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Masters Degrees (Music Law)

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The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law. Read more
The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law.

LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law deals with the global and regional regulation of international trade, structuring and managing international business transactions, and the economic foundations of trade and corporate law.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Students on the LLM programme who take both the QLLM136 Ethics in Business and in Finance and QLLM007 Banking Law modules will be eligible for exemption from the Chartered Banker Diploma compulsory module: Professionalism Regulation and Ethics.

Taught modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Commercial and Corporate Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of available LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change.

Please refer the toe QMUL Law website for a full list and information on the modules for this programme.

Below is an example of some of the modules for this programme .
◦◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM120 Business Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM305 Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM306 Competition enforcement: From investigation to sanctions (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Read more
The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Students will be able to study a wide range of topics from the protection of inventions, products, trade marks, creative works and designs to the global policy surrounding the law.


Modules:


To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Intellectual Property Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM162 Intellectual Property Taxation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM178 Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM308 Civil Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM309 Criminal Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM336 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK. Read more
Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK.

Overview

If you’re an experienced musician and want to put your skills to use supporting children and adults with additional needs, our emphasis on clinical placements will prepare you for a rewarding career.

Through lectures, practical workshops, case discussions and theoretical studies, we’ll introduce you to the most recent, effective music therapy approaches. You’ll reflect on your own practice in our clinical supervision group discussions, supported by regular individual tutorials.

In the UK there are two central elements of music therapy: the use of improvised and pre-composed music; and the significance given to the relationship between client and therapist. These principles will underpin your training. Our experiential teaching includes: development of your improvisation skills; focused work on your first instrument; keyboard, single line instrument and voice; music therapy theory and links to practice; block clinical placements in at least two fields, including community settings, schools, hospitals and hospices; and experience in multidisciplinary teams.

Your training will take place in our new state-of-the-art Music Therapy Centre and Clinic, where you’ll often study with MA Dramatherapy students. All our students go on supervised clinical placements, preparing you for employment in many different settings.

Throughout the course you'll be supported by our team of qualified music therapists, who have a strong reputation for research. In 2013 we appointed Jörg Fachner as Professor of Music, Mind and the Brain, to further develop our research activities. One of our course tutors, Professor Amelia Oldfield, was recently awarded the first ever Clinical Impact Award by the World Federation of Music Therapists. And in 2014, our music, dramatherapy and performing arts research was acknowledged as 'world-leading' in the UK Government's Research Excellence Framework.

Teaching times: two days a week plus two days on a clinical placement (Year 1). One day a week on campus plus a placement of least one day a week (Year 2).

Careers

As a qualified music therapist you’ll be able to work in many different areas including the NHS, hospices, social services, the education sector and the voluntary sector. The NHS Agenda for Change has led to improved career paths for music therapists at levels similar to, or higher than, those of other allied health professions.

You may also choose to work privately, or on a freelance basis, with a client base including adults and children with learning difficulties, mental health problems, and other special needs.

Successful completion of this course will allow you to register with the Health and Care Professions Council, a legal requirement for music therapists in the UK. Your qualification should also be recognised around the world.

You’ll benefit from our links with the British Association for Music Therapy and other allied health professions; Professor Helen Odell-Miller, for example, advises at government level for the profession. You’ll also be able to forge links with practitioners such as psychotherapists, arts therapists and psychiatrists.

Modules

Year one:
• Music Therapy Practical and Clinical Skills
• Music Therapy and Dramatherapy Multi-Disciplinary Theoretical Studies
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (1)

Year two
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (2)
• MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning in a number of ways, including essays, live presentations and practical tasks such as clinical improvisation and composition. You’ll also undertake some self-analysis and reflection with your personal tutor.

Half-way through the course, your progress and process towards becoming a music therapist will be assessed by an examiner. Your final piece of written work will be a Major Project, which involves clinical evaluation. Meanwhile, in your final oral assessment you’ll present a piece of clinical work to two examiners, who will assess your overall clinical skills and readiness to practice.

One of our modules touches on dramatherapy and covers content from our MA Dramatherapy, as well as the Music Therapy course. Where techniques and approaches are specific to each profession you’ll be taught separately but on more generic subjects, such as psychoanalytic studies, psychiatry and psychology, you’ll benefit from working together.

Specialist facilities

You'll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art therapy rooms and a large hall. The centre is used for all of our teaching and for our professional therapy consultations. We have a large range of musical instruments, specifically chosen for clinical work, and high-quality recording and videoing equipment in the therapy rooms.

You’ll also have access to the extensive range of facilities offered by the Department of Music and Performing Arts, including a fully-equipped drama studio, two other large drama rehearsal spaces, a recital hall, a suite of computer music studios and music practice rooms.

Our Cambridge campus also houses the Mumford Theatre, a full-size venue for professional touring companies.

Research

Our music therapy staff members are internationally renowned researchers and consultants and our research is recognised as world-leading. We hold regular international conferences and support a vigorous community of research students.

***This course has now reached full capacity for September 2016 but we are now accepting applications for September 2017***

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The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Read more
The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Within the field of musicology, students can slant their studies towards one or several of the following: music in nineteenth-century culture, opera studies, popular music studies or film music. The composition pathway, meanwhile, provides a practice-based contemporary composition curriculum that encourages students to push the boundaries of their practice and develop a voice as an engaged and creative composer.

This course is unusual in combining a rigorous academic education with the opportunity to acquire vocational skills through our innovative Professional Experience module. Students take up work placements with a wide range of external arts organisations or undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. The course therefore offers rich opportunities for career development and can pave the way for further study at PhD level if so required.

Why choose this course?

-The flexible structure of the MA Music allows you to tailor the course to your particular interests. The course is one of very few Music MAs in the UK to offer professional experience as part of the course; you can undertake a work placement with an external organisation such as a radio station, opera house, museum, music publisher, magazine, concert promoter or school. Alternatively, you can undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. Recent students, for example, worked at the Handel-Hendrix House Museum, the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Audiograft festival.

The course is taught by experts who are internationally renowned in their fields. Our research informs the content and methodology of our modules, ensuring that teaching is at the cutting edge of the discipline. Following REF 2014 Music has been singled out as an area of particular research strength within the University.Our staff disseminate their research to wider audiences via appearances on BBC Radio 3, articles in the national press and talks for major performing organisations. The activities of our research units in opera (OBERTO), popular music (PMRU), or sonic art (SARU) complement the programme of formal study. MA students can contribute to the research units' activities, for instance by participating in listening groups and helping to organise study days and conferences. Student composers have an opportunity to showcase their work through the annual Audiograft festival. Opera students go on a field trip to hear a live opera, usually in London.

Oxford is a fabulous city in which to study music, with a very lively concert scene and excellent research facilities. You will have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library and the new Brookes library also offers substantial collections centring on the specialist areas of the MA.

The course provides an excellent foundation for doctoral study for those who wish to continue into a career in academia.

This course in detail

Students studying for the MA/PG Dip in Music are required to complete the following compulsory modules* (30 credits):
-Research Skills and Applied Research
-Professional Experience

MA students are also required to complete the following (60 credits):
-Dissertation / Major Project

You will then take two of the following modules depending on your chosen specialism (30 credits each):
Composition Pathway
-Approaches to Experimental Composition and Sound Arts
-Electroacoustic and Live Electronic Composition

Musicology pathway
-Advanced Musicology 1: 19th-Century Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 1: Film Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2: Popular Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2:Opera Studies

*As our courses are reviewed regularly for quality assurance purposes, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

The MA in Music is taught through a combination of seminars, tutorials and skills-based workshops. Those taking a work placement will also receive mentoring and formative feedback from an individual at the placement organisation.

During your time here you will engage in lively discussions and original research. We aim to give you an in-depth understanding of recent critical debates, scholarship and practice in your chosen field, as well as to broaden your knowledge of musical repertoire.

Our pathways are original, exciting and flexible and one of the most striking features of the Music Department is its breadth of subject expertise. All staff members in Music are actively engaged in research and we have published our work in top journals and with the most highly respected publishers: our research in popular music, opera and sonic art was identified as 'world-leading' in the 2014 REF.

You will have an opportunity to work closely with staff members not only through the course modules but also through our specialist research units in popular music, opera and sonic art. Membership of these units allows you to attend conferences, workshops and talks by visiting speakers that will complement your formal studies.

Careers and professional development

Having an MA will make you stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the course straight after graduating from undergraduate study or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in music or to improve your current position. The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA in Music can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including management, law, journalism, media and the heritage industry.

Career destinations of our recent graduates include:
-Professional composition
-Performance
-Sound engineering
-Arts administration
-HE administration
-Teaching (secondary and FE)
-Retail management
-Youth work

Our programme provides the necessary research training for doctoral work and many MA students continue on into further research and pursue careers in academia. Our students have an excellent success rate in securing funded PhD places.

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Prepare for an international legal career with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in international business law, supported by staff who are active researchers and qualified practitioners, alongside students from around the world. Read more
Prepare for an international legal career with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in international business law, supported by staff who are active researchers and qualified practitioners, alongside students from around the world.

Overview

Our LLM course will give you an understanding of law in an international context. Through a combination of theory and practical application, you’ll explore issues of law and legal theory at an advanced level.

As well as investigating areas like trade law and dispute resolution, you’ll also have the chance to specialise in your own particular areas of interest, such as international governance or competition law.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

You’ll also learn alongside students from all over the world, giving you first-hand experience of working in a global context.

Our facilities include modern teaching rooms and a mock courtroom. You’ll have access to all our campus libraries and digital resources, including our Virtual Learning Environment which has a range of online resources to complement your studies.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-business-law

Careers

This course will give you the legal skills and knowledge you’ll need to work in international law firms, legal departments of international corporations, government departments and international agencies.

Or you might decide to carry on in academia and take a research degree like our PhD Law.

Modules

Core modules:
Business Law in the Global Context
International Trade Law
International Law Research
Dispute Resolution
Major Research Project in International and European Business Law

Optional modules:
Competition Law in the International Context
International Governance
Comparative Company Law
Current Legal Issues in the International Business Arena

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. Read more
Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. You’ll be supported by research-active staff with backgrounds in professional practice, and work alongside students from around the world.

Overview

Our LLM course offers a combination of theory and practical application that's relevant to the demands of international commercial practice, and in particular the relationship between legal disciplines and commercial undertakings.

It will give you the necessary background and legal expertise to work in international commercial law, or a range of other intellectually demanding roles – or to pursue academic research at the highest level.

You’ll investigate areas like commercial contracts, transnational commercial law and dispute resolution, but will also have the chance to specialise in your own areas of interest, such as international governance or company law.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date advice career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

Here in Cambridge, you’ll study alongside students from all over the world, giving you first-hand experience of working in a global context. Our facilities include modern teaching rooms and a mock courtroom.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-commercial-law

Careers

This course will give you the legal skills and knowledge you need to work in an international legal practice, as well as related careers. It will allow you to demonstrate a highly developed ability to conduct legal or legally-related academic research – a skill that’s in great demand in the legal profession and others.

Our past students enjoy careers in international law firms, legal departments of international corporations, government departments and international agencies.

Modules

Core modules:
Commercial Contracts
Business Law in the Global Context
International Law Research
Dispute Resolution
Transnational Commercial Law
Major Research Project in International and European Business Law

Optional modules:
International Governance
Comparative Company Law

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of assessments, such as coursework in which you’ll develop a critical view on a current issue in the area you're studying, and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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Develop your academic knowledge and awareness of issues in media and entertainment law, and increase your understanding of the legal dimension to activities taking place in the media and entertainment fields and the extent to which they might give rise to legal issues. Read more
Develop your academic knowledge and awareness of issues in media and entertainment law, and increase your understanding of the legal dimension to activities taking place in the media and entertainment fields and the extent to which they might give rise to legal issues. This distance learning programme is taught in partnership with Informa and was created in response to the growing demand for legal education in the media sector and specifically the areas of media and entertainment contracts, sports law, intellectual property rights, and advertising law and data protection.

More about this course

This internationally recognised qualification has been developed for those who wish to acquire expertise in media and entertainment law. This is a rapidly growing area of law including intellectual property, contracts, and defamation as these relate to media, including social media, and to areas such as advertising, music and sports law.

Taught in partnership with Informa via their online learning platform, this distance learning course has been designed specifically for those working in, or wishing to enter the media and entertainment fields; or for those with, or without legal backgrounds who wish to broaden their expertise and to understand better the legal issues arising in these areas. It therefore welcomes applicants from both legal and non-legal backgrounds who have the potential to benefit from the programme and includes an introductory module to English law designed to assist those with no prior legal training.

Due to current and varied issues ranging from the way print media is regulated, to the ever increasing problems now facing companies over the misuse of social media, this course aims to bring a structure to the way the media and entertainment world is constantly trying to coexist with the law. The law can be deemed to play catch up with society and one reason for this is due to the expansion of technological developments within the industry; examples of this can be seen with issues such as cybercrime and WikiLeaks which this course will be investigating. The course is designed to merge commercial practical components and the theoretical understanding of the way these two industries work.

The purpose of the course is to enable you to:
-Develop an in-depth and practical understanding of media and entertainment law
-Understand the principles and practice of media and entertainment law and the changing commercial contexts in which these operate
-Analyse issues in media and entertainment from a legal perspective
-Apply relevant law to help resolve issues that arise in media and entertainment practice
-Utilise mediation and other alternative dispute resolution methods to help secure settlements

As well as deepening your understanding of the law our focus throughout the programme is on the practical application of the law. The programme benefits from tutors with strong relevant backgrounds in the academic world and in legal practice with a number practising as barristers or solicitors.

The assessment includes a reaserch project and a dissertation alongside other projects.

For more information on the PGDip portion of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/media-and-entertainment-law---pg-dip/

Modular structure

The LLM ‘Topup’ by distance learning involves taking one research based module and completing a 15,000 word dissertation.

After the course

Successful completion of this course will highlight your legal skills in the specific context of media, entertainment and sports. The LLM will enable you to gain a professional advantage in media/entertainment industries, where legal skills are becoming more and more vital.

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Entertainment is a large part of life globally in many forms such as music, film, media, sports and the arts. It is a combination of society, popular culture and commerce, and the interaction of these with law produces an exciting contemporary commercial subject with eclectic outcomes. Read more
Entertainment is a large part of life globally in many forms such as music, film, media, sports and the arts. It is a combination of society, popular culture and commerce, and the interaction of these with law produces an exciting contemporary commercial subject with eclectic outcomes. It is an area deeply affected by technological progress as well as business adaptation. This course combines academic analysis and commercial practice elements of entertainment law in an international perspective. The diverse nature of entertainment law will enable you to follow a number of relevant specialisms, all of which are underpinned by issues of contract and intellectual property.

The course will suit graduates from a law background, or those from a non-law background who have significant relevant experience. There have been many successful international graduates on the course from all over the world. It will give you the opportunity to explore new ideas, thoughts and academic experiences within a supportive environment.

Course content

The course aims to develop your understanding of how key fields within the entertainment industries operate, to assess the impact of the law upon them, and give you the practical skills necessary to succeed in a career in entertainment and media law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN THE ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS
-POSTGRADUATE DISSERTATION IN LAW
-RESEARCH THEORY AND PRACTICE
-THE REGULATION OF RELATIONSHIPS IN THE ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS

Option modules
-MERCHANDISING IN THE ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS
-LAW AND MEDIA: CONTENT AND CONTROL
-LAW OF DIGITAL ENTERTAINMENT AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Associated careers

As an entertainment law graduate you will be able to develop a career in a whole range of professions within the entertainment industry. Perhaps the most popular of these are roles in sports, music, and media and communications law. The subject gives a modern edge to traditional law subjects and is well respected by employers.

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The LLM in Media Law at Queen Mary, University of London allows you the opportunity to gain expertise in a range of legal regimes governing key aspects of the media, from the regulation of all key forms of media content to the regulation of the infrastructures via which that content is delivered, including traditional, new and still-developing media. Read more

Overview

The LLM in Media Law at Queen Mary, University of London allows you the opportunity to gain expertise in a range of legal regimes governing key aspects of the media, from the regulation of all key forms of media content to the regulation of the infrastructures via which that content is delivered, including traditional, new and still-developing media.
In an age of seemingly infinite broadcast channels, online information at our fingertips, and the ever-increasing economic and cultural significance of the entertainment industry, media law has never been more relevant to our daily lives than it is today.

Your fellow students will come from the UK and more than 80 other countries, each able to draw on prior academic and in many cases professional experiences from different jurisdictions to enrich discussion and debate in class.

What is Media Law?

Media law is the study of the regulation of the media, whether in traditional print form, the broadcast media, or in the online arena. Increasingly, media regulations must be, and are being, adapted to take account of new technological developments as the dividing line between online media and traditional forms becomes less pronounced.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Media Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM355 Celebrity Privacy, the Media and the Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM359 Cyberspace Law: Protecting the Online Persona: Digital Rights in Cyberspace (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)

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Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project. Read more
Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project.

Overview

Medical law and ethics is a fascinating field of study as advances in research and new technologies shift the boundaries of medicine. New health issues are continually emerging and patient rights are increasingly taking centre stage. Complex medico-legal dilemmas are arising in healthcare practice and in the relationships between patients and healthcare professionals. You’ll find that many of the issues we cover on this course are highly topical.

Over the course of two years, you’ll explore the moral problems faced by medical and healthcare professionals, learn about issues that may raise legal liability in these areas, and reflect upon the legal, social and ethical context in which healthcare law is situated.

Our optional modules will allow you to tailor the course to your own particular interests. You’ll be able to explore these in greater depth in your Major Project, by undertaking a significant piece of independent research in your chosen topic.

You’ll benefit from working with students from medical, healthcare and legal backgrounds who will bring different experiences and viewpoints to the subject.

Delivered in short, intensive blocks of teaching, this part-time course is accessible to busy medical and legal professionals. It's taught jointly by staff from by Anglia Law School and our Faculty of Medical Science, reflecting its inter-professional ethos.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/medical-law-and-ethics

Careers

If you’re working in the medical or healthcare fields and want to move into a more senior position, our course will help to enhance your CV. By developing specialist academic expertise in the field of medical law you’ll broaden your knowledge and understanding of the legal and ethical context in which you work.

Our course will also provide a sound basis for continuing your studies at PhD level, particularly if you have a law degree.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules:
Applied Ethics in the Medical and Healthcare Context
Medical and Healthcare Law

Year two, core modules:
Major Project

Year two, optional modules:
Integrated Governance and Compliance Frameworks in Healthcare Communities
Legal and Ethical Issues Throughout Life
Medical Law and Ethics in the Care of Older People

Assessment

You’ll show your understanding of the modules through written coursework. Meanwhile, the Major Project will let you draw on your own professional background and/or personal interests to produce an original, extended piece of writing.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from gender and ethnicity, music and conflict, music revivals and performance culture, to postcolonial theory and the politics of ethnography. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

All students on the MusM Music programme take Advanced Music Studies: Skills and Methodologies as their core unit. Students on the Ethnomusicology pathway also take Studying World Music Cultures: Themes and Debates and, usually, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography . Other optional course units normally include Case Studies in Musicology: Texts and Histories ; and Historical or Contemporary Performance (subject to audition). A maximum of 30 credits may be chosen from another MA programme in the arts or social sciences (subject to availability and approval by the course tutor): possible options include Gender, Sexuality and the Body ; Filming History: Making Documentary Films for Research; and Documentary and Sensory Media . Students may also undertake a Work Placement with a local arts organisation or institution (by prior arrangement and subject to availability).

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
-Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
-Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
-Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
-Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources.

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This course is primarily a research programme with taught elements. You can study a range of musicological and creative practice topics. Read more
This course is primarily a research programme with taught elements. You can study a range of musicological and creative practice topics.

The MMus is a research Master's. It is 12 months full time or 24 months part time. This is a research programme, but there are some taught modules.

The MMus is an excellent foundation for students going on to a PhD. It is also a valuable qualification in its own right. For some the MMus adds a further dimension to their undergraduate degree, in a 3+1 model.

Your studies

The styles or repertories covered during your study can range across the full spectrum of early, classical, avant-garde, folk, popular and world music genres.

You can focus on creative musical practice, musicology, or a combination of the two. Use the elective projects to tailor your studies.

Careers

Studying music is both intellectually and musically demanding. You'll develop transferable skills to help you in your career, whatever you choose to do.

Transferrable skills
Studying music requires you to engage in a broad range of practical and intellectual activities. These include performance, composition, improvisation, analysis, research and critical intellectual enquiry. We foster teamwork and initiative through participation in music ensembles. You'll gain communication skills through performance, presentations and written work. Flexibility, self-discipline and good time management are all required to attain high technical standards. These skills are necessary to balance the demands of study, practice and performance.

Employability
Our graduates often become self-employed musicians, performers, composers, teachers, academics, music therapists, studio managers or sound engineers. Other opportunities include arts administration, music production, specialist magazine journalism, music librarianship or music publishing. The wide range of transferable skills music graduates develop means that you can easily move into any discipline. These include management, marketing, accountancy, law, events management, journalism and IT.

Careers resources
The University's award-winning Careers Service can help with planning for your future career from the day you arrive. They can help you even after you graduate from Newcastle. Read our Careers with a degree in Music publication. This will tell you more about:
-What a music degree is like
-How it prepares you for the world of work
-Our graduates who have pursued various roles

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Prepare to practice as a solicitor in England or Wales. completing our course will allow you to move on to take a training contract. Read more
Prepare to practice as a solicitor in England or Wales: completing our course will allow you to move on to take a training contract. We’ll explore a number of areas of legal practice, and keep you up to date with the latest opportunities in the legal profession. Thanks to our flexible teaching, you’ll have time to follow these opportunities up, too.

Overview

On our Legal Practice Course at Anglia Law School, you’ll explore civil litigation and dispute resolution, criminal law, property law and business law. As well as this, our range of optional modules will give you the chance to learn about family law, employment law, child care, commercial dispute resolution and private client work.

You’ll benefit from extra support and training, too. We offer non-assessed training in areas like billing, file management, commercial awareness and negotiation skills, plus a specialist non-assessed course in careers and professional development.

With our links to practitioners, who also help to develop the course, you’ll have access to the latest careers advice and maybe even the opportunity to be interviewed for a training contract. We’ll also keep you up to date on vacancies in the legal job market through our monthly email bulletin.

Our high staff-to-student ratio means we can give you an excellent level of pastoral care, addressing your individual needs and supporting your transition from undergraduate study to the Legal Practice Course, and from the Legal Practice Course to training contracts and employment.

And thanks to our flexible teaching, you’ll be able to fit study around other commitments such as employment or training. Most of our large group sessions are delivered by i-lecture, so you can join remotely from wherever you want.

When you're studying on-campus in Cambridge, you'll benefit from a range of facilities including our mock courtroom, which will allow you to practice advocacy in a realistic setting.

We're the only university in East Anglia to offer the Legal Practice Course. We were also the first university in England and Wales to have our course accredited by Skillsmark.

Teaching times: Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9am-6pm. You'll also attend a five-day induction week at the beginning of the course.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/legal-practice-course

Careers

This course will prepare you for life as a practising solicitor in England or Wales, and allow you to continue on to the two-year training contract that will fully qualify you for professional practice*.

You will most likely choose to complete your two-year training contract with a firm of solicitors in private practice, but might prefer to take one with an alternative employer, such as the UK government (through the Government Legal Service), local government, the Crown Prosecution Service or a law centre. Whatever you decide, you can be sure of receiving specialised careers guidance on our Legal Practice Course.

*unless you have a FILEX qualification and exemption from the SRA.

Modules

Core modules:
Litigation
Property Law and Practice
Business Law and Practice
Interviewing and Advising
Writing
Practical Legal Research
Advocacy
Drafting
Professional Conduct and Regulation
Solicitors Accounts
Wills and Administration of Estates
Career Development
Billing, File Management and Commercial Awareness
Negotiation

Optional modules:
Family Law and Practice
Employment Law and Practice
Child Care
Private Client
Commercial Dispute Resolution

NB optional modules will only run if there is enough demand.

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of timed open book supervised assessments, oral practical and coursework-style assessments across the course. You’ll also undertake full-scale mock assessments in all areas, including all skills subjects.

All students take our core modules, plus three vocational subjects from the list of optional modules. Please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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With this specialist LLM you will gain a detailed insight into the fast-growing field of Intellectual Property & Information Law. Read more

With this specialist LLM you will gain a detailed insight into the fast-growing field of Intellectual Property & Information Law. Expect interactive classes focusing on topical issues concerning the regulation of innovation and creativity, in which the issues of the day are explored in detail. Covering the latest practical and theoretical perspectives you will learn about the access to and use of data in a global context.

Key benefits

  • A strong IP Law community, with both informal and formal social and networking events, guest lectures by leading scholars/practitioners in the field and participation in the annual International IP moot competition.
  • Breadth and depth of teaching expertise; a reputed mix of dedicated full-time King's academics and internationally-acclaimed practitioners who all contribute to the extensive module offering.
  • Combines rigorous analytical and critical approaches with practical perspectives and practice-generated problems.

Description

Innovations, creative works, collections of data and communications infrastructure are central components of our digital, global society. How the law is and should be applied to the regulation of these intangible assets are important questions for government and commerce around the world.

That is why the LLM in Intellectual Property & Information Law attracts students from a diverse range of jurisdictions and backgrounds. This is matched by a teaching faculty at King's that comprises a diverse mix of leading academics and practitioners - offering a wide variety of perspectives on the role of Intellectual Property & Information Law today.

There is a strong international, European and comparative focus to the course and all of our students benefit from access to the wider legal community. Guest speakers, networking events, attendance at external seminars and participation in international mooting competitions are just some of what you can expect on this LLM.

Course purpose

For those who want to work in legal practice (in a variety of capacities - solicitor, advocate on in-house counsel) in the following sectors: the cultural and creative industries (music, film, art and publishing); 'brand' management for medium to large corporations; innovation industries, such as information and digital technology, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. Those from both EU and non-EU countries where the 'knowledge economy' is either developing or already rather crucial will be attracted to this pathway.

This programme allows you to deepen or to broaden your knowledge of law as an academic subject and assists your professional development by enhancing your problem-solving skills in a transnational context. Designed to maximise students' intellectual potential, it also keeps you grounded by drawing on the real world experiences of staff and other practitioners. The LLM offers a sharpened focus on our key areas of excellence and a commitment to offer a premier programme and a world class student experience. Aimed at recent law graduates (or graduates of joint degrees with a significant law content) as well as established legal professionals who may have graduated a number of years ago, the programme is rigorous and demanding and requires serious commitment.

Course format and assessment

In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. 

Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations.

Career destinations

In a competitive world we can give you the competitive edge to take your career to the next level. That’s why you’ll find our LLM programme is supplemented by opportunities to develop your skills and professional networks.

The result is that students are presented with a wide range of employment destinations when they leave; from positions at the European Central Bank, European Commission and UN to commercial roles as investment bank analysts, tax or public affairs advisers, as well as careers in the legal profession; accountancy; management consultancy; human rights organisations and other voluntary bodies; academia.



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This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation or critical edition (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from musicology as cultural history, through musicology and the body, source studies and performance practice, to postcolonial theory and postmodernism. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
-Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
-Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
-Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
-Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation or critical edition is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation or critical edition (12,000-15,000 words or equivalent) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources. One of our graduates writes of how the skills she honed at Manchester helped prepare her for her first job as an Editorial Assistant at Oxford University Press: `I use my written/essay skills in text editing (prefaces, composer notes, biographies etc.) and in preparing sales copy; analytical skills are continually employed during the editing process; the discipline of editing and proofing your own work is as important in my job as it was in my studies; the research skills that I developed during my time at Manchester have been useful in source research and in checking the factual accuracy of texts; and general skills such as planning and time management have been helpful preparation for the world of work.'

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