• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bath Featured Masters Courses
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
University College London Featured Masters Courses
emlyon business school Featured Masters Courses
"nuclear" AND "medicine"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Nuclear Medicine)

We have 42 Masters Degrees (Nuclear Medicine)

  • "nuclear" AND "medicine" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 42
Order by 
IN BRIEF. Receive guidance and tuition from respected nuclear medicine professionals. Enjoy access to managed practical sessions in internationally renowned nuclear medicine facilities. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Receive guidance and tuition from respected nuclear medicine professionals
  • Enjoy access to managed practical sessions in internationally renowned nuclear medicine facilities
  • Gain a qualification that's professionally accredited by the Society of Radiographers
  • Part-time study option

COURSE SUMMARY

As a healthcare professional, this course offers you a valuable multidisciplinary opportunity to participate in continuing professional development.

During your time with us, you'll tackle five compulsory modules that will develop a deep understanding of the theory of nuclear medicine imaging. Practically, it will allow you develop skills in nuclear medicine that will allow you to practice competently and deal with complex and challenging situations

The course takes a blended approach to learning where you have blocks of attendance at Universtiy for lectures, tutorials and workshops. Supporting these learning activities are online learning through our virtual learning environment (BlackBoard).

The opportunity to come to university and meet your peers is important as it helps develop a sense of community and you are able to support each other through the programme. The time at university is highly valued by students.

You must have a UK-based clinical placement before commencing the course and spend a minimum of 3 days per week in clinical practice (excluding annual leave and weeks at the University). We can advise on this should you not have a placement but please note we cannot arrange it for you. Please contact the programme leader for advice

COURSE DETAILS

This course is made up of five compulsory modules which integrate theory with the clinical application and practice of nuclear medicine. There is a clinical practice requirement for the duration of the PgDip and you will be required to work closely with a nominated clinical supervisor.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The PGDip runs over one year making use of the three trimesters. The dissertation module continues in year 2 if you wish to continue. There is the option of retuning to complete the MSc after a break in your studies. You are advised to discuss with the programme leader the best option for you.

The course structure provides you the chance to exit with the following awards:

  • Postgraduate Diploma: five modules over one year
  • Master's: five modules plus a dissertation over a total of 19 months

TEACHING

Your learning will be delivered through lectures, seminars, onlnie learning and group work.

You'll receive support from course tutors over email and via our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, where you can access discussion boards, online lectures, podcasts, videos and other learning materials.

ASSESSMENT

Fundamentals of Nuclear Medicine

  • Description and justification of a quality control procedure for a gamma camera (50%)
  • Critique and justification of a clinical imaging protocol (50%)

Advanced concepts of Nuclear Medicine

  • Case Study written in a style suitable for publication (100%

Scientific Principles of Hybrid Imaging in Nuclear Medicine

  • Electronic exam (2 hours) (100%)

Clinically based practices in Nuclear Medicine

  • Objective structured clinical examination (30%)
  • Portfolio of clinical learning and experience (70%)

Statistics and Research Methods in nuclear medicine

  • Portfolio of learning (100%)

Your learning will be delivered through lectures, seminars, onlnie learning and group work.

You'll receive support from course tutors over email and via our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, where you can access discussion boards, online lectures, podcasts, videos and other learning materials.

FACILITIES

During the scientific principles of hybrid imaging module you will have access to the University’s CT scanner where you will be able to undertake practical workshops.

We have an extensive collection of anatomical and physics phantoms and dosimetry equipment that is available to students undertaking the dissertation module.

CAREER PROSPECTS

This course will equip you with the skills and knowledge that will qualify you for additional roles and responsibilities, which, in turn will enhance your career opportunities. You will have the knowledge and skills to be able to work in any nuclear medicine department. You will have developed knowledge and skills in research and will be able to evaluate critically published literature and use this to inform practice. You will have skills in creating and disseminating original.

Graduates of this programme have gained senior positions in clinical departments, industry and in education and research.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

The programme team is made up of academic and clinical staff form a range of professional backgrounds including radiographers, clinical technologists, physicists, radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Staff have a wealth of experience in practice and research to ensure the course content is current.

We have strong links with industry especially in the North West, for example, during the SPECT and Fundamentals module there will be practical session at the Nuclear Medicine Department in the Christie Hospital and the Central Manchester Nuclear Medicine Department. Likewise during the Hybrid Imaging module there will be a practical session at the Central Manchester Nuclear Medicine Department.



Read less
This flexible and student-centred choice of routes was re-validated and accredited in 2013 by the Society and College of Radiographers. Read more
This flexible and student-centred choice of routes was re-validated and accredited in 2013 by the Society and College of Radiographers. It gives healthcare professionals currently involved in Nuclear Medicine practice the opportunity to develop and enhance their skills and understanding of this rapidly evolving subject and its application.

Key benefits

This course is accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers (SCoR).

Course detail

The MSc Nuclear Medicine course provides the educational and research foundations required to evaluate current working practice and understand the opportunities currently available in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging environments. As a result, peer learning is a big part of this course's value to individuals and employers. In addition to developing skills directly linked to clinical practice, you will also have the opportunity to contribute to the nuclear medicine knowledge base through research and publication.

This course is designed in conjunction with a number of clinical experts, and our partnership with clinical software provider Hermes Medical Solutions. This means it produces competent and professional practitioners with the skills needed to optimise and promote this imaging modality in current models of patient care.

Year 1 Postgraduate Certificate

• Fundamental Clinical Skills in Nuclear Medicine
• Science and Instrumentation in Current Nuclear Medicine Practice
• Cross-sectional Anatomy for the Nuclear Medicine Practitioner

Year 2 Postgraduate Diploma

• Enhancing Nuclear Medicine Practice
• Current Applications of Hybrid Imaging Practice
• Evidencing Work Based Learning

Year 3 MSc

• Health and Social Care Research: Methods and Methodology
• Research Dissertation

Format

The course is mostly distance-based, with only three contact days per year. This approach is highly popular for employers and employees in nuclear medicine, and is supported by a range of clinical experts alongside the UWE academic team. It's designed to give you the knowledge and skills needed to practice in a safe and competent manner, and a comprehensive education and research base to evaluate and inform current and future practice. There are many opportunities for inter-professional collaboration and shared learning, and you'll learn in practical settings how nuclear medicine contributes to patient management.

Assessment

Assessment methods include written assignments, case studies, online interactions and clinical portfolios.

Careers / Further study

You must be currently practicing nuclear medicine the routes available on this course are designed to help you complement existing skills and knowledge with a view to career progression.

Our links with software providers, and nuclear medicine practitioners and employers, are excellent, and this course is designed to benefit you and your employer by enhancing your ability to contribute to current thinking and practice.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

Read less
Our Nuclear Medicine. Science & Practice course will give you the skills to deliver safe, high-quality nuclear medicine services based on training in a strong scientific and academic framework in an approved structured service environment. . Read more

Our Nuclear Medicine: Science & Practice course will give you the skills to deliver safe, high-quality nuclear medicine services based on training in a strong scientific and academic framework in an approved structured service environment. 

Key benefits

  • GMC approved course for nuclear medicine training in the uk
  • Conveniently based in central London
  • All learning materials, including audio-recorded lectures, are accessible online via King’s E-learning and Teaching Service (KEATS) to support distance learning.
  • Contact with experts and key opinion leaders from across the UK.
  • Close links with leading London Medical Schools and nuclear medicine departments.

Description

This course draws on professional expertise from many disciplines. Our lectures will instruct you in clinical practice, radiopharmaceutical, scientific and regulatory issues in nuclear medicine, as well as providing a solid foundation in diagnostic nuclear oncology and radionuclide therapy. The course features practical components, ranging from clinical observations, audit, physics and radiopharmacy experiments and original research.

This course will develop your skills so that you can provide safe, high-quality nuclear medicine services.

Course purpose

This programme develops skills for the provision of safe, high-quality nuclear medicine services by offering nuclear medicine training with a strong scientific and academic framework in an approved structured service environment.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are an MSc student, you will have 222 hours of lectures. The amount of time you will spend on work placement will typically be around 60 days each year. We expect you to undertake 10 hours of self-study each week.

If you are a PG Dip student, you will have 174 hours of lectures. The amount of time you will spend on work placement will typically be around 60 days each year. We expect you to undertake 10 hours of self-study each week.

If you are a PG Cert student, you will have 120 hours of lectures. The amount of time you will spend on work placement will typically be around 60 days each year. We expect you to undertake 10 hours of self-study each week.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will assess you through a variety of methods, including:

  • Unseen written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical Logbooks
  • Written Thesis 

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

Extra information

This course is primarily taught at the King’s College London St Thomas’ Campus. All teaching materials are accessible on line via the KEATs eLearning platform to support distance learning and revision. Lectures are delivered at St Thomas’ Hospital with a short mini module at Great Ormond Street Hospital. Work placements are usually undertaken in the students’ own institution (UK students) or in major London Teaching hospitals.  

Career prospects

Students continue to work in a range of nuclear medicine services.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



Read less
The School of Clinical Medicine offers a programme in Medical Imaging with an option in Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety or Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography. Read more
The School of Clinical Medicine offers a programme in Medical Imaging with an option in Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety or Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

The Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety strands are offered in parallel on a bi-annual basis, the Magnetic Resonance Imaging and CT strand are offered on alternate years. In September 2013, the MRI and CT strands will commence.

The main aim of the programme is to train and qualify Radiographers in the practice of Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography.

The course is intended for qualified Radiographers with a clinical placement in a Nuclear Medicine Department, a Radiology Department, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department or a Computed Tomography Department. It is a course requirement that the student must spend a minimum of 15 hours per week on clinical placement in a Nuclear Medicine Department, a Radiology Department, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department or a Computed Tomography Department as appropriate to fulfill the requirements of the course.

The M.Sc. in Medical Imaging will be run over 12 months on a part-time basis.

In the M.Sc. in Medical Imaging, there are 4 separate strands: Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography. Students will choose one of the 4 options.

The taught component of the course is covered in the first 8 months. The student may opt to exit the programme upon completion of the taught component with a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Imaging.

From May to September, students undertake an independent research project. Successful completion of the research component of the programme leads to the award of M.Sc. in Medical Imaging.

The list of common core modules currently available to students of the Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and CT strands are:

Medico-Legal Aspects, Ethics and Health Services Management (5 ECTS)
Clinical Practice (10 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Nuclear Medicine strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation, and Computer Technology Radiation Protection and Quality Control in Nuclear Medicine (15 ECTS)
Clinical Applications of Nuclear Medicine and Hybrid Imaging (15 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to Nuclear Medicine (5 ECTS)
Radiopharmacy (5 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Radiation Safety strand are:

Radiation Protection Legislation (10 ECTS)
Practical Aspects of Radiation Protection (5 ECTS)
Physics and Instrumentation and Computer Technology (10 ECTS)
Quality Management and Quality Control (15 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation of MR and computer technology (15 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to MR (10 ECTS)
Safety in MR and Quality Control (5 ECTS)
MR Imaging Techniques and Protocols (15 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Computed Tomography strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation of CT and computer technology (10 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to CT (10 ECTS)
CT Imaging Techniques and Protocols (15 ECTS)
Radiation protection and quality assurance in CT (5 ECTS)

All common modules and strand-specific modules must be undertaken. The taught component thus consists of 60 ECTS.
Dissertation (30 ECTS)

Read less
Nuclear technology plays a crucial role in a wide variety of contexts and sectors in Belgium, including power production, waste management, nuclear fuel production, etc. Read more

Nuclear technology plays a crucial role in a wide variety of contexts and sectors in Belgium, including power production, waste management, nuclear fuel production, etc. The Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network (BNEN) combines the expertise in nuclear education and research of six major Belgian universities (KU Leuven, UGent, VUB, UCL, ULG and ULB) with the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN.

What is the Master of Nuclear Engineering about? 

Nuclear technology plays a crucial role in a wide variety of contexts and sectors in Belgium, including:

  • power production
  • nuclear fuel production
  • radioelement production
  • engineering
  • accelerator design and fabrication
  • waste management
  • safety management
  • nuclear medicine
  • research

 The Belgium Nuclear Higher Education Network combines the expertise in nuclear education and research of six major Belgian universities (KU Leuven, UGent, VUB, UCL, ULG and ULB) with the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre. 

Structure

The current programme can be divided into three core blocks:

  • Introductory courses allowing refreshing or first contact with the basic notions of nuclear physics, materials sciences and the principles of energy conversion through use of nuclear phenomena, supplemented by a core block of nuclear engineering applied to electricity generation and reactor use; theory of reactors and neutronics, thermal hydraulic phenomena during reactor operation, the nuclear fuel cycle and specific material-corrosion problems.
  • A block of elective courses that allow students to deepen certain topics of their choice.
  • A Master’s thesis.

The collaboration with SCK*CEN makes it possible to include actual use of facilities in the curriculum, supporting the development of skills and competences in a research environment. All subjects are taught by academics appointed by the partner universities, whereas the practical exercises and laboratory sessions are supervised by the experts of SCK*CEN. The Master’s thesis offers an opportunity for internship in industry or in a research laboratory.

All teaching activities take place on the premises of SCK*CEN. Courses are organised in English and in a modular way; teaching in blocks of one to three weeks for each module allows optimal time management for students and lecturers, facilitates registration for individual modules, and allows easy exchange with international students.

BNEN has served as a role model for the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) which now has become an association of over 60 members (universities, industry, regulators, research centres), aiming at facilitating mobility in Europe for students in nuclear engineering.

One particular aspect of the BNEN degree is that it automatically leads to the recognition as Class I Expert by the Federal Agency of Nuclear Control. In order to receive this accreditation the programme must at least offer 24 credits in Nuclear Safety and 12 credits in Radioprotection. 

Spotlight 

The Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering programme is an internationally oriented, interuniversity programme organised by BNEN in close collaboration with nuclear research centres and industry. The aim of the BNEN programme is to provide students with all the skills and scientific and technical background necessary to carry out duties at a high level of responsibility in order to ensure the safe and economical operation of nuclear power plants, the regulation and control of nuclear installations or to design new nuclear systems.

A major strength of the BNEN programme, as to its sustainability, is that it allows providing high quality academic education by experts from (or appointed by) the main Belgian universities at low individual cost and thus very efficiently harmonised/rationalised. In addition, the participation of the nuclear research centre SCK*CEN in the consortium provides superb realistic experimental facilities in a difficult (radioactive) environment at low cost for the universities.

A further fundamental strength of the programme can be found in the fact that a well-balanced curriculum is offered where the contents and format have been discussed at length with representatives of the major nuclear companies that are the first potential employers of the graduates. Objectives and programme outcomes were defined that encompass in depth disciplinary specific competences as well as, but in a less pronounced way, transferable skills and competences that are needed for an efficient integration of a graduate in a larger engineering team. There is a nearly complete overlap between objectives and realised competences in courses, electives, exercises and Master’s thesis. This can be ascribed to the following contributing factors:

  • There is a good balance between theory and practical skills. This is implemented through an appropriate diversity of didactic formats, including exercises and/or labs for nearly all courses.
  • There is a good balance between basic subjects and advanced subjects through elective course modules and topical days organized by SCK*CEN.
  • There is appropriate care for multidisciplinary scientific competences and for transferable skills through the importance given to the Master’s thesis.
  • The competences of the teaching staff (lecturers and assistants) with respect to the theoretical background are strong.
  • There is a good mix of junior and senior lecturers.
  • The education in programmes is backed by world-class research at the universities, the research center and the involvement of teachers working in international research institutes.
  • The involvement of several professors who have their principal employment in nuclear companies.
  • There is a large and dynamic group of young researchers involved in the course teaching (seminars), labs and exercises sessions and as mentors of Master’s theses.
  • Both the professors and the young researchers are very active in the major international research programmes and associations related to applications of nuclear phenomena.

Career perspectives

Graduates possess the necessary skills and knowledge to carry out duties at a high level of responsibility in:

  • nuclear power plants
  • nuclear research reactors
  • nuclear regulatory organisations
  • nuclear engineering firms
  • nuclear fuel fabrication
  • nuclear waste treatment
  • radio-isotope production

In addition, the degree itself is an important part of the legal qualifications necessary to become a safety professional in a major nuclear installation.



Read less
The Radiopharmaceutics & PET Radiochemistry course will equip you with the skills to work as a radiopharmaceutical scientist in a PET radiochemistry centre (cyclotron unit) or in the field of conventional radiopharmacy, providing diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals to nuclear medicine centres and specialised commercial centres. Read more

The Radiopharmaceutics & PET Radiochemistry course will equip you with the skills to work as a radiopharmaceutical scientist in a PET radiochemistry centre (cyclotron unit) or in the field of conventional radiopharmacy, providing diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals to nuclear medicine centres and specialised commercial centres.

Key benefits

  • Highly specialist study pathway that is the first of its kind worldwide. 
  • All learning materials are accessible online via King’s E-learning and Teaching Service (KEATS).
  • Opportunities to experience a working placement in a hospital, PET centre or industrial cyclotron centre.
  • Multidisciplinary study programme that attracts graduates from a range of science disciplines including chemists, bio-scientists, physicists, pharmacists.
  • Recognised by European Association of Nuclear Medicine, Masters students will be able to take the European Radiopharmacy exam.
  • On successful completion of the MSc students with a chemistry or pharmacy background can apply for membership with the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Description

The Radiopharmaceutics & PET Radiochemistry course will provide you with opportunities to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills in the principles and practice of radiopharmaceutical science.

The course is made up of optional and required modules. The MSc pathway requires modules totalling 180 credits to complete the programme, 60 of which will come from a research project. You will complete the course in one year, from September to September.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, tutorials and laboratory practicals to deliver most of the modules on the programme. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

 Each 30-credit module typically requires attendance at lectures/tutorials (80%) and labs (20%) for 24 full days. Each of these full days’ will include at least six hours of contact time.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

The course is assessed by a variety of mechanisms including:

  • Unseen written examinations
  • Practical laboratory work and reports
  • Case studies and oral presentations
  • Workshops
  • Audio-visual presentations
  • Laboratory/ library-based research projects

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change. 

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine – EANM (Radiopharmacy Education Board) and the Royal Society of Chemistry – RSC.

Career prospects

Expected destinations are the NHS and commercial nuclear medicine services, the pharmaceutical industry or PhD research.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



Read less
The MPhil in Nuclear Energy, provided by the Department in collaboration with the Cambridge Nuclear Energy Centre, is a one year full-time nuclear technology and business masters for engineers, mathematicians and scientists who wish to make a difference to the problems of climate change and energy security by developing nuclear power generation. Read more
The MPhil in Nuclear Energy, provided by the Department in collaboration with the Cambridge Nuclear Energy Centre, is a one year full-time nuclear technology and business masters for engineers, mathematicians and scientists who wish to make a difference to the problems of climate change and energy security by developing nuclear power generation. The combination of nuclear technology with nuclear policy and business makes the course highly relevant to the challenges of 21st century energy needs, whether in the UK or in countries across the globe.

The MPhil is part of the University of Cambridge's Strategic Energy Initiative in response to the prospect of a nuclear renaissance in the UK and around the world. The aim is to provide a masters-level degree course in Nuclear Energy which will combined nuclear science and technology topics with business, management and policy teaching. Students will be equipped with the skills and information essential to responsible leadership of the international global nuclear industry.

The course recognises that, though the prospects for nuclear energy are now better than they have been for twenty years, the nuclear sector is situated within in a wider market for energy technologies, and has no special right to be developed. The political, economic and social contexts for nuclear power are as important as the technical merits of the designs of reactors and systems. The course therefore has a multi-disciplinary emphasis, aiming to be true to the reality of policy-making and business decision-making.

This course is for students who have a good degree in Engineering or related science subject and who wish to gain the knowledge and skills to build a career in the nuclear and energy sectors. Secondary career paths might include nuclear proliferation prevention, radiological protection, nuclear governance, nuclear medicine and health physics. While the prime focus of the course is to equip students for roles in industry, there is a path towards research through preparation for a PhD programme. The modular open architecture of the course allows students to tailor the degree to suit their background, needs and preferences.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egegmpmne

Course detail

The course will equip its graduates with a wide range of skills and knowledge, enabling them to fully engage in the nuclear sector.

Graduates will have developed a knowledge and understanding of nuclear technology, policy, safety and allied business. They will have received a thorough technical grounding in nuclear power generation, beginning with fundamental concepts and extending to a range of specialist topics. They will also be equipped with an appreciation of the wider social, political and environmental contexts of electricity generation in the 21st century, with a firm grounding in considering issues such as climate change, energy policy and public acceptability.

The programme will cultivate intellectual skills allowing graduates to engage with the business, policy and technical issues that the development and deployment of nuclear energy poses. These include skills in the modelling, simulation and experimental evaluation of nuclear energy systems; critically evaluating and finding alternative solutions to technical problems; applying professional engineering judgment to balance technological, environmental, ethical, economic and public policy considerations; working within an organisation to manage change effectively and respond to changing demand; understanding business practice in the areas of technology management, transfer and exploitation.

The programme will also develop transferable skills enabling graduates to work and progress in teams within and across the nuclear sector, including the management of time and information, the preparation of formal reports in a variety of styles, the deployment of critical reasoning and independent thinking.

Finally, graduates will have research experience having planned, executed, and evaluated an original investigative piece of work through a major dissertation.

Format

The MPhil in Nuclear Energy is based in the Department of Engineering and is run in partnership with Cambridge Judge Business School and the Departments of Materials Science and Metallurgy, and Earth Sciences.

The programme consists of six compuslory courses in nuclear technology and business management, and four elective courses chosen from a broad range of technical and management courses. These elective courses enable the student to tailor the content of the programme to his career needs; they range from wholly management-oriented courses to technical courses in preparation for an engineering role or further research through a PhD. A long research project is required, with topics chosen from a list offered by members of staffed and Industry Club members, and linked to the principal areas of energy research in their respective departments and companies.

Students are also expected to attend field visits, a Distinguished Lecture Series and weekly seminars, and are able to benefit from research skills training offered by the Department.

Assessment

A large individual research project will be undertaken, which will be examined in two parts. The first part will include a report (of up to 4,000 words) and a five-minute oral presentation. The second part is assessed through the writing of a 15,000 word dissertation, including a fifteen minute oral presentation.

All students will be required to complete at least four items of coursework.

All students will take at least three written examinations, of 1.5 hours each.

Continuing

Students wishing to apply for continuation to the PhD would normally be expected to attain an overall mark of 70%.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

UK applicants are eligible to apply for scholarships of £7,000; these scholarships are funded by the MPhil's industrial partners.

To apply for a scholarship, eligible applicants must list the Nuclear Energy Scholarship in Section B(4) of the online GRADSAF form. People wishing to be considered for a scholarship must submit their application before the end of May 2016.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
Your programme of study. If you want to study Medical Physics with applications in nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, electronics and MRI University of Aberdeen has an world renowned historic reputation within major global innovation in this health area. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to study Medical Physics with applications in nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, electronics and MRI University of Aberdeen has an world renowned historic reputation within major global innovation in this health area. Did you know the first MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scanner was invented at Aberdeen over 30 years ago? Major innovations to this technology are still being researched at Aberdeen today. You learn everything you need to know as an advanced grounding in medical physics such as understanding anatomy and how cells are altered by disease. You look at the engineering behind MRI and other visual scanning techniques to understand how applications are made in areas such as nuclear, Positron, Tomography, Radio diagnosis (X-ray), MRI and Ultrasound. You understand radiation and you apply electronics and computing to medical physics. The degree ensures plenty of practical understanding and application and you learn MRI within the department that built it.

If you want to work within imaging and medical physics to pursue a medical career in hospitals, industry and healthcare and diagnose disease by different methods of imaging the degree in Medical Physics will help you towards this goal. You can also develop your own research portfolio and PhD from this MSc and work within academia to pursue innovation in the discipline.

You receive a thorough academic grounding in Medical Physics, are exposed to its practice in a hospital environment, and complete a short research project. Many graduates take up careers in health service medical physics, either in the UK or their home country. The MSc programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics & Engineering in Medicine as fulfilling part of the training requirements for those wishing to work in the NHS. You can also work as a researcher, risk manager, radiation physics specialist and within the medical device industry in product development and innovation.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Biomedical and Professional Topics in Healthcare Science
  • Imaging in Medicine
  • Radiation in Medicine
  • Computing and Electronics in Medicine
  • Generic Skills

Semester 2

  • Radiation and Radiation Physics
  • Nuclear Medicine and Post Emission Tomography
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Medical Electronics and Instrumentation
  • Medical Image Processing and Analysis
  • Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Protection

Semester 3

  • Project Programmes in Medical Physics and Medical Imaging

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by renowned researchers with opportunity to contribute to the expanding research portfolio
  • You learn in a cutting edge medical facility adjacent to the teaching hospital including a PET-CT scanner, radiotherapy centre and linac treatment machines, plus MRI scanners
  • The MRI scanner was invented and developed at University of Aberdeen

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 months or 24 months
  • Full time or Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



Read less
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

Read less
The Medical Imaging MSc, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate offer ideal opportunities for qualified practitioners (eg in Diagnostic Radiography, Physiotherapy and Midwifery) wishing to advance their skills and career prospects within their area of specialism. Read more
The Medical Imaging MSc, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate offer ideal opportunities for qualified practitioners (eg in Diagnostic Radiography, Physiotherapy and Midwifery) wishing to advance their skills and career prospects within their area of specialism.

The MSc Medical Imaging course offers the following pathways:

• Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and MSc
o Magnetic Resonance Imaging
o Medical Ultrasound
o Nuclear Medicine
o Medical Imaging

• Postgraduate Certificate only
o Radiopharmacy Practice
o Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/medical-imaging.aspx

Course detail

The course aims to:
• ensure you are a skilled, competent and confident practitioner in either Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Medical Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine or Medical Imaging
• enable you to be proactive in initiating and leading role developments in your specific field
• integrate academic learning with the development of higher levels of professional practice.

Content

The course is modular in structure and flexible. Each module attracts 20 credits at Master’s level (HE4). For the award of an MSc, you'll be required to successfully complete nine modules (180 credits). All pathways have a Postgraduate Certificate award comprising three modules (60 credits) and a Postgraduate Diploma award comprising six modules (120 credits).

The modules are a mixture of workplace-based (clinical applications or open), taught and research modules. The acquisition of specific competences takes place in the work setting under the supervision of an expert practitioner, underpinned by a learning agreement.

It is expected that all assignments will be relevant and specific to your own practice within the theoretical context and learning outcomes of the module. All assessments must be passed in order to gain the degree. Individual marks are not awarded. Students’ work is graded as fail, pass, merit or distinction and comprehensive written feedback is given.

Assessment

Assessment includes long essays, seminar presentations, unseen written exams, written reports, projects and case studies and the research dissertation.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

Read less
This programme introduces you to the advanced study of the history of medicine and health in the modern period and equips you with the conceptual and practical skills to carry out independent historical research in this field. . Read more

This programme introduces you to the advanced study of the history of medicine and health in the modern period and equips you with the conceptual and practical skills to carry out independent historical research in this field. 

You learn from experts working in the field and examine how different societies, cultures and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. The programme covers a range of concepts, placing developments within medical theory and practice in a broad social and cultural framework.

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Students take four modules including two compulsory modules (HI835 - Modern Medicine and Health, 1850 to the Present and HI878 - Methods and Interpretations in Historical Research) and two additional specialist modules (to be chosen from a choice of variable yearly options). 

60 further credits are earned through a final 15,000-word-long dissertation.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)

HI835 - Modern Medicine and Health, 1850 to the Present (30 credits)

HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)

HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)

HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)

HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

HI887 - Knowledge in the Real World (30 credits)

HI888 - Money and Medicine in Britain and America since 1750 (30 credits)

HI993 - History Dissertation (60 credits)

This programme aims to:

  • ensure that students of the history of medicine and health acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis.
  • enable students to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of history of medicine and health in different academic contexts. Develop students' capacities to think critically about past events and experiences.
  • encourage students to relate the academic study of the history of medicine and health to questions of public debate and concern.
  • promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate.

Study support

Postgraduate resources

The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of War, Media and Society which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award

All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history

Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history

Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine

Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Medical Radiation Physics course builds on the highly successful research partnerships between the College of Medicine and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) Health Board, including the Institute of Life Science and Centre for NanoHealth initiatives, and ongoing work in Monte Carlo-based radiotherapy modelling and dosimeter development, body composition, tissue characterisation and novel modes of the detection of disease with state-of-the-art CT and MRI facilities.

Key Features of the MSc in Medical Radiation Physics

On the Medical Radiation Physics MSc, you will gain the necessary knowledge and understanding of fundamental aspects of the use of radiation in medicine, in order that you are conversant in medical terms, human physiology and radiation mechanisms.

A direct link to clinical practice is provided through hands-on instruction with equipment used routinely in the hospital setting, which will prepare you for research in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer-based modelling, research methodology and the ethical dimensions associated with medical research.

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time Delivery mode

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Medical Radiation Physics scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Timetables for the Medical Radiation Physics programme are typically available one week prior to each semester.

Modules

Modules on the Medical Radiation Physics course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

• Introduction to the Practice of Medical Physicists and Clinical Engineers

• Nanoscale Simulation

• Physics of the Body

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology

• Research Methods

• Radiation Protection

• Radiation Physics

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Medical Imaging

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• MSc Research Project

Accreditation

The Medical Radiation Physics course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). IPEM is the professional body that works with physical science, engineering and clinical professionals in academia, healthcare services and industry in the UK and supports clinical scientists and technologists in their practice through the provision and assessment of education and training.

Links with industry

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London, as well Velindre NHS Trust (a strongly academic cancer treatment centre), offers the opportunity for collaborative research through student placements.

The academic staff of this discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations, which are the destination of our medical engineering graduates. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

Careers

The Medical Radiation Physics course will prepare you for research and clinical practise in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer modelling, human engineering and the medico-legal issues they imply. It will enable you to develop the potential to become leaders, defining and influencing medical practise.

For a medical physicist career path, the role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, offering a uniquely diverse career. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

This three-year programme in Clinical Science (Medical Physics), hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features of MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc is accredited by the Department of Health.

Modules

Modules on the Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc typically include:

• Introduction to Clinical Science

• Medical Imaging

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging

• Radiation Protection

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Research Methods

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• Specialist Radiotherapy

• Advanced Radiation Safety

• Specialist Radiation Safety

Careers

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Links with industry

The close working relationship between Swansea University and the NHS in Wales, through the All-Wales Training Consortium for Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, provides the ideal circumstances for collaborative teaching and research. The Consortium is recognised by the Welsh Government. A significant proportion of the teaching is delivered by NHS Clinical Scientists and other medical staff.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.

The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.



Read less
Your programme of study. If you are interested in medical imaging and highly sophisticated ways of assisting in diagnostics visually the medical imaging programme comes from a long heritage of major world innovation which was led by research at Aberdeen. Read more

Your programme of study

If you are interested in medical imaging and highly sophisticated ways of assisting in diagnostics visually the medical imaging programme comes from a long heritage of major world innovation which was led by research at Aberdeen. Did you know researchers at Aberdeen invented the first MRI scanner (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) for instance? Since this time much has been done to further work on the MRI scanner and deliver some of the most advanced forms of body visualisation tools available to the health area. If you have ever wondered how X rays work or you are interested in the latest radiotherapy techniques to provide therapeutic tools from radiographic equipment and advances this programme not only gives you the theory and practice in applying imaging in a health setting, it also gives you opportunities to think about the technologies involved and the applications. There is a lot of Physics and Maths required behind the different technologies involved in medical imaging so if you have these subjects and a life science background plus engineering or similar science disciplines this will make the programme more accessible.

By the end of the MSc programme you will have received a thorough academic grounding in Medical Imaging, been exposed to the practice of Medical Imaging in a hospital Department, and carried out a short research project. The MSc programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics & Engineering in Medicine as fulfilling part of the training requirements for those wishing to work in the NHS. There are wide ranging career possibilities after graduation. You may wish to go straight into clinic settings to apply your skills within diagnostics or you may wish to study further for a PhD towards teaching or researching. There have also been spin out companies as a result of understanding and applying imaging technologies towards innovative applications. This subject also aligns with some major innovations in Photonics and other areas of medical science which you may like to explore further if you are interested in invention and innovation at the Scottish Innovation Centres: http://www.innovationcentres.scot/

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Radiation in Imaging
  • Introduction to Computing and Image Processing
  • Biomedical and Professional Topics in Healthcare Science
  • Imaging in Medicine
  • Generic Skills

Semester 2

  • Nuclear Medicine and Positron Emission Tomography
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Medical Image Processing and Analysis
  • Diagnostic and Radiation Protection

Semester 3

  • MSc Project for Programme in Medical Physics and Medical Imaging

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You have the opportunity to contribute research within the department, expanding the knowledge of medical imaging technology within the largest teaching hospital and Medical School in Europe
  • You have access to a PET-CT scanner, new radiotherapy centre and linac treatment machines.
  • The university won the Queens Anniversary Prize in recognition of achievements in new medical imaging techniques
  • The MRI scanner was invented at the University over 30 years ago - a major innovation which has been global in impact

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 or 24 months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



Read less
Our multidisciplinary Medical Imaging Sciences MRes offers you the opportunity to undertake research in an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Read more

Our multidisciplinary Medical Imaging Sciences MRes offers you the opportunity to undertake research in an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Medical imaging is growing in importance both in patient management and clinical decision making, and also in drug development and evaluation. You will work with a multidisciplinary team of academics directing a wide range of cutting-edge research projects, with an emphasis on putting ideas and theory into practice, literally “from bench to bedside”. 

Key benefits

  • You will have access to state-of-the-art preclinical and clinical imaging facilities.
  • Two research projects within the Imaging Sciences Wellcome/EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre or CRUK/EPSRC Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre.
  • Excellent research facilities based within a hospital environment where you will be encouraged to apply your clinical skills.
  • All learning materials are accessible online via King’s E-learning and Teaching Service (KEATS).
  • On successful completion of the MRes, students with a chemistry or pharmacy background can apply for membership with the Royal Society of Chemistry.
  • Clinically applied modules
  • May consitute first of a four-year PhD.

Description

Our Medical Imaging Sciences course aims to provide graduates of chemistry, physics, computing, mathematics, biology, pharmacy or medicine with advanced training in the imaging field.

We have designed this course mainly to prepare you for a PhD, but it also serves as training for employment in hospitals and industry. The key components are two research projects, which may be built around different aspects of a single research area in medical imaging. Medical imaging is a rapidly expanding field that needs input from team members with knowledge and skills in these different areas (chemistry, physics, computing, mathematics, biology, pharmacy, medicine) to achieve its promise in improving patient care.

Our course consists of required and optional taught modules in semesters one and two, and two medical imaging-related research projects in semester two. You will begin with a 30-credit introductory module, which will introduce you to the general area of medical imaging in all its forms and give you a firm grounding in the core elements of the course and preparation for the later research projects. Following this, you will be able to choose optional modules from a range of multidisciplinary modules from other masters’ programmes offered by the School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences..

Throughout the course you will be provided with Research Skills training including a dedicated 15-credit module covering the topic in semester two.

Cardiovascular Stream

We also offer a selection of Cardiovascular Imaging modules, including Cardiovascular Imaging 1: SCMR and Cardiovascular Imaging 4: Introduction to Cardiovascular Physiology. We welcome applications from those with a background in Cardiovascular Imaging, and also from physicians, surgeons, technicians, cardiac physiologists and radiographers.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the programme. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

In full-time mode, attendance at lectures, tutorials, laboratory practicals, completing coursework assignments and private study is expected to fill a standard 40 hour week during the semester. The research project requires full time work at least during the months of June, July and August.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a variety of mechanisms including: unseen written examinations; practical laboratory work and reports; case studies and oral presentations; workshops; audio-visual presentations; and laboratory- or library-based research projects.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change. 

Career prospects

Expected destinations are study for PhD, employment (research or service) in the NHS and commercial nuclear medicine services, the pharmaceutical or medical engineering industry.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X