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The PG Cert in NGO and Development Management via distance learning offers you the opportunity to examine the central issues facing developing countries in today’s globalised world and to learn practical skills to work in development. Read more
The PG Cert in NGO and Development Management via distance learning offers you the opportunity to examine the central issues facing developing countries in today’s globalised world and to learn practical skills to work in development.

This course not only addresses the theories of development, but also explores how development works at the grassroots.

This allows you to gain a unique set of skills in how development programmes and projects are designed, implemented and managed and it equips you with vital understanding of the role that NGOs can play in promoting social and economic progress.

It is increasingly important for those working in international development, policy makers and workers attached to NGOs to appreciate the relationship between poverty, inequality and international development processes.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The course consists of two modules: Development in the International Context and Project and Programme Design. This is a part-time course that is completed over two terms in one year.

You will learn about development management in the international context and the impact of globalisation.
Our Project and Programme Design module will give you insight into a range of approaches to development interventions, including design, implementation and management.

This introduces design methods used by NGOs and aid agencies as well as important issues sustainability and alternatives to the project approach.

HOW YOU WILL LEARN

We appreciate that our distance-learning students may have professional commitments and may be based internationally, so they need greater flexibility.

Because of the direction and support in the online materials, student/tutor interaction time via, for example, online discussions should be minimal so that it can fit around work schedules and commitments.

At the same time, dedicated support staff and academic tutors will be available through the Online Student Community and will address all queries in line with our student charter for distance learning.

You’ll have access to specialist teaching staff with expertise relating to a range of different contexts and NGOs.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course has a strong focus on employability and is specifically designed to give you the skills you need to work for development agencies, NGOs and in the wider development sector.

You will gain the experience and knowledge either to further your career in NGO and development management or to use your skills within the area to enhance the role you are already playing.

If you have not been involved in NGOs or development management previously, the course will give you the knowledge and practical skills which are highly sought after by development agencies.

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This course examines the central issues facing developing countries in today’s globalised world, giving you the skills for a job in development and the wider sectors. Read more
This course examines the central issues facing developing countries in today’s globalised world, giving you the skills for a job in development and the wider sectors.

You’ll be equipped with all the practical skills that are in great demand in development agencies. But you’ll also gain insight across the wider picture, understanding how developing countries can progress and how the poor can be mobilised to escape from the poverty trap.

The course also explores how NGOs can play a key role in promoting social and economic progress and you’ll develop the ability to identify, design and implement programmes with a view to engaging with and enhancing the situation of the poor.

Our students and staff are a diverse group from different backgrounds and your tutors have expertise in many key development regions and countries from South Asia and Latin America to Middle East and Africa.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The course consists of four modules and a dissertation. The full-time MSc takes one year to complete and the part-time course is completed over two years.

You’ll learn about development management in the international context and the impact of globalisation. We focus on public management and the role of aid agencies and NGOs in development and encourage you to gain general conceptual, critical and evaluative skills.

Our Project and Programme Design module will give you insight into a range of approaches to development interventions, including design, implementation and management. The course introduces design methods used by NGOs and aid agencies as well as important issues such as sustainability and alternatives to the project approach.

We’ll also teach you how to examine rationales for research and a range of investigative techniques. This will help you prepare for your dissertation in which you’ll demonstrate your ability to use theories from earlier modules alongside your own research findings.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This course has a strong focus on employability and is specifically designed to give you the skills to work for development agencies, NGOs and in the wider development sector.

The experience and contacts of our staff will help you set up placements in the UK, Africa, Asia or Latin America and gain more understanding of how the sector works.

You’ll gain the experience and knowledge either to further your career in NGO and development management or to use your skills within the area to enhance the role you are already playing.

Our students who have worked in the field before have found that after the course, they are in a much better position to apply for more senior jobs across the development sector with the extra practical and critical thinking skills they have developed.

If you’ve not been involved in NGOs or development management previously, the course will give you the knowledge and practical skills which are highly sought after by development agencies.

MODULES

Development Management in the International Context (core)
Programme and Project Design (core)
Research Methods (core)
Sustainability and the Commons (option)
Introduction to Forced Migration (option)
Psycho-Social Perspectives of Forced Migration (option)
International Human Rights (option)
Global Environmental Politics (option)
Cultural Encounters in International Relations (option)
University Wide Option (option)
Dissertation (core)

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This unique course is one of the only management courses in Europe to focus on the specific needs of the staff, trustees and volunteers working in international NGOs - particularly those whose activities are focused on working with the poor and vulnerable in the developing world. Read more
This unique course is one of the only management courses in Europe to focus on the specific needs of the staff, trustees and volunteers working in international NGOs - particularly those whose activities are focused on working with the poor and vulnerable in the developing world. It is aimed at those currently working in the sector, but also at people exploring a career shift into the international development sector and consultants looking to develop their expertise in the NGO sector.

What sets the Cass Business School NGO Management course apart is that it is:

• Future-facing: The course focuses on the rapidly evolving context of international development. It explores the implication for NGOs of such trends as the changing role of civil society, altering aid flows, increased funding for humanitarian and security work, shifting North-South relations, the impact of new digital technologies, the moves to greater collaboration and the increasing influence of the private sector in the development process.

• Both academic and applied: The course combines the academic rigour of an internationally respected management school with a highly practical and applied approach. The course is delivered by NGO Management practitioners with decades of first-hand experience and ongoing involvement in the sector. In addition we have guest lectures by senior NGO staff or consultants presenting the latest issues and exploring the real-world challenges they face. The shadowing exercise, a key component of the course, provides students with a unique insight into the day-to-day realities of NGO management.

• A rich learning environment: The course lecturers are among the highly regarded in the University and have been awarded prizes for the quality of their teaching. Personal reflection and learning is encouraged through action learning sets and the coaching opportunities that are available. We place considerable emphasis on student participation and interaction. Together with the diversity of the student cohort each year, this creates a stimulating learning environment.

This academically rigorous and practically applied postgraduate course is designed for those hoping to develop and senior management career in international development, become a board member of an international NGO board, or work in a foundation funding work internationally. As a student you will gain:

• An understanding of the strategic issues and organisational challenges facing NGO managers
• Relevant management competencies, leadership skills and analytical capabilities
• Insight into the different strategies and approaches commonly adopted by NGOs
• An appreciation of the issues of managing change in NGOs
• Access to a strong network and connections within the sector
• Confidence to pursue your career in the sector.

Visit the website: http://www.cass.city.ac.uk/courses/masters/charity-courses/ngo-management/2017

Course detail

The aim of the NGO Management course is to enable students to develop key management competencies and analytical capabilities needed by those in leadership and management positions in international NGOs.

The course has been developed in partnership with leading INGOs and BOND (the UK-NGO network). It is one of the five postgraduate courses offered by Cass’s Business School’s Centre for Charity Effectiveness. This is one of the only centres of excellence in Europe offering a full range of latest research, education, training and consultancy geared to the needs of voluntary sector managers and leaders.

Format

The course is taught on a part-time basis and is taught over a period of twelve months. The Postgraduate Diploma consists of four core modules that all students take and are common to all the Centre’s postgraduate courses. These core modules provide the essential underpinning of management skills for the specialist courses. Upon successful completion of the diploma you can continue to the MSc Programme.

The MSc requires completion of the Research Methods for Managers module. This is followed by either: a further six months of personal, supervised research and the presentation of a 15,000-word research-based dissertation. Or alternatively, you can opt to take a taught Masters which allows you to choose specialist modules from one of the other Charities programmes.

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This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/. Read more
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice.

Human rights are carried by different actors:

-grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
-lawyers and judges
-bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
-journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be.

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices.

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance.

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Kate Nash.

Modules & Structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed.

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign).

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology.

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use.

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in Sociology, Media and Communications, the Centre for Cultural Studies, English and Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Politics, Music and Educational Studies.

This includes the following option module, available to Human Rights students only:

Practising Human Rights (30 credits)
This series of workshops accompanies your placement in an organisation or grassroots activist network. We will discuss diaries that each participant will carry out during the placements in the context of broader debates about human rights on the one hand, and about professional practice, organisations and activism on the other hand. As a requirement for this option, you will negotiate a placement in an organisation whose work can be related to human rights or practical involvement in a grassroots campaign.

Skills & Careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights.

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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As pressure on energy resources grows, the search for new and renewable forms of energy intensifies. Simultaneously, as the intersections with the environment are increasingly visible, the use and exploitation of energy have become of increasing concern to governments, NGOs, individuals, and businesses across the world. Read more

Introduction

As pressure on energy resources grows, the search for new and renewable forms of energy intensifies. Simultaneously, as the intersections with the environment are increasingly visible, the use and exploitation of energy have become of increasing concern to governments, NGOs, individuals, and businesses across the world.
The LLM/MSc in International Energy Law and Policy at the University of Stirling has been specifically designed to address such developments. Expert staff have come together to offer an innovative and distinctive multi-disciplinary degree which will provide graduates with in-depth understanding of energy law and policy, key areas of investment and environmental policy, as well as knowledge of corporate governance and responsibility.
Our graduates will be well placed to pursue careers in:
- legal firms
- the environmental sector
- government
- regulatory authorities
- international bodies
- non-governmental organisations
- business
- pressure groups
- charities

Key information

- Degree type: LLM, MSc
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time: LLM: 12 months Diploma: 9 months Certificate: 3 months Part-time: LLM: 27 months Diploma: 21 months Certificate: 9 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Ioana Cismas

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Career opportunities

As climate change is increasingly regarded as the challenge of our generation, energy law and policy are amongst the most topical societal issues at the moment. Conscious of these developments, law firms are opening their own specialised Energy Law divisions. Consequently, there is a great demand for employees who have a specialised legal knowledge in energy law and policy. Graduates will significantly enhance their employability within this growing field. Other employment destinations include posts in corporate strategy and corporate management; governmental branches and public sector organisations; international organisations; specialised legal practice (for those already qualified as legal practitioners), journalism, third sector (voluntary) organisations, and NGOs.

Skills you can develop through this course:
- Excellent writing and analytical skills and communciation skills
- Time management skills
- Knowledge, understanding and skills at Master's level appropriate to careers in law offices, government, international organisations, NGOs and business
- In-depth insights into relevant legal, political and economic issues related to energy law at national, regional and international levels
- An understanding of the dynamics of past and current energy law and policy-making and governance and likely future developments in the area;
- The academic foundation for progression to PhD-level study

Chances to expand your horizons
With:
- opportunities to complete an industry-led collaborative research dissertation
- six modules over two semesters and one dissertation on a specific topic in energy law and policy (12-month course)
- visits to different electricity generation plants
- guest lectures from leading energy law and policy experts and other international experts
- an international student population
- an interdisciplinary learning approach

Industry connections

There are a number of international and national energy companies that interact with our course. Usually near 50 percent of students take the opportunity to complete internships, work placements and collaborative research work with energy companies. Students develop their CV and interview skills in applying to work for these energy companies. The LLM in International Energy Law & Policy is also part of the highly successful Making-the-Most-of-Masters programme where students have the opportunity to work on an industry-led dissertation with energy companies.

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The MSc in Water Hazards, Risk and Resilience is unique in Scotland offering an applied interdisciplinary approach to real world case studies and problems faced by environmental agencies, local and regional councils, as well as government level implementation of a robust hazard policy. Read more
The MSc in Water Hazards, Risk and Resilience is unique in Scotland offering an applied interdisciplinary approach to real world case studies and problems faced by environmental agencies, local and regional councils, as well as government level implementation of a robust hazard policy. With a potential increase in intensity and duration of water hazards associated with on-going climate change, the course is well placed to address a real need for graduates with hazard analysis and assessment expertise across a wide range of sectors.

Why study Water Hazards, Risk and Resilience at Dundee?

This course is uniquely placed as the only MSc in the UK to offer a balanced interpretation and adaptation to water hazards, bringing together an understanding of the science with its impacts on Society.

The course will be integrated with public and third sector bodies in order to meet the growing demand for graduates who wish to pursue or advance a career in water hazard or risk management, environmental monitoring, emergency planning or catastrophe-related mitigation for NGOs. Emergency response officers and members from a range of bodies will participate and run workshops as an integral part of research training.

Potential for work-based placements across the wide sector identified above will provide unique opportunities for students to gain real-hazards experience in conjunction with the dissertation module. Internationally recognised experts teach the MSc with cross-disciplinary expertise in environmental hazards, environmental sciences, human geography and health.

What's so good about this course?

The MSc programme will provide a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary approach to the study of natural water hazards. This will provide training in the key fundamentals of the geoscience of water hazards which underpins hazard research and assessment. Skills will be developed to allow a career in a range of environmental sectors. These include rapid hazard assessment techniques, key field skills in the geomorphological mapping of hazard zones as well as a comprehensive study of the impacts of hazards on both the landscape and human populations.

This course focuses on the physical processes that generate natural hazards through an advanced understanding of geological and environmental processes, field recognition and mapping of hazards, GIS and remote sensing techniques for mapping and modelling of hazards, risk assessment techniques as well as the social and cultural dimension of those hazards. Links with industry and practitioners in the emergency and disaster management field, including, community resilience officers, Local Authority Emergency Planning Departments, NGOs (e.g. Red Cross) and major disability and older persons charities will allow graduates to develop a range of skills and real-world expertise in preparedness and planning.

Who should study this course?

This course should appeal to graduates of geography, geoscience, environmental science, planning and related disciplines, who wish to widen their subject knowledge of natural water hazards and combine integration of science with societal impact and policy.

Funded places

Due to an initiative from the Scottish Funding Council (SFC) designed to support key sectors in the Scottish economy, there are 10 fully-funded places available to eligible students starting this course in 2013/14. This covers all tuition fees associated with the MSc programme and can be held by students classified as Scottish or EU for fee purposes only. Please indicate your interest in being considered for a funded place when you apply through UKPASS.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months full time.

How you will be taught

Modules start at the beginning of the academic session in September.

The course is taught using lectures, seminars and workshops as well as integrated field study of between 1 day to 1 week duration.

What you will study

The programme is taught over two semesters, plus the summer period for the Dissertation. It consists of four core modules and two optional modules which the student can choose from a list of six possible modules. Modules will be taught as follows:

Semester 1: September to December

Core modules (20 credits):

Research Training
Water Hazard Geoscience
Plus one option module (20 credits):

Hydrological Monitoring and Modelling
Quantitative Methods
Semester 2: January to April

Core modules (20 credits):

Population Vulnerability and Resilience
Fieldcourse
Plus one option module (20 credits):

Research in Practice (work placement)
Qualitative Methods
Applied GIS and Geospatial Data Analysis
Hydrological Applications
Students enrolled on the MSc programme also complete a Dissertation (worth 60 credits) over the summer period.

Careers

This course is relevant for individuals who wish to pursue careers in:
Water hazard or risk management
Environmental monitoring
Emergency planning
Catastrophe-related mitigation for NGOs
Further postgraduate research (PhD)
Research and development organisations

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International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. Read more

Overview

International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. The regulation of financial markets, environmental protection, the management of migrations or the prosecution of war criminals are all areas in which international law plays a major role. International law does not only affect the behaviour of states and intergovernmental institutions. Neither is it simply a discipline of diplomats, academics and philosophers. International law today dominates the activity of transnational corporations, NGOs and individuals, from footballers to victims of human rights violations. As a result, governments, international institutions, NGOs, businesses and law firms are increasingly looking for individuals capable of dealing with complex issues of transnational law.

Why Study International Law at Keele?

The Keele Law School has a long tradition of academic expertise in the field of international law. International law has been taught at Keele by world-renowned experts such as Michael Akehurst and Patrick Thornberry. In recent years, the Keele Law School has invested heavily in the area of international law. Students will be taught be dynamic academic staff with a wide range of expertise and research interests.

The Keele LLM in International Law differs from most existing LLMs in several important respects:

- Flexibility: the programme is based upon a ‘pathway’ structure, where students tailor their degree according to their needs and preferences. Depending on their choice of electives, students can graduate with any one of the following degrees: LLM in International Law; LLM in International Law and Politics; LLM in International Law and Human Rights; LLM in International Law and the environment; LLM in International Law and Business.

- Interdisciplinarity: students can choose from a wide range of electives offered not only within the Law School, but also within the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE) and the Keele Management School (KMS).

- Skills: students can study modern languages – including key UN languages – as part of their degree, increasing their range of professional skills. Keele currently offers courses in: Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

- Professional opportunities: students interested in more hand-on practical experience have the possibility to do work placements as part of their degree, with any one of our partner institutions (UN agencies, international tribunals, non-governmental organisations, law firms, etc. – places are limited).

Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationallaw/

Course Aims

The aims of the LLM in International Law are to:
- Provide students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the role, nature and functioning of international law.

- Encourage students to develop a critical awareness of the social, historical and political contexts in which international law operates.

- Provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international law of professional or intellectual interest to students.

- Develop students’ research skills in the context of supervised research on an agreed topic in public international law and encourage the production of original and creative scholarship.

- Encourage students to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of legal and non-legal contexts.

- Provide a strong educational foundation that enhances a student’s prospects of professional, commercial or academic employment.

Teaching & Assessment

The LLM in International Law is taught by a team of talented academics and practitioners. Members of our staff hold degrees from the most prestigious Universities in Europe and North America (Sorbonne, Oxford, Cornell etc.). They have published widely on questions of United Nations law, international trade law, international investment law, dispute settlement, international criminal law, human rights law, international environmental law, or international legal theory. They have acted as legal advisers to governments and international organisations, have worked as human rights field officers, and have been consulted by the House of Lords on burning issues such as human trafficking.

The programme is taught principally through semester-long modules. During each taught module, students take part in lectures, tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading.

The programme is assessed principally, though not exclusively, through written work. Written work may be in the form of research essays, final examinations, blog discussions or reflective portfolios. Through the essays, students demonstrate their understanding of a particular area of international law (or one of the other taught subjects, i.e. human rights/environment/politics/business) as well as their ability for original thinking and high-level written communication skills.

The final form of assessment is the dissertation, which is an extended (15,000 – 20,000 words) and in-depth piece of writing that brings together all of the skills that students have learned throughout the programme. As part of the dissertation, students are also required to prepare a dissertation proposal and give an oral presentation (as part of the graduate research workshop).

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Careers Development

The LLM in International Law will enable entry into a range of occupations where specialist expertise knowledge is needed. It provides an ideal basis for those seeking employment as international law practitioners in relevant national and international organisations (government agencies, UN bodies, NGOs), multinational corporations, or transnational law firms. Equally, the programme will equip students for further study in the form of a postgraduate research programme, such as a PhD, by providing appropriate research training and an introduction to key thinkers and scholarship.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. Read more
The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. It meets the increasing demand for a postgraduate qualification in Children's Rights, explicitly focused on interdisciplinary research and child rights-based research methods, delivered flexibly through a blended format of online and face-to-face learning.

The aim of the MSc Children's Rights is to provide high-level knowledge and skills in children's rights law and practice of value to those working with and for children, including public officials and NGOs as well as educators, social workers and health care providers.

The programme is linked to the Centre for Children’s Rights, an innovative inter-disciplinary centre with an international reputation for advancing understanding of children’s rights, promoting children’s participation and developing children’s rights-based research methods. This new and unique MSc incorportates the Centre's expertise and will develop students’ knowledge and skills in two distinct but interconnected areas:

- Children’s Rights - using the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international standards to evaluate the laws, policies and practices which affect children.
- Research with Children - evaluating the best methods of conducting research into children’s lives with a particular focus on approaches which involve children actively in the research process. The CCR has a particular expertise in relation to children’s rights-based research.

The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide students with a thorough grounding in these two areas and the opportunity to explore a range of contexts in which these perspectives can be used to better understand children’s lives and secure improved outcomes for children. Professionals will have the opportunity to improve aspects of their practice and career development.

The Centre for Children’s Rights has extensive links with Northern Ireland charities and NGOs and can provide some opportunities for students to undertake relevant research. This may be of particular interest to students seeking to gain experience in the children’s sector, perhaps to secure a job or to change position. The Centre has a vibrant community of students undertaking PhD research in a range of issues and in several countries. The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide a good foundation for students wishing to pursue their own research through doctoral study.

Why Choose Children's Rights at Queen's?

◦As a prestigious Russell Group University, Queen’s is ranked 8th within the UK in relation to research intensity;
◦Education at Queen’s has been ranked 4th within the UK in relation to research intensity with 87% of the research undertaken within the School assessed as ‘internationally excellent or world leading’ (REF, 2014);
◦The programme features input from leading international children’s rights scholars;
◦There will be some opportunities available to develop advanced workplace skills by collaborating with community organisations to undertake research to help them improve their services for children and young people;
◦The programme incorporates the Centre for Children's Rights expertise in interdisciplinary work and rights-based approaches to research methods. This will empower students to undertake research with children and young people in a range of contexts;
◦The programme is part of an innovative university wide initiative ‘Improving Children’s Lives’ which will give students access to interdisciplinary research and education which aim to improve the quality of life for children in Northern Ireland and beyond;
◦The interdisciplinary nature of the programme reflects the real-life practices of many child-related services;
◦If you don’t want, or need, to study for the research dissertation, flexible exit awards are available (PG Diploma/ PG Certificate);
◦You may also undertake individual course modules without completing a full degree.

“The best thing about studying children’s rights at Queen’s is that it provides you with the opportunity to reflect on your professional practice with academics who are leaders in their field. This has equipped me to return to my workplace and be a better informed and more analytical practitioner. I have taken the learning from this course and applied it directly into my professional practice with positive outcomes for service users and colleagues. It is the sort of training that has given me the confidence and skills to go further and make a real difference." Gerry Marshall (Children’s Services Inspector)

Programme Content

The award of MSc requires the accumulation of 120 credit points from the taught modules and a 15,000-20,000 word dissertation, equivalent to 60 credit points. Modules include:

Core modules

Childhood and Youth Research in Practice
Children's Rights
Children's Rights-Based Research Methods
Perspectives on Childhood and Youth
Research Methods

Optional modules

Childhood Adversity
Children's Rights and Disability
Children's Rights and Education
Children's Rights and Health
Children's Rights and Social Care
Children's Rights; Philosophical Approaches
Qualitative Research in Childhood and Youth
Quantitative Research in Childhood and Youth

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods eg multiple choice exam, essays, project reports, and contributions to an online forum. Students will have the option of undertaking research work for external organisations to submit as part of their dissertation.

Opportunities for Careers

There is increasing demand for postgraduates with high-level skills in interdisciplinary research, participatory research methods and knowledge of children's rights.

Professionals within children/human rights-focused NGOs, public officials, educators, social workers and health professionals who work with children should find this degree beneficial.

Special Features

Flexibility: this programme is designed to meet the needs of local and international professionals and is delivered via blended and online learning.

Choice: there are several entry and exit points to this programme, please see School website.

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This pioneering MSc in global health brings together students from a range of disciplines to understand and address major health challenges. Read more
This pioneering MSc in global health brings together students from a range of disciplines to understand and address major health challenges. It equips those working in the health sector with the knowledge and skills to critically reflect on health and health care in low and middle income settings and apply this knowledge with supported practical experience within our international capacity building partnerships.

Key benefits

- Programme led from the King’s Centre for Global Health, with extensive experience in global health teaching (running the popular intercalated BSc in Global Health).

- Programme linked to the Centre’s health systems strengthening programmes in Somaliland, Sierra Leone and Zambia, creating exciting opportunities for field research.

- Draws on a uniquely wide range of global health expertise – from the School of Social Science & Public Policy to the 4 health schools and the three partners NHS Foundation Trusts.

- Teaching delivered through an innovative combination of interactive small group work, film, practical classroom tasks and observation in local health settings.

- Combines the development of a strong interdisciplinary foundation in global health with the opportunity to develop specialist expertise in a specific subject area

- Unique career potential due to specialist concentrations, focus on programme management and research skills and the involvement of NGOs and other employers in delivering the programme.

- Specifically designed to focus on specialist training, to network with relevant NGOs at an early stage and to meet the needs of people working in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/global-health-msc-pg-dip-pg-cert.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme takes an innovative approach to teaching global health by providing an interdisciplinary foundation in health and social sciences before giving students the opportunity to specialise in one of four settings:

- Global Surgery
- Health Professions Education
- Disasters & Adaptation
- Conflict & Security

This applied approach will enable students to consider theoretical and ethical debates, and assess their relevance for the realities of fieldwork using case studies.

Drawing on the Centre’s experience in programmatic work, students will have the opportunity to learn from experts in the field, and share their own knowledge and experiences of working in health care, development and humanitarian settings.

Using a wide range of approaches from interactive classroom teaching, to observation in health care settings, film as a medium to stimulate debate, interaction with our partnerships in low and middle income countries and an opportunity to deliver important research outcomes, it provides a stimulating and engaging approach to this subject.

- Course purpose -

This programme will provide critical training for those pursuing careers in health care delivery, humanitarian relief, public health, policy making, advocacy and research. It will be particularly useful for those who already have experience in health or programmatic work, but who are keen to develop their academic skills and gain a global perspective on health and healthcare.

- Course format and assessment -

The programme consists of 180 credits: 80 credits of taught core modules; 40 credits of pathway modules and a 60-credit dissertation. Modules are asssessed by a combination of essays, presentations and exams.

Career prospects

This programme provides high quality graduate training for students seeking employment in the global health sector in high and low income countries, in humanitarian emergency settings, and in policy making, research and advocacy roles.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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OVERVIEW. Engineering is a global industry with organisations operating in a multidisciplinary and international market place. Engineers often face situations that demand an understanding of social and cultural issues in parallel with the technical requirements of the project. Read more
OVERVIEW

Engineering is a global industry with organisations operating in a multidisciplinary and international market place. Engineers often face situations that demand an understanding of social and cultural issues in parallel with the technical requirements of the project.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Increasing access of people to basic services such as water, sanitation, shelter, energy, transport remains a significant global challenge. The use of innovative engineering and computing is essential to addressing these challenges, whilst ensuring environmental concerns and financial restrictions are adhered to. A further challenge for engineers can be meeting these needs in disaster prone or conflict affected areas.

The computing and engineering industries having highlighted the need for specialists who are not only technically competent but are also able to apply their skills to meet these complex and demanding issues. Global engineers need to be able to select the most appropriate solution for the local context, not just the ‘best’ technical solution.

They should be able to offer affordable solutions that are developed using available resources, manufacturing techniques and local knowledge.

This Masters programme will teach how a broad range of engineering and computing disciplines can be applied in conjunction with one another to reach appropriate, workable and affordable solutions to a variety of complex, diverse and human-centred challenges.

This MSc in Humanitarian Engineering and Computing is designed to meet the industry requirement of a globally aware engineer and computing specialist. It has been designed in partnership with both industry and charitable organisations to produce engineers who will have career prospects in large multinational global engineering organisations through to NGOs.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The suite of modules in this MSc is unique to Coventry University, due to our broad expertise and extensive network of industrial and academic partners.

The initial course design has been influenced by our Royal Academy of Engineering funded Advisory Board the membership of which includes; practicing humanitarian professionals, key international engineering companies, policy makers and CEOs of leading Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in this area, such as Engineers Against Poverty and RedR. The course content has been developed by industry professionals to address the skills they want in their employees. Students can expect to work with experts from industry throughout the course.

The taught content will be practically focused on areas such as; water and sanitation, energy, use of IT systems, logistics, health, materials, manufacturing, project management and more. The modules themselves will emphasise the appropriate use of these skills in situations such as disaster relief (pre, during and post), development work, UK based humanitarian projects and application in large multinational global engineering projects. There is a large practical element throughout the whole course combined with real life examples and case studies supplied by our network of experts. Industrial visits, hands on workshops and guest lecturers will enhance the learning experience.

This MSc in Humanitarian Engineering and Computing is designed to meet the industry requirement of a globally aware engineer and computing specialist. It has been designed in partnership with both industry and charitable organisations to produce engineers who will have career prospects in large multinational global engineering organisations through to NGOs.

The dissertation for this MSc will showcase how students can appropriately use the practical skills gained throughout the course of the year. Opportunities will be offered for projects with our overseas partners, projects based with our UK partners through to projects based in large global organisations.

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Over recent decades the fashion and textile industries has been making changes; responding to enviromental and social needs; publishing corporate social reports and working with industry bodies and NGOs. Read more

Introduction

Over recent decades the fashion and textile industries has been making changes; responding to enviromental and social needs; publishing corporate social reports and working with industry bodies and NGOs. Yet the Rana Plaza disaster in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 2013 was tragedy for the workers, their families, the country and the industries, and an imperative for new thinking, new practice, and fresh ethics. It is a horrific milestone for fashion manufacture, communication, consumer awareness and industry responsibilities. The industries are now reaching out to governments, NGOs, charities, unions and radical thinkers for advice and support. They are accountable for their current and future ethics. Without doubt it is time for change in which education is a crucial contributor to the new solutions, and alternative futures for the industries.

The new MSc Ethics in Fashion (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-ethics-in-fashion/ ) is a research led, taught programme, focussed on analysing and understanding the industry, whilst mapping the changes in practice, monitoring the voices and diversity of stakeholders in the supply-chain. The programme offers a chance for ethically aware graduates and established professionals to refresh and extend their knowledge and skillset. An escalating need for an Ethics in Fashion programme has been identified, and Heriot-Watt University is in a unique position with subject specific research faculty, global industry links, outstanding fashion and textiles facilities and an enviable pastoral location, with strong transport connections.

"A Masters of Science on Ethics in Fashion is exactly what was missing in fashion education. Sustainability and ethics are key issues for this industry. Those who are not able respect people and the environment in their supply chain cannot stay in the sector for long. Today, all major players have a CSR officer integrated in their business, a profile that didn’t exist until a few years ago. Having this MSc is a true work of innovation." Simone Cipriani, Head, ITC Ethical Fashion Initiative (United Nations)

Our students

The taught programme has been created for those wanting to work, or already working in the fashion and textiles industries, in design, sourcing management, buying, journalism and corporate affairs. The qualification provides a set of fresh perspectives and insights for an existing first degree qualification, or relevant experience in any of the above areas or similar for those wanting to be part of the dynamic changing industries.

Industry links

The School of Textiles and Design, and the research staff have strong global industry and NGO links in design, corporate social responsibility reporting and corporate affairs, social enterprise. In addition teaching staff are Fellows of the Fellowship of 500, in the Ethical Fashion Forum. There are both courses, and research opportunities to work with local and international industry.

The programme has been designed to utilise selected core postgraduate courses offered within the School and introducing courses specific to Ethics in Fashion, thus encouraging inter-disciplinary participation and discourse, and membership of the a growing research community.

"There is a growing demand from consumers that the clothes they choose to wear haven’t been produced in sweatshops. Tragedies such as the Rana Plaza garment factory collapse in Bangladesh have only heightened public concern. This is why it is critical that fashion colleges and universities are incorporating ethics into their programs of work. Ethical sourcing is increasingly becoming the norm for the clothing & footwear industry and we see this only growing in the future." Simon McRae, National Manager, Ethical Clothing Australia

Objectives

- Analyse the ethics in supply-chain practice
- Speculate on, and develop, effective methods of communicating ethics
- Identify and map outcomes and consequences of unethical and ethical practice
- Speculate and apply new criteria within the supply-chain
- Analyse the motivations and roles of consumers in the ethics discourse and practice
- Identify best practice models across the traditional fashion and textiles industries, social enterprise and non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
- Research independently the role of ethics in fashion practice and theory

Assessment

Students are assessed through a combination of individual and group written course work, and projects and the Masters dissertation. Emphasis is placed on rigorous academic standards as well as acquiring and developing a range of transferable industry skills and individual development. Assessment exercises can therefore include making effective visual and oral presentations, writing reports and as well as team and group work.

How to apply

Applications are made by submitting a completed application form to the Postgraduate Office at the Edinburgh Campus. Additionally, before our final decision can be given, applicants will be asked to supply documentation to provide proof of academic background and suitability as a candidate:
- A copy of your degree(s) certificates and relevant transcripts
- A portfolio of past work where appropriate and/or evidence of relevant work experience
- Proof of having being awarded a first degree(s)
- Proof of your ability in the English language if this is not your mother tongue
- Proof of how your tuition fee and personal maintenance costs are to be met
- Two academic referees

For full details about our application process including relevant forms and guidance notes, please contact us or visit our website http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/textiles-design/

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. Pre-sessional English courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) are available for applicants at the Edinburgh Campus to improve on English language usage and study skills. Please note that completion of pre-sessional courses are not a guarantee of admittance.
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-ethics-in-fashion/

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Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective. Read more
Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective.

Your studies will provide a broad level of understanding by exposing you to the variety of ways in which our subjects are approached in diverse contexts, and there will be a particular focus on the global south, and on recognising how responses to social issues have developed.

There will also be an emphasis on issues which have an international dimension, such as human rights and social justice, trafficking and other forms of exploitation.

[Why choose this course?]]

• Study, compare and evaluate different welfare regimes and indigenous responses to human need within a framework of equality and social justice
• Explore the ethical aspects of your subject including attention to power and anti-discriminatory practice
• Develop a comprehensive and critical understanding of the knowledge, theoretical and ethical underpinnings and approaches to international social work and social development in diverse global contexts
• Gain an in-depth knowledge and critical appreciation of research models and methods, and acquire a high level of skill in evaluating and undertaking research while working within a robust ethical framework
• Benefit from a programme that will give you the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings, for example working for NGOs, governments or voluntary organisations.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/international-social-work-and-social-development#about

Course detail

This course offers global perspectives, theoretical foundations, ethics and practice skills equipping social work and social development professionals to respond effectively in diverse country contexts and make global-local connections. It aims to enable students to develop cultural competence and the ability to work effectively in different global contexts.

You will develop critical thinking, enquiry and evaluation in response to human need encouraging reflectiveness, increasing self-awareness and questioning of models of practice. You will also develop team working skills as be exposed to multi-disciplinary and culturally diverse working, both through collaboration with other students and observing practice in community-based projects.

The course aims to equip students with the skills to carry out research and to understand the implications of research for practice. It also provides the opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge of a specialist subject of your own choosing.

The practice skills element of the course enables students to apply theory to practice and to develop the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings; for example working for NGOs, government or voluntary organisations.

Modules

• International Social Work and Social Development
• Comparative Social Work and Cultural Competence - Approaches, Policy and Practice
• Models and Methods of Social Investigation
• Human Rights, Advocacy and Social Justice
• Complexities of Forced Migration: Human Displacement, Trafficking and Refuge
• Humanitarian Aid, Non-governmental Organisations and Social Work in Disasters
• Gender in International Social Work and Social Development
• International Relations - Globalization
• Practice Skills Workshops – Project Management, Training and Development, Evaluation and Communication Skills
• Dissertation

Assessment

The assessment methods include:
• Case studies
• Reflective accounts of student experience
• Individual and group presentations
• Design of a training package
• Analysis of qualitative and/or quantitative data
• The dissertation allows you to undertake a research project and communicate knowledge, findings and recommendations

Careers

There is growing demand in both developed and developing countries for the skills of social work and social development professionals. A wide range of job opportunities is available in both the statutory and non-statutory sectors, these include specialist roles in NGOs and various humanitarian organisations.

Job titles for typical successful Masters students include: Social Development Worker, Child Protection Worker, Community Worker, Animateur, Project Worker, Women’s Worker, Gender based Violence Specialist, Advocacy Worker. Roles in policy and research in the public, private and NGO sector are also open to graduates.

Further study options include PhD or the Professional Doctorate for Home/EU Students.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. Read more
This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Students will gain a broad empirical knowledge of the diverse societies of Latin America and the Caribbean from the perspective of at least two disciplines, together with an awareness of the general patterns of differences and commonalities in the histories, politics, economies and cultures of the different linguistic territories of the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All option modules are subject to availability.

Core modules
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules - students choose four option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Democratisation in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Key Economic Thinkers of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Latin American Political Economy
-The Making of Modern Latin America: History, Politics and Society
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-Society and Development in Latin America
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-Latin American Economics: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Environmental Issues, Movements and Policies in the Americas
-International Politics of Latin America
-From Silver to Cocaine
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a topic relating to the Caribbean, or Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, independent reading and research. Assessment is through varied assignments including essays, an oral presentation and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master's students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.
There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance and international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Employability
Students will have excellent opportunities to expand professional networks enhancing their future employability. Through Institute staff members' extensive contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the diplomatic service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent graduates have found employment in government (Foreign & Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position at the core of academic study of the region in the UK, promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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