• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Edinburgh

University of Nottingham in China Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
Liverpool John Moores University Featured Masters Courses
Bangor University Featured Masters Courses
Newcastle University Featured Masters Courses
"peacebuilding"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Peacebuilding)

We have 43 Masters Degrees (Peacebuilding)

  • "peacebuilding" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 43
Order by 
COURSE OVERVIEW. The programme offers a multidisciplinary introduction to the study and practice of reconciliation and peacebuilding, with the work and experience of St Ethelburga's Centre for Reconciliation and Peace informing its design. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

The programme offers a multidisciplinary introduction to the study and practice of reconciliation and peacebuilding, with the work and experience of St Ethelburga's Centre for Reconciliation and Peace informing its design. Drawing on insights from subject areas including psychology, religious studies and the arts, students are encouraged to examine key ideas and theoretical frameworks in the study of reconciliation in a wide variety of different contexts.

Students are supported in identifying and understanding the root causes of conflict, and in critically assessing a range of methods and practices which have the potential to turn violent and destructive conflict into positive and sustainable outcomes. Students are encouraged to reflect on the pivotal relationship between theory and practice and to consider a variety of factors which impact upon the effectiveness of peacebuilding and reconciliation activities.

Students have the opportunity to become involved with peacebuilding projects and organisations throughout the duration of the programme.

Careers

Graduates pursue careers working in the fields of international development, conflict management, peacebuilding and international relations. This work is often on international and local Non-Governmental Organisations and government, civil service and peacekeeping institutions such as the United Nations and European Union.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

There are opportunities for students to take part in voluntary work placements or carry out a pre-determined piece of work for a relevant organisation.

Field trips

Students have the opportunity to get involved with peacebuilding projects and organisations throughout the duration of the programme.

Learning and teaching

Start date: September

Distance learning available: MA Reconciliation and Peacebuilding is offered as distance learning only

Teaching takes place: Evenings

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff including internationally renowned scholars working in the areas of reconciliation and peacebuilding. The programme is delivered through a combination of distance and blended learning. Participation in practical modules requires intensive periods of attendance. All students have access to dedicated tutors and can converse with other students through the University's Learning Network and online forums.

Location

King Alfred or West Downs, University of Winchester

Assessment

Types of assessment include portfolios, presentations, reflective journals, practical work, essays and reports. There are no examinations. For the final assessment students have the option of completing a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words; undertaking a consultancy placement with an organisation working in the field, or participating in and reflecting on a practical peacebuilding project.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening or by contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.



Read less
This online course is for practitioners in humanitarian and peacebuilding field. This course has been designed using the knowledge and expertise of both the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP). Read more

This online course is for practitioners in humanitarian and peacebuilding field. This course has been designed using the knowledge and expertise of both the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP).

Built on the experiences and expertise developed by the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP) at Oxford Brookes University, the MA explores the interactions between humanitarian action and peacebuilding. It links applied knowledge and practice with theory through online lectures, action research, sharing of experiences, discussions with key practitioners, and critical reflection on practices. 

This programme is designed mainly for practitioners working in the fields of humanitarian action and peacebuilding, though it is open also to those working in related fields. It allows you to broaden your perceptions, critically review your role, and develop and refine hard and soft skills needed to work effectively in the fields of humanitarian action and peacebuilding. The programme is also relevant for practitioners working in other fields, interested in exploring new opportunities in conflict transformation.

Why choose this course?

  • Flexible and user-friendly online learning environment allowing you to learn from your workplace
  • Investigating cutting-edge issues in the field of humanitarian action and peacebuilding, proposing innovative tools and reflecting on current field practices
  • Designed and delivered jointly by Oxford Brookes University and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) offering you access to resources and support from both institutions online and in the field through UN missions 
  • Unparalleled support from a team of academic experts and top-ranked practitioners as well as field experts for specific topics
  • Founded on action-research, and on populations and employers' direct needs in humanitarian and peacebuilding programming 
  • Access to a worldwide community of learners. 

This course in detail

This is the first MA aimed at investigating the interactions between humanitarian action and peacebuilding, merging knowledge and know-how developed in both fields to promote better targeted initiatives and comprehensive responses. This MA is also one of the first Masters working on the principle that long-term and sustainable peace can only be built by local and national actors and initiatives. Therefore culture sensitivity, community initiatives and local responses are at the core of the learning process. 

To explore the links between humanitarian action and peacebuilding and learning from field practices, the MA relies on three distinctive features brought together to propose a unique and innovative learning approach: 

  • Based entirely on online delivery to create a web-based learning community, the MA offers a flexible and diverse method based mostly on collaborative work. A large portion of the learning activities are based on discussion and confrontation of ideas and practices to enhance peer to peer learning and discourse. 
  • The workplace is intended to be the main learning environment, to allow learners from all countries to engage with this global community of reflective practitioners. As a result, case studies, action research and hands-on exercises with live and field-based problems, working with communities, practitioners and agencies are an integral part of the programme. 
  • Based on innovative multicultural and multidisciplinary approaches, the MA uses studies and theories from social sciences, peace and conflict studies, humanities, management, political sciences, law, urban planning and architecture. It also merges practice-based knowledge produced by field practitioners and research outputs from practice-oriented scholars. The diversity of learners and lecturers creates a unique opportunity to merge and discuss different cultural paradigms, perceptions and intellectual traditions.

This part-time programme is usually studied over 30 months. However, you are able to take up to 5 years to complete the necessary credits or to finish it in 24 months if you can take time out of work to complete the programme.

It is constituted of three core modules; three issue-based modules as well as a research skills module as preparation for the dissertation.

How this course helps you develop

  • This programme will allow you to strengthen your professional network as you will be working collaboratively with other professionals and experts based in different humanitarian fields of operation.
  • It will allow you to strengthen you digital literacy and distance team-working
  •  It will develop self-reflective approaches and allow you to appraise critically your work environment.  

Careers

This course is ideal for a career in the field of humanitarian action, conflict transformation or related fields - such as civil servants or diplomats in charge of humanitarian affairs, academics teaching humanitarian practices, journalists seeking a better understanding of humanitarian issues, or military personnel ready to be deployed in a field of operation where humanitarian actions are taking place.



Read less
This interdisciplinary MA explores the processes through which actors have attempted to define and build peace in areas affected by war and violence, particularly since the end of the Cold War. Read more

This interdisciplinary MA explores the processes through which actors have attempted to define and build peace in areas affected by war and violence, particularly since the end of the Cold War. Drawing on expertise from the fields of history, politics, anthropology and the arts, this newly revamped course will offer students the opportunity to engage with conflict management, conflict resolution, conflict transformation, peacebuilding and statebuilding theories and practices.

 Moreover, the programme will critically address the conceptualization of peace and the implementation of peacebuilding projects by global, regional, national and local actors, including the UN, the International Financial Institutions, development agencies and donors, INGOs, and local organisations in conflict-affected environments. In particular, it will focus on social agency for peace, the question of the nature of the `peaceful state', and the ever-fraught question of the reform of the international system. The dynamics of these various contributions to peace will be the focus of a guided engagement, via local partner organisations, with the range of peace and conflict management actors present in either Bosnia Herzegovina or Cyprus (in Semester II).

Aims

Students will be able to show a critical understanding of:

1. Key issues and debates related to the theories of peace and practices of peacebuilding, statebuilding, conflict management, resolution, and transformation. They will become familiar with the range of international actors and organisations, their policies and practices, and their pros and cons.

2. The range of social science topics that influence peacebuilding, statebuilding, conflict management, etc., (including political, historical, anthropological understandings of peace and related programming strategies). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.

3. The analytical and policy literature concerning peacebuilding, international governance structures, statebuilding, and the role of key actors and institutions including NGOs and military and other security actors. Concurrently, students will be able to evaluate the theory and policy tools in the context of the recent history of peacebuilding and statebuilding since the end of the Cold War, in a range of examples, including across the Balkans, Cambodia, Timor Leste, Cyprus, Northern Ireland, Afghanistan, the recent and various Arab Revolts, and others.

4. An understanding of local approaches to peacebuilding, including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with `bottom up' approaches. Students will examine current debates on the nature of everyday peace and hybrid forms of peace, related questions about `local agency' and forms of resistance, activism, and social mobilisation.

5. Students will experience the on-the-ground realities of peacebuilding and statebuilding through a guided research visit to the range of actors involved in Bosnia-Herzegovina or Cyprus. This will form a key part of one of the core modules of the programme and will be run in association with local partners.

6. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferrable skills through both independent and group-based work.

7. A detailed understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of peacebuilding along with the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject, and of how to produce an original piece of academic research. This will be delivered via the dissertation.

Special features

The Institute is developing a novel configuration for research and teaching which will uniquely associate practitioners, non-governmental organisation (NGO) partners, theoreticians, policy makers and analysts in sustained intellectual engagement. Combining a targeted programme of research with the provision of timely analysis on current emergencies and conflicts, the institute will seek to develop new methodologies in the emerging field of humanitarian and conflict response research.

Additional voluntary workshops and events throughout the year further enhance study including:

   The evidence of objects, a trip to the Imperial War Museum (North)

   Other Case Briefings (e.g., Cyprus, Arab Uprisings)

   Policy Sessions: UN system and INGOs (Professor Dan Smith, International Alert)

   Manchester Peace and Social Justice Walk

   Working with Governments (Professor Dan Smith, International Alert)

   Regular `Leading Voices' workshops, with key thinkers in the field

Students studying this programme will also benefit from possible additional activities, such as:

   Student organised trips to London (International Alert ), New York (UN/IPA ) and Brussels

   Case Study Internships

   Attendance at the annual Peacebuilding conference in Manchester and potential participation in student panels.

Teaching and learning

Delivery of the course will take a range of forms, including lectures, seminars, tutorials, directed reading, a guided walk, a museum trip, a field trip and independent study. Much of the delivery will be problem based/enquiry based learning.

This MA will be influenced and informed by the research of both staff and postgraduate research students at the Institute including research projects on:

  •    Political space in the aid industry
  •    Local/hybrid approaches to peacebuilding
  •    The contribution of BRICS nations to peace and security programming
  •    Critical peace studies
  •    The role of the state in peace and security programming
  •    Ethnographic approaches to understanding violence
  •    Refugees and internally displaced persons
  •    The political economy of conflict
  •    Performance in conflict and disaster zones
  •    Historical analyses of aid

Career opportunities

 Students completing this MA may consider a wide range of career choices, including careers with:

  • Civil Service (working within various government ministries, including the foreign office, international development office)
  • International Institutions (such as the UN Peacebuilding Commission, Department of Peacekeeping Operations and regional bodies such as the European Union, African Union, Organization of American States)
  • NGOs (local and international) working on peacebuilding initiatives
  • Academia/Research Institutes/Think-Tanks


Read less
The MA in Human Security and Peacebuilding program is a two-year, interdisciplinary graduate program that responds to the increasing demand for leadership in humanitarian assistance, social reconstruction, conflict management and peacebuilding in international contexts. Read more
The MA in Human Security and Peacebuilding program is a two-year, interdisciplinary graduate program that responds to the increasing demand for leadership in humanitarian assistance, social reconstruction, conflict management and peacebuilding in international contexts. Peacebuilding is viewed as a broad concept which emphasises social transformation integrating short-term (development) initiatives into long-term, sustainable peace processes. The program provides working professionals, or those aspiring to work in the field, with the theoretical and practical skills necessary to help restore peace and civil society in post-conflict contexts.

A one-year Graduate Diploma in Human Security & Peacebuilding is also offered.

Delivery Model

Online Learning
The majority of this program is experienced through online learning. Online courses enable you to meet the demands of work and family while studying. Using our web-based learning platform, you will access your reading materials, complete individual and group assignments, and engage with the rest of your classmates and instructors; online from anywhere. Each online course will be nine weeks in length, with a two-week break between courses.

Residency
During the course of your two-year program, you will attend two, two-week on-campus residencies. Here you’ll interact face-to-face with your instructors, cohort and team. You’ll have set class hours as well as homework and meetings outside of class hours, making this an intensive and rewarding time.

Completion Options

During the first year of study, all students will take the same set of courses. During the second year, students can select from the following options:

Thesis Track
Students taking the thesis track will be required to take a second research course during their second residency.

Course-Based Track
Students taking the course-based track will be able to continue their studies online during the second year, choosing from a suite of electives designed to appeal to students in all three Humanitarian Studies’ graduate programs.

Course-Based Track with Internship
Within the course-based track, students may choose to take a 6-credit internship. Students who choose an internship will gain field experience. This experiential learning will help students apply their theoretical knowledge by demonstrating their ability in a real-world setting, and documenting their experiences.

Learning Outcomes

Royal Roads University works with an outcomes-based learning model. Learning outcomes are clear, plain language descriptors of knowledge and performance tasks that students demonstrate in order to successfully complete a program.

Within the MA in Human Security and Peacebuilding, there are five key learning outcome domains:
-Critical Thinking
-Communication
-Research
-Knowledge
-Professional Skills & Practice

Using learning outcomes helps to clarify a program’s focus, helps students connect their program to their workplace, provides a focus for assessment/evaluation, and helps employers understand the benefits of the program. Read more about the learning outcomes.

Who It’s For

Many of our students have experience in complex emergency environments, working in either domestic or international settings within NGOs, government and military, as well as First Nation or indigenous populations. These professionals have experience in human security and peacebuilding, and are now looking to further develop their understanding of the complex interrelationship between economic, political, and social development, and human security. This program will enable them to advance their professional practice in complex conflict-related contexts.

Flexible Admission

Normally 10 years of work experience, with a minimum of two years of relevant professional experience in a leadership or management position, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. All flexible admission applicants will normally be required to take "Academic Writing and Critical Thinking" and obtain a minimum B+ (77%).

Read less
The Graduate Diploma (GD) in Human Security and Peacebuilding program is a one-year, interdisciplinary graduate program that responds to the increasing demand for leadership in humanitarian assistance, social reconstruction, conflict management and peacebuilding in international contexts. Read more
The Graduate Diploma (GD) in Human Security and Peacebuilding program is a one-year, interdisciplinary graduate program that responds to the increasing demand for leadership in humanitarian assistance, social reconstruction, conflict management and peacebuilding in international contexts. Peacebuilding is viewed as a broad concept which emphasises social transformation integrating short-term (development) initiatives into long-term, sustainable peace processes. The program provides working professionals, or those aspiring to work in the field, with the theoretical and practical skills necessary to help restore peace and civil society in post-conflict contexts.

Delivery Model

Online Learning
The majority of this program is experienced through online learning. Online courses enable you to meet the demands of work and family while studying. Using our web-based learning platform, you will access your reading materials, complete individual and group assignments, and engage with the rest of your classmates and instructors; online from anywhere. Each online course will be nine weeks in length, with a two-week break between courses.

Residency
During the course of your one-year program, you will attend one, two-week on-campus residency. Here you’ll get to interact face-to-face with your instructors, cohort and team. You’ll have set class hours as well as homework and meetings outside of class hours, making this an intensive and rewarding time.

Learning Outcomes

Royal Roads University works with an outcomes-based learning model. Learning outcomes are clear, plain language descriptors of knowledge and performance tasks that students demonstrate in order to successfully complete a program.

Within the GD in Human Security and Peacebuilding, there are five key learning outcome domains:
-Critical Thinking
-Communication
-Research
-Knowledge
-Professional Skills & Practice

Using learning outcomes helps to clarify a program’s focus, helps students connect their program to their workplace, provides a focus for assessment/evaluation, and helps employers understand the benefits of the program.

Who It’s For

Many of our students have experience in complex emergency environments, working in either domestic or international settings within NGOs, government and military, as well as First Nation or indigenous populations. These professionals have experience in human security and peacebuilding, and are now looking to further develop their understanding of the complex interrelationship between economic, political, and social development, and human security. This program will enable them to advance their professional practice in complex conflict-related contexts.

Laddering Options

Students who wish to continue their studies towards completion of the Master of Arts in Human Security and Peacebuilding may do so through the laddering process. Students may apply to transfer to the MA stream while still in the diploma program. Space may be limited, so the ability to transfer is not guaranteed, and in these cases, only the masters degree will be awarded upon completion of the MA, not the diploma. Graduates of the diploma program must formally apply to the MA program.

Flexible Admission

Normally 10 years of work experience, with a minimum of two years of relevant professional experience in a leadership or management position, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. All flexible admission applicants will normally be required to take "Academic Writing and Critical Thinking" and obtain a minimum B+ (77%).

Read less
COURSE OVERVIEW. Identify and understand the root causes of conflict. Critically assess strategies which can turn conflict into positive and sustainable outcomes. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Identify and understand the root causes of conflict
  • Critically assess strategies which can turn conflict into positive and sustainable outcomes
  • Participate in practical peacebuilding projects throughout the course

The Reconciliation programmes at Winchester draw on insights from a range of academic disciplines, case studies, and cultural and faith traditions from around the world. They give you a multidisciplinary introduction to the study and practice of reconciliation and peacebuilding, with the work and experience of St Ethelburga’s Centre for Reconciliation and Peace informing their design.

Drawing on insights from subject areas including psychology, religious studies and the arts, you examine key ideas and theoretical frameworks in the study of reconciliation in a wide variety of different contexts. We discuss and reflect on the pivotal relationship between theory and practice and to consider a variety of factors which impact upon the effectiveness of peacebuilding and reconciliation activities. You also have the opportunity to become involved with peacebuilding projects and organisations throughout the duration of the programme.

Study core modules including Research Methods and Skills, Understanding the Nature and Causes of Conflict, Theories and Dynamics of Reconciliation, and The Practice of Reconciliation. Supplement these with options including Skills for working with divided groups, Building Networks of Peace, Multi-faith Cooperation on Peacebuilding, Religion and Globalisation, and Theology, Religion and Ethics. You also complete a final assessment, for which you have the option of writing a dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words; undertaking a consultancy placement with an organisation working in the field; or participating in and reflecting on a practical peacebuilding project.

Graduates pursue careers working in the fields of international development, conflict management, peacebuilding and international relations. This work is often in international and local Non-Governmental Organisations and government, civil service and peacekeeping institutions such as the United Nations and European Union.

Careers

Graduates pursue careers working in the fields of international development, conflict management, peacebuilding and international relations. This work is often in international and local Non-Governmental Organisations and government, civil service and peacekeeping institutions such as the United Nations and the European Union.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

There are opportunities for students to take part in voluntary work placements, or carry out a pre-determined piece of work for a relevant organisation.

Learning and teaching

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff who include internationally renowned scholars working in the areas of reconciliation and peacebuilding. The programme is delivered through a combination of distance and blended learning. Participation in practical modules requires intensive periods of attendance. All students have access to dedicated tutors and can converse with other students through the University's Learning Network and online forums.

DISTANCE LEARNING AVAILABLE 

Majority of programme

TEACHING TAKES PLACE

Evenings

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester).

Assesment

Types of assessment include portfolios, presentations, reflective journals, practical work, essays and reports. There are no examinations. For the final assessment students have the option of completing a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words; undertaking a consultancy placement with an organisation working in the field, or participating in and reflecting on a practical peacebuilding project.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.



Read less
Course Structure. Read more

Course Structure

The MSc will provide students with advanced knowledge of the complex and specialised areas of peacebuilding, among it conflict analysis, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, community driven reconstruction, peace processes within the context of contemporary conflicts and in the context of broader international (humanitarian) interventions. Integrated into the MSc structure are opportunities to develop operational and vocational skills for example in negotiations, conflict mediation, conflict sensitive programme design and programme management, or urban peacebuilding. Students are provided with theoretical and empirical knowledge and with practical skills that are helpful for current and future employment opportunities. The courses are thus attractive to both graduates and mid-career practitioners. Whilst the academic and applied focus of the MSc comes through a peace and conflict studies analytic lens, course material will also draw from traditional strategic/security and development studies, enabling cross fertilisation between different perspectives. It allows the exploration of unique and new paradigms and practices in the fields of conflict, peace, security, defence, diplomacy, development and humanitarian intervention.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules

  • Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
  • Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
  • Responses: Peace Processes and Political Negotiation
  • Recovery and Reconstruction: Consolidating Peace after Violence
  • Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

  • Religion, Culture and Conflict
  • Conflict Mediation
  • Fieldtrip
  • Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
  • Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
  • Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
  • International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities
  • Defence Engagement 
  • Conflict Analysis.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, as well as the general induction programme offered by the School and the university, Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi) students are invited to a programme specific induction. This induction provides an overview of the programme an opportunity to meet members of the team and an opportunity to discuss optional module choices.

 The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Students also have to submit a dissertation (60 credits) of not more than15,000 words. Practitioners have the option of writing an in-depth policy document as their dissertation.

Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation. Assessment methods include: an examination, essays, presentations, reflective journal, reports, article reviews and policy briefs. 

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are either delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays or over a single term in 2-hour seminar sessions. There is also the opportunity to participate in a study visit which provides an opportunity to investigate issues ‘in the field’ concerned with conflict prevention, conflict resolution, state and peace-building. Of particular interest is the theory-practice linkage

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute which also hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



Read less
Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to know more about what happens before and after conflict occurs in a country from understanding the issues of the 21st century, economic issues, political issues, justice in specific territories to the fundamental issues of conflict management this programme is an ideal method of analysing and understanding this area. You will learn theory and history of the subject area to reflect on processes by considering the boundaries of peace, justice and reconciliation after conflict. You study periods of conflict and territories such as the Balkans, West Africa, Central Africa, Southeast Asia, Latin America and the Middle East.  You can also study for a PGCert or Diploma if you want to study a shorter programme.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods
  • Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

  • Post-Conflict Justice and Peace building

Optional

  • Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World
  • The Comparative Study of European Societies
  • Dimensions of Globalisation
  • Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches
  • Quantitative Sociology: Philosophy & Methods
  • Global Conflict and Peace Processes

Semester 3

  • Dissertation in Peace

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You study in a cosmopolitan city at the centre of the global energy hub
  • Teaching quality of the Department of Sociology was judged as 'Excellent'
  • The department is driven by staff with an international reputation in Political violence, conflict, transition and peace

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs

 

 

 



Read less
MA Peace and Conflict studies is delivered by the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations. It is the centre’s flagship programme building on the legacy of Coventry as a city for peace and reconciliation. Read more
MA Peace and Conflict studies is delivered by the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations. It is the centre’s flagship programme building on the legacy of Coventry as a city for peace and reconciliation. You will not only learn about the value of peace and conflict studies but will also be inspired by the city’s reputation and legacy.

This programme provides students with in-depth knowledge and understanding of peace and conflict theories, issues and practices, and an ability to apply theory and case studies to the practices of peacebuilding in complex situations. With opportunities to develop critically reflective peace-making practices in a friendly and supporting learning environment, the programme promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and is underpinned with a concern for integrity and courage.

You will also develop a valuable range of transferable key skills and personal attributes for a wide variety of careers in related field such as international development, in charities and policy settings.

Qualifications available:
-Postgraduate Certificate in Peace and Conflict Studies (8 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Postgraduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies (16 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Full Term MA Peace and Conflict Studies (24 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Fast-Track MA (APEL) Peace and Conflict Studies (15 months)

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA Peace and Conflict Studies is a high-quality postgraduate qualification, shaped by research-active staff and informed by a concern for the real world, providing an opportunity to study in a highly interactive and supportive learning environment. You will develop a reflective learning skill for both intellectual enquiry and professional development.

We will provide you:
-An opportunity to achieve an MA in 15 months with accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL). Enabling professionals to obtain academic credits based on their professional experience
-Access to a professional network of individuals working in various roles related to peacebuilding internationally
-Research informed curriculum and teaching. Our courses are global, from the content of the programme and the staff leading them, to the diverse backgrounds of our participants
-A flexible blended learning approach, combining intensive workshops, online learning and small group tutorials, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments
-Access to Coventry University e-learning resources

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Alongside the MA-route (180M credits), this programme can also be studied at Postgraduate Certificate (60M credits) and Postgraduate Diploma level (120M credits), and is offered via blended learning or distance learning. The three different qualifications on offer are sequential, and can therefore lead into one another, following the successful completion of the earlier portion.

At Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) stage, you will study three mandatory modules:
-Peace, Conflict and Security in the 21st Century
-Philosophies of Non-Violence and Reconciliation
-Peacebuilding: Theories into Practice

At Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) stage you will undertake one core module, Project Management in Practice, and two elective modules from the following list:
-Environment, Peace and Conflict
-Religion, Peace and Conflict
-Gender, Peace and Conflict.
-Migration, Displacement and Belonging
-Privatisation of International Security
-Comparative Peace Processes

At MA Stage, you will undertake a dissertation in an area of study which you would like to explore in more depth, with support from a supervisor.

CTPSR BURSARIES

Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations are pleased to offer a limited number of partial bursaries towards tuition fees, available to overseas students who wish to pursue an MA in Maritime Security or Peace and Conflict Studies.

Eligibility
-Complete a bursary application form including a detailed statement of support which should not exceed 500 words by 28 April 2017.
-Demonstrate capacity and commitment to undertake and complete the programme.
-Explain how the programme is aligned to your future aspirations and how it will benefit your professional development.

Limitations
-Please note that this scholarship cannot be combined with any other CTPSR scholarship.
-The decision to award is at the sole discretion of the Centre. The Centre reserves the right to determine the number of scholarships to award from this category.
-Bursaries will only be awarded if your admissions application is successful.

How to Apply
Students wishing to apply for a bursary should complete an application form and submit this to by no later than 28 April 2017.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Peace and Conflict Studies is taught by experts in the broad field of peace and conflict studies and is informed by their research, practice and activism. As such, the programme is able to provide a deeper insight into both theoretical and practical perspectives of the contemporary peacebuilding challenges.

Further to this, the course ultimately seeks to create a learning community, where ideas can be interchanged and debated amongst academic staff, alumni, and current students, lasting well beyond the timespan of the academic programme itself.

If you are already a practitioner, you will have the opportunity to broaden your professional network, which is very likely to be useful to you in the workplace, whilst also gaining a formal accredited postgraduate qualification, which may be required for further progression in your career. If you are an individual with an interest in peace and conflict, this course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to enter into jobs within a broad spectrum of organisations, including: international non-government organisations, multi-national government organisations like the United Nations, regional communities such as the European Union or the Economic Community of West African States, faith group organisations, community organisations, the private sector, think tanks, and indeed also academia.

Read less
This programme empowers actors and practitioners from development, security and other peace and security related institutional backgrounds involved in international peace-building with the knowledge, skills and competencies that will enable them to provide leadership to reduce and ultimately eliminate violent conflict. Read more

Overview

This programme empowers actors and practitioners from development, security and other peace and security related institutional backgrounds involved in international peace-building with the knowledge, skills and competencies that will enable them to provide leadership to reduce and ultimately eliminate violent conflict.

This master’s programme will provide a challenging learning experience for those who wish to develop and integrate mediation and negotiation knowledge and skills with their awareness of wider conflict and development issues while providing students with a critical insight of the entire spectrum of international conflict intervention.

The main theme of the programme will be an integrated and comprehensive approach to the the nexus of peacebuilding, security and development. With increased awareness of the importance of these interlinkages has come increased demands on national and international institutions to respond in a holistic way. In the field, security actors are required to have a better understanding and greater skills in engaging with local communities, institutions and organizations at the local level, while development practitioners recognise a skills deficit with respect to conflict resolution and mediation and are increasingly expected to understand and engage with representatives of multifaceted agencies and communities, particularly when anticipating or responding to the consequences of complex crises.

Students will develop

Conceptual and strategic analytical capacity, including ability to analyse and articulate the violent conflict dimension of complex issues that require an integrated and comprehensive response.
Demonstrated problem-solving skills and judgment in applying technical expertise to resolve a wide range of complex and unusual issues/problems and in developing innovative and creative solutions.
Ability to negotiate and to influence others to reach agreement.
Knowledge of institutional mandates, policies and guidelines pertaining to interventions in violent conflict.
The programme describes the process of negotiating and implementing peace agreements and security actors and international interventions, drawing in senior personnel experienced in peacekeeping/ peace making and security operations. It also explores the notion of partner and aid donors, the contribution of international organisations and cooperation with key strategic partners and the use of broad development instruments in support of conflict prevention and peace building.

Completion of the module, Mediation Knowledge and Practice provides the basis for the opportunity to take a Mediation Competency Assessment and on successfully passing this assessment, the student is in a position to apply for Certified Status with the Mediators Institute of Ireland.

Course Structure

The programme will be a fulltime offering every second year from August 2017 onwards. The programme will be delivered in the following manner;

Semester 1 – Classroom / Online modules (Aug – Dec)

Semester 2 – Classroom / Online-modules (Feb – June)

Semester 3 – Mixture of Online /Classroom/Supervision (May – Oct)

In following a fulltime programme, students must complete- 30 credits per semester and complete a dissertation within the 14 month period of the programme. A flexible approach to delivery will be taken, through blended learning. Classroom based modules will be provided on campus in Maynooth University or in Kimmage Development Studies Centre, as part of existing Maynooth University MA programmes.

For development modules, on-campus delivery of each 5 credit module involves 24 hours of class-contact. adopts a flexible approach to delivery of classroom based modules with some courses offered through 2 hour taught classes over 12 weeks (usually in the evenings) while others are offered through more concentrated blocks of time depending on timetable requirements and arrangements (typically 4.5 day blocks, delivered in a single week or over two weeks). Distance learning modules are structured to allow students to study at their own pace over a semester, with modules running in two cycles annually – October through January and February through May / June.

For the Kennedy Institute, classroom based modules which are normally 10 credits typically involve week long blocks (4.5 days). Each 1 ECTS module will typically involve at least 20 hours of work, including attending lectures, reading, writing coursework, preparing for exams and sitting exams.

For the dissertation module, master classes on research design /methods will be provided by lecturers, and lecturers will provide supervision sessions, which will amount to 36 hours. Students must also undertake approximately 500 hours of independent study when completing the dissertation.

Modules include

KD 615 Conflict, Development and Security (Online)

KD 601 Political Economy of Development (Online & Classroom)

KD 604 Introduction to Development Theory and Practice (Online & Classroom)

KD 602 Gender and Development (Online & Classroom)

KD 605 Adult Learning for Development (Online and Classroom)

KD 610 Facilitation for Transformation (Classroom)

KD 613 Health and Development (Classroom)

KD 614 Sustainable Livelihoods and Climate Change Adaptation (Online)

KD 616 Human Rights and Advocacy (Classroom)

KD 606 Research Methods

KD 607 Dissertation

MC 601 Mediation Theory + Conflict Analysis (Classroom)

MC 615 Mediation Knowledge and Practice (Classroom)

MC629 Resolving Protracted Conflict: Applied Concepts and Peace Process Theories (Classroom)

MC630 Post Conflict: Challenges of Implementing Peace Agreements (Classroom)

MC TBD Negotiation Theory and Skills (Classroom)

MC TBD Conflict Intervention, stabilisation and the comprehensive approach (Classroom)

MC 603 Research

MC 690 Minor Thesis

Career Options

This programme will give graduates knowledge, skills and competencies to work in:

-International Development and Peacebuilding NGOs

-Security Organisations

-International Organisations such as UN, EU and World Bank

-Government Agencies and Departments



Envisaged roles include:

-Monitoring and Evaluation Officer

-Conflict Analysis Advisors

-Military and security analysis

-Peacebuilding Policy Officer and Advocate

-Conflict Mediator

-Political Affairs Specialist

-Advisor on Gender and Security

-Advisor on Peacebuilding, Environment and Security

- Project Manager

among many others.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MH54M / MH55M



The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
Conflict resolution is now a global activity and concerns engaging both academics and practitioners in finding durable solutions to the most pressing conflicts of the twenty-first century. Read more
Conflict resolution is now a global activity and concerns engaging both academics and practitioners in finding durable solutions to the most pressing conflicts of the twenty-first century.

This course attracts students from all over the world, and the optional modules reflect the key expertise of the faculty. You will acquire subject-specific knowledge and understanding of:
-The theories and concepts of peace and conflict and their application to global, regional and local contexts
-The emergence, nature and significance of conflict analysis/ conflict resolution as a distinct field of academic enquiry
-The nature of conflict and the variety of mechanisms and processes available for its management and resolution

You will also acquire a strong ability to evaluate different explanations of conflict analysis/conflict resolution and to articulate such evaluations at recognised postgraduate level.

Conflict Resolution is concerned with understanding the causes, dynamics and consequences of conflict, and employing that knowledge in practical efforts to mitigate or resolve conflict, and to respond to some of the most pressing challenges of the 21st century. This MA balances formal academic study and vocationally-relevant learning, opening up options for careers ranging from local mediation to work with international peacebuilding or humanitarian organisations.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/conflict-resolution-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

This is a flagship course for both teaching and research in this area and has gained a global reputation for its pioneering work. The MA is located in Peace Studies, a Rotary International recognised centre of expertise for teaching and research on peace and conflict issues.

Modules

Core modules
-Conflict Resolution Theory (20 Credits)
-Introduction to Peace Studies (20 Credits)
-Applied Conflict Resolution Skills (20 Credits)
-Dissertation project in a topic of your choice (related to Conflict Resolution) (60 Credits)

Option modules
-Arms Trade and Arms Control (20 Credits)
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus (20 Credits)
-International Politics and Security Studies (20 Credits)
-Introduction to African Politics (20 Credits)
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (20 Credits)
-Religions, Conflict and Peacemaking in a Post-secular World (20 Credits)
-Africa Study Visit (20 Credits)
-Cities in Conflict (20 Credits)
-Gender, Conflict and Development (20 Credits)
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation (20 Credits)
-Social Movements, Globalisation and Political Change (20 Credits)
-The Authoritarian Challenge to Democracy (20 Credits)

You have the opportunity to define your own engagement with the discipline by choosing from the full range of modules offered by Peace Studies. It is therefore up to you to decide what specific dimensions of peace you wish to focus on, with possible options ranging from modules on: the environment, human rights, Islam, Christianity and politics, African politics, nationalism, international political economy, international politics and security studies, conflict resolution, East Asia, Latin America and the Middle East.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

A graduate of this degree will be able to:
-Explain the emergence and development of conflict resolution, with an understanding of key events or trends in the 20th and 21st centuries which have shaped the field
-Critically analyse key theories of conflict, using theory to develop effective conflict case-studies
-Identify and evaluate the main approaches to ‘peacemaking, peacekeeping and peacebuilding’ that are practised and theorised within Conflict Resolution, demonstrating a critical understanding of their applications and limitations
-Demonstrate increased competence in a range of skills relevant to professional practice in conflict resolution

Read less
Course content. Develop an in-depth understanding of contemporary development issues, and gain the specialist skills to work in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and humanitarian response. Read more

Course content

Develop an in-depth understanding of contemporary development issues, and gain the specialist skills to work in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and humanitarian response.

Whether you are a graduate aiming to pursue a development or humanitarian career in conflict-affected regions, or a professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical thinking, this course is for you.

The course addresses the core global challenges of conflict and humanitarian crisis and explores a variety of tools and approaches for responding in these contexts. Rooted in real-world practical and policy challenges, the course is founded on Bath’s outstanding international expertise in international development. It uses innovative learning approaches to promote in-depth investigation of cases and issues, while drawing links across global, regional, national and local scales.

The course offers you the opportunity of a placement-based research project, providing hands-on experience to complement classroom-based learning.

You will leave the course with:

  • in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary humanitarian action and conflict response
  • a critical understanding of humanitarian, peacebuilding and development policy and practice
  • practical skills in research, analysis and communication and an understanding of how these can be applied to the fields of humanitarianism, conflict and development
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

We encourage diversity of intake, in experience, qualifications and interests, to stimulate the richness of experience and learning.

Graduate prospects

Our international development courses provide an excellent grounding for careers in international development, humanitarian action, and working for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South. They provide the core skills required in a range of policy, communication, advocacy, research and programmatic roles.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high profile organisations, including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while some have stayed in academia to complete doctoral studies.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Conflict, development and peacebuilding

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Humanitarianism
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Attendance
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Online assessment
  • Oral assessment
  • Portfolio
  • Practical work
  • Residential
  • Seminar
  • Thesis
  • Work-based placement
  • Written examination
  • Other


Read less
Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice. Read more

Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice.

Whether you are a graduate aiming to make a difference in the world, or a professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical thinking, our suite of International Development MSc courses is for you.

Engaged with current debates in policy and practice and grounded in interdisciplinary social sciences, you will develop the tools and confidence to work towards creative solutions that address practical problems in strategic ways.

Four distinct pathways provide a choice of flexibility and breadth, or the chance to pursue a particular interest in greater depth.

Innovative learning approaches promote in-depth investigation of particular cases and issues. These will draw out connections and contradictions between different actors and analytical perspectives, across global, regional, national and local scales.

The opportunity of a placement, leading to a work-based project, will provide hands-on experience to complement classroom-based learning.

You will leave the course with:

  • a critical understanding of the concepts and approaches used in international development and humanitarian action, and their strengths and limitations
  • practical skills in research, analysis and communication and an understanding of how these can be applied in work for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South
  • the ability to analyse the complex interaction of social, economic, political and environmental factors in shaping problems and proposed solutions
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Course pathways

MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action

The MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action pathway enables you to gain an in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary humanitarian action and conflict response. You will also form a critical understanding of humanitarian, peacebuilding and development policy and practice. You will learn how to interpret and evaluate research information and evidence on topics related to humanitarianism, conflict and development.

MSc International Development with Economics

The MSc International Development with Economics pathway covers the key economic concepts, theories and tools required to understand development issues, policies and practices, including those of heterodox and social economics. You will learn how to apply them to analyse specific development problems, such as through appropriate combinations of quantitative and qualitative methods.

MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability

The MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability pathway enables you to gain an interdisciplinary understanding of theories and concepts of social and environmental justice, wellbeing and sustainability. You will develop in-depth knowledge of people’s practical struggles globally and locally for a better life, and the forms of policy and politics that can support or frustrate these. You will also explore how integrated perspectives can capture the complex interactions between social and ecological systems. Additionally, you will consider areas of complementarity and the trade-off between economic development, human wellbeing and environmental sustainability.

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

Graduate prospects

This course provides an excellent background for those wishing to pursue an international development career and improve people’s lives.

You will be qualified to work in a wide variety of roles, including social research, public policy, public information and campaigning.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high profile organisations, including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while others have stayed in academia, to complete doctoral studies.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Management of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Economics for development
  • Social and environmental justice
  • Conflict, development and peacebuilding

Semester 2

  • Global political economy
  • Sustainability and wellbeing
  • Humanitarianism
  • International development policy analysis and evaluation
  • Education and international development

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.



Read less
Peace Studies deals with one of the most pressing issues of the contemporary world - the challenges that confront actors in conflict and post-conflict societies. Read more
Peace Studies deals with one of the most pressing issues of the contemporary world - the challenges that confront actors in conflict and post-conflict societies. The course will reflect on the complexity of peace and peacebuilding, combining theoretical approaches with opportunities for in-depth case study research.

The aim of this programme is to deconstruct the notion of peace and shed light on the issues of peacebuilding. The course encourages thinking beyond the mainstream and encourages students to make a contribution to the discipline.

The programme is built around a core of International Relations, but also draws on other disciplines such as History, Economics, Religious Studies and Law. The objective is to encourage our students to engage critically with both the theoretical and practical dimensions of contemporary conflicts and attempts to (re) build peace.

Curriculum

Students must take the core modules: Theories and Concepts in Peace Studies (30 credits) as well as Theory and Analysis of International Relations (30 credits), a postgraduate research methods module (15 credits), a case studies module (15 credits) and a further 30 credits worth of elective modules before progressing to a dissertation (60 credits).

Elective modules are expected to include:

International Organisation
International Peacekeeping
The EU as an International Actor
Analysing Security
Global Economic Development
Conflicts in Global Justice
Religion and Conflict

You may be entitled to a fee waiver for 2014/15 if you are enthusiastic and willing to contribute to the Centre - See more at: http://www.hope.ac.uk

Read less
The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline. Read more
The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline.

Our research programmes provide a combination of formal research training and individual supervision within a supportive environment, with regular interaction between staff and students. For example, the School runs a weekly Graduate Research Training Seminar, where students are encouraged to present their work and receive feedback from peers and staff. Students enjoy regular meetings with a supervisor and supervisory team, and are also given opportunities to collaborate with other members of staff through the staff research seminar and the activities of the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (http://www.kent.ac.uk/politics/carc/index.html).

Students are encouraged to participate in the annual postgraduate research conference, during which various staff members discuss the work of research students, and outside speakers offer plenary lectures. Research students will also be able to benefit from the skills training offered by the University’s Graduate School.

The breadth of expertise within the School enables us to provide research supervision on a very wide range of topics across the area of International Conflict Analysis. Current projects of students studying in this area include: Peacebuilding Palestinians: the Hamas-Fatah Rapprochment, The Impact of Music on Conflict Resolution, Young People, Peace and Education, Horizontal Inequalities, Intra-State and Social Conflict.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/62/international-conflict-analysis

Research areas

Our research interests span a broad spectrum of the discipline, with particular strengths in the fields of conflict analysis and resolution, political theory and European politics. The strength of the School’s research culture is reflected in the numerous books and articles published and in the existence of its four University-recognised research centres: the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC), the Global Europe Centre (GEC). and the Centre for Critical Thought (CCT).

All members of staff can supervise theses leading to research degrees. We encourage potential research students to refer to our postgraduate research handbook (pdf) for detailed information.

In 2011, the University successfully applied for ESRC recognition as a provider of doctoral training in political science and international studies (and other areas of the social sciences) as part of a consortium. As a result, we are now part of the South East ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, making us one of the key training outlets in our subject in the UK. Further details can be found on the South East DTC website.

Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC)
Kent has been at the forefront of conflict negotiation and resolution for almost 50 years. The Conflict Analysis Research Centre brings together academics working on different aspects of conflict and security as well as PhD and Master’s students studying International Conflict Analysis, International Law and International Relations. Current research includes an investigation into how migrant communities can support peacebuilding in their home society and how South Africa and the UK treat refugees and security. The Centre is also at the forefront of trying to resolve actual conflicts – for example, it played a role in the Moldova-Transnistria peace process and has supported reconciliation efforts in Africa.

Global Europe Centre (GEC)
The Global Europe Centre is a pioneering research-led learning centre focusing on the study of Europe and its relations with the outside world. The GEC’s research focus is on contemporary policy challenges to Europe and its nation states, the engagement with policy-makers and policy-shapers is at the core of its activities. The GEC mission is to promote excellence, through innovative research and knowledge exchange and to facilitate research-driven impact through its learning and teaching activities. The GEC’s activities include dissemination of policy-relevant research via publications, research-led knowledge transfer workshops, conferences and public lectures, and keynote addresses by leading public figures. The Centre has a strong commitment to the creation of the next generation of ideas innovators and policymakers and pursues these through its learning, teaching and knowledge exchange activities and via the Global Europe Student Forum. GEC is an interdisciplinary research centre aiming to develop synergies across Politics and International Relations, Economics, Law, Business, History, and European Languages and Culture.

Centre for Critical Thought (CCT)
The Centre for Critical Thought is an exciting multidisciplinary initiative across both the Social Sciences and Humanities Faculties, co-ordinated by staff in Politics and International Relations, Law and Italian Studies. It enables staff and students interested in cutting-edge critical thought to discuss their work together and to explore the insights of interdisciplinary collaboration. In addition, it serves as a forum for distinguished lectures, seminars and an annual workshop. The Annual Kent Lecture in Political and Social Thought is the headline lecture series and recent speakers have included Professor Bernard Stiegler, Professor Chantal Mouffe and Professor William Outhwaite. All students interested in contemporary critical thought are encouraged to become members while at Kent.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X