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Masters Degrees (Medical Communication)

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Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. Read more
Medical art encompasses a wide range of applications from patient communication and information to medical teaching and training. It is also used by the pharmaceutical industry to aid in explanation of their products and by television companies in the production of documentaries.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course employs highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced medical art supervisors.

Why study Medical Art at Dundee?

Medical Art is the depiction of anatomy, medical science, pathology and surgery. This may include medical images, models or animations for use in education, advertising, marketing and publishing, conceptual work in relation to research, education and publishing and two or three-dimensional visualisation for the training of specific medical professionals.

Medical and forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge.

What's so good about studying Medical Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

Internships

Short term internships in forensic and medical institutes throughout the world will be offered to selected students following graduation. Internship institutes offer these internships based on the reputation of the course and its tutors and include the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), USA; the Turkish Police Forensic Laboratory, Ankara and Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

Students on both Forensic Art and Medical Art MSc's share joint modules with increasing specialisation. Students may carry out their semester three Dissertation module either at the University or from a working environment or placement.

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

Medical Art students study:

Semester 1 (60 credits)
Anatomy - Head and Neck
Anatomy - Post Cranial
Life Art
Digital Media Practice
Research Methods

Semester 2 (60 credits)
Medical Art 1 - Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2 - Communication and Education
Medical-Legal Ethics

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a research project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Art.

How you will be assessed

Anatomy modules will be assessed by spot-tests and practical examinations and coursework. Medico-legal ethics will be assessed by both a written exam and coursework. All other modules will be assessed by coursework.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in medical art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In medical art potential careers exist in the NHS as well as industry. Medical art and visualisation is a rapidly changing and broad discipline. Possible careers include:

NHS medical illustration departments producing patient information and illustration services for staff
E-learning
3D model making (including clinical/surgical skills trainers) companies
Digital art and animation studios
Publishing houses
Illustration studios
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance illustration and fine art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

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The full time MSc Medical Imaging. International programme provides a coherent pathway of study relevant to contemporary medical imaging practice. Read more
The full time MSc Medical Imaging: International programme provides a coherent pathway of study relevant to contemporary medical imaging practice.

It is designed to be of particular interest to international students, with a qualification in diagnostic radiography or medical technology, who are currently working in the area of medical imaging and who wish to enhance their knowledge so as to contribute to improve medical imaging services. It is designed to support healthcare professionals develop their knowledge, understanding and theoretical skills related to medical imaging required for a professional who aspires to work at an advanced level of practice.

Education within the clinical environment is not a component of the course and on successful completion students will not be eligible to apply for Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration.

The programme is delivered by the Radiography academic team within the School of Allied Health professions and Sport in partnership with clinical and scientific experts working within specialised areas of medical imaging to ensure the curriculum remains appropriately diverse and clinically relevant, and alongside the part time MSc Medical Imaging programme for UK students.

This full-time MSc pathway is a modular programme encompassing a range of academic modules related to medical imaging, and research. Upon successful completion of the MSc Medical Imaging: International, students will have the knowledge and understanding necessary to work at an advanced level of practice within their chosen medical imaging discipline and apply research informed learning to international health communities to inform health service practice and delivery.

The role of higher education within the UK is not only to develop the learning and critical thinking skills of students but to provide students such as yourself with the opportunity to study for an award which will support your current and future career prospects within a dynamic and evolving healthcare environment.

Why Bradford?

The MSc Medical Imaging: International programme is aligned with the Faculty of Health’s SSPRD framework, a multidisciplinary framework for continuing professional development. The framework provides an opportunity to study alongside students from a range of healthcare disciplines to provide an enriched learning experience.

The programme is delivered by the experienced Radiography academic team within the School of Allied Health Professions and Sport in partnership with clinical and scientific experts working within specialised areas of medical imaging to ensure the curriculum remains appropriately diverse and clinically relevant, and alongside the part time MSc Medical Imaging programme for UK students.

This full-time MSc pathway is a modular programme encompassing a range of academic modules related to medical imaging, and research. Upon successful completion of the MSc Medical Imaging: International, students will have the knowledge and understanding necessary to work at an advanced level of practice within their chosen medical imaging discipline and apply research informed learning to international health communities to inform health service practice and delivery.

There is now some flexibility in module choice for MSc Medical Imaging: International. Applicants have a choice to study 2 out of 3 optional modules which support their experience and knowledge. They will then have 3 core modules which are compulsory.
The ethos of sustainable development is a fundamental feature of the programme with students encouraged to develop autonomous learning skills and the ability to apply critical thinking to clinical practice.

Modules

-Current Topics in Medical Imaging
-Preparing for a Systematic Review
-Pursuing a Systematic Review
-Computed Tomography
-Magnetic Resonance Imaging
-Principles of Reporting

Learning activities and assessment

When you have completed the programme you will be able to;
-Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the literature that relates to your specialist field of practice
-Critically analyse and synthesise the research evidence that informs the development of policy and service delivery in your specialist field of practice
-Evaluate and critically apply theoretical concepts and where appropriate, for your field of practice, master practical skills for the management of complex issues within your field of practice
-Reflect upon and demonstrate knowledge of values, ethical thinking, equality awareness, inclusive practice and demonstrate mastery within your specialist field or practice
-Develop and demonstrate the ability to articulate sound arguments using a variety of formats including written and oral communication skills
-Demonstrate management and leadership through effective communication, problem solving, and decision making
-Demonstrate the ability to become an autonomous learner through independent study and critical reflection on continuing development needs
-Demonstrate the ability to use IT skills to gather and synthesise information , to access course materials
-Demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of different theoretical constructs underpinning research and/or project management methodologies.
-Design, undertake and report on either a systematic review, a piece of empirical research, work based or management project that contributes to or extends the body of knowledge for your field of practice

The MSc Medical Imaging assessments allows students flexibility to direct assessments to their area of developing practice and have been praised by external examiners for their relevance to current clinical practices. Assessments range from: portfolios demonstrating advanced practice skills; case studies; presentations; critical evaluations of imaging practices; examinations in image appearances and imaging technology; and a final research project.

Students need to achieve a mark of 40% for each assessment for each module.

Career support and prospects

The theoretical knowledge gained in the imaging modalities of Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and/or principles of medical image reporting will compliment the skills of critical reflection and research that developing practitioners and academics will use in advancing their careers.

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Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Read more
Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Besides using the internet and mobile phones for interpersonal communication; businesses, banking, transportation systems, TV and radio broadcasts and smart power grids rely on advanced communication technology.

In a constant and rapidly evolving field, you as a communication engineer will be needed to design and build the systems of the future.

Programme aim

Society today is firmly rooted in electronic communication systems, and it is hard to imagine life without them.

Global systems such as TV, radio, the Internet and wired and mobile telephones have a fundamental impact on the way we live and work.

In the near future, we will see rapid development of e.g.

- sensor network communication,
- algorithms to decrease energy consumption of communication networks,
- tele-presence systems that reduce the need for transportation of people,
- communication as it becomes an increasingly prominent aspect of vehicles and transportation,
- many more areas.

Exactly what the future will bring is unknown, but some things are almost certain: there will still be advanced communication systems - some of them will be different from what the world knows today and communication engineers will be needed to develop and maintain them.

Programme description

Global communication systems have not only changed the world but are also advancing at an exceptional rate. Future communication systems will form the foundation for a sustainable and intelligent society where people and equipment can be connected anywhere, any time – with anything. A high degree of connectivity will be a key enabler for new innovative technologies and applications that can benefit from information sharing.

Evolving technologies are e.g. 5G mobile communications, machine communications, fibre optical links and networks, and sensor network communication, with emerging new applications such as remote and assisted medical diagnosis and treatment, traffic and vehicle safety, environmental monitoring, maximizing efficiency and reliability in smart grid infrastructure, and tele-presence systems that reduce the need for energy consuming transportation of people.

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential.

Besides the fundamentals in communication engineering we focus on e.g. random signal analysis, stochastic methods for digital modulation and coding, applications of digital signal processing, optical fibres and lasers and information theory and coding.

The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge in systems that apply on a global scale gives you a toolbox and a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communication technologies.

Who should apply

You should apply if you find the future outlook for communication engineers interesting, and have the following skills at a bachelor’s level: signals and systems theory (including linear systems and transforms), mathematical analysis (including probability and linear algebra) and basic programming. Basic knowledge in data communications is recommended but not required.

Why apply

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential, where mathematics and signal processing are important tools. The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge prepares students with a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communications.

Educational methods

The pedagogical structure of the programme is targeted towards learning system design processes as practiced in the communication industry. In general, the educational methods are based on what are expected from engineering graduates in an industrial environment, with specific emphasis on building and refining problem-solving skills, team work and presentation skills. Certain emphasis is placed on solving complex tasks by defining subtasks and interfaces, performing these subtasks independently, and assembling the results. All courses in the program are permeated by the principles of sustainable development. You get the opportunity to interact with the industry via guest lectures and study visits. Finally, the Master’s Thesis gives you training in individual research, project planning, documentation and presentation. It can be carried out at the University, industry or another university/research institute.

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This course is flexible in that it offers several entry routes, choices for modular study and appropriate academic targets. Read more
This course is flexible in that it offers several entry routes, choices for modular study and appropriate academic targets. Those who have already completed either the BSMS Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Education (or equivalent, if APL requested) or the BSMS Postgraduate Certificate in Simulation Studies, may enter at Postgraduate Diploma Level. These participants would then successfully complete a further three 20-credit optional modules to achieve a Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Education (120 M level credits). Normally these modules would be completed part-time within one academic year.

Participants wishing to progress to Masters level must include Module MDM 10 ‘Research Methods & Critical Appraisal’ in their choice of three. A 16000-word Dissertation (as well as a 3000-word draft paper for publication) in the academic field of clinical education completes the Master of Science degree (180 M level credits). This would normally be completed in a further year, but some students with busy NHS jobs find it can take up to two years to complete.

For those who have not yet taken any ‘M Level’ postgraduate study in this area, the normal route would be to take at least two of the the ‘PG Cert Med Ed’ modules in year 1 (MDM 28/140), and then proceed with the PG Diploma/Masters routes in years 2 & 3, as described above.

Key Areas of Study

The overall aim of the course is to promote knowledge of and research into learning, teaching and communication in a clinical context, together with facilitating a reflective awareness of participants’ related educational skills and their ongoing development.
-Learning, teaching and communication skills theory & practice in clinical education
-Development of the participant’s identity as a teacher and facilitator in educational settings
-Simulation in clinical education
-Feedback & debriefing in educational contexts
-Clinical educational research as an academic discipline and its importance in the praxis of teaching
-Teaching as leadership & facilitation, both face-to-face and through the use of technology enhanced and blended learning

Course Structure

The format of assessment throughout the course is varied: some modules are assessed by more traditional 3,000 word written assignments, centred on a topic relevant to the student’s own practice or in-depth analyses of specific case studies or significant educational events. Others feature the development of specific educational tools (e.g. on–line learning or simulation-based assessment), focussing on more practical aspects of clinical education. Students will also develop a personal educational portfolio of about 5,000 words using an appropriate national professional standards framework i.e. Health Education Academy (HEA) or Academy of Medical Educators (AoME).The Dissertation module involves a personal research project and is assessed by a 16,000 word thesis plus a draft paper for submission for publication in an appropriate academic journal.

MSc
-MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education
PLUS (2 of 4) Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM148 Principles and Practice of Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
PLUS
-MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal
PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM96 Medical Education Research Dissertation Mandatory (60 credits)

PGDip
-MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education Mandatory (20 credits)
PLUS (3 of 5)
-MDM148 Principles and Practice of SimulationAnd/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in SimulationAnd/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal Optional (20 credits)

PGCert
MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education Mandatory (20 credits)
PLUS (1 of 6)
MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education Optional (20 credits)
MDM148 Principles and Practice of Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
And/or
MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal Optional (20 credits)

Career Opportunities

This course provides health professionals with a firm base to underpin their role as medical educators.

Formal credentialing in medical and clinical education is currently being considered seriously at national level in the UK and elsewhere, and the ‘Teaching Excellence Framework’ (May 2016) for higher education institutions in the UK also means that careers in medical or clinical education are likely to be enhanced via the acquisition of formal qualifications in clinical teaching. This course provides an ideal vehicle for participants to pursue an appropriate level of study for their educational commitments and in this national context, should help them in career development.

Any clinician wishing to take a professional approach to their postgraduate studies in medical or clinical education would be strongly recommended to consider this new course.

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The course aims to promote knowledge of learning and teaching theories in a medical and health context and to facilitate a reflective awareness of the student’s own teaching and learning practice, ensuring that the teacher is also a learner. Read more
The course aims to promote knowledge of learning and teaching theories in a medical and health context and to facilitate a reflective awareness of the student’s own teaching and learning practice, ensuring that the teacher is also a learner.

Students gain an overview of medical education theory and practice in a supportive environment, which helps to develop confidence in teaching. The course has been designed using an interprofessional framework and participants are encouraged to share their teaching experiences and to transcend professional barriers in their learning.

The Academy of Medical Educators (AoME) has fully accredited the course and successful completion now entitles participants to Membership of the Academy of Medical Educators (MAcadMEd). This qualification allows all holders to use the MAcadMEd post nominals, and is specifically recognised by the GMC. For further information visit the AoME website: http://www.medicaleducators.org/

Key Areas of Study

-Learning and teaching in medical education
-Pedagogical practice in medical education
-Advanced communication skills and strategies in medical education
-Medical education research

Course Structure

Most modules are assessed by 3,000 word written assignments which are centred on a topic relevant to the student’s own practice. Students also develop a personal Educational Portfolio of about 5,000 words.

PGCert
-MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education (20 credits)
-MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education (20 credits)
-MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education (20 credits)

Career Opportunities

This course provides health professionals with a firm base to underpin their role as medical educators.

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Is your passion linked to the human system? Are you interested in the workings of the brain, or would you be the one that bridges the different understandings of fundamental biological processes and health & disease in humans? Your choice might be Medical Biology!. Read more

Passion for the human system

Is your passion linked to the human system? Are you interested in the workings of the brain, or would you be the one that bridges the different understandings of fundamental biological processes and health & disease in humans? Your choice might be Medical Biology!

Where studying Biology starts with a fascination for life, Medical Biology shares this trait and specifies it towards the human system. The Master's in Medical Biology in Nijmegen focuses strongly on molecular and cellular life processes at the cutting edge of fundamental biology and medical scientific research.

Our programme is unique because it is a combination of fundamental research and the translation of its findings into clinical applications. This is facilitated by our close cooperation with the University Medical Centre.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology

Specialisations within the Master's in Medical Biology

At the beginning of the first year, all students follow an orientation course before they choose one of the three Master's specialisations:
- Clinical Biology
- Medical Epigenomics
- Neuroscience
- Science in Society
- Science, Management and Innovation

Career prospects

This programme provides you with the qualifications you need to start working on your PhD and in the field of communication, business and management or education. Medical biologists often continue their research careers in universities, research institutes, pharmaceutical companies and public health authorities. On graduation, our students quickly take up positions as researchers or analysts in government departments, research organisations and medical or pharmaceutical companies.

What medical biologists do:
- Researchers at universities or in companies
- Supervisors of clinical trials
- Consultants
- Lecturers
- Teachers

Where medical biologists work:
- Research/education
- Health care
- Business services
- Industry
- Government
- Trade

Our approach to this field

Other Master's specialisations
The Master's programme has a strong emphasis on research, especially during the first year, but allows you to broaden your horizons towards the fields of Management, Communication and Education during the second year. This way, you have the opportunity to experience whether these specialisations might suit you when you start looking for a job. There are four Master's specialisations which you can choose from:
- Research trains students for fundamental and applied research. This specialisation is required for people pursuing a PhD position or a position in industrial or institutional research.
- Science, Management and Innovation prepares students for a management position as an academic professional. It prepares students for a career in science related business and administration and for innovation and enterprise from an academic perspective.
- Science in Society trains students in the direction of science communication, which prepares them for a career in communication research, applications and media.
- Education prepares students to become a (first degree) teacher (this variant is only available in Dutch).

Our research in this field

Experts
Education is closely linked to on-going research within the:
- Institute for Water and Wetlands Research;
- Institute of Neuroscience;
- Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences.

Nijmegen's biologists are experts in the fields of animal physiology at system level as well as at cellular and molecular level. But they also are top researchers in the fields of human health, disease and development.

- Personal tutor
The programme offers you many opportunities to follow your own interests under the guidance of a personal tutor. Each time you start a research internship you will select a research group and be allocated a supervisor. Together you will decide which research to carry out and the specialisations and subject choices that most effectively support it. In practice you will be occupied for four days a week with your own research and one day will be devoted to lectures.

- The Nijmegen approach
The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the working, exploring and studying people that you will meet there. No wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, in direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personal Master's programme.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology

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This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. Read more

Overview

This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. These areas include an understanding of medical education, ability to appraise research and assess clinical effectiveness, an appreciation of medical ethics and management and leadership skills in the health care setting.

Each module consists of a mixture of types of delivery, some online learning and some face-to-face blocks of teaching, utilising a mixture of seminars, group work and short lectures.

There are a number of core modules and then a wide range of modules that are optional. We have designed the award to be as flexible as possible, including enabling students to study some modules from other Keele awards. This award has been mapped against the revised Good Medical Practice from the General Medical Council and can help you demonstrate your commitment to maintaining your fitness to practice for when recertification is introduced as part of medical relicensing.

Course Content

Each module is given a credit rating within the national Masters framework. These may be transferable from or to other institutions where the learning outcomes are comparable.
- Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Science: 60 credits
- Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Science: 120 credits
- Masters in Medical Science: total 180 credits

(The Masters degree must be completed within five years of registration, the Diploma within four years and the Certificate within three years. It will be possible to complete a Masters Degree in Medical Science in two years.)

Course Modules

- Communication Skills for Health Professionals in Clinical Practice (15 credits) – The module aims to develop excellent communication skills through an approach based on skills and values, to explore the theory and evidence underpinning communication skills teaching and to enable participants to use a skills-based approach to teach others

- Strategic Management of Patients with Long-Term Conditions (15 credits) – The module aims to provide participants with an effective framework for planning, delivering and evaluating care packages for patients with chronic conditions, based on the National Service Frameworks and the principles of clinical governance It explores the natural history, impact and outcomes of chronic disease, using cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and epilepsy as models

- Contemporary Challenges in Healthcare Ethics and Law (15 credits) – To provide students with a high quality introduction to ethical issues in health care and the knowledge and skills for further work in the subject

- Medical Education (15 credits) – Much of a doctor’s professional life is concerned with facilitating the learning of junior medical staff, as well as contributing to the education of other health professionals and patients. This module blends active learning on a teaching the teachers course with a virtual learning environment online – to enable you to study at a time and place more convenient to you

- Statistics and Epidemiology (15 credits) – A basic appreciation of epidemiology and statistics is invaluable in understanding published literature and in designing studies, both research and audit studies

- Health Informatics (15 credits) – This module aims to acquaint participants with the ways in which information technology can support clinicians, patients and managers

- The Interface between Primary and Secondary Care (15 credits) – This module aims to provide an understanding of UK health care in the context of primary and secondary care providers

- Research Methods (15 credits) – This module aims to introduce students to issues in health research and to research methodology

- Leadership and Management for Healthcare Professionals (15 credits) – A significant part of a clinician’s professional life is spent as a leader and dealing with managers and aspects of management, often despite minimal experience and training in this area

- Clinical Effectiveness – (15 credits) – To familiarise students with the methods and processes of critical evaluation of the professional literature and applying this clinically and as a self-learning model

- Reflective Practice (15 credits) – This module explores the nature of professional practice, using the paradigm of ‘The Reflective Practitioner’. It uses a variety of methods and participants’ current clinical practice to develop skills of ‘reflection in action’

- Contemporary Mental Health Issues in Primary Care (15 credits) – Mental health remains one of the biggest and most challenging areas in primary care practice. There can be significant gaps in the training of new GPs in psychiatric issues and very few universities offer courses in mental health for updating and continuing professional development. This module aims to help reduce the stigma of mental illness amongst clinicians by increasing awareness, knowledge and skills.

Dissertation

The award of an MMedSci follows successful completion of the taught modules which make up the Diploma in Medical Science and submission of a further 60 credits worth of learning. This latter may be a research dissertation in a subject related to the individual’s speciality, in which case all candidates will also be expected to have completed the Research Methods and usually the Statistics and Epidemiology modules. A practice-based project is another possibility such as evaluation of changes implemented in a clinical setting, educational projects, or exploration of ethical dilemmas. It is expected to be a significant piece of work and we encourage all students to consider aiming for publication of their findings.

All candidates will be expected to have a local clinical supervisor for their project and educational supervision will continue to be provided by the award team. Previous experience has shown us that this is an extremely popular component of the Degree. Candidates have often published or presented their dissertation at Regional and National meetings.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

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Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement C
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Skills (Euromasters)
-Outreach and Public Engagement
-Euromaster Dissertation Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

In the second year of the programme the outcomes are linked closely to a unique 8-month research project (two months preparation and research skills development, 5 months research, and 1 month reporting), students will apply their acquired research skills to an individual research project in a Research Group.

During the first two months of year two of the programme students will further extend their self-confidence in their practical, analytical and programming abilities; their ability to communicate; realise that they can take on responsibility for a task in the Research Group and see it through.

An important element is the assignment of responsibility for a substantial research project which is aimed to be of a standard suitable for publication in an appropriate professional journal.

It is expected that the student will approach the project in the manner of a new Research Student, e.g. be prepared to work beyond the normal working day on the project, input ideas, demonstrate initiative and seek out relevant information.

Thereby the students will acquire proficiency in research skills, including (but not limited to) careful planning, time scheduling, communication with colleagues and at workshops, keeping a detailed notebook, designing and testing equipment, taking and testing data and analysis.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

During the Research Project as a whole it is expected that the students will further develop communication skills through participation in group meetings, preparation of in-house reports, giving oral presentations and show initiative in acquiring any necessary new skills.

The oral presentation at the end of the Research Project is a chance to show their oral presentation skills and ability to think independently.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development.

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The University of Nottingham has an international reputation for research and teaching in the field of professional communication. Read more
The University of Nottingham has an international reputation for research and teaching in the field of professional communication. The study of health communication is a rapidly expanding field and the distance learning programme has been designed to reflect the growing interest in and importance of health care communication.

Communication is increasingly recognised as a vital part of the health care environment. From clinical consultations to health care policy, language plays a key role in promoting health, facilitating understanding and managing the emotional climate of health care.

The MA programme in Health Communication provides a unique opportunity to investigate language and communication in various health care contexts. The course gives students a thorough grounding in the concepts, theories and research methods used in this area. It will be of interest for those wishing to develop careers in the area of health communication: health promotion officers, health information managers, hospital administrators, medical and allied health practitioners (such as doctors, pharmacists, nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, speech therapists and occupational therapists), workers in the voluntary sector, workers based in health or lifestyle charities, healthcare communication professionals and those with an interest, though not necessarily a background, in this growing field.

The course is run by the University’s Health Language Research Group, with its rich membership of clinical practitioners and scholars, and is affiliated to the Schools of Nursing, Sociology and Social Policy, and English Studies, all of which look to communication as a way of making sense of health care. The University of Nottingham has an international reputation for research and teaching in the field of professional communication. The study of health communication is a rapidly expanding field and the distance learning programme has been designed to reflect the growing interest in and importance of health care communication.

The MA has intakes in September and February.

Key facts

- The MA Health Communication is a distance learning programme and includes the option of voluntary day schools held for participants in Nottingham.
- The course is taught using a course tool software called Moodle.
- As well as completing this course at a pace that suits you and your other commitments, you have the flexibility to study towards a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or an MA (180 credits, including dissertation).

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Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. Read more
Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. It is increasingly important that developments in science, medicine and technology are effectively communicated so as to allow individuals to have an informed opinion on controversial issues.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/93/science-communication-society

Course detail

The Kent MSc in Science, Communication and Society gives experienced, practical, professional and critical perspectives on science communication. Students will explore how journalists, documentary makers, lobbyists, museum curators, politicians and government research bodies enter into scientific dialogue with the public. The course evaluates different strategies for tailoring science to particular audiences, and is illustrated by specific historical examples and present day issues and controversies. It provides training in practical transferable skills pivotal to communicating science across a range of professional settings, making appropriate use traditional modes of communication alongside current and developing technologies.

Purpose

It is intended primarily, though not exclusively, for the following:

• Science graduates intending to pursue a career in media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Practising scientists wanting a career change into media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Continuing professional development for scientists or teachers of science;
• Humanities graduates with an interest in history of science, technology or medicine.

Format and assessment

The MSc has been developed by the School of Biosciences, a leading school in teaching, research and science communication, and the School of History, which has a dedicated research centre in the History of the Sciences. It integrates current theory and practice in communicating science with insights from historical and ethical perspectives. Two core modules have a case study-driven approach to science communication, learning from key scientific moments in history and from science communicators who work in a variety of different professions (eg, media, politics, education, journalism).

Two optional modules allow you to specialise in a particular area relevant to science communication, based on your interests and experience, focusing on either practical/scientific or humanities-based approaches to the study of science communication. An extended research project allows you to take a practical approach to science communication, or to do in-depth research on a historical or contemporary episode in science.

In some cases, these projects may be undertaken in conjunction with external partners, such as Research Councils, charities and NGOs.

You can opt to take only the core modules, resulting in a postgraduate certificate, or to take the compulsory plus two optional modules, leading to a postgraduate diploma.

Continuous assessment throughout the year is diverse, innovative and context-driven, from short pieces of writing to longer essays, and from the development and evaluation of science communication activities to mock professional reports and grant applications. The aim of each assessment is not only to monitor understanding, but also to integrate information across modules and give you practical experience in a range of transferable skills for future employability.

Careers

The opportunities for careers in science communication are significant as professional science organisations recognise the increasing importance of public engagement. Graduates of this MSc bring together skills drawn from both sciences and humanities, and the programme is designed to build a portfolio of outputs that can be used in subsequent applications, including blogs, funding applications and the development of specific science communication events. Graduates from the programme have moved into roles in museums, medical writing agencies, research funding councils, public engagement roles in professional science organisations, as well as PhD positions in science communication.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/93

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The MSc in Electronics with Medical Instrumentation aims to produce postgraduates with an ability to design and implement medical instrumentation based systems used for monitoring, detecting and analysing biomedical data. Read more
The MSc in Electronics with Medical Instrumentation aims to produce postgraduates with an ability to design and implement medical instrumentation based systems used for monitoring, detecting and analysing biomedical data. The course will provide ample opportunity to develop practical skill sets. The student will also develop an in-depth understanding of the scientific principles and use of the underlying components such as medical transducers, biosensors and state-of-the-art tools and algorithms used to implement and test diagnostic devices, therapeutic devices, medical imaging equipment and medical instrumentation devices.

The course broadens the discussion of medical equipment and its design by investigating a range of issues including medical equipment regulation, user requirements, impacts of risk, regulatory practice, legislation, quality insurance mechanisms, certification, ethics and ‘health and safety’ assessment. The course will enable a student with an interest in medical electronics to re-focus existing knowledge gained in software engineering, embedded systems engineering and/or electronic systems engineering and will deliver a set specialist practical skills and a deeper understanding of the underlying principles of medical physics. A graduate from this course will be able to immediately participate in this multi-disciplined engineering sector of biomedical and medical instrumentation systems design.

Course structure

Each MSc course consists of three learning modules (40 credits each) plus an individual project (60 credits). Each learning module consists of a short course of lectures and initial hands-on experience. This is followed by a period of independent study supported by a series of tutorials. During this time you complete an Independent Learning Package (ILP). The ILP is matched to the learning outcomes of the module. It can be either a large project or a series of small tasks depending on the needs of each module. Credits for each module are awarded following the submission of a completed ILP and its successful defence in a viva voce examination. This form of assessment develops your communication and personal skills and is highly relevant to the workplace. Overall, each learning module comprises approximately 400 hours of study.

The project counts for one third of the course and involves undertaking a substantial research or product development project. For part-time students, this can be linked to their employment. It is undertaken in two phases. In the first part, the project subject area is researched and a workplan developed. The second part involves the main research and development activity. In all, the project requires approximately 600 hours of work.

Further flexibility is provided within the structure of the courses in that you can study related topic areas by taking modules from other courses as options (pre-requisite knowledge and skills permitting).

Prior to starting your course, you are sent a Course Information and Preparation Pack which provides information to give you a flying start.

MSc Electronics Suite of Courses

The MSc in Electronics has four distinct pathways:
-Robotic and Control Systems
-Embedded Systems
-System-on-Chip Technologies
-Medical Instrumentation

The subject areas covered within the four pathways of the electronic suite of MSc courses offer students an excellent launch pad which will enable the successful graduate to enter into these ever expanding, fast growing and dominant areas. With ever increasing demands from consumers such as portability, increased battery life and greater functionality combined with reductions in cost and shrinking scales of technologies, modern electronic systems are finding ever more application areas.

A vastly expanding application base for electronic systems has led to an explosion in the use of embedded system technologies. Part of this expansion has been led by the introduction of new medical devices and robotic devices entering the main stream consumer market. Industry has also fed the increase in demand particularly within the medical electronics area with the need of more sophisticated user interfaces, demands to reduce equipment costs, demands for greater accessibility of equipment and a demand for ever greater portability of equipment.

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Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project. Read more
Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project.

Overview

Medical law and ethics is a fascinating field of study as advances in research and new technologies shift the boundaries of medicine. New health issues are continually emerging and patient rights are increasingly taking centre stage. Complex medico-legal dilemmas are arising in healthcare practice and in the relationships between patients and healthcare professionals. You’ll find that many of the issues we cover on this course are highly topical.

Over the course of two years, you’ll explore the moral problems faced by medical and healthcare professionals, learn about issues that may raise legal liability in these areas, and reflect upon the legal, social and ethical context in which healthcare law is situated.

Our optional modules will allow you to tailor the course to your own particular interests. You’ll be able to explore these in greater depth in your Major Project, by undertaking a significant piece of independent research in your chosen topic.

You’ll benefit from working with students from medical, healthcare and legal backgrounds who will bring different experiences and viewpoints to the subject.

Delivered in short, intensive blocks of teaching, this part-time course is accessible to busy medical and legal professionals. It's taught jointly by staff from by Anglia Law School and our Faculty of Medical Science, reflecting its inter-professional ethos.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/medical-law-and-ethics

Careers

If you’re working in the medical or healthcare fields and want to move into a more senior position, our course will help to enhance your CV. By developing specialist academic expertise in the field of medical law you’ll broaden your knowledge and understanding of the legal and ethical context in which you work.

Our course will also provide a sound basis for continuing your studies at PhD level, particularly if you have a law degree.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules:
Applied Ethics in the Medical and Healthcare Context
Medical and Healthcare Law

Year two, core modules:
Major Project

Year two, optional modules:
Integrated Governance and Compliance Frameworks in Healthcare Communities
Legal and Ethical Issues Throughout Life
Medical Law and Ethics in the Care of Older People

Assessment

You’ll show your understanding of the modules through written coursework. Meanwhile, the Major Project will let you draw on your own professional background and/or personal interests to produce an original, extended piece of writing.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone. Read more
Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone.

In this MA programme, you are introduced to many questions asked about medicine from within the humanities. For example, you have the opportunity to examine the history of Western medicine and to consider how medical practice is presented in, and shaped by, literature and the arts. You have the chance to reflect on what is involved in classifying something as a disease or an abnormal mental state, and to explore various ethical and legal problems that arise within medicine.

As a interdisciplinary programme, the MA is taught by scholars from many different disciplines across the University, including the Departments of Philosophy, Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature and Religious Studies and the Schools of Arts, English, History and Law.

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/3/medical-humanities

You take four modules across the autumn and spring terms, including one core module and from a variety optional modules, before undertaking a supervised 12-15,000-word dissertation over the summer.

The programme is aimed primarily at people with a humanities background, but we also welcome healthcare practitioners or those with medical backgrounds who are interested in the growing field of the medical humanities.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, philosophy was ranked 12th for research impact in the UK. We were also ranked 16th for research intensity and in the top 20 for research power.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 97% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

Modules -

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

PL821 - Medical Humanities: An Introduction (30 credits)
CL821 - Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI866 - History of Science and Communication (30 credits)
LW862 - Death and Dying (20 credits)
LW863 - Consent to Treatment (20 credits)
LW866 - Medical Practice and Malpractice (20 credits)
Show more... https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/3/medical-humanities#!structure

Assessment

Assessments vary across the modules. Typically the main assessment is a 5-6,000 word essay and a dissertation of 12-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- introduce you to a variety of ways in which medical science and practice can be examined within the humanities and social sciences, and to a range of questions and issues that it raises. In doing so, part of the richness of medical science will be revealed, as well as its problems. The relevant disciplines include history, literature, philosophy and law
- place the study of various materials (such as texts, images, data, legal judgments, etc) at the centre of student learning and analysis
- expose you to a variety of methods, writing styles, researching styles, concepts (etc) that are used across a range of academic disciplines in relation to specific topics and questions in medical science and practice
- expose you to some of the various possibilities and problems that medical science and practice has raised and continues to raise
- develop your capacities to think critically about past and present events and experiences in relation to medicine
- encourage you to relate the academic study of medical science and practice to questions of public debate and concern
vpromote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate from different Humanities and related disciplines
- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in philosophy is a valuable and flexible qualification, which allows you to develop skills in logical thinking, critical evaluation, persuasion, writing and independent thought.

Graduates have gone on to positions in journalism, administration in the civil service, education, advertising and a range of managerial positions. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills. Read more

Programme Aims

This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills.

A. Advancement in Knowledge and Skill
‌•To develop specialists in their respective professional disciplines to enhance their career paths;
‌•To broaden students' exposure to health science and technology to enable them to cope with the ever-changing demands of work; and
‌•To provide a laboratory environment for testing problems encountered at work.

Students develop intellectually, professionally and personally while advancing their knowledge and skills in Medical Laboratory Science. The specific aims of this award are:
‌•To broaden and deepen students' knowledge and expertise in Medical Laboratory Science;
‌•To introduce students to advances in selected areas of diagnostic laboratory techniques;
‌•‌To develop in students an integrative and collaborative team approach to the investigation of common diseases;
‌•To foster an understanding of the management concepts that are relevant to clinical laboratories; and
‌•To develop students' skills in communication, critical analysis and problem solving.

B. Professional Development
‌•To develop students' ability in critical analysis and evaluation in their professional practices;
‌•To cultivate within healthcare professionals the qualities and attributes that are expected of them;
‌•To acquire a higher level of awareness and reflection within the profession and the healthcare industry to improve the quality of healthcare services; and
‌•To develop students' ability to assume a managerial level of practice.

C. Evidence-based Practice
‌•To equip students with the necessary research skills to enable them to perform evidence-based practice in the delivery of healthcare service.

D. Personal Development
‌•To provide channels for practising professionals to continuously develop themselves while at work; and
‌•To allow graduates to develop themselves further after graduation.

Programme Characteristics

Our laboratories are well-equipped to support students in their studies, research and dissertations. Our specialised equipment includes a flow cytometer, cell culture facilities, basic and advanced instruments for molecular biology research (including thermal cyclers, DNA sequencers, real-time PCR systems and an automatic mutation detection system), microplate systems for ELISA work, HPLC, FPLC, tissue processors, automatic cell analysers, a preparative ultracentrifuge and an automated biochemical analyser.

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (UK), and graduates are eligible to apply for Membership of the Institute.

Programme Structure

The Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology consists of the following awards:
‌•MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science
‌•MSc in Medical Laboratory Science

A range of subjects that are specific to the Medical Laboratory Science profession, and a variety of subjects of common interest and value to all healthcare professionals, are offered. In general, each subject requires attendance on one evening per week over a 13-week semester.

Award Requirements

Students must complete 1 Compulsory Subject (Research Methods & Biostatistics), 4 Core Specialism Specific Subjects, 2 Elective Subjects (from any subjects within the Scheme) and a research-based Dissertation. They are encouraged to select a dissertation topic that is relevant to their professional and personal interests.

Students who have successfully completed 30 credits, but who have taken fewer than the required 4 Core Specialism Specific Subjects, will be awarded a generic MSc in Health Technology without a specialism award.

Students who have successfully completed 18 credits, but who decide not to continue with their course of MSc study, may request to be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) as follows:
‌•PgD in a specialism if 1 Compulsory Subject, 4 Core Subjects and 1 Elective Subject are successfully completed; or
‌•PgD in Health Technology (Generic) if 1 Compulsory Subject and any other 5 Subjects within the Scheme are successfully completed.

Core Areas of Study

The following is a list of the Core Medical Laboratory Science Subjects. Some subjects are offered only in alternate years.

•Integrated Medical Laboratory Science
‌•Advanced Topics in Health Technology
‌•Clinical Applications of Molecular Diagnostics in Healthcare
‌•Clinical Chemistry
‌•Epidemiology
‌•Haematology & Transfusion Science
‌•Histopathology & Cytology
‌•I‌mmunology
‌•Medical Microbiology
‌•Molecular Technology in the Clinical Laboratory
‌•Workshops on Advanced Molecular Diagnostic Technology

Having selected the requisite number of subjects from the Core list, students can choose the remaining Core Subjects or other subjects available in this Scheme as Elective Subjects.

The two awards within the Scheme share a similar programme structure, and students may take subjects across disciplines. For subjects offered within the Scheme by the other discipline of study, please refer to the information on the MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science.

English Language Requirements

If you are not a native speaker of English, and your Bachelor's degree or equivalent qualification is awarded by institutions where the medium of instruction is not English, you are expected to fulfil the University’s minimum English language requirement for admission purpose. Please refer to the "Admission Requirements" http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg/admissions-requirements section for details.

Additional Document Required
Transcript / Certificate

Other Information
Suitable candidates may be invited to attend interviews.

How to Apply

For latest admission info, please visit [email protected] http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg and eAdmission http://www.polyu.edu.hk/admission

Enquiries

For further information, please contact:
Telephone: (852) 3400 8653
Fax: (852) 2362 4365
E-mail:

For more details of the programme, please visit [email protected] http://www51.polyu.edu.hk/eprospectus/tpg/2016/55005-mmf-mmp website.

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Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

During their 60-credit Research Project students will gain further practical, analytical or programming abilities through working on a more extended investigation. This may be an experiment- or modelling-based project, for which the student will be encouraged to propose and set in place original approaches.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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