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Masters Degrees (Medical Communication)

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Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. Read more
Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. It is also used by the pharmaceutical industry to aid in explanation of their products and by television companies in the production of documentaries.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course employs highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced medical art supervisors.

Why study Medical Art at Dundee?

Medical Art is the depiction of anatomy, medical science, pathology and surgery. This may include medical images, models or animations for use in education, advertising, marketing and publishing, conceptual work in relation to research, education and publishing and two or three-dimensional visualisation for the training of specific medical professionals.

Medical and forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge.

What's so good about studying Medical Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

Internships

Short term internships in forensic and medical institutes throughout the world will be offered to selected students following graduation. Internship institutes offer these internships based on the reputation of the course and its tutors and include the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), USA; the Turkish Police Forensic Laboratory, Ankara and Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

Students on both Forensic Art and Medical Art MSc's share joint modules with increasing specialisation. Students may carry out their semester three Dissertation module either at the University or from a working environment or placement.

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

Medical Art students study:

Semester 1 (60 credits)
Anatomy - Head and Neck
Anatomy - Post Cranial
Life Art
Digital Media Practice
Research Methods

Semester 2 (60 credits)
Medical Art 1 - Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2 - Communication and Education
Medical-Legal Ethics

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a research project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Art.

How you will be assessed

Anatomy modules will be assessed by spot-tests and practical examinations and coursework. Medico-legal ethics will be assessed by both a written exam and coursework. All other modules will be assessed by coursework.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in medical art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In medical art potential careers exist in the NHS as well as industry. Medical art and visualisation is a rapidly changing and broad discipline. Possible careers include:

NHS medical illustration departments producing patient information and illustration services for staff
E-learning
3D model making (including clinical/surgical skills trainers) companies
Digital art and animation studios
Publishing houses
Illustration studios
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance illustration and fine art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

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Medical Imaging is an essential component of modern medicine, playing a key role in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease. Read more

Medical Imaging is an essential component of modern medicine, playing a key role in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease. The Medical Imaging MSc covers:

  • the basic physics involved in the different imaging techniques
  • image formation, pattern recognition and applications in the field of radiology
  • current issues in a modern UK NHS radiology department.

Whilst not a clinical skills course, the teaching of the technical aspects of imaging techniques is firmly grounded and in their clinical usage. Many of our lecturers are at the forefront of research in their field and bring insights from emerging imaging techniques.

This programme is designed for recent graduates preparing for a career in medical imaging, professionals already working in the field, and medical students wishing to intercalate.

More Information

You can study this subject at a MSc, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate level.

You may transfer from your original programme to another one, provided that you do this before you have completed the programme and before an award has been made. Part-time study is also an option. 

You’ll become familiar with the range of clinical imaging techniques.

By the end of the programme you should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the physical and mathematical aspects of image formation of several techniques;
  • Identify the anatomical and physiological properties of tissue associated with image formation and contrast for several techniques;
  • Analyse and compare the technical performance of various modalities;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the clinical applications of each technique, the variables involved and how they can be compared;
  • Apply IT in literature searching, analysis and display of data, and report writing to enhance life-long learning in medical imaging;
  • Demonstrate enhancement of their professional skills in communication, problem-solving, learning effectively and quickly, and effective self-management;
  • Critically evaluate relevant published work, demonstrating an understanding of the underpinning principles of statistics, project design and data analysis.

Course structure

PGCert

Compulsory modules:

  • Medical Imaging Core Skills 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medical Imaging PGCert in the course catalogue

PGDip

Compulsory modules :

  • Principles for Medical Imaging Interpretation 15 credits
  • Medical Imaging Core Skills 15 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 15 credits
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging 15 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 15 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 15 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Research Methods 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medical Imaging PGDip in the course catalogue

MSc

You’ll study modules worth 180 credits. If you study this programme part time you will study fewer modules in each year.

Compulsory modules:

  • Principles for Medical Imaging Interpretation 15 credits
  • Medical Imaging Core Skills 15 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 15 credits
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging 15 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 15 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 15 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Research Methods 15 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits 

As an MSc student, you undertake a research project in the field of Medical Imaging. New research topics are available each year and include projects in MRI, Ultrasound, X-ray and their clinical application. You'll be asked to state your preferred research project. Before projects are allocated, you are encouraged to meet potential supervisors and discuss the research work.

Learning and teaching

All modules (except for your research project) are taught through traditional lectures, tutorials, practicals and computer based sessions. We also employ blended learning, combining online learning with other teaching methods.

You’ll be taught about the underpinning science of the various imaging modalities, and we cover a range of clinical applications demonstrating the use of medical imaging in modern medicine. Many of the lecturers are at the forefront of research in their particular field and will bring insights from current clinical imaging practice and developments of new and emerging imaging techniques.

Assessment

The taught modules are assessed by coursework and unseen written examinations. Exams are held during the University exam periods in January and May.

The research project is assessed in separate stages, where you submit a 1,000-word essay (20%), a 5,000-word journal-style research article (70%) and make an oral presentation (10%).

Career opportunities

Past graduates have gone on to enter careers in medical imaging or related disciplines, such as radiology and radiography. Often students are already working in the area, and use the skills and knowledge gained in the programme to enhance their careers. Students have gone on to take lecturer or research positions, and have also chosen to take post graduate research degrees (such as a PhD). As a intercalated degree for medical students the programme is useful for students considering radiology or many other medical specialties.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Our course enables you to meet the growing need for increased knowledge in cross-cultural communication. You will receive communication-focused training and develop expertise in cross-cultural communication. Read more
Our course enables you to meet the growing need for increased knowledge in cross-cultural communication. You will receive communication-focused training and develop expertise in cross-cultural communication. The course covers understanding how cultures and human behaviour reflexively interconnect.

Changing social conditions and circumstances require new ways of dealing with people, and fresh ways of interacting and communicating with people of other cultures.

There is an urgent need to improve our knowledge and understanding of the processes and issues involved in cross-cultural communication, and to discover how such knowledge can be effectively applied in everyday experiences.

What this means in practice is that we need to develop our knowledge of why and how communication 'works' and how and why it sometimes does not 'work'.

The course answers questions including how cultural background impacts upon successful communication and how language, thought, and behaviour are interrelated.

The Cross-Cultural Communication (CCC) MA is relevant if you wish to study communication, language and culture. It will also suit anyone intending to work, or are already working, in international and cross-cultural environments where communication is an essential aspect of that work, as for example:
-Communications consultants
-Interpreters
-Social workers
-International sales representatives
-Journalists
-Medical and healthcare professionals
-Humanitarian aid staff
-Teachers
-Local government officials

The course is theoretically, practically and research oriented, and allows selection of one of six specialist pathways.

Our CCC courses are the only ones in the world to offer such a broad range of specialisms. This unique combination of expertise in cross-cultural communication and an additional area provides our graduates with enhanced employability in the competitive global marketplace.

We have an international student cohort, with up to 35 countries represented. Former students identify this as one of the main strengths of the course, as they are regularly working with peers from a wide range of national, linguistic and professional backgrounds. This provides everyone with an opportunity to develop their interpersonal and intercultural skills while studying.

Through the research portfolio, you are equipped with the analytical and theoretical skills required to understand and analyse communication in a wide range of settings. You learn about research in communication and cross-cultural communication from a range of perspectives, including:
-Social psychology
-Communication studies
-Intercultural communication studies
-Ethnography
-Discourse studies

The course has received praise from external examiners and the University's Internal Subject Review committee for the emphasis on teaching and assessing empirical, data-driven research. You receive training on the practical, theoretical and methodological skills required to conduct research relevant to the field of cross-cultural communication. This includes the various ways of collecting and analysing empirical data:
-Ethnographic observation
-Research interviews
-Questionnaire-based statistical analysis
-Discourse analysis

Delivery

Modules are delivered through a range of means, including:
-Lectures
-Seminars
-Workshops
-Group projects

Each module tends to last one semester. Some optional modules are taught in short, intensive blocks and/or on occasional weekends.

Work experience

You are encouraged to apply your research interests to real world case studies, particularly of international organisations or workplaces with which you have a connection.

For example, your empirical project submitted in research file three can be in connection with voluntary work (for a charity or NGO) or an internship, arranged over the summer towards the end of the course.

As a part time student you can conduct a research project of relevance to your employer and/or industry.

Pathway

The Cross-Cultural Communication MA has six specialist pathways:
-Applied Linguistics
-Education
-International Management
-International Marketing
-Media
-International Relations

Facilities

As a student in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences you'll have access to facilities and a growing collection of online resources, including:
-A well-stocked Education Resource Centre
-Language Analysis Lab
-A phonetics lab
-An audio-video lab
-A recording studio

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The course aims to promote knowledge of learning and teaching theories in a medical and health context and to facilitate a reflective awareness of the student’s own teaching and learning practice, ensuring that the teacher is also a learner. Read more

The course aims to promote knowledge of learning and teaching theories in a medical and health context and to facilitate a reflective awareness of the student’s own teaching and learning practice, ensuring that the teacher is also a learner.

Students gain an overview of medical education theory and practice in a supportive environment, which helps to develop confidence in teaching. The course has been designed using an interprofessional framework and participants are encouraged to share their teaching experiences and to transcend professional barriers in their learning.

The Academy of Medical Educators (AoME) has fully accredited the course and successful completion now entitles participants to Membership of the Academy of Medical Educators (MAcadMEd). This qualification allows all holders to use the MAcadMEd post nominals, and is specifically recognised by the GMC. For further information visit the AoME website http://www.medicaleducators.org/

Key areas of study

  • Professional identity as a teacher
  • Learning and teaching in medical education
  • Pedagogical practice in medical education
  • Advanced communication skills and strategies in medical education
  • Medical education research

Course structure

Most modules are assessed by 3,000 word written assignments which are centred on a topic relevant to the student’s own practice. Students also develop a personal Educational Portfolio of about 5,000 words.

PGCert

Career opportunities

This course provides health professionals with a firm base and accredited professional standards to underpin their role as medical and clinical educators.



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Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs. Ranked among the . top 20 graduate programs of its kind nationwide.  by U.S. News and World Report, our renowned . Read more

Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs

Ranked among the top 20 graduate programs of its kind nationwide by U.S. News and World Report, our renowned Master of Science program in Communication Disorders will provide you with the career-ready skills and hands-on experience you need to make an immediate impact on the lives of people living with communication and speech disorders.

In this program, you will have access to:

  • Exceptional clinical opportunities through more than 120 external placements and our on-campus facility, the Robbins Center 
  • Participation in faculty research investigating a range of communication disorders across the lifespan
  • The dynamic city of Boston, home to world-renowned medical centers, research institutions, and biotech companies
  • A close-knit community of faculty and students collaborating in a small college environment
  • Top scholars, clinicians, and educators in your field who will challenge and support you as you approach graduation and beyond

Prepare for Your Career in Communication Disorders

The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders offers a graduate degree program that provides students with career-ready skills and the hands-on experience needed to make an immediate impact on people’s lives.

The Master of Science in Communication Disorders program is designed for students interested in pursuing certification and licensure in the field of speech-language pathology. You will receive classroom and hands-on preparation in applying family-focused, developmental, cognitive, psychosocial, behavioral, and medical models to the assessment and treatment of a broad range of communication disorders and differences.

Graduates of the program are sought after to work with a wide range of populations in a variety of clinical settings throughout the US and internationally.

The MS in Communication Disorders program is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top graduate programs of its kind nationwide. The program is fully accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Your program of study at Emerson will satisfy the academic and clinical requirements for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology of ASHA.

In 2015, Emerson College’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorderscelebrated its 80th anniversary. As a pioneer in the dynamic and increasingly important field of speech-language pathology, the department has earned a reputation for excellence in clinical preparation.

Why Choose Emerson

Exceptional Clinical Opportunities

Through your clinical placements, you will learn about the range of communication disorders that affect speech, language, cognition, and swallowing across the lifespan. You will have opportunities to work in multiple clinical settings, such as early intervention programs, public and private schools, private practices, acute care and rehabilitation hospitals, and others. Through your clinical placements you will learn professional collaboration, counseling skills, and how to best evaluate and treat a wide range of individuals, including a multicultural urban population. As an Emerson student, you will acquire the clinical knowledge and skills necessary to excel as a speech-language pathologist.

Learn more about clinical training and supervision »



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Passion for the human system. Is your passion linked to the human system? Are you interested in the workings of the brain, or would you be the one that bridges the different understandings of fundamental biological processes and health & disease in humans? Your choice might be Medical Biology!. Read more

Passion for the human system

Is your passion linked to the human system? Are you interested in the workings of the brain, or would you be the one that bridges the different understandings of fundamental biological processes and health & disease in humans? Your choice might be Medical Biology!

Where studying Biology starts with a fascination for life, Medical Biology shares this trait and specifies it towards the human system. The Master's in Medical Biology in Nijmegen focuses strongly on molecular and cellular life processes at the cutting edge of fundamental biology and medical scientific research.

Our programme is unique because it is a combination of fundamental research and the translation of its findings into clinical applications. This is facilitated by our close cooperation with the University Medical Centre.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology

Specialisations within the Master's in Medical Biology

At the beginning of the first year, all students follow an orientation course before they choose one of the three Master's specialisations:

- Human Biology

- Medical Epigenomics

- Neuroscience

- Science in Society

- Science, Management and Innovation

Career prospects

This programme provides you with the qualifications you need to start working on your PhD and in the field of communication, business and management or education. Medical biologists often continue their research careers in universities, research institutes, pharmaceutical companies and public health authorities. On graduation, our students quickly take up positions as researchers or analysts in government departments, research organisations and medical or pharmaceutical companies.

What medical biologists do:

- Researchers at universities or in companies

- Supervisors of clinical trials

- Consultants

- Lecturers

- Teachers

Where medical biologists work:

- Research/education

- Health care

- Business services

- Industry

- Government

- Trade

Our approach to this field

The Master's programme has a strong emphasis on research, especially during the first year, but allows you to broaden your horizons towards the fields of Management, Communication and Education during the second year. This way, you have the opportunity to experience whether these specialisations might suit you when you start looking for a job.

- Research trains students for fundamental and applied research. This specialisation is required for people pursuing a PhD position or a position in industrial or institutional research.

- Science, Management and Innovation prepares students for a management position as an academic professional. It prepares students for a career in science related business and administration and for innovation and enterprise from an academic perspective.

- Science in Society trains students in the direction of science communication, which prepares them for a career in communication research, applications and media.

- Education prepares students to become a (first degree) teacher (this variant is only available in Dutch).

Our research in this field

Experts

Education is closely linked to on-going research within the:

- Institute for Water and Wetlands Research;

- Institute of Neuroscience;

- Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences.

Nijmegen's biologists are experts in the fields of animal physiology at system level as well as at cellular and molecular level. But they also are top researchers in the fields of human health, disease and development.

- Personal tutor

The programme offers you many opportunities to follow your own interests under the guidance of a personal tutor. Each time you start a research internship you will select a research group and be allocated a supervisor. Together you will decide which research to carry out and the specialisations and subject choices that most effectively support it. In practice you will be occupied for four days a week with your own research and one day will be devoted to lectures.

- The Nijmegen approach

The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the working, exploring and studying people that you will meet there. No wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, in direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personal Master's programme.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology



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Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management. Read more

Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management.

It is also a key tool in medical research and it is becoming increasingly possible to relate imaging studies to genetic traits in individuals and populations. Novel imaging biomarkers of disease can enable more rapid and precise diagnosis and inform decision making in drug discovery programmes.

As medical imaging involves knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology, physics, mathematics and computation, our course is suitable if you want to expand your disciplinary horizons and pursue a career in an image-related field in clinical medicine, medical research, or technological research or development.

You will cover the basic science and technology behind the principal imaging modalities currently used in medicine and medical research, as well as advanced imaging methods, clinical and research applications, imaging biomarkers and computational methods.

You will learn how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. You will also receive training in computational and quantitative methods of image analysis or in the interpretation of clinical images from different imaging modalities.

This course comprises both a taught component and a research project, giving you the skills and knowledge required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical or scientific research, or technical development.

Aims

We aim to provide you with:

  • with a systematic understanding of the scientific basis of the major medical imaging modalities;
  • a broad understanding of the principal clinical applications of medical imaging and its role in diagnosis, monitoring and therapy;
  • an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of medical imaging for deriving quantitative anatomical and physiological data;
  • knowledge of how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery;
  • the experience to plan, implement and complete a research project;
  • generic transferrable skills required in a multidisciplinary scientific or clinical research environment;
  • the knowledge and skills required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical research, scientific research or technical development.

Special features

Excellent facilities

Benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Learn from experts

Manchester has an imaging and image computing research group with a strong international reputation. Our research groups and facilities are staffed by scientists conducting research in novel imaging and image analysis methods, and clinicians who apply these methods in clinical practice.

Flexible learning

Learn when it suits you thanks to options for either full-time or part-time study.

Multidisciplinary learning

Study alongside physicists, engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, chemists, biologists and clinicians working in hospitals and research-dedicated imaging facilities.

Teaching and learning

As this course aims to produce graduates equipped to pursue either clinically or technically-focused careers in imaging, it is important to provide an adequate knowledge base. For this reason, much of the teaching takes the form of lectures.

However, in most course units, this is supplemented by group discussions and practical exercises. Other than the introductory units, most course units provide you with an understanding of research methods by requiring submission of a critical review of appropriate research literature or clinical material, either as a report or presentation.

Where appropriate, practical imaging exercises are provided, requiring you to cooperate in acquiring images and analysing results.

All units require a considerable component of independent research and study.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment will occur in a variety of forms.

Summative assessment takes the form of written assignments, examinations, oral presentations and online quizzes. Written assignments and presentations, as well as contributing to summative assessment, have a formative role in providing feedback, particularly in the early stages of course units.

Online quizzes provide a useful method of regular testing, ensuring that you engage actively with the taught material. As accumulation of a knowledge base is a key aim of the course, examinations (both open-book and closed-book) form an important element of summative assessment.

In addition, formal assessment of your research and written communication skills is achieved via the dissertation. This is a 10,000 to 15,000-word report, written and organised to appropriate scientific standards, describing the design, execution and results of the research project.

Course unit details

The MSc requires students to pass 180 credits composed of eight course units of 15 credits each and a 60-credit research project.

We provide course units in Human Biology and Introductory Mathematics and Physics to bring students up to the required level in these topics.

Semester 1: Compulsory units

  • Scientific Skills
  • Mathematical Foundations of Imaging
  • Radioisotope Imaging (PET/SPET)
  • Non-radioisotope Imaging (MRI, CT, US)

Semester 2: Compulsory units

  • Advanced MR Imaging
  • Advanced PET Imaging
  • Quantitative Imaging into Practice (Imaging Biomarkers for Healthcare and Research)

Semester 2: Elective units (select one)

  • Imaging in Clinical Diagnosis
  • Medical Image Analysis and Mathematical Computing

Semester 3:

  • Research project

Facilities

You will benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Each student will have an identified personal tutor who can provide advice and assistance throughout the course. During the research project, you will be in regular contact with your research supervisor.You will also be able to access a range of other library and e-learning facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Graduates will be in an excellent position to pursue careers in image-related fields in healthcare and research. This MSc will also form a sound basis for students who wish to proceed to PhD research in any aspect of medical imaging.

Intercalating medical students may use this qualification as a platform to pursue a clinical career in radiology.

Physical science/engineering graduates may see this as a route to imaging research or development in an academic or commercial environment.



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The University of Nottingham has an international reputation for research and teaching in the field of professional communication. Read more
The University of Nottingham has an international reputation for research and teaching in the field of professional communication. The study of health communication is a rapidly expanding field and the distance learning programme has been designed to reflect the growing interest in and importance of health care communication.

Communication is increasingly recognised as a vital part of the health care environment. From clinical consultations to health care policy, language plays a key role in promoting health, facilitating understanding and managing the emotional climate of health care.

The MA programme in Health Communication provides a unique opportunity to investigate language and communication in various health care contexts. The course gives students a thorough grounding in the concepts, theories and research methods used in this area. It will be of interest for those wishing to develop careers in the area of health communication: health promotion officers, health information managers, hospital administrators, medical and allied health practitioners (such as doctors, pharmacists, nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, speech therapists and occupational therapists), workers in the voluntary sector, workers based in health or lifestyle charities, healthcare communication professionals and those with an interest, though not necessarily a background, in this growing field.

The course is run by the University’s Health Language Research Group, with its rich membership of clinical practitioners and scholars, and is affiliated to the Schools of Nursing, Sociology and Social Policy, and English Studies, all of which look to communication as a way of making sense of health care. The University of Nottingham has an international reputation for research and teaching in the field of professional communication. The study of health communication is a rapidly expanding field and the distance learning programme has been designed to reflect the growing interest in and importance of health care communication.

The MA has intakes in September and February.

Key facts

- The MA Health Communication is a distance learning programme and includes the option of voluntary day schools held for participants in Nottingham.
- The course is taught using a course tool software called Moodle.
- As well as completing this course at a pace that suits you and your other commitments, you have the flexibility to study towards a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or an MA (180 credits, including dissertation).

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Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project. Read more
Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project.

Overview

Medical law and ethics is a fascinating field of study as advances in research and new technologies shift the boundaries of medicine. New health issues are continually emerging and patient rights are increasingly taking centre stage. Complex medico-legal dilemmas are arising in healthcare practice and in the relationships between patients and healthcare professionals. You’ll find that many of the issues we cover on this course are highly topical.

Over the course of two years, you’ll explore the moral problems faced by medical and healthcare professionals, learn about issues that may raise legal liability in these areas, and reflect upon the legal, social and ethical context in which healthcare law is situated.

Our optional modules will allow you to tailor the course to your own particular interests. You’ll be able to explore these in greater depth in your Major Project, by undertaking a significant piece of independent research in your chosen topic.

You’ll benefit from working with students from medical, healthcare and legal backgrounds who will bring different experiences and viewpoints to the subject.

Delivered in short, intensive blocks of teaching, this part-time course is accessible to busy medical and legal professionals. It's taught jointly by staff from by Anglia Law School and our Faculty of Medical Science, reflecting its inter-professional ethos.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/medical-law-and-ethics

Careers

If you’re working in the medical or healthcare fields and want to move into a more senior position, our course will help to enhance your CV. By developing specialist academic expertise in the field of medical law you’ll broaden your knowledge and understanding of the legal and ethical context in which you work.

Our course will also provide a sound basis for continuing your studies at PhD level, particularly if you have a law degree.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules:
Applied Ethics in the Medical and Healthcare Context
Medical and Healthcare Law

Year two, core modules:
Major Project

Year two, optional modules:
Integrated Governance and Compliance Frameworks in Healthcare Communities
Legal and Ethical Issues Throughout Life
Medical Law and Ethics in the Care of Older People

Assessment

You’ll show your understanding of the modules through written coursework. Meanwhile, the Major Project will let you draw on your own professional background and/or personal interests to produce an original, extended piece of writing.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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Who is it for?. The MSc Medical Magnetic Resonance has been designed for Qualified Radiographers working in or rotating through Magnetic Resonance Imaging who wish to advance their clinical practice and understanding of this modality. Read more

Who is it for?

The MSc Medical Magnetic Resonance has been designed for Qualified Radiographers working in or rotating through Magnetic Resonance Imaging who wish to advance their clinical practice and understanding of this modality.

Objectives

This course has been designed to:

  • Enhance the professional practice and personal development of practitioners
  • Provide opportunities for discussion and shared experience between practitioners
  • Enhance critical, analytical, professional, research and communication skills and promote the ability to relate these skills to individual clinical practice
  • Further develop the skills necessary for life-long independent learning
  • Prepare you to take on the professional roles of advanced practitioners
  • Encourage autonomous planning and implementation of tasks at a professional level
  • Encourage the development of originality in the application of knowledge to clinical practice
  • Enhance your understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to interpret knowledge in your field.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mix of lectures, class discussions, seminars, presentations, case study analyses, interactive computer-based exercises, a virtual learning environment, guided independent learning and individual supervision.

You will be taught by City Academics who specialise in Computed Tomography, Radiologists, Industry Professionals and Radiographers.

Assessment

You are assessed on a range of areas including your project dissertation, exams, written assignments, oral presentations and posters.

Modules

Core and elective module diet will vary depending on which certificate is undertaken.

Core modules

Core modules in year one (certificate year) are:

  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term one
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term two.

Both these classroom modules involve two three-day blocks of teaching totalling thirty-six hours (six hours per day).

For the Postgraduate Diploma (year two) in Radiography (Medical Magnetic Resonance) the core modules of:

  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term one
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term two
  • HRM011 Introduction to Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis (30 credits) - year two, term one.

The remainder of the course will be selected from elective modules.

For the MSc Radiography (Medical Magnetic Resonance) (year three) you must obtain a minimum of 180 credits and include core modules of:

  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term one
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term two
  • HRM011 Introduction to Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis (30 credits) - year two, term one
  • APM002 Dissertation (60 credits) - year two, terms one and two.

The remainder of the course will be selected from elective modules.

Elective modules

  • RCM005 Evidence Based Practice (15 credits – distance learning)
  • RCM010 Student Negotiated Module 1 (15 credits – distance learning)
  • CHM003 Comparative Imaging (30 credits – distance learning)
  • CHM002 Education in the Workplace (15 credits – distance learning)
  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits – 36 hours classroom based) only suitable for students with some CT rotation
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits – 36 hours, classroom based). Only suitable for students with some CT rotation.

Career prospects

The postgraduate programme in Medical Magnetic Resonance will enable you to work towards advancing your practice and support a rationale for more senior roles in the profession including specialist clinical practice, management and research.

The programme is accredited by the College and Society of Radiographers.

Previous students have gone on to take positions overseas, in research, management and advance clinical practice. Some of our students have taken their skills and continued to study to PhD level.



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Medical statistics is a fundamental scientific component of health research. Medical statisticians interact with biomedical researchers, epidemiologists and public health professionals and contribute to the effective translation of scientific research into patient benefits and clinical decision-making. Read more

Medical statistics is a fundamental scientific component of health research. Medical statisticians interact with biomedical researchers, epidemiologists and public health professionals and contribute to the effective translation of scientific research into patient benefits and clinical decision-making. As new biomedical problems emerge, there are exciting challenges in the application of existing tools and the development of new superior models.

About this degree

The UCL Medical Statistics degree provides students with a sound background in theoretical statistics as well as practical hands-on experience in designing, analysing and interpreting health studies, including trials and observational studies. The taught component equips students with analytical tools for healthcare economic evaluation, and the research project provides experience in using real clinical datasets.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a foundation course, six core modules (90 credits) two optional modules (30 credits) and the research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Foundation Course (not credit bearing)
  • Statistical Inference
  • Statistical Models and Data Analysis
  • Medical Statistics I
  • Medical Statistics II
  • Statistical Computing
  • Applied Bayesian Methods

Optional modules

  • At least one from:
  • Statistics for Interpreting Genetic Data
  • Bayesian Methods in Health Economics
  • and at least one from:
  • Epidemiology
  • Statistical Design of Investigations

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an individual research project, culminating in a dissertation of approximately 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials and classes, some of which are dedicated to practical work. External organisations deliver technical lectures and seminars where possible. Assessment is through written examination and coursework. The research project is assessed through the dissertation and a 15-minute presentation. 

Workshops running during the teaching terms provide preparation for this project and cover the communication of statistics, for example, the presentation of statistical graphs and tables.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Statistics (Medical Statistics) MSc

Careers

Medical statisticians enable the application of the best possible quantitative methods in health research and assist in the reliable translation of research findings to public and patients’ health care.

The National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) has identified medical statistics as one of the priority areas in their capacity building strategy and has awarded UCL two studentships annually for this MSc.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Biostatistician, Boehringer Ingelheim
  • Statistical and Epidemiological Modeller, University of Oxford
  • PhD in Statistical Science, UCL
  • Graduate Bio-Statistician, PRA International

Employability

There is an acute shortage of medical statisticians in the UK and employment opportunities are excellent. Recent graduates from this programme have been employed by clinical trials units, the pharmaceutical industry, NHS trusts and universities (e.g. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UCL).

Why study this degree at UCL?

One of the strengths of UCL Statistical Science is the breadth of expertise on offer; the research interests of staff span the full range from foundations to applications, and make important original contributions to the development of statistical science.

UCL is linked with four NHS hospital trusts and hosts three biomedical research centres, four clinical trial units and an Institute of Clinical Trials and Methodology. Established links between UCL Statistical Science, the NIHR UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the Clinical Trial Units provide high-quality biomedical projects for Master's students and opportunities for excellent postgraduate teaching and medical research.



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Overview. This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. Read more

Overview

This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. These areas include an understanding of medical education, ability to appraise research and assess clinical effectiveness, an appreciation of medical ethics and management and leadership skills in the health care setting.

Each module consists of a mixture of types of delivery, some online learning and some face-to-face blocks of teaching, utilising a mixture of seminars, group work and short lectures.

There are a number of core modules and then a wide range of modules that are optional. We have designed the award to be as flexible as possible, including enabling students to study some modules from other Keele awards. This award has been mapped against the revised Good Medical Practice from the General Medical Council and can help you demonstrate your commitment to maintaining your fitness to practice for when recertification is introduced as part of medical relicensing.

Course Content

Each module is given a credit rating within the national Masters framework. These may be transferable from or to other institutions where the learning outcomes are comparable.

- Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Science: 60 credits

- Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Science: 120 credits

- Masters in Medical Science: total 180 credits

(The Masters degree must be completed within five years of registration, the Diploma within four years and the Certificate within three years. It will be possible to complete a Masters Degree in Medical Science in two years.)

Course Modules

Clinical Audit

Clinical Geriatric Medicine 1

Clinical Geriatric Medicine 2

Communication Skills for Health Professionals in Clinical Practice

Contemporary Challenges in Healthcare Ethics and Law

Contemporary Mental Health Issues in Primary Care

Evidence Based Medicine

Following the Money: Finance in the National Health Service

Governance and Assurance in Healthcare

Independent Practice Based Study

Leadership and Management for Healthcare Professionals

Leadership for Patient Safety

Managing Change & Quality Improvement

Medical Education

Rational Prescribing

Research Methods in Health

Statistics and Epidemiology

Strategic Management of Frailty as a Long Term Condition

Dissertation

The award of an MMedSci follows successful completion of the taught modules which make up the Diploma in Medical Science and submission of a further 60 credits worth of learning. This latter may be a research dissertation in a subject related to the individual’s speciality, in which case all candidates will also be expected to have completed the Research Methods and usually the Statistics and Epidemiology modules. A practice-based project is another possibility such as evaluation of changes implemented in a clinical setting, educational projects, or exploration of ethical dilemmas. It is expected to be a significant piece of work and we encourage all students to consider aiming for publication of their findings.

All candidates will be expected to have a local clinical supervisor for their project and educational supervision will continue to be provided by the award team. Previous experience has shown us that this is an extremely popular component of the Degree. Candidates have often published or presented their dissertation at Regional and National meetings.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.



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The MA in Professional Communication (MAPC) provides the knowledge and training for superior oral, written, and visual communication skills. Read more

The MA in Professional Communication (MAPC) provides the knowledge and training for superior oral, written, and visual communication skills. Our program is designed for people who seek the techniques and knowledge required to be communication specialists in a wide range of fields in an ever-shifting 21st century workplace.

The program features small class sizes, personal attention and opportunities for applied research and professional engagement.

• The program’s convenient schedule of late afternoon and evening courses appeals to full-time graduate students and enables professionals to work while completing their degree.

• The MAPC includes courses that meet both on-campus and in a hybrid (on-campus/online) format for flexibility and convenience, while providing engagement with cutting-edge technology.

• Offering three concentrations, the program creates a community of professional communicators who have varied career interests.

You can request more information on our website

Concentrations

Strategic Communication

Strategic communicators work as planners, designers, and leaders to develop and disseminate messages both within and outside of organizations. Students enrolled in this concentration analyze how organizations interact internally and externally with the public, industry and media. Students also gain practical communication skills that give them a competitive edge in the workplace.

Technical Communication

Technical communicators use communication skills to translate complex scientific, engineering or technical information into content that users can understand and utilize. Students enrolled in this concentration learn how to communicate to the user while ensuring that the product or service has a competitive advantage. As technology grows in a variety of fields, the demand for such skilled, user-centered and agile technical communicators has never been greater.

Health Communication

This concentration equips students with the theoretical and practical communication tools needed to effectively and ethically impact public and personal health literacy. From creating health awareness campaigns, improving patient relationships, working with regulations, and explaining health care policy, Health Communication professionals are critical to the facilitation of understanding health care issues as a basis for informing, influencing and motivating diverse audiences about health and medical issues.

You can request more information by visiting our website

Career Opportunities

Graduates from the program bring a thorough knowledge and skill set of advanced communication to careers in a range of sectors — including technology, government, finance, health services, academic, and many other sectors where communications skills are highly valued.



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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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This programme pathway is designed for students with an interest in the engineering aspects of technology that are applied in modern medicine. Read more

This programme pathway is designed for students with an interest in the engineering aspects of technology that are applied in modern medicine. Students gain an understanding of bioengineering principles and practices that are used in hospitals, industries and research laboratories through lectures, problem-solving sessions, a research project and collaborative work.

About this degree

Students study in detail the engineering and physics principles that underpin modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical imaging and patient monitoring. The programme covers the engineering applications across the diagnosis and measurement of the human body and its physiology, as well as the electronic and computational skills needed to apply this theory in practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions and Dosimetry
  • Imaging with Ionising Radiation
  • MRI and Biomedical Optics
  • Ultrasound in Medicine
  • Medical Electronics and Control
  • Clinical Practice
  • Medical Device Enterprise Scenario

Optional modules

Students choose one of the following:

  • Applications of Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials and Engineering for Orthopaedic Devices
  • Computing in Medicine
  • Programming Foundations for Medical Image Analysis

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project within the broad area of physics and engineering in medicine which culminates in a written report of 10,000 words, a poster and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, practicals, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework, the dissertation and an oral examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Physics and Engineering in Medicine: Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates from the Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging stream of the MSc programme have obtained employment with a wide range of employers in health care, industry and academia sectors.

Employability

Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the forefront of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the UCL Hospitals Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer.

Students have access to a wide range of workshop, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays, radiation dosimetry, and implant development, as well as new biomedical engineering facilities at the Royal Free Hospital and Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore.



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