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Masters Degrees (Medical Humanities)

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This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are. Read more
This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are: What can the humanities contribute to healthcare? How do they differ from the sciences? And what can they tell us about illness?

Key benefits

- Unrivalled central London location, giving immediate access to important medico-historical and cultural resources, including libraries, galleries, archives and museums, e.g. The Wellcome Collection and Library, the Hunterian Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the British Library.

- World class expertise in a breadth of subject areas, including: History of Psychiatry, Literature & Medicine, Philosophy of Medicine and Mental Disorder, Medical Portraiture, Nursing and Film, Bioethics.

- Taught at the Wellcome-funded Centre for the Humanities & Health, which supports the research activities of internationally renowned scholars in the field; has a vibrant and active post-graduate and post-doctoral community; and hosts a lively programme of seminars, conferences and events.

- Close links between the School of Arts & Humanities and one of the largest Schools of Biomedicine in Europe.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-humanities-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The Medical Humanities constitute a growing field of scholarship productive of powerful, innovative analyses of health care issues today. The chief educational aims of this course are to explore the foundations of the field and teach analytical and critical skills that enable students to address questions such as:

Does studying the humanities make us more humane? How are the humanities different from the sciences? What new angles do they offer on old ethical dilemmas? What is health? What is illness? What kind of evidence about illness does literature provide? What is narrative and how embedded are narrative ways of thought in health care practice?

Students who take this course will come away from it with a strong sense of how a variety of humanities disciplines conceive of health and illness and of the contributions these can make to health care. The disciplines involved include Philosophy, Literature, Film, Psychiatry, Art History and Nursing.

- Course purpose -

The MSc in Medical Humanities incorporates the previous King's MA Literature and Medicine programmes. The course allows students to choose a broader range of modules within their degree, interact with a wider range of students, and gain a firm footing in the medical humanities by following common core modules. Students will come from a wide variety of academic and health backgrounds: biosciences such as medicine, nursing, psychology; from health law and social work and humanities trainings in philosophy, film and/or literary studies. They will develop further skills in visual, bioethical, literary, historical and philosophical analyses of health care.

- Course format and assessment -

Seminar-based teaching; dissertation workshops; assessment by coursework.

Career Prospects:

The programme will appeal to medical and health professionals; students of health policy; those who wish to pursue further academic study in medicine and/or the humanities or those hoping to study on a Medical Humanities PhD programme and considering careers in journalism or bioethics.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Medical Humanities is a new, but rapidly expanding field, both in Britain and the United States; it is ‘an interdisciplinary exploration of how humanities disciplines can engage and illuminate the nature, goals and practices of medicine’ (University of Connecticut School of medicine, programme in Medical Humanities). Read more
Medical Humanities is a new, but rapidly expanding field, both in Britain and the United States; it is ‘an interdisciplinary exploration of how humanities disciplines can engage and illuminate the nature, goals and practices of medicine’ (University of Connecticut School of medicine, programme in Medical Humanities). At Keele, extensive and established teaching and research connections between members of staff in Humanities and the Keele Medical School have shaped the development of this important new route through the MRes Humanities.

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What is ‘the art of medicine’ and how can it improve patient care? This new degree programme in medical humanities allows you to reflect on and develop your daily clinical practice, through a deeper understanding of the humanities - art, literature, music, myth and culture. Read more
What is ‘the art of medicine’ and how can it improve patient care? This new degree programme in medical humanities allows you to reflect on and develop your daily clinical practice, through a deeper understanding of the humanities - art, literature, music, myth and culture.

The programme draws together the emergent fields of medical humanities and intercultural medicine to explore and develop the lived experience of clinicians in the everyday complexities of real-life clinical settings as they interact with patients and cultures. You will encounter the rich insights of the humanities about culture, the body and what it means to be human, and find ways to integrate these with medical science, to develop a richer understanding of your clinical practice. As part of this engagement, you will have the opportunity to explore non-Western models of medical practice, and to consider how far they complement biomedicine, from the viewpoints of cultures, patients and practitioners. You will acquire and refine skills in verbal and written communication, as well as in research and critical analysis.

This programme combines world-class, research-led humanities teaching with an established understanding of the real-life experience of clinical practice and patient care.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Learn how the humanities disciplines conceive of key aspects of human existence, the body and culture.
Find new ways to reflect upon and develop your clinical practice, and enhance patient care.
Learn about indigenous and non-Western medical traditions.
In addition to its own library, Birkbeck’s location in Bloomsbury offers excellent access to all the major research libraries in London, including Senate House Library, the British Library and the Wellcome Collection.

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Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone. Read more
Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone.

In this MA programme, you are introduced to many questions asked about medicine from within the humanities. For example, you have the opportunity to examine the history of Western medicine and to consider how medical practice is presented in, and shaped by, literature and the arts. You have the chance to reflect on what is involved in classifying something as a disease or an abnormal mental state, and to explore various ethical and legal problems that arise within medicine. You also learn about the history of the medical humanities as a field and the debates that have surrounded its identity and role.

As an interdisciplinary programme, the MA is taught by scholars from many different disciplines across the University, including the Schools of English, Arts, History and Law and the Departments of Philosophy, Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature and Religious Studies. You take four modules across the autumn and spring terms, including one core module and from a variety of optional modules, before undertaking a supervised 12,000-word dissertation over the summer.

The programme is aimed primarily at people with a humanities background, but we also welcome healthcare practitioners or those with medical backgrounds who are interested in the growing field of the medical humanities.

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This programme explores the histories of science, technology and medicine (HSTM) through a wide range of case studies, from the emergence of professional scientific disciplines such as physics and biology, to the growth of `Big Science' in the Cold war era, to the complex history of the National Health Service. Read more
This programme explores the histories of science, technology and medicine (HSTM) through a wide range of case studies, from the emergence of professional scientific disciplines such as physics and biology, to the growth of `Big Science' in the Cold war era, to the complex history of the National Health Service. We focus on the integrated understanding of HSTM through consideration of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and pay particular attention to how scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

The taught course consists of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Reflecting CHSTM¿s established research strengths, studies focus on nineteenth- and twentieth-century cases. Students will gain experience in historical essay-writing before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc is appropriate for students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in HSTM, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds (often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields).

The HSTM pathway is the most appropriate for students who have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular. If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the parallel Science Communication MSc programme.

Aims

-To explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts.
-To provide an opportunity and open access to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth encourage and support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society.
-To encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment.
-To provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history.
-To enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field. Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives. All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. Progression is developed through the Faculty's online-delivery Electronic Graduate Training Programme.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission. The HSTM pathway includes one examination based on a precirculated paper. All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) counting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Career opportunities

Many of our students go on to PhD research in related areas, or to careers in fields including museums, libraries and archives; teaching; technical authorship and editing; science policy work; research administration; journalism and the media.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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The new MA in Medical History and Humanities is run jointly between the Departments of History and English. The curriculum is directly informed by cutting-edge international research and scholarship that spans the fields of medical history, literature, sociology, philosophy, health sciences and policy. Read more
The new MA in Medical History and Humanities is run jointly between the Departments of History and English. The curriculum is directly informed by cutting-edge international research and scholarship that spans the fields of medical history, literature, sociology, philosophy, health sciences and policy. Students will have the opportunity to explore historical, literary, social and cultural understandings of illness and health, general well-being, public health and the history of medicine, as well as the links between history, the humanities and policy.

The MA brings together students and colleagues working across different disciplines, periods and geographical regions to offer a distinctively international and inter-disciplinary perspective on medical history and humanities. It draws on existing expertise in both departments, including the Wellcome Trust-supported Centre for Global Health Histories, which is the WHO Collaborating Centre for Global Health Histories and is based in the Humanities Research Centre. This allows our students and post-doctoral scholars to benefit from established connections with the scholarly networks associated to the World Health Organization’s Global Health Histories Initiative, as well as medical history and humanities programmes worldwide, including countries such as Brazil, Portugal, Denmark, Switzerland, India, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, Singapore, France, Chile, South Africa and the USA.

Programme of Study

The programme consists of four taught modules (20 credits each) and a dissertation of up to 20,000 words (100 credits). For students registered for full-time study they are organised across the academic year as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
All students take the core module, ‘Critical Studies in History, Humanities & Wider Interdisciplinarity’. The module, taught by weekly seminar, introduces students to the key concepts, methods and debates in medical history and humanities. It is taught by a variety of different staff members to allow students to engage with these questions from different disciplinary perspectives. In addition, students select an option module from a long list of possible areas in medical history and humanities and beyond.
-Core Module: Critical Studies in History, Humanities & Wider Interdisciplinarity
-Option Module 1
-Research Training (taught content)

Spring Term (January-March)
Students choose two optional modules. They can choose from a long list of modules in the areas of medical history and humanities but they may also follow up other research interests.
-Option Module 2
-Option Module 3
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, all students will write a research dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing and under the supervision of a member of staff, and submitted at the end of the academic year. Students receive advice about topics, research skills and instruction in bibliography, plus additional specialist advice and guidance from a supervisor.

Part-time Students
Students registered for part-time study over two years take the Medical History and Humanities core module in their first autumn term plus an option in the Spring Term of their first year. This is followed by two more option modules in their second Autumn and Spring Terms respectively, with the planning, research, and writing of their dissertation spread over the two years of their registration.

Internships

The MA programme provides unique insights into health and medical policy (the Centre for Global Health Histories at York is the WHO Collaborating Centre for Global Health Histories). Students will have the opportunity to better understand the links between health and social and economic development, as well as cross-cultural policy-making, in certain optional modules. If they wish, they can also develop applications with the help of the course convenors at the end of their MA studies to take up an internship that will support select World Health Organization departments based around the world (this is dependent on WHO requirements at the point of application).

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Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Read more
Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Experiences and portrayals of health and illness in literature, film and contemporary culture are also studied.

Degree information

The programme enables students to approach issues relating to health and illness from both a historical and contemporary perspective and from a variety of a disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, science and technology studies, global health, literature and film studies. Students will also learn to work in an interdisciplinary manner.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), elective modules of 15 or 30 credits each (up to a total of 60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), two core modules (60 credits) and two electives (60 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), two core modules is also offered.

Core modules
-Illness
-Madness

Optional modules - students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors.
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Classical Chinese Medicine
-Clinically Applied Cultural Psychiatry
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Cultural Memory
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disease in History
-German Literature and Psychology
-Global Health and Development: Emerging Policy Debates
-Global Justice and Health
-Health Inequalities Over the Lifecourse
-Health Policy and Reform
-Medical Anthropology
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science, Technology, and Identity
-Social Value and Public Policy, Health and the Environment
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to present
-Medicine on Screen

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays and a dissertation. There is no unseen examination.

Careers

This MA provides an exceptional foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, ranging from interdisciplinary work in the health humanities to a broad spectrum of more specialised disciplines, such as medicine, the philosophy of medicine, history of medicine, medical sociology or medical anthropology, among others. It is also a suitable preparation for a range of careers including science and medical journalism, bioethics, healthcare policy, NGOs and museum and heritage.

Employability
The programme gives students the opportunities to work in an interdisciplinary manner, and to engage in debate and develop their presentation skills. Students will gain experience of writing essays and training in conducting original research and applying the appropriate methodology. There are many additional activities available, both within the UCl Health Humanities Centre and the Institute of Advanced Studies, and the wider UCL community, to help students develop employability skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Health Humanities MA is based in UCL's new Health Humanities Centre which draws together world-leading researchers from different disciplines including medicine and health in history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and cultural and film studies.

Leading clinicians at UCL's acclaimed Medical School and Division of Psychiatry, who are engaged in humanities and social science research, are also actively involved with the centre. The centre was formed through the merger of the Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health and the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines.

UCL Health Humanities Centre forms part of the new UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, which showcases and fosters multidisciplinary research within the humanities and the social sciences, with an active programme of events and visiting international scholars.

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- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree. - Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree.

- Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world

- People with professional experience in medical practice who have an interest in cross-cultural understandings of health and illness.

- Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist topics in the anthropology of medicine.

- Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology

- The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

As one might expect of study at SOAS, our programme is unique in that we take a cultural and phenomenological approach to the anthropology of medicine. That is, we stress a truly cross-cultural method, one which unites all medical systems in a unified comparative perspective. This allows students to grasp the underlying principles and questions common to all therapeutic systems. Given the diversity of the School’s courses, students may choose options which strengthen either the humanities or the development studies aspects of their interests.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/

Structure

- Core course: Cultural Understandings of Health - 15PANC093 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Medical Anthropology and the candidate’s supervisor.

- In addition, all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

- Students without previous experience of anthropology must take the foundation course, Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit).

Option Courses - Group A and Group B:

Students then choose TWO 0.5 unit courses from the Group A and B lists.

- AT LEAST ONE of the two 0.5 unit courses normally must come from Group A
- Students not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology may then select their fourth unit (either a single 1.0 unit course or two 0.5 unit courses) from the Option Courses list.
- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures
- In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Cultural Understandings of Health (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Medical Anthropology and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 230kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/file93566.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- All students are introduced to the types of problem and areas of questioning which are fundamental to the anthropology of medicine.

- Students new to the discipline are given knowledge of the general principles of anthropological enquiry

- All students develop advanced knowledge and understanding of the theoretical approaches which help form an anthropological perspective.

- All students gain an understanding of the practical methods by which this perspective is applied in field research.
All students will be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be familiar with the foundational literature on the basis of which medical anthropology is linked to and emerges from broader disciplinary concerns.

- Students will have knowledge of the intersections linking medical anthropology to related fields, such as social studies of science, studies in bioethics, and critical approaches to public health

- Students will be familiar with the numerous ethnographic studies of health and illness.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to deploy an ethnographic kind of questioning – one directed toward teasing out of complex situations the sets of particular norms or principles which condition or shape them.

- As anthropologists, they will be trained to look for the specifically social in everything (even & especially in the “natural”)

- Students will learn how to form an anthropological problem – that is to distinguish an anthropological problem from a mere topic or area of interest.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Personal drive: Students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning

- Students will develop research skills: including location and adjustment to differing types of library collection, as well as locating organizations and people who hold significant information

- Listening & understanding: Students will be able to assimilate complex arguments quickly on the basis of listening – and to discuss or disagree constructively with points made by others.

- Planning and problem solving: students will be able to set targets and achieve them, and will be able to work well to deadlines.

- Working in a group: students will learn to lead by contributing to the development of consensus.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language.

Transferable skills:

- Students will develop an ability to begin from a general question or issue and develop an appropriate research model and method.
- Ability to clearly represent a concise understanding of a project/problem and its solution.
- An ability to recognize and appreciate for what it is an unconventional approach or an unfamiliar idea
- An ability creatively to resolve conflict while working in a team; being able to see the other person’s point of view
- An ability to work and feel at ease in multicultural or cross cultural environments.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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Study at the frontiers of archaeological science. Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Read more
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science

Why choose this course?

Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Uniquely, however, it is the only course in the UK to combine this discipline with the molecular analysis of human remains. Nowhere else can you immerse yourself in the study of stable isotopes, lipid residue analysis, palaeoproteomics and ancient DNA – and play an active role in the development of new techniques in this constantly evolving branch of archaeology. In 2014, seven of the top 100 discoveries in science were in archaeology, and BioArCh staff were involved in three of these.
-Advanced training in human osteoarchaeology, delivered by the UK’s leading practitioners
-Study ancient biomolecules in world-class facilities at the BioArch centre and Department of Biology
-Unique opportunity to combine bioarchaeology with complementary subjects and tailor a course to suit your interests
-Access an incredible range of in-house analytical equipment
-Take part in cutting-edge science and build essential practical skills
-Work alongside leading researchers and academics in a diverse range of specialisms
-Work on diverse material that is often ‘fresh out of the ground’ and make valuable contributions to live projects Receive career and research guidance from staff with significant experience in the sector and a track record of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and dissertation research, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of bioarchaeology theory, investigation and practice.

Uniquely, you can combine bioarchaeology with a range of subjects and tailor your degree to your own interests. You could adopt a ‘period’ focus, for example, to specialise in the bioarchaeology of the Medieval, Viking, Mesolithic or early prehistoric periods. You could combine human bioarchaeology with zooarchaeology and orientate your course towards more advanced studies of bone function and anatomy. Or you could focus on skills such as GIS modelling and field archaeology.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for students with a passionate interest in the future of archaeology, who want to work at the frontiers of archaeological science. The degree is primarily aimed at those whose previous experience is in archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, but we do accept students from diverse backgrounds. The common factor among our student intake is a keen interest in science and in human remains at a biomolecular or bone level.

What can it lead to?

Molecular analysis is used increasingly widely in archaeology, but the range of osteological and molecular skills offered by the course provide valuable training and expertise for a wide range of careers and further study.

Many students go on to take PhDs at York and other institutions around the world. Others pursue a wide range of professional careers, from osteoarchaeology and environmental archaeology to the medical humanities and laboratory technician work.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Bioarchaeology course you will be able to:
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Understand advanced methods for analysing bone tissues, including biomolecular methods
-Apply chemical and biomolecular methods to skeletal material
-Understand the processes of decay and diagenesis of bone tissue
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Work effectively within a laboratory environment
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many our MSc Bioarchaeology postgraduates go on to further research in bioarchaeological and environmental fields. The BioArch department has a successful track record of placing students on PhD courses in York and institutions worldwide.

Here’s a selection of the career and research destinations of some of our recent students: US graduate school programmes
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Digital Humanities at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Digital Humanities at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Digital Humanities at Swansea has research strengths in innovative digital applications and critical studies of digital culture in several fields, where researchers in Arts, Humanities and Social Science areas are collaborating with Computer Scientists. These fields include applications and devices for the UK and international heritage sector, intellectual and literary history, digital editing, innovative mapping applications, applied linguistics and translation, digital mass media and experimental media, online cultures, digital pedagogy, digital security, war and crime, and societal impacts of digital technologies in both the rich and poor worlds. We are home to the Centre on Digital Arts and Humanities (CODAH), which connects arts and humanities, social science and computing researchers.

An MA by Research in Digital Humanities gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (typically in the private sector, the Civil Service, or education).

The MA by Research in Digital Humanities will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

You will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students in Digital Humanities are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

Environment and Staff Expertise

Digital Humanities boasts a dynamic research and teaching environment which has already won attention and funding from outside bodies such as the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), Wellcome Trust and the EU, most recently a multi-million EPSRC grant for “CHERISH-DE”.

COAH staff with relevant expertise are located within all the COAH Departments (Languages, Translation and Communication; English Language and Literature; History and Classics; Political and Cultural Studies). COAH staff work closely on digital research with staff in other Colleges, especially the College of Science (home to Computer Science, Geography), the College of Human and Health Science (Psychology, Public Health, Health Data), the College of Law (Criminology).

Computer Science research at Swansea has particular strengths in human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, devices for resource-constrained communities, medical applications and informatics, visual computing, data visualisation, theoretical computer science.



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Major advances in medical technology, increased expectations, and changing moral attitudes have combined to generate many complex ethical and legal problems in the fields related to medical ethics and palliative care. Read more

Overview

Major advances in medical technology, increased expectations, and changing moral attitudes have combined to generate many complex ethical and legal problems in the fields related to medical ethics and palliative care. Individuals who care for patients with life-threatening illnesses can face particularly pressing and difficult moral choices. The course provides an opportunity to gain a deeper and more systematic understanding of these issues, and to explore the moral problems health care professionals working in these areas may face.

Teaching is delivered in short intense blocks, enabling those in full-time employment to do the course part-time and fit it around the demands of their work wherever they are based. The course is taught in Liverpool by lecturers from Keele’s Centre for Professional Ethics (PEAK) and the Learning & Teaching Department of the Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute. From time to time, law lecturers from Keele University may provide specialist input, and external expert speakers may also be invited to speak on the course. This is an exciting joint venture uniting academic and practical expertise.

Students come from a wide range of backgrounds within the field of health care and many diverse geographical locations. Past and current students have reported that meeting and exchanging ideas with others who work in different fields and in different parts of the country is one of the major benefits of the course.

The Medical Ethics and Palliative Care teaching team have many years experience of teaching postgraduate applied ethics courses. We are aware of the special problems and challenges which may face mature students and those combining study with full-time work, and therefore we do our utmost to offer a supportive and stimulating environment for learning. Each student is assigned a personal supervisor from the teaching team, whom they can contact for help or advice at any time during the course.

Teaching staff also work at the forefront of research in medical ethics, which helps to give the course a contemporary edge. In the recent 2014 REF, staff from Keele's Healthcare Law and Bioethics cluster who teach on the MA were part of Keele's Philosophy submission, which was ranked first in the country for its Impact work. The impact submission was based on staff's work in the field of Biomedical ethics, with 80% of this work judged as being world-leading and the remaining 20% as being of internationally excellent.

See the website - https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalethicsandpalliativecare/

Course Content

The MA in Medical Ethics and Palliative Care involves both taught sessions and a chance for students to write a dissertation on a topic of their choosing related to the course. Teaching occurs in four three-day modules that run between October and April. This innovative structure has proved particularly popular with health care professionals in full-time employment as it allows students to combine study with full-time work, family and other commitments. It also enables students who are based in all areas of the UK and beyond to attend. Contact between students and staff, and between students, is facilitated between modules to create a distinctive student community.

The MA requires the successful completion of 180 M Level credits, made up of four 30-credit taught modules and a 60-credit dissertation. It can be taken either full-time or part-time. When taken part-time the four taught modules are completed in the first year, with the dissertation being completed in the second year. When taking this route there are no specific attendance requirements during the second year apart from a one-day research skills workshop – you may meet your supervisor at mutually convenient times, keep in touch via email or phone, or use a combination of methods.

When taken full-time, the course is completed within one year with the dissertation being submitted at the start of September.

Some students may not want to do the whole course. An alternative route is to leave after completing the four taught modules. Successful completion of these will lead to the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Ethics and Palliative Care.

Teaching & Assessment

Each teaching block is followed by an assignment. For module one this is made up of three short written tasks, whilst for each of modules 2, 3 and 4 the assignment consists of a 4,000-word essay. All modules must be passed in order to proceed to the dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Advances in biomedical technology, changing moral attitudes, and developments in law, combine to generate difficult ethical, legal, policy challenges for those involved in the delivery of healthcare. Read more

Overview

Advances in biomedical technology, changing moral attitudes, and developments in law, combine to generate difficult ethical, legal, policy challenges for those involved in the delivery of healthcare. This programme provides an opportunity to gain a deeper and more systematic understanding of these issues and to explore the moral problems faced by healthcare professionals and those involve in healthcare management and policy. It also aims to provide a foundation for pursuing further study at doctoral level for those interested in doing so.

Applications are welcome from people with a professional or other serious interest in Medical Ethics and Law, including (but not limited to) doctors, nurses, health care managers, intercalating medical students, radiographers, chaplains, charity and voluntary workers, social workers, hospice directors, medical and pharmaceutical researchers, dentists, veterinary practitioners and health care educators. While the programme is primarily aimed at healthcare professionals, it is open to anyone who is suitably qualified and who can demonstrate sufficient academic aptitude.

The MA in Medical Ethics and Law is run by the Centre for Professional Ethics and School of Law at Keele University. It is one of England’s longest established master’s programmes in this subject area, having first been presented in 1987.

The programme is available part-time, full-time, by modular study, and by intercalation within a medical degree. It is taught in short, intensive blocks to make it accessible to those in full-time employment and from across the country and beyond.

Teaching staff also work at the forefront of research in medical ethics, which helps to give the course a contemporary edge. In the recent 2014 REF, staff from Keele's Healthcare Law and Bioethics cluster who teach on the MA were part of Keele's Philosophy submission, which was ranked first in the country for its Impact work. The impact submission was based on staff's work in the field of Biomedical ethics, with 80% of this work judged as being world-leading and the remaining 20% as being of internationally excellent.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalethicsandlaw/

Course Aims

This course aims to deepen students’ understanding of health care ethics and law, and to enhance their ability to think systematically about the moral and legal issues that health care professionals may face in the course of their work. It also aims to provide a foundation for pursuing further study at doctoral level for those interested in doing so.

Undertaking an MA in ethics will not give you a list of answers to moral problems. What our courses can do is help you to work out answers for yourself, answers that are worth having because they’re based on the best ethical thinking and reasoning we can manage, answers you can justify, to yourself and others. The MA course will give you an introduction to a number of different (rival) moral theories - all of which have their strengths and their weaknesses - as well as providing you with a range of analytical tools with which to assess different ethical and legal claims. It will also help you to communicate ethical and legal arguments to others in a clearer way.

Although ethical issues are rarely out of the headlines, much public 'debate' about ethics in the media is (with occasional honourable exceptions) of very poor quality. Our courses will help you to construct, categorise and criticise different ethical arguments and to spot common fallacies. Ethics at Keele is a participatory activity, not a spectator sport!

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching for the four taught modules is delivered in short intense blocks, enabling those in full-time employment to do the course part-time and to fit it around the demands of their work wherever they are based. Each student is assigned a personal supervisor from the outset, whom they can contact for help or advice at any time during the course.

We regard high levels of student participation in discussion as particularly important for teaching and learning in this area, and employ teaching techniques which encourage this wherever possible. Students come from a wide range of backgrounds and report that meeting and exchanging ideas with others who work in different fields and in different parts of the country is one of the major benefits of the course.

From time to time, experts from outside Keele are invited to speak on the course; this provides an insight into academic work in healthcare ethics and law taking place in other institutions and professional perspectives. In addition, Keele's Centre for Law, Ethics and Society hosts a wide range of seminars, workshops and lectures, which students are welcome to attend.

Each of the four taught modules is assessed through a 5,000-word essay. The essay question is chosen from a list reflecting the main themes of the module, enabling students to focus on the issues that are most interesting to them or relevant to their work. For each essay, students submit a plan (required for modules 1 and 2; optional for modules 3 and 4), on which feedback is provided. In addition, students receive written feedback on each of their essays, aimed at helping them to improve their performance as they progress through the programme, and have the opportunity to discuss the feedback with their supervisor.

For the dissertation module, students are allocated a supervisor to provide support and advice during the writing process, and attend a one-day Research Methods Workshop in Semester 1.

Additional Costs

Students not living within daily travelling distance of Keele will need to arrange accommodation during the teaching blocks.

Although recommended readings are available in the library or on-line, students may wish to purchase some books for themselves.

We do not anticipate any other additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Mills & Reeve Dissertation Prize

The Mills & Reeve Dissertation Prize is awarded each year to the student who produces the best dissertation. The winner receives a cash prize of £100 sponsored by the law firm Mills & Reeve, and an invitation to lunch at the firm.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This course aims to prepare you for a role in undergraduate and postgraduate clinical education as teacher and trainer, according to the best clinical and educational standards. Read more

Overview

This course aims to prepare you for a role in undergraduate and postgraduate clinical education as teacher and trainer, according to the best clinical and educational standards.

To achieve this you will:

- study the sciences basic to education, behaviour and clinical enquiry
- acquire an understanding of the theoretical basis of learning and teaching, and the practical application of these skills
- gain knowledge and practical application of the technology required for efficient and innovative undergraduate and postgraduate teaching

It is ideally suited to medical, dental, veterinary, nursing and pharmacy educators, including scientists contributing towards the teaching of these disciplines plus paramedical groups and allied health professions who are seeking to develop their knowledge and skills in the theory and practice of teaching and learning.

It has been devised in recognition of the trend across all healthcare professions towards a structured approach to personal professional development, and recognises the need for relevant academic qualifications for those individuals who are tasked with providing undergraduate and postgraduate education and training.

The programme is also relevant to doctors and dentists directly involved in the provision of Postgraduate Medical and Dental Education (PGMDE), as well as clinical tutors in Trusts, Regional Advisors, College tutors and those involved in the provision of vocational training schemes.

Key facts

- This course is relevant to a wide range of backgrounds and is directly applicable to anyone involved in the provision of bio-medical and clinical education
- The modular format means you have the flexibility to adapt the course to suit your individual interests and circumstances
- A number of fees scholarships are available for University of Nottingham staff and overseas applicants (see Course Fees)
- This course consists of a blended learning format; both on-line and taught learning

COURSE DETAILS

Masters students take three core modules ("Teaching and Learning: Core Theory and Practice", "Effective Learning and Assessment", "Research Methods"), and then choose a further two elective modules from a choice of five.

Once the taught components of the course have been completed, Masters students then undertake a research and dissertation module involving a relevant, original investigation or development in the field of medical education.

The Masters Medical Education can be completed in one year of full-time study or over two years part-time.

Modules

Core modules

MedWise – an online introduction to teaching, learning and assessment (10 credits)
Learning Theories (10 credits)
Introduction to Clinical Teaching and Learning (10 credits)
Introduction to Assessment in Clinical Education (10 credits)
The Humanities, Ethics and Professionalism(20 credits)

Elective modules

Psychometrics of Assessment: Theory & Practice (20 credits)
Principles of Leadership and Management (20 credits)
Fundamentals of Simulation-Based Education in Healthcare (20 credits)
Problem Based Learning in Medicine and Health Sciences (20 credits)
Advanced Teaching, Learning and Assessment (20 credits)
Supervising PG trainees in the modern NHS (20 credits)
eLearning in Clinical Education (20 credits)


Masters students

Research and Dissertation (60 credits)
If you wish to discuss or take an individual module, please contact the Course Administrator.

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