain
  • America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
  • Human Rights
  • Political Ideology
  • Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
  • Just War in Political Theory and Practice
  • Nationalism Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
  • Political Economy and Development of Chinese Business
  • Political Ideology
  • Region, Nation and Citizen in Southeast Asia
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
  • A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into four core and two optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



Read less
This programme is now closed but you may want to consider other courses such as the . Mathematics MSc. . . Read more

This programme is now closed but you may want to consider other courses such as the Mathematics MSc

The Financial Mathematics MSc programme enables graduates and professionals with a strong mathematical background to research, develop and apply quantitative and computational techniques to investment and risk management. Based in the Department of Mathematics, this course has a superb reputation for research-led teaching and strong links to industry.

  • A rigorous approach to quantitative finance taught entirely by the Department of Mathematics.
  • In-depth coverage of the skills needed for working in the financial, actuarial or related industry: probability theory, optimisation, statistics and computer implementation.
  • Unrivalled facilities in central London with City of London's financial centre close by, and with access to live market data in our Bloomberg Data Laboratory.
  • Flexible study programme offering the opportunity to study part-time.
  • King’s is a member of the London Graduate School in Mathematical Finance which provides advanced courses for students who wish to push beyond the MSc core syllabus.
  • Lecturers on the programme have extensive experience in consulting and work for financial companies and institutions such as Bank of Finland, Commerzbank, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, ION Trading, Standard Chartered Bank and Winton Capital Management.

Description

Financial Mathematics studies problems of optimal investment and risk management, and this course covers a diverse range of topics, from classical options pricing to post-crisis investment and risk management

Like any branch of applied mathematics, financial mathematics analyses a given problem by first building a mathematical model for it and then examining the model. Both steps require detailed knowledge in different areas of mathematics, including probability, statistics, optimisation, computer science and many more traditional fields of mathematics.

Our Financial Mathematics MSc course is a unique study pathway that encompasses the essential skills required for successful risk management, trading and research in quantitative finance: probability, statistics, optimisation, computing and financial markets. You will explore probability theories, risk neutral valuation, stochastic analysis as well as interest rate and credit risk modules. We also offer you the opportunity to study an additional zero-credit supportive module called mathematical analysis for financial mathematics.

The Financial Mathematics MSc programme offers you the choice to study either full or part-time and is made up of optional and required modules. You must take modules totalling 180 credits to complete the course. If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your programme will take two years to complete, you will study the required modules in the first year, and a further selection of required and optional modules including the 60-credit financial mathematics report module in your second year.

Bloomberg terminal laboratory

King’s is one of only a few academic departments in the UK that offers full access to Bloomberg terminals. These terminals will provide you access to live financial data. They are heavily used within the financial industry, and the data they provide is critical in assisting traders in making investment decisions and for risk managers monitoring investment probabilities. We have 13 Bloomberg terminals available for exclusive use by the Financial Mathematics MSc programme.

You will use the Bloomberg terminals to:

  • Gain an intuition for the conduct of real financial markets
  • Develop potential investment strategies
  • Experience using real-world investment and risk management software and obtain data for research.

The skills you will learn from using the terminals are highly valued by employers. King’s is part of a strong network of financial mathematics in London with connections both in academia and in the industry.

We are also members of the University of London and by arrangement, you can enrol in optional modules at other institutions within the University of London, which includes Birkbeck, London School of Economics and Political Sciences, University College London and many others.

Course purpose

This programme is suitable for students or professionals with a strong mathematical background. It covers the principles and techniques of quantitative finance to prepare students for advanced work in the financial sector or research in mathematical finance.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the programme. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

Average per week: Three hours for 11 weeks per each 15 credit module.

You are expected to spend approximately 10 hours of effort for each credit (so for a typical module of 15 credits this means 150 hours of effort).

Assessment

The primary method of assessment for this course is a combination of written examinations, essays, coursework and individual or group projects and oral presentations.  

Career destinations

Our graduates are highly sought after by investment banks, corporate risk management units, insurance companies, fund management institutions, financial regulatory bodies, brokerage firms, and trading companies. Recent employers of our graduates include, Capital Investment, Credit Suisse, European Bank for Reconstruction & Development, Fitch Ratings, HSBC and Morgan & Stanley. Some graduates have pursued research degrees in financial mathematics.



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