• Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
University of Strathclyde Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Aberdeen University Featured Masters Courses
"numerical" AND "simulati…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Numerical Simulation)

  • "numerical" AND "simulation" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 72
Order by 
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Simulation Driven Product Design at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Simulation Driven Product Design at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Computer simulation is now an established discipline that has an important role to play in engineering, science and in newly emerging areas of interdisciplinary research.

Key Features of Simulation Driven Product Design

Using mathematical modelling as the basis, computational methods provide procedures which, with the aid of the computer, allow complex problems to be solved. The techniques play an ever-increasing role in industry.

Swansea University has been at the forefront of international research in the area of computational engineering. Internationally renowned engineers at Swansea pioneered the development of numerical techniques, such as the finite element method, and associated computational procedures that have enabled the solution of many complex engineering problems.

MSc by Research in Simulation Driven Product Design typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Facilities

Engineering at Swansea University has utilised an award of £3M from the Science Research Infrastructure Fund (SRIF) to provide state-of-the-art research facilities.

Simulation Driven Product Design research students will benefit from one of the most advanced university computing facilities in Europe.

Hardware includes a 450 cpu Cluster, high-end graphics workstations and high-speed network links. Extensive software packages include both in-house developed and 'off-the-shelf' commercial.

Links with Industry

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering has an extensive track record of industrial collaboration and contributes to many exciting projects, including the aerodynamics for the current World Land Speed Record car, Thrust SSC, and the future BLOODHOUND SSC, and the design of the double-decker super-jet Airbus A380.

Research

The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) in 2008 ranked Engineering at Swansea University as 8th in the UK for the combined score in the research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The RAE showed that 73% of research produced by academic staff is classified as world-leading (4*) or of internationally excellent (3*) quality.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering, Swansea University harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Read less
Develop skills in the analysis, design and assessment of engineering structures subject to normal, seismic and extreme loading and environmental conditions. Read more
Develop skills in the analysis, design and assessment of engineering structures subject to normal, seismic and extreme loading and environmental conditions.

Accredited by relevant professional bodies and designed to meet the needs of the modern construction industry, this course offers a wide range of structural engineering principles, as you learn about issues relating to steel and concrete structures and foundations.

Through this highly technical course, studied one year full-time or two years part-time, you will develop skills in numerical simulation using a variety of advanced software.

Part-time study is flexible. Normally students will take three years to complete the programme if they undertake one module per week but the length of the course can be reduced to two years, if two modules are taken each week. Many part-time students undertake projects in their place of work.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MScPGDipPGCert-Advanced-Structural-Engineering-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

You will also learn failure analysis methods, the Eurocodes and the code of practice for the design of various construction materials, research skills and the legal issues surrounding construction.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE) and the Chartered Institution of Highways & Transportation (CIHT). Industry practitioners are regularly invited as guest speakers and lecturers.

Modules

• Advanced mechanics of materials and FEA
• Advanced structural concrete
• Advanced; structural steel design
• Forensic engineering;
• Foundation design to eurocode 7
• Structural; dynamics and earthquake design
• MSc thesis

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

As a qualified structural engineer with advanced training, you will be in demand in the construction industry worldwide. Alternatively, you may choose to use this course as the basis for further education or extensive research.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Master's course in Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy places strong emphasis on state-of-the-art semiconductor devices and technologies, advanced power electronics and drives, and advanced power systems. The Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy course also covers conventional and renewable energy generation technologies. Exciting new developments such as wide band gap electronics, energy harvesting, solar cells and biofuels are discussed and recent developments in power electronics are highlighted.

Key Features of MSc in Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy

The College of Engineering has an international reputation for electrical and electronics research for energy and advanced semiconductor materials and devices.

Greenhouse gas emission and, consequently, global warming are threatening the global economy and world as we know it. A non-rational use of electrical energy largely contributes to these.

Sustainable energy generation and utilisation is a vital industry in today’s energy thirsty world. Energy generation and conversion, in the most efficient way possible, is the key to reducing carbon emissions. It is an essential element of novel energy power generation system and future transportation systems. The core of an energy conversion system is the power electronics converter which in one hand ensures the maximum power capture from any energy source and on another hand controls the power quality delivered to grid. Therefore the converter parameters such as efficiency, reliability and costs are directly affecting the performance of an energy system.

Transmission and distribution systems will encounter many challenges in the near future. Decentralisation of generation and storage systems has emerged as a promising solution. Consequently, in the near future, a power grid will no longer be a mono-directional energy flow system but a bi-directional one, requiring a much more complex management.

The MSc in Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy students must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time Delivery mode

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Modules

Modules on the MSc Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

Advanced Power Electronics and Drives
Power Semiconductor Devices
Advanced Power Systems
Energy and Power Engineering Laboratory
Power Generation Systems
Modern Control Systems
Wide Band-Gap Electronics
Environmental Analysis and Legislation
Communication Skills for Research Engineers
Optimisation

Facilities

The new home of MSc in Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy is at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Engineering at Swansea University has extensive IT facilities and provides extensive software licenses and packages to support teaching. In addition the University provides open access IT resources.

Our new WOLFSON Foundation funded Power Electronics and Power System (PEPS) laboratory well-appointed with the state-of the-art equipment supports student research projects.

Careers

Employment in growing renewable energy sector, power electronic and semiconductor sector, electric/hybrid vehicle industry.

The MSc Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy is for graduates who may want to extend their technical knowledge and for professional applicants be provided with fast-track career development. This MSc addresses the skills shortage within the power electronics for renewable energy sector.

Links with industry

BT, Siemens, Plessey, GE Lighting, Schlumberger, Cogsys, Morganite, Newbridge Networks, Alstom, City Technology, BNR Europe, Philips, SWALEC, DERA, BTG, X-Fab, ZETEX Diodes, IQE, IBM, TSMC, IR, Toyota, Hitachi.

As a student on the MSc Power Engineering and Sustainable Energy course, you will learn about numerical simulation techniques and have the opportunity to visit electronics industries with links to Swansea.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

With recent academic appointments strengthening electronics research at the College, the Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) has been re-launched to support these activities.

The Centre aims to represent all major electronics research within the College and to promote the Electrical and Electronics Engineering degree.

Best known for its research in ground-breaking Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics, the Centre is also a world leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has gained a significant international profile as one of the key international centres for research and training in computational mechanics and engineering. As a student on the Master's course in Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics, you will be provided with in-depth, multidisciplinary training in the application of the finite element method and related state-of-the-art numerical and computational techniques to the solution and simulation of highly challenging problems in engineering analysis and design.

Key Features of Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics MSc

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering is acknowledged internationally as the leading UK centre for computational engineering research. It represents an interdisciplinary group of researchers who are active in computational or applied mechanics. It is unrivalled concentration of knowledge and expertise in this field. Many numerical techniques currently in use in commercial simulation software have originated from Swansea University.

The Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course is a two-year postgraduate programme run by an international consortium of four leading European Universities, namely Swansea University, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Spain), École Centrale de Nantes (France) and University of Stuttgart (Germany) in cooperation with the International Centre for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE, Spain).

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will gain a general knowledge of the theory of computational mechanics, including the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, appreciate the worth of undertaking a computational simulation in an industrial context, and be provided with training in the development of new software for the improved simulation of current engineering problems.

In the first year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will follow an agreed common set of core modules leading to common examinations in Swansea or Barcelona. In addition, an industrial placement will take place during this year, where you will have the opportunity to be exposed to the use of computational mechanics within an industrial context. For the second year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics, you will move to one of the other Universities, depending upon your preferred specialisation, to complete a series of taught modules and the research thesis. There will be a wide choice of specialisation areas (i.e. fluids, structures, aerospace, biomedical) by incorporating modules from the four Universities. This allows you to experience postgraduate education in more than one European institution.

Modules

Modules on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study the following core modules (together with elective modules):

Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Continuum Mechanics
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Industrial Project
Finite Element Computational Analysis
Entrepreneurship for Engineers
Finite Element in Fluids
Computational Plasticity
Fluid-Structure Interaction
Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics and Transient Analysis
Reservoir Modelling and Simulation

Accreditation

The Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

See http://www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

This degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Links with Industry

On the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will have the opportunity to apply your skills and knowledge in computational mechanics in an industrial context.

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course you will be placed in engineering industries, consultancies or research institutions that have an interest and expertise in computational mechanics. Typically, you will be trained by the relevant industry in the use of their in-house or commercial computational mechanics software.

You will also gain knowledge and expertise on the use of the particular range of commercial software used in the industry where you are placed.

Careers

The next decade will experience an explosive growth in the demand for accurate and reliable numerical simulation and optimisation of engineering systems.

Computational mechanics will become even more multidisciplinary than in the past and many technological tools will be, for instance, integrated to explore biological systems and submicron devices. This will have a major impact in our everyday lives.

Employment can be found in a broad range of engineering industries as this course provides the skills for the modelling, formulation, analysis and implementation of simulation tools for advanced engineering problems.



Student Quotes

“I gained immensely from the high quality coursework, extensive research support, confluence of cultures and unforgettable friendship.”

Prabhu Muthuganeisan, MSc Computational Mechanics

Read less
Cranfield University has many years of specialist knowledge and experience in High Performance Computing. What was once a set of techniques used only in the narrow confines of numerical simulation is now the mainstream approach to developing software on modern computing hardware. Read more
Cranfield University has many years of specialist knowledge and experience in High Performance Computing. What was once a set of techniques used only in the narrow confines of numerical simulation is now the mainstream approach to developing software on modern computing hardware. As such, the Software Engineering for Technical Computing MSc offers a unique insight into the development of computer applications across a wide spectrum of modern computing environments, from multi-core CPUs to specialist GPUs to Cloud Computing, all of which are relevant to the IT industry today.

Read less
This programme has been designed to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing global market by providing the skills and abilities to contribute to the availability of well-designed products, process and systems. Read more
This programme has been designed to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing global market by providing the skills and abilities to contribute to the availability of well-designed products, process and systems.

As a broad-based Mechanical Engineering degree this programme provides a wide variety of career options in the engineering sector.

Core study areas include experimental mechanics, simulation of advanced materials and processes structural analysis, computer aided engineering, engineering design methods, sustainable development: the engineering context, the innovation process and project management, thermofluids and a project.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mechanical-manufacturing/mechanical-engineering/

Programme modules

- Experimental Mechanics
This module introduces the following elements: experimental techniques for analysis and characterisation of various engineering materials and full-field, non-contact optical methods for deformation and strain measurements. Students will learn to identify the most appropriate experimental techniques for evaluating material response in a specific setting and for different types of materials.

- Simulation of Advanced Materials and Processes
The objective of this module is to introduce students to the concepts in numerical simulation of advanced materials and processes. To enable students to gain theoretical and practical experience in simulating mechanical behaviour of advanced materials and modelling processes related to these materials using finite element modelling techniques.

- Structural Analysis
Students will gain an understanding of modern concepts of structural analysis. They will gain practical experience in analyses of structures using finite-element modelling and understand the need for structural analysis in design.

- Computer Aided Engineering
Students will learn how to evaluate, choose and implement CAE systems. Students will learn to select and apply appropriate computer based methods and systems for modelling engineering products; analysing engineering problems; and assisting in the product design process.

- Engineering Design Methods
The aims of this module are to provide students with a working understanding of some of the main methods which may be employed in the design of products and systems. Students will learn to identify appropriate methods and techniques for use at different times and situations within a project.

- Sustainable Development: The Engineering Context
The objective of this module are to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of sustainable development and to provide them with an understanding of how engineers can help manufacturing businesses develop into more sustainable enterprises.

- The Innovation Process and Project Management
This module allows students to gain a clear overview of the innovation process and an understanding of the essential elements within it. Students will learn strategies for planning and carrying out innovative projects in any field.

- Thermofluids
In this module students study the fundamentals of combustion processes and understand key aspects relating to performance and emissions. Students develop knowledge and skills required by engineers entering industries involved in the design and use of combustion equipment.

- Project
In addition to the taught modules, all students undertake an individual major project. Part-time students normally undertake a major project that is based on the needs of their employing company.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling and independent research.

The programme consists of eight, week-long, taught lecture modules plus project work. Each taught module is self-contained and covers a complete target. This programme is available in both full-time and part-time forms. Full-time students commence their studies on the first Monday in October for a period of 12 months. Part-time students may commence their registration at any time between October and the following March, and take 3 years (typical) to complete the programme.

On completion of this programme, students should be able to:
- Plan and monitor multi-disciplinary projects;
- appreciate the central role of design within engineering;
- demonstrate competence in using computer based engineering techniques;
- analyse and understand complex engineering problems; and
- use team working skills and communicate effectively at an advanced technical level.

Facilities

As a student within the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering you will have access to a range of state-of-the-art equipment. Our computer labs are open 24/7 and use some of the latest industry standard software including STAR-CCM and CAD.

We have high-tech laboratories devoted to:
- Dynamics and control
- Electronics
- Fluid mechanics
- Materials
- Mechatronics
- Metrology
- Optical engineering
- Structural integrity
- Thermodynamics

Careers and further study

The programme will allow students to acquire the technical and transferable skills required to succeed in a career in industry or academic research. Graduates may also study for an MPhil or PhD with the School.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a country outside the European Union. These scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why Choose Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at Loughborough?

The School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering is a leader in technological research and innovation, with extensive national and international industrial links, and a long standing tradition of excellent teaching.

Our Industrial Advisory Committee, comprising of engineers at senior levels in the profession, ensures that our programmes contain the optimal balance of subjects and industrial relevance, with our programmes accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Institution of Engineering and Technology and Institution of Engineering Designers.

- Facilities
The School has laboratories devoted to disciplines such as; dynamics and control, automation, fluid mechanics, healthcare engineering, internal combustion engines, materials, mechatronics, metrology, optical engineering, additive manufacturing, sports engineering, structural integrity and thermodynamics.

- Research
The School has a busy, multi-national community of well over 150 postgraduate research students who form an important part of our internationally recognised research activities.
We have seven key research centres (Electronics Manufacture, Intelligent Automation, Regenerative Medicine Embedded Intelligence, High Efficiency SCR for Low Emission Vehicles and High Value Manufacturing Catapult Centre) and we are a lead governing partner in the newly formed UK Manufacturing Technology Centre.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment or further study within six months of graduating. Our graduates go on to work with companies such as Airbus, BAE Systems, Caterpillar, EDF Energy, Ford, IBM, Jaguar Land Rover, Millbrook Proving Ground, Rolls Royce and Tata Steel.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mechanical-manufacturing/mechanical-engineering/

Read less
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
Advanced Mechanical Engineering looks at computational mechanics, response to materials and reliability engineering. SEMESTER 1. Read more
Advanced Mechanical Engineering looks at computational mechanics, response to materials and reliability engineering.

SEMESTER 1
Compulsory Courses
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Numerical Simulation of Waves
Advanced Composite Materials

Optional Courses
Fire and Explosion Engineering
Structural Dynamics

SEMESTER 2
Compulsory Courses
Finite Element Methods
Mathematical Optimisation
Engineering Risk and Reliability Analysis

Optional Courses
Project Management
Risers Systems Hydrodynamics
Renewable Energy 3 (Wind, Marine and Hydro

SEMESTER
Project

Read less
Master’s Degree in Quantitative Finance and Risk Management draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in quantitative finance, and makes great use of the collaborations with the Universities of Paris-Dauphine and Cergy-Pontoise. Read more
Master’s Degree in Quantitative Finance and Risk Management draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in quantitative finance, and makes great use of the collaborations with the Universities of Paris-Dauphine and Cergy-Pontoise. The Master is primarily going to appeal to international students, "free movers" or those from our partner universities or for high-potential foreign engineers who are looking for an international career in the domain of finance. This program leads to a Master degree and a Diplôma accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research.

Objective

This Master’s degree covers the whole chain of quantitative finance, from theoretical aspects to the application in a professional setting. The chain can be described as follows:
o Description of the market and financial products
o Mathematical models of finance
o Mathematical models of risk
o Numerical resolution: computer-aided simulation
o Calibration and asset evaluation

Specific details of the Master:
o The Master came from the Financial Engineering option (IFI) taught at the ESITI for the last 13 years (all students from the option have found work as soon as their compulsory internships finished, and have an average salary 20% higher than the norm in this sector).
o In and of itself, the Master is intrinsically international.
o The theoretical teaching of this Master is very thorough, covering everything needed to know in the associated professions. As a consequence, the students are very adaptable within the work market.
o The Master offers a 3-skilled approach, in Computer Science, Mathematics and Finance.

Practical information
The Master’s degree counts for 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) in total and lasts two years. The training lasts 1316 hours (646 hours in M1 and 670 hours in M2). The semesters are divided as follows:
o M1 courses take place from September until June and count for a total of 60 ECTS
o M2 courses take place from September until mid-April and count for a total of 44 ECTS
o A five-month internship (in France) from mid- April until mid- September for 16 ECTS. Usual indemnities are around 1000 € per month.

Non-French speakers will be asked to participate to a one week intensive French course that precedes the start of the program and allows students to gain the linguistic knowledge necessary for daily interactions.

Organization

M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 646 h):
• Mathematics
• Measure and Integration (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Functional Analysis (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Stochastic Processes-Discrete/Continuous Time (5,5 ECTS, 55 h)
• Optimization (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Jump Processes and Application (3 ECTS, 30h)
• Partial Differential Equations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
 Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Monte Carlo Simulations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Finite Difference Methods (2,5 ECTS, 25 h)
• Calibration of Financial Models (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Bloomberg trading room (3ECTS, 30h)
• C++ and Object Oriented Design (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• VBA Programming (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Interdisciplinary Project (5 ECTS, 5 h)
 Finance and Insurance
• Introduction to Quantitative Finance (3 ECTS, 25 h)
• Risk Management in a mono-period Financial Market & Derivatives (4 ECTS, 40 h)
• Contingent Claims Valuation (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Management and Financial Risks (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Mathematics Applied to Insurance (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4,5 ECTS, 96 h)

M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 646 h):
• Mathematics
• Measure and Integration (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Functional Analysis (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Stochastic Processes-Discrete/Continuous Time (5,5 ECTS, 55 h)
• Optimization (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Jump Processes and Application (3 ECTS, 30h)
• Partial Differential Equations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Monte Carlo Simulations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Finite Difference Methods (2,5 ECTS, 25 h)
• Calibration of Financial Models (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Bloomberg trading room (3ECTS, 30h)
• C++ and Object Oriented Design (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• VBA Programming (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Interdisciplinary Project (5 ECTS, 5 h)
• Finance and Insurance
• Introduction to Quantitative Finance (3 ECTS, 25 h)
• Risk Management in a mono-period Financial Market & Derivatives (4 ECTS, 40 h)
• Contingent Claims Valuation (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Management and Financial Risks (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Mathematics Applied to Insurance (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4,5 ECTS, 96 h)

M2 modules take place from September to Mid-April (60 ECTS, 670h)
• Mathematics
• Mathematical Statistics (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Mathematical Tools in Finance (4,5 ECTS, 54h)
• Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Advanced Numerical Methods for PDEs in Finance(2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Advanced Spreadsheet Programming (2 ECTS, 24h)
• Simulations (2 ECTS, 24 h)
• Calibration (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Theoretical and Practical Finance
• Theory of Contingent Claims (4,5 ECTS, 54 h)
• Interest Rate, Exchange and Inflation Markets (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Managment (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Imperfect Markets (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Dynamic Hedging and Risk Measures (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Business Evaluation (2,5 ECTS, 35 h)
• Jump Processes and Applications (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Careers and financial products (2 ECTS, 30 h)
• Practical Fixed Income Management (2 ECTS, 24 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4 ECTS, 72 h)
• Master's Thesis (9 ECTS, 150 h)
• Internship (22 weeks from mid-April to)

Teaching

Fourteen external teachers (lecturers from universities, teacher-researchers, professors etc.), supported by a piloting committee, will bring together the training given in Cergy.

All the classes will be taught in English, with the exception of:
• The class of FLE (French as a foreign language), where the objective is to teach the students how to understand and express themselves in French.
• Cultural Openness, where the objective is to enrich the students’ knowledge of French culture.
The EISTI offers an e-learning site to all its students, which complements everything the students will learn through their presence and participation in class:
• class documents, practical work and tutorials online
• questions and discussions between teachers and students, and among students
• a possibility of handing work in online

All Master’s students are equipped with a laptop for the duration of the program that remains the property of the EISTI.

Read less
Joining the Department as a postgraduate is certainly a good move. The Department maintains strong research in both pure and applied mathematics, as well as the traditional core of a mathematics department. Read more
Joining the Department as a postgraduate is certainly a good move. The Department maintains strong research in both pure and applied mathematics, as well as the traditional core of a mathematics department. What makes our Department different is the equally strong research in fluid mechanics, scientific computation and statistics.

The quality of research at the postgraduate level is reflected in the scholarly achievements of faculty members, many of whom are recognized as leading authorities in their fields. Research programs often involve collaboration with scholars at an international level, especially in the European, North American and Chinese universities. Renowned academics also take part in the Department's regular colloquia and seminars. The faculty comprises several groups: Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Probability and Statistics.

Mathematics permeates almost every discipline of science and technology. We believe our comprehensive approach enables inspiring interaction among different faculty members and helps generate new mathematical tools to meet the scientific and technological challenges facing our fast-changing world.

The MPhil program seeks to strengthen students' general background in mathematics and mathematical sciences, and to expose students to the environment and scope of mathematical research. Submission and successful defense of a thesis based on original research are required.

Research Foci

Algebra and Number Theory
The theory of Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations play an important role in many of the recent development in mathematics and in the interaction of mathematics with physics. Our research includes representation theory of reductive groups, Kac-Moody algebras, quantum groups, and conformal field theory. Number theory has a long and distinguished history, and the concepts and problems relating to the theory have been instrumental in the foundation of a large part of mathematics. Number theory has flourished in recent years, as made evident by the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. Our research specializes in automorphic forms.

Analysis and Differential Equations
The analysis of real and complex functions plays a fundamental role in mathematics. This is a classical yet still vibrant subject that has a wide range of applications. Differential equations are used to describe many scientific, engineering and economic problems. The theoretical and numerical study of such equations is crucial in understanding and solving problems. Our research areas include complex analysis, exponential asymptotics, functional analysis, nonlinear equations and dynamical systems, and integrable systems.

Geometry and Topology
Geometry and topology provide an essential language describing all kinds of structures in Nature. The subject has been vastly enriched by close interaction with other mathematical fields and with fields of science such as physics, astronomy and mechanics. The result has led to great advances in the subject, as highlighted by the proof of the Poincaré conjecture. Active research areas in the Department include algebraic geometry, differential geometry, low-dimensional topology, equivariant topology, combinatorial topology, and geometrical structures in mathematical physics.

Numerical Analysis
The focus is on the development of advance algorithms and efficient computational schemes. Current research areas include: parallel algorithms, heterogeneous network computing, graph theory, image processing, computational fluid dynamics, singular problems, adaptive grid method, rarefied flow simulations.

Applied Sciences
The applications of mathematics to interdisciplinary science areas include: material science, multiscale modeling, mutliphase flows, evolutionary genetics, environmental science, numerical weather prediction, ocean and coastal modeling, astrophysics and space science.

Probability and Statistics
Statistics, the science of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting data, is an essential tool in a wide variety of academic disciplines as well as for business, government, medicine and industry. Our research is conducted in four categories. Time Series and Dependent Data: inference from nonstationarity, nonlinearity, long-memory behavior, and continuous time models. Resampling Methodology: block bootstrap, bootstrap for censored data, and Edgeworth and saddle point approximations. Stochastic Processes and Stochastic Analysis: filtering, diffusion and Markov processes, and stochastic approximation and control. Survival Analysis: survival function and errors in variables for general linear models. Probability current research includes limit theory.

Financial Mathematics
This is one of the fastest growing research fields in applied mathematics. International banking and financial firms around the globe are hiring science PhDs who can use advanced analytical and numerical techniques to price financial derivatives and manage portfolio risks. The trend has been accelerating in recent years on numerous fronts, driven both by substantial theoretical advances as well as by a practical need in the industry to develop effective methods to price and hedge increasingly complex financial instruments. Current research areas include pricing models for exotic options, the development of pricing algorithms for complex financial derivatives, credit derivatives, risk management, stochastic analysis of interest rates and related models.

Facilities

The Department enjoys a range of up-to-date facilities and equipment for teaching and research purposes. It has two computer laboratories and a Math Support Center equipped with 100 desktop computers for undergraduate and postgraduate students. The Department also provides an electronic homework system and a storage cloud system to enhance teaching and learning.

To assist computations that require a large amount of processing power in the research area of scientific computation, a High Performance Computing (HPC) laboratory equipped with more than 200 high-speed workstations and servers has been set up. With advanced parallel computing technologies, these powerful computers are capable of delivering 17.2 TFLOPS processing power to solve computationally intensive problems in our innovative research projects. Such equipment helps our faculty and postgraduate students to stay at the forefront of their fields. Research projects in areas such as astrophysics, computational fluid dynamics, financial mathematics, mathematical modeling and simulation in materials science, molecular simulation, numerical ocean modeling, numerical weather prediction and numerical methods for micromagnetics simulations all benefit from our powerful computing facilities.

Read less
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Read more
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Covering topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques, it produces graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well-equipped to proceed to doctoral research or directly into employment in industry, the professions, and the public service. It also provides training for the academic researchers and teachers of the future, encouraging the pursuit of research in computational methods for science and technology disciplines, thus being an important gateway for entering PhD programmes containing a substantial component of computational modelling.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpscm

Course detail

The MPhil in Scientific Computing has a research and a taught element. The research element is a project on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. The taught element comprises of core lecture courses on topics of scientific computing and elective lecture courses relevant to the science or technology topic of the project. Most of the projects are expected to make use of the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

The students will attend lecture courses during Michaelmas Term (some courses may be during Lent Term) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for continuation to a PhD programme or employment, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners who are working with the participating Departments and may be sponsoring the research project.

There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively.

Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments on the core courses 25%; written examinations on the elective courses 25%.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project.

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core lectures are on topics of high performance scientific computing numerical analysis and advanced numerical methods and techniques. They are organized by the Centre for Scientific Computing and are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their dissertation and for their general education in scientific computing.

In particular, their objective is to introduce students to the simulation science pipeline of problem identification, modelling, simulation and evaluation - all from the perspective of employing high-performance computing. Numerical discretisation of mathematical models will be a priority, with a specific emphasis on understanding the trade-offs (in terms of modelling time, pre-processing time, computational time, and post-processing time) that must be made when solving realistic science and engineering problems. Understanding and working with computational methods and parallel computing will be a high priority. To help the students understand the material, the lecturers will furnish the courses with practical coursework assignments.

The lectures on topics of numerical analysis and HPC are complemented with hands-on practicals using Linux-based laptops provided by the course (students may bring their own), as well as on the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

Appropriate elective lecture courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor. While every effort is made within the Departments to arrange the timetable in a coherent fashion, it is inevitable that some combinations of courses will be ruled out by their schedule, particularly if the choices span more than one department.

Continuing

For continuation to a PhD programme in Scientific Computing, students are required to gain a Distinction (overall grade equal or greater than 75%).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Read more
Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Numerical methods can only play an even more important role in the future as we face even bigger challenges. Therefore, skilled scientific programmers are in high demand in industry and academia and will drive forward much of the future economy.

Degree information

This programme aims to produce highly computationally skilled scientists and engineers capable of applying numerical methods and critical evaluation of their results to their field of science or engineering. It brings together best practice in computing with cutting-edge science and provides a computing edge over traditional science, engineering and mathematics programmes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), is also offered.

Core modules
-Computational and Simulation Methods
-Numerical Methods
-Numerical Optimisation
-Research Computing with C++
-Research Software Engineering with Python
-Techniques of High-Performance

Optional modules - options include a wide selection of modules across UCL Engineering and UCL Mathematical & Physical Sciences.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and hands-on programming and includes a variety of short programming projects, delivered as part of the taught component. Students are encouraged to participate in scientific seminars, for example, weekly seminars at the UCL Centre for Inverse Problems. Assessment is through examinations, assignments, small projects and the dissertation, including a computer programme.

Careers

We expect our graduates to take up exciting science and engineering roles in industry and academia with excellent prospects for professional development and steep career advancement opportunities. This degree enable students to work on cutting-edge real-life problems, overcome the challenges they pose and so contribute to advancing knowledge and technology in our society.

Employability
Students develop a comprehensive set of skills which are in high demand both in industry and academia: professional software development skills including state-of-the-art scripting and compiled languages; knowledge of techniques used in high-performance computing; understanding and an ability to apply a wide range of numerical methods and numerical optimisation; a deeper knowledge of their chosen science subject; oral and written presentational skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a global reputation for excellence in research and is committed to delivering impact and innovations that enhance the lives of people in the UK, across Europe and around the world. UCL is consistently placed in the global top 20 across a wide range of university rankings (currently fifth in QS World University Rankings 2014/15). Furthermore, the Thomson Scientific Citation Index shows that UCL is the 2nd most highly cited European university and 13th in the world.

Our wide-ranging expertise provides opportunities for groundbreaking interdisciplinary investigation. World-leading experts in the field and students benefit from a programme of distinguished visitors and guest speakers in many scientific seminars. In this way a network of collaborators, mentors and peers is created, which students can access in their future career.

This degree has been designed to balance a professional software development and high performance computing skills with a comprehensive selection of numerical mathematics and scientific subjects, culminating in a scientific computing dissertation project. The dual aspect of a science and computing degree enable students to tackle real-life problems in a structured and rigorous way and produce professional software for their efficient solution.

Read less
This course focuses on the physical processes that generate natural hazards through an advanced understanding of geological and environmental processes. Read more

Why take this course?

This course focuses on the physical processes that generate natural hazards through an advanced understanding of geological and environmental processes.

You will be fully trained by internationally recognised experts in hazard identification, terrain evaluation techniques as well as hazard modelling and risk assessment techniques. Providing you with the essential skills to monitor, warn and help control the consequences of natural hazards.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is accredited by the Geological Society of London. It offers advanced professional and scientific training providing an accelerated route for you to attain Chartered Status, such as Chartered Geologist (CGeol) and Chartered Scientist (CSci) on graduation.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Aid organisations
Environmental organisations
Offshore work
Civil sector roles
Mining
Insurance companies

Module Details

You can opt to take this course in full-time or part-time mode.

The course is divided into two parts. The first part comprises the lecture, workshop, practical and field work elements of the course, followed by a five-month independent research project. The course is a mixture of taught units and research project covering topics including site investigation, hazard modelling and mapping, soil mechanics and rock mechanics, contaminated land, flooding and slope stability.

Here are the units you will study:

Natural Hazard Processes: The topic of this unit forms the backbone of the course and give you an advanced knowledge of a broad range of geological and environmental hazards, including floods, landslides, collapsible ground, volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, hydro-meteorological and anthropogenic hazards. External speakers are used to provide insights and expertise from an industry, regulatory and research perspective.

Numerical Hazard Modelling and Simulation: This forms an important part of the course, whereby you are trained in the application of computer models to the simulation of a range of geological and environmental hazards. You will develop skills in computer programming languages and use them to develop numerical models that are then used to simulate different natural hazard scenarios.

Catastrophe Modelling: On this unit you will cover the application of natural hazard modelling to better understand the insurance sector exposure to a range of geological and environmental hazards. It includes external speakers and sessions on the application of models for this type of catastrophe modelling.

Volcanology and Seismology: You will gain an in-depth knowledge of the nature of volcanism and associated hazards and seismology, associated seismo-tectonics and earthquake hazards. This unit is underpinned by a residential field course in the Mediterranean region that examines the field expression of volcanic, seismic and other natural hazards.

Flooding and Hydrological Hazards: These are a significant global problem that affect urban environments, one that is likely to increase with climate change. This unit will give you an in-depth background to these hazards and opportunities to simulate flooding in order to model the flood hazard and calculate the risk.

Hazard and Risk Assessment: This unit gives you the chance to study the techniques that are employed once a hazard has been identified and its likely impact needs to be measured. You will have advanced training in the application of qualitative and quantitative approaches to hazard and risk assessment and their use in the study of different natural hazards.

Field Reconnaissance and Geomorphological Mapping: These techniques are integral to the course and an essential skill for any graduate wishing to work in this area of natural hazard assessment. On this unit you will have fieldwork training in hazard recognition using techniques such as geomorphological mapping and walk-over surveys, combined with interpretation of remote sensing and aerial photography imagery.

Spatial Analysis and Remote Sensing: You will learn how to acquire and interpret aerial photography and satellite imagery, and the integration and analysis of spatial datasets using GIS – all key tools for hazard specialists.

Geo-mechanical Behaviour of Earth Materials: You will train in geotechnical testing and description of soils and rocks to the British and international standards used by industry.

Landslides and Slope Instability: This unit will give you an advanced understanding of landslide systems, types of slides in soils and rocks and methods for identification and numerical analysis.

Impacts and Remediation of Natural Hazards: You will cover a growing area of study, including the impact of hazardous events on society and the environment, and potential mitigation and remediation methods that can be employed.

Independent Research Project: This provides you with an opportunity to undertake an original piece of research to academic or industrial standards, typically in collaboration with research staff in the department or external industry partners. In addition to submission of a thesis report, you also present the results of your project at the annual postgraduate conference held at the end of September.

Programme Assessment

The course provides a balanced structure of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You will learn through hands-on practical sessions designed to give you the skills in laboratory, computer and field techniques. The course also includes extensive field work designed to provide field mapping and data collection skills.

Assessment is varied, aimed at developing skills relevant to a range of working environments. Here’s how we assess your work:

Poster and oral presentations
Project reports
Literature reviews
Lab reports
Essays

Student Destinations

This course provides vocational skills designed to enable you to enter this specialist environmental field. These skills include field mapping, report writing, meeting deadlines, team working, presentation skills, advanced data modelling and communication.

You will be fully equipped to gain employment in the insurance industry, government agencies and specialist geoscience companies, all of which are tasked with identifying and dealing with natural hazards. Previous destinations of our graduates have included major re-insurance companies, geological and geotechnical consultancies, local government and government agencies.

It also has strong research and analytical components, ideal if you wish to pursue further research to PhD level.

We aim to provide you with as much support as possible in finding employment through close industrial contacts, careers events, recruitment fairs and individual advice.

Read less
This course is designed to respond to a growing shortage of workforce in manufacturing sector. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to respond to a growing shortage of workforce in manufacturing sector. It intends to equip our students with relevant and up-to-date knowledge and skills of advanced design tools, materials, manufacturing processes and systems in conjunction with developing efficient operation and effective management skills. Integrating these will ensure our students to develop the technological and practical ability to meet manufacturing demand for product, company and market needs.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Use simulation and modelling application software for virtual design and manufacturing
Utilise our strong links with companies and investigate real industrial problems to enhance your understanding of the profession
Tie in the topic of your individual project with one of our research groups and benefit from the expertise of our actively researching academics

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course has been accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) meeting the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). It will provide you with some of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Design
Research and development
Product manufacture
Project management

Module Details

This course aims to provide you with the inter-disciplinary knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to apply the principles of advanced manufacturing systems within the manufacturing industry. You will study several key topics and also complete a four-month individual project tailored to your individual interests that can take place in our own laboratories or, by agreement, in industry.

Here are the units you will study:

Integrated Manufacturing Systems: Systems concepts and techniques are developed in logistics and manufacturing areas with a strong emphasis on simulation techniques and practical case study analysis.

Operations and Quality Management: A strategic approach is used with modern inventory and supply chain management and logistics tools and techniques. Management strategies are developed for quality, including quality systems and quality control.

Advanced Materials: This unit is designed to deal with a wide range of advanced materials for engineering applications. Teaching will address analytical and numerical methods to assess the strength, stiffness, toughness, non-linearity behaviours, vibration and failures of engineering materials for component and structure design.

Supply Chain Management: Supply chain management involves the coordination of production, inventory, location and transportation, among participants in a supply chain. This unit considers the principles and tools of supply chain management, with an emphasis on lean six sigma methods.

Virtual Systems Design and Simulation for Production: This unit is particularly designed to enhance students’ analytical knowledge and practical skills focusing on a sustainable development of systematic approaches and lean production methods to support manufacturing systems analysis, design and performance evaluation with an aid of using advanced computer design and modelling simulation tools.

CAD/CAM Systems: An integrated approach is used towards CAD and CAM. Significant practical hands-on experience is given with commercial level software. Emphasis is placed on case study analysis and system selection and evaluation.

Individual Project: A strong feature that comprises a third of the course. You will be encouraged to undertake projects where possible in industrial companies. However, we also use our extensive resources and staff skills to undertake them within the University.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials (personal and academic), laboratory sessions and project work. The course has a strong practical emphasis with a significant amount of your time spent our laboratories. We pride ourselves on working at the leading-edge of technology and learning practices.

A range of assessment methods encourages a deeper understanding of engineering and allows you to develop your skills. Here’s how we assess your work:

Written examinations
Coursework
Laboratory-based project work
A major individual project/dissertation

Student Destinations

The demand for more highly skilled manufacturing engineers is always present and it is generally accepted that there is a current shortage of engineers.

This course has a record of almost 100 per cent of our graduates gaining employment in relevant areas such as manufacturing and logistics management, systems engineering, production engineering, design engineering and project management. You could work for a large company, in the Armed Forces or in one of the many small companies within this sector. You could even start your own specialist company.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Manufacturing engineer
Product design engineer
Aerospace engineer
Application engineer

Read less
Most business schools offer an MSc in Finance. Few offer an MSc with such a strong investment component. A powerful blend of academic rigour and vocational insight, the MSc in Finance and Investment will add considerably to the knowledge of those looking to further their career in this vital sector. Read more

This programme is not currently accepting applications.

Programme description

Most business schools offer an MSc in Finance. Few offer an MSc with such a strong investment component. A powerful blend of academic rigour and vocational insight, the MSc in Finance and Investment will add considerably to the knowledge of those looking to further their career in this vital sector.

The School's location in the UK's second largest financial centre allows us to attract visiting speakers from the key financial institutions, fund management houses and a range of analysts. Students are able to interact with leading figures from many major companies; this is particularly evident in the dissertation, which offers an invaluable opportunity to collaborate on a topic that has real, of-the-minute industry relevance.

The practical, theoretical and numerical skills learnt through the programme, as well as the global perspective of investment markets and asset classes, will leave you well qualified for a range of finance related professions. We expect graduates to take up positions in investment analysis, portfolio management, financial statement analysis and evaluation, corporate finance, product development, client servicing and risk management.

The School is recognised a partner institution by the Chartered Financial Analysis (CFA) Institute. Equally the School is recognised as a Centre of Excellence in the provision of postgraduate education in finance and investment by the Chartered Institute for Securities & Investment (CISI).

Programme structure

Learning will primarily be through lectures, set reading, class discussions, exercises, group-work assignments, problem solving in tutorials and case studies. Assessment methods include examinations, assignments, presentations or continuous assessment.

Learning outcomes

Students will learn about corporate finance, global financial markets, financial accounting statements, derivatives, portfolio management, investment analysis and investment mathematics. They will also learn about the use of software and sources of information in investment and risk management.

How to estimate the fair value for an investment, to test assumptions and sensitivities and to compare different investments are explored in depth. Students will also gain an understanding of the role of different asset classes, their behaviour in isolation and in relation to other asset classes, and an understanding of how portfolios of investments can be constructed and analysed.

Intellectual skills

Students will develop:

critical analysis – an ability to assimilate new knowledge in the field of finance and investment (and to analyse the information gained) and the operations and methods used in the financial sector
research skills – an ability to identify and define pertinent research questions, to review the relevant literature, to define a proper methodology and to conduct research in the context of data analysis or other suitable methods
discipline – a major difficulty in investment is removing emotion from the decision-making process; research in behavioural finance shows that the desire of investors to follow consensus, and the ease with which they can misinterpret data, are obstacles to sound decision making - the programme will seek to imbue students with the discipline required to make good investment decisions
analytical and numerical skills – an ability to analyse and solve investment problems, to handle large volumes of numerical data, to extract and manipulate relevant data in a meaningful manner, and to analyse accounting information

Subject-specific knowledge

Students will develop:

an understanding of investment and risk-management tools and databases such as Datastream, Osiris, WRDS and ThomsonOne Banker, through use of such products and demonstrations of their output and capabilities
an understanding of industry practice in risk management and general techniques such as value-at-risk and optimisation
an ability to understand, speak and write the language of finance and investment. An ability to analyse financial statements of companies, to evaluate earnings quality and firm performance
an understanding of analytical and problem-solving methods through the use of techniques such as discounted cash flow analysis, quadratic programming, sensitivity analysis, scenario analysis and Monte Carlo Simulation
an understanding of risk and its applicability beyond investment
a knowledge of the nature and findings of academic enquiry in the areas of finance and investment

Transferable skills

Students will develop an:

ability to understand, assess and present complex lines of argument
ability to work individually and with others in teams, often under time pressure
ability to communicate clearly on paper and in presentations
enhanced numerical skills and fluency in spreadsheet use, developed through problem solving in quantitative courses within the programme

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X