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Masters Degrees (Medical Tourism)

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The degree is suitable for students with an intellectual interest in anthropological approaches to the study of health as well as for those who work in health care in Africa and Asia. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an intellectual interest in anthropological approaches to the study of health as well as for those who work in health care in Africa and Asia.

The MA Medical Anthropology comprises two pathways catering for candidates with or without anthropological training. Students come to the course from all over the world, following BA study, work and travel experience or after long careers in other fields. This combination of diverse experience and skills makes for an intellectually exciting atmosphere for both teachers and students.

The course is distinctive in its focus on medical and health issues pertaining to Africa, Asia and Latin America. It covers anthropological theory, cultural understandings of health, and various options. These include combinations of anthropology and food, gender, shamanism and therapy, psychoanalysis, religion and healing in South Asia, China and in Africa, and study of the language and ethnography of a particular region.

The programme consists of four elements, three examined courses and a dissertation of 10,000 words. The degree is suitable for students with an intellectual interest in anthropological approaches to the study of health as well as for those who work in health care in Africa and Asia. The aim of the degree is to provide:

- A phenomenological understanding of the body, which implies also subjective attitudes to notions of health, sickness, disease, recovery and personal vulnerability
- an understanding of these experiences within regional, political, economic and cultural contexts

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/mamedanth/

Structure

Programme Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of taught examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Cultural Understandings of Health - 15PANC093 (1.0 unit).
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Medical Anthropology and the candidate’s supervisor.
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses - Group A and Group B:
- Students then choose TWO 0.5 unit courses from the Group A and B lists below.
- AT LEAST ONE of the two 0.5 unit courses must come from Group A.

Option Courses:
- Students not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology may then select their fourth unit (either a single 1.0 unit course or two 0.5 unit courses) from the Option Courses list.
- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 209kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/mamedanth/file49466.pdf

Employment

A Masters in Medical Anthropology at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme will also develop a specialist understanding of social processes and cultural representations of health, illness and the nursing/care practices associated with these. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MSc in Medical Anthropology offers a unique opportunity to engage with anthropological approaches to the study of health drawing on sociocultural, ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Read more

The MSc in Medical Anthropology offers a unique opportunity to engage with anthropological approaches to the study of health drawing on sociocultural, ecological and evolutionary perspectives. The course provides a strong grounding in ethnographic approaches to the study of health, the political ecology of health and the application of anthropology to contemporary public health concerns, as well as a diverse range of options in areas such as theories of the body and evolutionary medicine. Our unique biosocial approach to the anthropology of health is one of our key strengths and attracts a wide range of students, contributing to a stimulating and exciting learning environment. An emphasis on developing and applying research skills is also central to our degree. The course is taught by the academic researchers from our highly regarded Anthropology of Health Research Group http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/research/health

Please see the website for further information on modules.

Course Learning and Teaching

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Full-time students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with further assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation by September. Core modules introduce the Anthropology of Global Health and Public Health Anthropology, and anthropological methods. Students can choose to focus on qualitative or quantitative methods or to train in both.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hoursThey give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week, and are also expected to attend weekly departmental and Anthropology of Health Research Group research seminars, often given by prominent visiting speakers. Students also have the opportunity to present their work at the Department’s annual postgraduate conference, and to join activities with other universities, such as our annual advanced medical anthropology workshop with the University of Edinburgh. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work.

Throughout the programme, all students meet fortnightly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis, or can be e-mailed to arrange a mutually agreeable time. Students work closely with leading academics to develop an original piece of research for their dissertation, and guidance on the dissertation is also provided by the dissertation leader. Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparing for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions, including a field trip and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the degree tutor for Medical Anthropology. Students also attend an introduction to our departmental research groups, including the Anthropology of Health Research Group.

Career Opportunities

Students with a postgraduate qualification in Anthropology pursue a diverse array of careers in areas such as conservation, tourism, public health, health research and management, captive primate care and zoological research management, local government research and management, education (secondary, further and higher), social care, social research, in addition to academia.



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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This Economic and Social Research Council approved MA provides training in research methods with a focus on methods used by researchers in anthropology. At the end of this course, you will be well-prepared to go on to do research in Anthropology or a related discipline. Read more

This Economic and Social Research Council approved MA provides training in research methods with a focus on methods used by researchers in anthropology. At the end of this course, you will be well-prepared to go on to do research in Anthropology or a related discipline. Most students expect to move on to a PhD. The course includes training in qualitative and quantitative methods needed by researchers in social sciences and draws on expertise within the Department of Anthropology to provide specialised training in either sociocultural anthropology, medical anthropology, the anthropology of development or cultural evolution (depending on your chosen pathway). It is affiliated to the Northern Ireland and North East Doctoral Training Partnership, which offers funding to British and European Union students interested in taking the course preparatory to moving on to a PhD at Durham.

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation in September. This is often a pilot project for a PhD project. 

Students take core modules on qualitative and quantitative methods. Further modules are chosen from within each specialist pathway.

Please see the website for further information on modules.

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. They give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues. 

Full-time students have on average 8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week and are also expected to attend weekly departmental seminars and research group seminars (hosted by our Social Anthropology Research Group http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/research/socialanthropology, our Anthropology of Health Research Group http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/research/health and our Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/research/evolutionary, depending on their particular interests. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Throughout the programme, all students meet fortnightly with their degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. Students work closely with leading academics (usually their expected PhD supervisors) to develop an original piece of research for their dissertation, and guidance on the dissertation is also provided by the dissertation leader. Before the academic year starts, we make provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival, we have induction sessions, including field trip, and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the Degree Tutor for the MA. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Career Opportunities

Students with a postgraduate qualification in Anthropology pursue a diverse array of careers in areas such as conservation, tourism, public health, health research and management, captive primate care and zoological research management, local government research and management, education (secondary, further and higher), social care, social research, in addition to academia.



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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Our MSc in Intercultural Communication for Business and the Professions (ICBP) is for anyone who wants to develop their intercultural skills, and apply those skills to the world of business or beyond. Read more

Are you ready for the global workplace?

Our MSc in Intercultural Communication for Business and the Professions (ICBP) is for anyone who wants to develop their intercultural skills, and apply those skills to the world of business or beyond. With research increasingly showing a need for employees who can work across cultures, the intercultural skills you’ll learn on the course will prepare you for wherever you want your career to take you.

A programme tailored to your needs

With a wide variety of modules to choose from, our MSc ICBP lets you tailor your studies to your own career aspirations. Want to apply your intercultural knowledge in a role within marketing? Or perhaps you’re interested in issues in intercultural politics?

Our core modules focus on culture and communication, developing your ability to analyse, explain and research intercultural communication, as well as strengthening your practical cultural skills. You can also choose from optional modules that enable you to specialise in various communication and/or professionally oriented areas, including marketing, international business and even learning and working in a new language.

What’s more, you can choose the pace of your studies, with full-time and tailored part-time study options available.

Apply your intercultural skills in the real world

On our MSc ICBP, our programme is rooted in the understanding that teaching needs to be informed by research and practice alike. Our research with organisations across a wide range of industries is reflected in both our course content and our approach to teaching. That’s why each module on our programme gives you the chance to apply your intercultural skills and knowledge in a practical way – from in-class discussions and group projects, to case studies or an experiential placement.

As an MSc student you’ll also have many opportunities to gain first-hand insights into challenges that organisations face, thanks to our guest speaker series that runs through all terms. In previous years, we’ve hosted speakers from businesses and organisations from around the world, on a wide range of intercultural, international issues.

Experiential placements: go beyond the classroom

In today’s competitive workplace, opportunities to put theory into practice when studying are invaluable. As a student on our MSc ICBP, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake an experiential placement as part of your degree programme – giving you hands-on experience of applying the skills you’ve learned in the real world.

Our students have undertaken placements ranging from visiting our partner universities around the world, to organising their own work placement. Whether you want to study in China, or work with an international business in South Africa, you’ll have the chance to gain a real edge in taking the next step in your global career.

Where will our course take you?

Our students have gone on to follow a huge range of career paths in including the following:

Marketing
- Fashion & Lifestyle
- Mobile communications
- Web technology
- Education management
- Arts

Public Relations and Media
- Editing & Publishing
- Primary sector industries
- Education
- Consulting
- Journalism

Consulting
- Management & Business
- Electronics
- Insurance
- Translation & Interpreting
- Food

Management/HR
- Oil & Energy
- Investment
- Medical devices
- International recruitment
- Tourism

Education
- Secondary education
- Central administration
- Teaching
- Higher education
- Research

To find out more about where our course can take you, send us an email (), or visit our website: MSc Intercultural Communication for Business and the Professions (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/al/study/msc/)

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The only Master`s programme in Europe that is focused on wellness and spa management. Delivered by experts from Switzerland/USA, Hungary, Scotland, Finland, Portugal, Germany/Egypt and Estonia. Read more

The only Master`s programme in Europe that is focused on wellness and spa management. Delivered by experts from Switzerland/USA, Hungary, Scotland, Finland, Portugal, Germany/Egypt and Estonia. What is wellness? It can be defined as the balanced state of body, spirit and mind, including emotional, physical, intellectual, social, environmental, occupational and spiritual wellness. Therefore the studies include aspects of wellbeing, leisure, medical wellness, tourism, management and entrepreneurship.



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This course will suit you if you are a sport and exercise graduate, a graduate from a related science or a medical student looking to specialise in the field of sport physiology. Read more
This course will suit you if you are a sport and exercise graduate, a graduate from a related science or a medical student looking to specialise in the field of sport physiology.

It is designed to focus on professional skills that improve your employability, as you learn with state-of-the-art equipment including environmental chambers, breath-by-breath analysers, blood sampling analysers and transcranial magnetic stimulation devices.

You also gain real-world experience in areas relevant to your interests by working alongside experienced practitioners. Past projects have included the design of individualised training programmes leading up to the Brighton Marathon and the physiological testing of elite athletes.

Our teaching laboratories are accredited by the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES), as are most of our course staff. You can register on the BASES Supervised Experience Scheme yourself to achieve personal accreditation.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available for this course. Please click the link below for more information.
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/studying-here/fees-and-finance/postgraduate/index.aspx

Course structure

The course is flexible in that it allows you to exit with a postgraduate certificate at the end of one semester (three 20-credit modules) or a postgraduate diploma at the end of two semesters (six 20-credit modules). You must complete the 60-credit research project to qualify for the MSc.

You spend around 100 hours of the course with an organisation related to the practice of physiology, which will allow you to apply your academic knowledge in a vocational setting. Previous students have worked with organisations including Brighton and Hove Albion Football Club and the English Institute of Sport.

Many students have started their professional careers with the organisation that provided them with work experience.

Areas of study

In taught physiology modules, you will experience and discuss the responses of the human body to various stimuli, including effect of environmental changes (heat and hypoxic chambers) and of ergogenic aids, which can be used to simulate peculiar clinical conditions and help you understand better exercise tolerance.

This novel approach to teaching integrative physiology will help you to develop a host of laboratory skills. You will also be introduced to the latest in the research field of exercise physiology and will have an opportunity to write your own paper from your research project.

Through professional modules, placement opportunities and chances to network in the world of sports physiology, you will graduate with a competitive edge in the jobs market and a foot firmly in the industry.

Teaching environment

Laboratory work:

We accept a maximum of 15 students on this course
All classes take place in our exercise physiology laboratories with a staff:student ratio of 2:3
Students work in groups of four to five on problem-based situations

Tutorials:

Students can book individual tutorials with every lecturer offering around three hours of tutorials per week
Group tutorials are also scheduled in our teaching programmes

Modules:

Critical Insights into the Study of Physiology
Professional Enquiry
Exercise Tolerance (integrative physiology)
Expertise in Laboratory Skills for Sport Physiologists

Options:

Applied Environmental Physiology
Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
Bodies of Sport
Ethical and Social Responsibility: Theory and Application
Consultancy
Issues and Innovations in Physiology

Facilities

Our facilities include an x-m square gym over two floors with state-of-the-art fitness equipment, which features a three-camera system to analyse weight-lifting actions and an isokinetic dynamometer to allow measurement of muscle strength.

Our sport and exercise laboratories are all accredited by the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES). They include:

• a molecular genetics laboratory with biobanking
• a biomechanics laboratory with motion analysis equipment, various EMG systems and an immersive screen
• two exercise physiology laboratories where aerobic/anaerobic endurance, power and strength assessments as well as body composition, cardiac and pulmonary screening can be carried out
• an environmental laboratory with purpose-built environment chamber where we can simulate different climates by controlling the temperature (-20 to +50°C) and relative humidity (20 to 95 per cent), and a 1.13m x 1.13m x 1.5m water immersion tank
• a research-based laboratory with an oxygen-controlled chamber to simulate altitude (hypoxia).

Professional experience

Professional-Based Learning Module:

All credit-based postgraduate courses at the School of Sport and Service Management offer the Professional-Based Learning module.

The module offers you an opportunity to undertake practical experience in a work environment and gain invaluable first-hand knowledge. It is designed to help you engage with the process of planning and delivering expertise in practice, and to reflect upon and take steps to improve your academic, personal and professional skills.

In Semester 1 (September–January) you will have classes on CV development, interview skills, target setting, reflective practice and experiential learning, leading to 100 hours of professional experience in Semester 2 (February–June). This experience could take the form of a part-time job, an unpaid internship, a volunteering opportunity in the university or time as a mentee in your chosen industry. You can also take this module as part of a live consultancy in connection with one of your tourism, sport, hospitality or event modules, either in the UK or a School of Sport and Service Management project overseas.

Our school-based Employability Hub will be on hand to assist you in securing an experience that best meets your career goals and aspirations. Professional experience will enhance your practice and academic knowledge, and many of our students have started their careers with their placement organisation.

Careers and employment

Career opportunities for sport and exercise scientists are growing. Sports science is recognised as a vital ingredient in the success and development of most sports and for the individuals that take part it is an everyday aspect of their training. Many hospitals and primary care trusts are also appointing specialists with exercise backgrounds to work in areas such as cardiac rehabilitation and health promotion.

An MSc in Applied Sport Physiology from the University of Brighton will help you to stand out in today's competitive job market. It will equip you with both the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary for a successful career and is also ideal preparation for continuing your study at MPhil or PhD level.

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Whether undertaken for the continued love of literature, or for personal or professional development, studying our MA English Literature will help you gain a more confident critical voice and advanced analytical and research skills. Read more
Whether undertaken for the continued love of literature, or for personal or professional development, studying our MA English Literature will help you gain a more confident critical voice and advanced analytical and research skills.

This course is taught by internationally recognised scholars who are at the cutting-edge of their areas of research. You will work with us on the latest developments in literary criticism.

The Humanities department runs a number of exciting research groups, many of which are interdisciplinary in method and scope. The English division has particular strengths in the Early Modern period, the Long Eighteenth Century, Modernism, Gender, and Popular Culture.

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page below:
2 years part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/english-literature-dtpegl6/

1 year distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/english-literature-dtdegl6/

2 years distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/english-literature-dtpegld6/

Learn From The Best

This MA reflects – and is informed by – staff interests across periods, locations, and theoretical approaches: from the Early Modern period to contemporary writing; British, American and transnational literature; sexuality; and cultural heritage.

Each MA module is reflective of areas of staff expertise, ranging from the gory delights of the Gothic to how associations between authors and locations lead to the development of literary heritage sites, such as Dove Cottage.

Northumbria’s Humanities department works with a range of cultural partners including New Writing North, the co-operative movement, Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums and Shandy Hall, providing students with direct industry exposure and live project opportunities.

Teaching And Assessment

During the English Literature MA you will be encouraged to become more aware of the production and determination of meaning by historical, social, political, stylistic, ethnic, gender, geographical and other contexts.

This heightened awareness is facilitated through examining literature produced within a wide range of contexts: different periods; geographical locations; as well as a variety of social backgrounds (institutional, gendered, private, public, domestic). This wide-ranging critical examination opens up new perspectives on literary texts and provides you with the strategies needed to discuss literature in expert and critically informed ways.

You will choose your non-core modules from a pool while the core modules Critical Contexts and Research Methods: Traditional and Digital will run in all years. You conceive your dissertation topic individually in conjunction with a supervisor of similar research interests.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7016 - Dark Tourism: Urban Underworlds and Modern City Spaces (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7018 - Final Frontiers: future worlds, cyberspace and alternative realities (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7019 - Research Methods: Traditional and Digital (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7021 - Critical Contexts (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7022 - MA English Literature Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
EL7027 - Writers in their Place: Literature and Heritage (Optional, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

The delivery of the MA offers a degree of flexibility by allowing you to choose your learning environment. The MA in English Literature is offered in a traditional classroom setting with regular face-to-face supervision, or alternatively you can complete the course via distance learning through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The Humanities department is made up of a community of learners all the way through from first year undergraduate to final year PhD level. All Humanities staff are engaged in research and actively create the knowledge that is taught in the department.

English Literature MA students, as part of Northumbria’s Humanities department, will have access to the new Institute for Humanities which houses a range of specialist research resources.

Research-Rich Learning

The subject area of English and Creative Writing produces high quality research and has been successful in securing external funding for research projects from the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and the Leverhulme Trust.

Northumbria is rated in the UK top 15 for the quality of its English Literature, Language and Creative Writing publications. You can explore some of the key themes here.

Furthermore, as an MA student in English Literature you will engage with the activities of the Institute for Humanities, which is home to five international journals in English studies and which regularly hosts an exciting range of seminars, symposia and conferences on topics as varied as Memory, Heritage and Identity; Transnationalism and Societal Change; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities; and American Studies.

Give Your Career An Edge

On completion of the MA, you will have improved your employability through enhancing your critical skills and attitudes, presentation skills, and reflective and evaluative abilities. You will be self-motivating, be capable of making decisions in complex situations, and possess a thirst for independent learning.

In addition to these personal skills, you will have demonstrated a critical awareness of the current research and scholarship within your discipline, facilitating your ability to interpret knowledge in a variety of professional fields.

The MA builds on undergraduate skills, distinguished by the level of intensity, complexity, and density of study. Advanced communication skills and media literacy must be demonstrated along with exceptional ability for time management, ethical and professional understanding, and highly developed research and inquiry skills.

From the start of the course you are encouraged to access the central university Careers and Employment Service, and to use this service regularly to seek advice on areas such as career guidance.

Your Future

There are considerable opportunities for you to advance your studies further, and advice in writing PhD and funding applications is available. The course offers a qualification that may enhance promotion prospects in some professions – most notably teaching, professional research, museums/archives, public policy, and project management.

Julie Orme came to Northumbria as a mature student and achieved a distinction in the English Literature MA. She says:

“Studying at Northumbria allowed me to develop good analytical and research skills and to attain the grades and display the work ethos necessary for becoming a good prospect for employers. It has also opened the door to further, vocational study.

The best thing about my MA was the way that one's critical skills were developed to the point of autonomous study whereby, one graduated from being a student to being a literary critic."

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This short course is designed for very experienced graduates with substantial successful teaching experience, who currently work as unqualified teachers. Read more
This short course is designed for very experienced graduates with substantial successful teaching experience, who currently work as unqualified teachers. It does not include any training and is only suitable if you are currently working as an unqualified teacher.

Supported by your school or college, the course allows you to demonstrate that you already meet all the QTS standards through assessment of your current teaching. A successful assessment leads to a recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)

How will I be assessed?

The assessment takes place in the school or college where you are currently employed. Full support by your employer is essential to ensure the assessments can take place.

The assessment process

The assessment will include:

1. a completed application form, including a personal statement and your teaching timetable
2. a reference from your current employing school or college
3. presentation of comprehensive and detailed evidence to show how you meet the Teachers' Standards for QTS
4. observation and assessment of your teaching in a school
5. evidence of passing the National College for Teaching and Leadership's Professional Skills tests
6. a DBS (formerly CRB) enhanced disclosure clearance and appropriate medical checks.

How long does the assessment take?

The assessment will be completed within a maximum period of 12 weeks. If a longer period or training is required, then an alternative training programme can be advised.

As school observations are required, the assessment can not take place over school holidays. Therefore, assessments will not take place until the Autumn term for any applications made after the Easter period.

Subjects we can support:

Primary education
Applied Information and Communication Technology
Art and Design
Biology
Business Education
Chemistry
Citizenship
Classics
Computer Science
Dance
Design and Technology
Drama
Economics
Engineering
English
Geography
Geology / Earth Science
Health and Social care
History
Information and Communication Technology
Leisure and Tourism
Manufacturing
Mathematics
Media Studies
Modern Languages
Music
Physical Education
Physics
Psychology
Religious Education
Social Science.

For Early Years teaching, see our Early Years Initial Teacher Training (Assessment Only) course.

How to apply

Applications should be made directly to the University via the online application system at http://www.ntu.ac.uk/apply.

Interview

If your application is successful, the initial interview and observation will take place in the school/college where you are currently employed.

You will be required to:
present a portfolio of evidence to meet the Teachers' Standards for QTS
provide original copies of relevant qualifications.

We can advise you of how to complete your portfolio before attending the interview.

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This programme examines the social, political and cultural implications of environmental adaptation. You will learn to assess political and communication strategies, technological innovations and ethical values as tools for achieving sustainable environments. Read more
This programme examines the social, political and cultural implications of environmental adaptation. You will learn to assess political and communication strategies, technological innovations and ethical values as tools for achieving sustainable environments. It trains professionals, decision-makers and students in the social implications of environmental issues, particularly in relation to technologies as potential solutions. It focuses on responsible innovation.

Why this programme

● This programme addresses the wider social and political dimensions behind our scientific and technological choices concerning the environment, using a global approach.

● We provide interdisciplinary teaching, combining solutions from science and engineering with the sensitivities of sociology, history, ethics and politics.

● Our programme has an applied focus, and features a programme of guest speakers from relevant fields.

● The School of Interdisciplinary Studies is one of the UK’s foremost centres of expertise in interdisciplinary environmental teaching and research.

● Dumfries & Galloway, in south west Scotland, is an excellent location for environmental study and research. The modern campus is ideally situated in proximity to a natural living laboratory, relevant non-governmental organisations, renewable energy companies and a range of partnership organisations.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses, and complete a dissertation. Teaching is through a combination of methods including lectures, seminars, case studies and a programme of guest speakers.

Core courses

• Environment, technology and society
• Environmental communication
• Environmental ethics and behavioural change
• Environmental politics and society.

Optional courses

• Advanced research methods
• Climate change: impacts on ecology
• Critical perspectives on knowledge and power
• Critical thinking and communication
• Reading the environment: modern and contemporary nature writing
• Tourism, sustainability and climate change
• Writing the environment: old and new world romanticisms.

Please refer to the website to see

Academic Staff

http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/environmentalchangesociety/#/academicstaff

Career prospects

As a graduate you will be able to pursue careers in technology assessment, environmental management and policy making and analysis with government agencies, environmental consultancies, and private companies. The degree also aims to empower active citizens by providing the skills and understandings to underpin successful environmental campaigns. The degree is also an excellent first step toward a PhD in topics related to the wider implications of our environmental and societal choices.

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Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history. Read more

Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history.

Bioarchaeology (the study of archaeological human remains) is an exciting field that draws on a variety of techniques, ranging from visual examination of the whole skeleton to the biomolecular analysis of small bone samples. Demographic shifts, environmental changes, migrations, the spread of diseases and the impact of violence and conflict all leave traces on the skeleton.

This MSc provides the skills required to understand skeletal biographies and interpret them in their cultural context at the individual and the population level. Combining theoretical learning with hands-on practice, we will provide you with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills essential to your handling and analysis of specimens recovered from archaeological sites.

Programme structure

Throughout the programme, you’ll take part in lectures, seminars and practical work with archaeological skeletal assemblages and reference collections. You will complete six courses that are assessed through reports, lab exams, oral and poster presentations and essays.

Drawing on Edinburgh’s long history in the study of the human body, you will also have the opportunity to visit Surgeons’ Hall Museum and the Anatomy Department, which provide unique collections of pathological and anatomical study specimens.

You will also submit a dissertation on a research topic of your choosing. Past dissertations have ranged from experimental projects on violence in prehistory to dietary studies of Chalcolithic Turkey and considerations of disease and impairment in post-Medieval England.

The courses on this programme are:

  • Analytical Methods in Human Osteology
  • Bioarchaeological Interpretation
  • Human Musculoskeletal Anatomy
  • Practical Osteology
  • Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology
  • Skeletal Pathology

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to:

  • identify and interpret human skeletal remains from archaeological sites
  • develop hypothesis testing skills
  • carry out relevant scientific analyses, often in cooperation with experts in other disciplines
  • engage in theoretical and methodological discussions relevant to osteoarchaeology
  • design research strategies based on transferable skills providing a basis for advanced studies (PhD and beyond)

Career opportunities

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police.

An archaeology degree does not, of course, restrict you to a career in archaeology. The programme also equips you for advanced study.



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