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Masters Degrees (Immigration And Asylum Law)

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The LLM in Immigration Law will provide you with the opportunity to study legal responses to the global phenomenon of immigration at international, supranational and domestic levels and to understand the rationale and operation of the law in context. Read more

Overview

The LLM in Immigration Law will provide you with the opportunity to study legal responses to the global phenomenon of immigration at international, supranational and domestic levels and to understand the rationale and operation of the law in context.

This Master of Laws programme offers a comprehensive overview of the major legal and theoretical issues concerning immigration law and policy from a domestic, comparative, European and international perspective. Modules include international migration and refugee law, European migration law, comparative immigration law, cultural diversity and the law, and migration and security. This LLM is unique globally as it is taught by leading academics in the field and you will be exposed to insights from legal practitioners, international organisations and NGOs.

The East End of London is a historic site of migration and displays the interplay between migration and human rights, on the one hand, and migration and security, on the other hand, as well as the transnational nature of the phenomenon of human mobility across borders in a globalised world. The programme adds to the existing expertise offered by the School of Law in human rights, public law, legal theory, and public international law. Our academics are engaged in leading research into the areas covered within the programme.

This programme will:
◦Allow you to gain the most up to date knowledge of developments in the area of international and comparative immigration and refugee law.
◦Deliver knowledge and analysis of a range of concerns of relevance to professional communities involved in the field.
◦Enable you to understand the formal legal dimensions of your subjects as well as the more contextual political, historical and socio-legal dimensions.
◦Give you exposure to an array of experts who have research as well as policy led focus on the issues at stake.

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Immigration Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM172 Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM193 Free Movement of Persons in the European Union (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM321 Ethics of Migration and Asylum (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)

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In developing a career in the competitive world of government, NGOs, international consultancies or think tanks – as well as in the legal profession - an LLM is an important asset. Read more
In developing a career in the competitive world of government, NGOs, international consultancies or think tanks – as well as in the legal profession - an LLM is an important asset. There are four pathways to choose from at Middlesex: you can take the General LLM programme or specialise in International Business Law, Employment Law or Minorities, Rights and the Law.

Whichever path you take, you will broaden your knowledge of law and deepen your understanding of legal methods, concepts and processes. Our General LLM (outlined below), rather than a specialist pathway, is ideal for students who have not yet chosen a more specialised field of interest, or who wish to gain the overview that can achieved by completing modules across different specialisms.

Why study LLM/PGDip/PGCert Law at Middlesex?

The School of Law at Middlesex brings together a staff team that includes world-renowned scholars who are expert in communicating the latest developments in and thinking about legal questions. You will be taught by these staff members, who combine instruction in core topics with the fruits of their current research. As a student, you will also benefit from their networks of contacts, notably as regards internship opportunities in national and international organisations such as the United Nations, in on-campus litigation centre (the European Human Rights Advocacy Centre), through involvement in our regular client-facing Intellectual Property Clinics, or in the form of placements in a range of local companies providing professional legal services.

The Law Department at Middlesex is known for high quality research, teaching and seminar events on current legal topics, all taking place in a lively and supportive environment. Led by award-winning European Law specialist and Head of Department Prof. Laurent Pech, our scholars and legal experts include Prof William Schabas (a world expert on genocide, the death penalty and international criminal law), Dr. Erica Howard (an expert on EU equality and anti-discrimination law), Prof Philip Leach (Director of the European Human Rights Advocacy Centre), Prof. David Lewis (internationally regarded for his scholarship on whistleblowing and Employment Law), Prof. Rohan Kariyawasam (commercial and digital law), Prof Alan Durant (media and communication law), Dr. Helena Wray (international and UK migration law and policy, and editor of the Journal of Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Law), and Prof Joshua Castellino (international law and human rights law, currently member of the Leadership Council of the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network). Across all our specialist pathways you will work with outstanding and professionally engaged staff who combine expert teaching with professional lessons gained through external research and consultancy.

Course highlights:

- Around 75% of Middlesex Law graduates find employment within six months of graduating (the remaining 25% mostly pursue further study).
- Your studies are located within easy reach of London's major legal institutions, such as the law courts, the House of Lords and the Inns of Court. Visits to relevant institutions such as the London Court of International Arbitration are incorporated into modules.
- The Department has an exchange agreement with Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, providing an exceptional opportunity to be awarded a double degree combining a degree from a US Law School with an LLM award from Middlesex University.
- The Middlesex Law Society is a well-established and active professional association of local lawyers, offering students events and professional links.
- A rapidly growing number of international placements offers you opportunities in leading organisations within and beyond the UK. - These include the Practicum in International Organisations, which gives you the chance to intern at institutions such as the United Nations, Global Union Federations and NGOs.
- The LLM is open to non-law graduates with appropriate experience, subject to taking a short 'Introduction to Law' course.
- We have a proud record of attracting and supporting international students over several decades and place great emphasis on supporting students from all parts of the world.
- As a student of this course you'll receive a free electronic textbook for every module.

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Under which circumstances do immigrants have the right to family reunification in the country of their preference? What are the European Union’s obligations… Read more
Under which circumstances do immigrants have the right to family reunification in the country of their preference? What are the European Union’s obligations under international human rights treaties when dealing with, for example, the refugee-boat problem? And what is the role of Brussels in managing migration within the EU as well as towards Europe? This is a sample of the issues that are dealt with in the Master’s specialisation in Human Rights and Migration.

This specialisation studies legal issues relating to migration and human rights in its theoretical, operational, social and political context. The basis of the programme lies in European legislation and international human rights treaties. This is a lively field of law that constantly develops and changes. Changes in public opinion in a European member state may affect its domestic legal order, which in turn influences European laws and vice versa. This specialisation therefore also focuses on the dynamic interplay between national, European and international law, as well as on the ins and outs of the EU lawmaking process.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/humanrights

Why study Human Rights and Migration at Radboud University?

- This specialisation focuses on issues of freedom of movement and immigration within the European Union; asylum and immigration appeals and remedies; as well as international human rights law.

- The Netherlands has a long-standing tradition in the field of refugee law and international human rights and with the presence of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, it’s a great country for studying this field of law.

- The staff that teaches students of this Master’s specialisation are recognised experts in the field, who have published widely in the field of European free movement of persons, asylum and immigration, European and international law and international human rights.

- You’ll study at a Law School that is rated number one in the Netherlands for student satisfaction.

- The Faculty of Law in Nijmegen was the first in the Netherlands to set up a dedicated European Law programme. It has built an international reputation in the field of European law, immigration law and private law, and is part of a large network that includes more than fifty universities in Europe, the United States, Asia and Australia.

- The international mix of students gives the classes and project work a multicultural touch. This will give you the extra benefit of gaining multicultural communication skills as well as a multitude of legal and cultural perspectives in this field. By the time you receive your Master's diploma, you’ll have gained excellent skills to work in the Netherlands or in any other country.

- Students of Radboud University regularly take part in international and European Law Moot Court competitions, enabling you to put academic theory into legal practise during your studies.

- You have the option of going abroad, either for an internship or to follow additional courses as an exchange student at our academic partner institutions. This adds to your personal international experience as well as increasing your knowledge further. Our professors have a good network, and are willing to assist you in finding a position that meets your interests.

Career prospects

Graduates of this specialisation are well-qualified to take up positions in law, lobbying or consulting firms anywhere in the world. As the name of the Master’s implies, your area of expertise will be in the legal field of human rights and migration, and specifically where it applies to citizens dealing with the European Union. You’ll also have a thorough, general understanding of the internal and external markets of the European Union and the position of Europe in the world.

- Prospective employers
Prospective employers interested in your expertise include NGOs, governmental organisations including the Immigration and Naturalisation Service, and international organisations such as the European Commission, the United Nations, international courts and tribunals, lobby organisations, councils for refugees and charity foundations. There are also a number of commercial businesses with a need for legal experts with knowledge of free movement of persons in the European Union.

Our approach to this field

At Radboud University, we strive for clear practical relevance of academic knowledge.
1. Many of our lecturers are also law practitioners. We can therefore not only teach our students the black letter law, but also add our own professional experiences, indicating the strengths and challenges of certain rules, legal instruments or strategies.

2. Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their experiences, enlightening students with real-world scenarios, and providing them with tips on how to deal with cases that don’t follow the official norms.

3. In our research we are engaged in collaborative ventures in this field, such as international and European courts and tribunals as well as NGOs and councils. Therefore, we are informed of the issues that practitioners deal with in their regular work. We respond to their questions by developing research that is relevant.

4. In the Master’s programme in European Law we focus on the law in force, and in accordance with the approach of professionals, focus on justifying decisions in legal terms, in reference to legal rules, principles, and precedents. However, we don’t shy away from critically analysing those rules, principles and precedents, indicating possible alternatives and desired improvements where necessary.


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/humanrights

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes.

You'll gain knowledge of the protection of international human rights within the context of international development and refugee practice and the role of a rights-based approach to international development practice.

Events

The Law Department hosts annual events such as updates on Human Rights delivered by our Visiting Professors, Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Joel Bennthan QC and Imran Khan. We also host the Young Legal Aid Lawyers Question Time and occasional events such as our recent inter-professional conference – Responding to Rape, and meetings and seminars for Burmese human rights campaigners.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/international-human-rights-development-llm

Modules

Core Modules
- Images of development
- Research methods
- International law and human rights
- International law in the developing world
- Dissertation

Optional Modules
- International business, trade and less developed countries
- International humanitarian law
- Forced migration and resettlement
- International refugee law
- Case management
- Advocacy
- International criminal law
- Forced migration in developing societies

Employability

You'll graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to work in the fields of law, human rights and development (either in the UK or abroad) as advisors, experts, researchers and policy makers.

With a background in law, you might practise in human rights, immigration and asylum, and public law.

With a development studies background you might go on to practice in the NGO sector employing a rights-based approach to development.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

Through our growing pool of visiting fellows and professors, the Law Department has developed a strong network of contacts with leading law practitioners in the UK. Many members of the Law Department are practitioners, or retain strong links with the legal profession. We enjoy strong links with a number of leading European Law Faculties, including Universitie Cergy Pontoise in France, INHOLLAND University in the Netherlands and Zagreb University in Croatia.

Recent guest lecturers:
- Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
- Vera Baird, QC, MP;
- Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
- Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
- Imran Khan, Solicitor;
- Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Teaching and learning

The LSBU Law Department has a strong set of experts, consultants and international advisors in the field of Human Rights and hosts a number of annual events and conferences.

Head of the Law Department, Andy Unger, has worked as a consultant in former communist countries such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia. In the South Caucuses, his most recent working has been with the British East-West Centre, designing and supervising the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office funded projects offering human rights training to lawyers and justice officials in the region.

Senior Lecturer in Law Caron Thatcher has observed elections in many parts of the former Soviet Union including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and also in Russia itself and monitoring the final election of Mr. Putin in 2004.

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At The University of Law, we pride ourselves in offering the best legal training - and our Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) is no exception. Read more

Our Bar Professional Training Course

At The University of Law, we pride ourselves in offering the best legal training - and our Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) is no exception.

Our BPTC is designed to help you secure pupillage and prepare you for life as a barrister. You can expect exceptionally high standards of tutoring, a bespoke level of careers support and a wealth of pro bono projects giving you invaluable experience.

Why choose our BPTC?

We’re the only BPTC provider that requires all students undergo a selection process http://www.law.ac.uk/postgraduate/bptc/#our-unique-selection-process-and-advocacy-committee before being offered a place on our course. This means you’ll study in small classes alongside carefully selected students

We offer four times the advocacy required by the Bar Standards Board (BSB), all taught by qualified practitioners with unparalleled experience in delivering advocacy training

Benefit from our unique Advocacy Committee http://www.law.ac.uk/postgraduate/bptc/#our-unique-selection-process-and-advocacy-committee: enter prestigious international and national competitions and test your advocacy skills in front of real barristers and judges

Succeed in pupillage applications and beyond and be supported from the moment you accept - with support from our award-winning Careers and Employability Service http://www.law.ac.uk/employability-service/

Gain a real insight into the profession and make a wealth of valuable connections at our networking practitioner events

Benefit from our scholarships and prizes http://www.law.ac.uk/postgraduate/postgraduate-scholarships/. We have one of the most comprehensive scholarship schemes in legal education and reward academic success with a series of prizes at the end of your BPTC year

Flexible study options – you can choose to study your BPTC full-time or part-time in Birmingham or London Bloomsbury, or full-time in Leeds

Follow this link to discover more about how you'll benefit from our Selection Process and Advocacy Committee - http://www.law.ac.uk/postgraduate/bptc/

Course Content

With its unique combination of face-to-face teaching and online training, the BPTC structure has been designed to reflect the litigation process that practising barristers encounter every day.

Knowledge areas

•Civil litigation, evidence and remedies
•Criminal litigation, evidence and sentencing
•Professional ethics

Core skills

•Advocacy, including examination-in-chief, cross-examination and civil applications
•Conferencing
•Drafting
•Opinion writing
•Resolution of disputes out of court

Study options

In your final term, you’ll choose to study two options from a list that includes:

•Advanced criminal litigation
•Alternative dispute resolution: mediation
•Chancery
•International commercial practice
•Employment tribunal practice
•Family practice
•Immigration practice and asylum
•Judicial review
•Personal injury and clinical negligence

Mock trials

We give you as many opportunities as possible to hone your essential advocacy skills and put what you learn into practice:

•Participating in mock trials in real courtrooms with real judges and senior barristers
•Advocacy skill demonstrations with feedback from practising barristers
•Visits to the High Court, Magistrate’s Court, Crown Court and County Courts

Employability

At The University of Law, we recognise that your ultimate goal is to obtain pupillage, progress onto tenancy and hone all the skills and experience you need to develop your practice. That’s why we ensure that every step of the way, you have dedicated careers support and a wealth of opportunities to progress.

A personal careers service

The University of Law has the UK’s largest law careers and employability service, with more than 30 experts providing support as soon as you accept your place. Through one-on-one careers appointments, live and virtual workshops, the careers team advise on:

•CVs and cover letters
•Mini-pupillage applications
•Which sets to apply to based on your interests and profile
•Pupillage applications: drafting and review
•Interview preparation, including spotting and debating current affairs and relevant legal topics
•Mock interviews
•Deciding between pupillage offers
•Post-BPTC employment, scholarships and further study

Events

As well as bespoke advice and assistance, our careers team are able to organise a wide-range of events and presentations thanks to our excellent links with chambers across the country.

Typical events include:

•Inviting the barristers on pupillage committees to discuss and answer questions about the pupillage application process
•Specialist panels and external speakers discussing the nuances of specific practice areas e.g. Commercial & Chancery and Family
•Presentations by external speakers including specialist practitioners and representatives from the Inns of Court
•Discussion on the non-legal aspects of being a barrister including talks from a chambers’ marketing manager and a tax consultant
•A small number of evenings hosted by specific chambers, reserved for students only

Pro bono opportunities

The University runs a varied pro bono programme at all of our centres, which allow our students to gain experience in dealing with real cases while helping the local community. You’ll get valuable first-hand experience of client relationships, legal research and drafting, whilst helping those who may not otherwise have access to legal support and advice.
Current projects include: Legal Advice Centre, Own-It (Intellectual Property), Royal Courts of Justice Personal Support Unit, Family Law Advice Clinic, Social Welfare Legal Advice, Environmental Law Foundation and Streetlaw.

How to Apply

Applications for our full-time and part-time BPTC are now open.

Please follow this link http://www.law.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply-for-a-postgraduate-course/#apply-for-the-bptc

Locations

This course is available at the following University of Law locations: Birmingham, Leeds, London Bloomsbury and London Moorgate. http://www.law.ac.uk/locations/

Further Information

For further information on eligibility, stucture and assessment, course fees and the application process, please follow this link http://www.law.ac.uk/postgraduate/bptc/

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Our aim is that the Glasgow Diploma comes to be regarded as the trademark of excellence, ensuring that you are not just employable but sought after by employers. Read more
Our aim is that the Glasgow Diploma comes to be regarded as the trademark of excellence, ensuring that you are not just employable but sought after by employers.

Key facts

• PgDip: 9 months full-time;
• Contact:

Why Glasgow

• This highly practical programme has been designed by practising lawyers to replicate the work that you will do when you commence your traineeship, ensuring that you will be a confident and competent trainee solicitor.
• The Glasgow Legal 40, legal alumni of the university who practise across a wide range of areas, support our Diploma students in various ways including mentoring them and attending networking events.
• We have developed strong links with employers and work with them to ensure that the programme we offer meets their requirements enabling you to commence your traineeship with the necessary skills and knowledge.
• Extensive use is made of our library of filmed resources which link to course materials developed in collaboration with the judiciary and our tutors.They include various court hearings including criminal trials, proofs, debates, motions and a judicial review as well as a mediation, collaboration and negotiation.
• Students attend Glasgow Sheriff Court and appear before sheriffs to deliver pleas in mitigation; police officers attend the university to take part in court cases.
• Almost every one of our 150 tutors is a practising lawyer, and all are dedicated, enthusiastic, committed and keen to share their experience with the next generation of lawyers.

Programme Structure

You will take 5 core and 3 optional courses. This allows you to select courses which suit your areas of interest or meet the requirements of your future employers in the legal profession. Courses are delivered through a combination of on-line resources, e-modules, lectures and by small group tutorials (12 or less). Our team of 150 highly experienced, enthusiastic and committed tutors, almost all of whom are practising solicitors or advocates, are all focused on ensuring that you meet the requirement of a “Day 1 ready trainee” by the end of each course.

Core courses
• Criminal litigation (incorporating advocacy, evidence and procedure and negotiation)
• Civil litigation (incorporating advocacy, rules of procedure, evidence, negotiation and pre-action protocols)
• Property Law and Conveyancing (incorporating commercial leases)
• Private client (incorporating wills, trusts, deeds of variation and guardianship)
• Business, ethics, finance and practice awareness.

Optional courses
• Advanced civil litigation (incorporating advocacy, remedies, debates, proofs and appeals)
• Advanced criminal litigation (incorporating advocacy)
• Commercial contracts
• Commercial conveyancing
• Corporate
• Family law (incorporating negotiation, mediation, collaboration and litigation)
• Human rights (incorporating employment, asylum and immigration, legislative competence, children's hearing referrals)
• Contemporary Scottish Public Law

Industry Links and Employability

Our Services to Students

Following completion of the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice students must complete a traineeship within a legal firm as a pre-requisite for legal practice.

We strive to increase our students’ employability through our links with the legal profession by working with colleagues in the School of Law, the University's Career Service and other relevant organisations. Our aim is to support and guide our students to help them make the correct career choices.

When planning future career choices, Glasgow DPLP students can access
• The Glasgow Legal 40 mentoring network: exclusive to Glasgow Diploma students
• Professional Legal Practice events including Glasgow Legal 40 networking events and "Life in Law" autobiographical talks from distinguished members of the profession
• Expert advice from the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice team
• Projects such as CLASP pilot in which corporate law students advise start-up businesses
• An annual Law Fair to network with Scottish Law Firms and other employers
• Information about traineeships and other jobs direct from employers
• Employability website
• After completion of the progrmme - invitations to events to improve employability.

Legal 40 Mentoring Network

The Glasgow Legal 40 is an initiative designed for University of Glasgow School of Law Diploma students. The group comprises 40 successful University of Glasgow legal alumni, drawn from all sectors of the legal profession. The main activities of the group include a mentoring programme and a series of social and educational events which allow Diploma students to engage with distinguished members of the legal profession and which will benefit the next generation of lawyers to emerge from the School of Law.

Since 2013, the group has been strengthened and developed by the introduction of Glasgow Legal 40 associates. This involves students who benefited from support and mentoring offered by Glasgow Legal 40 members undertaking the same role for their successors.

Launched in September 2010, our programme aims to bridge the gap between academia and professional legal practice; the Glasgow Legal 40 is a unique and key initiative which allows us to achieve our goal of ensuring our students are not just employable, but sought after by employers. Eileen Paterson, Director of Professional Legal Practice (Operations) explains: “The Glasgow Legal 40 initiative has already been of enormous benefit to our students. We are extremely grateful to our alumni who have supported our students in numerous ways and have been enthusiastic in their commitment to this initiative."

Our Diploma students benefit from
• Easing students' transition from university to practice
• Allowing students to draw on the experience of expert mentors
• Increasing student networking skills
• Providing role models for students pursuing careers in legal practice
• Increasing student links with the legal profession
• Increased employability.

Students contemplating pursuing a career as an advocate at the Scottish Bar are able to take courses in International Private Law and/or Roman Law at no additional cost. These courses are compulsory entry requirements for the Faculty of Advocates.

Career Prospects

Upon successful completion of the programme you will be eligible to progress through your traineeship to work as a solicitor or advocate. The Diploma in Professional Legal Practice is a requirement for entry into these roles in the legal profession.

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Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. Read more
Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in either January or September this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration, analyse, critique and evaluate host governments, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNCHR) and NGO's policies on protection, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter and non-governmental organisations.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/refugee-studies-msc

Modules

- International refugee law

- Asylum policy in the EU and member states
This module begins with a brief history of the EU and traces trends and transformations in the post-war period, before focusing on five case studies and then examining of the different but related processes of harmonisation and convergence between EU member states. The links between sending and receiving counties and new initiatives linking development (aid) and asylum policy will also be considered. The course will also spend several weeks examining the asylum policies of the Americas and Africa. We will look into the differences between the systems and the causes behind those differences. Are those systems better than the Common European Asylum System? If so, why? Can we learn from other systems or are there too many fundamental differences.

- Forced migration and human rights
This module examines the inter-relationship between international human rights standards and forced migration. It will familiarise the student both with internationally and regionally protected human rights standards (civil and political, economic social and cultural) whose violation gives rise to forced migration and with the human rights issues in the host states to which the forced migrants move. It will introduce students to the UN and regional systems governing these issues and to specific themes which bring human rights and forced migration together.

- Forced migration and development
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Contemporary issues in development
The module aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed introduction to the contemporary challenges facing developing countries in the coming years. Topics vary from one year to the next, but currently the focus is on issues of poverty and poverty reduction; aid and its effectiveness; debt and debt servicing; governance and transparency; the environmental impact of development; patterns of inequality; the impact of urbanisation; and more generally, on changing economic relations within the world economy following the 2008-9 global crisis and subsequent events. The module also assesses the main developing strategies followed by selected middle and low-income countries, with detailed case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It also examines these topics from a gender perspective.

- Research methods for development
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

- Dissertation (triple module)

Employability

The course is interdisciplinary and designed for graduates who wish to pursue careers with governments (eg immigration authorities), immigration lawyers, lobbying groups, national and international NGOs, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and other international humanitarian and development organisations.

Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies programme have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

You'll be taught by academic staff with a wide range of theoretical, practical and research experiences of refugee studies in the EU, Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

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This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. Read more
This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. It provides advanced training in social science research methodology to fulfil Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) postgraduate research training requirements.

[[Why this programme}}

● The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics and ethics as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.

● You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.

● You will be taught research methods by expert staff from a wide range of disciplines, allowing you to benefit from specialist knowledge and methodology.

● The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.

● The programme is the only Masters programme in Scotland with a focus on migration studies and social justice.

● This degree is taught jointly with the MSc Global Migrations & Social Justice, which has a stronger focus on the subject, with less emphasis on research methods.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project.

Core courses

• Global migrations: Histories, structures, experiences.
• Public social science for social justice
• Research design
• Qualitative methods
• Quantitative data analysis.

Optional courses

• Access, equity, health
• Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
• Immigration and asylum law
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet Migrations
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
• Racism and modernity
• Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language.
• Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of • Social & Political Sciences.

Resources and facilities

In addition to a long history of large communities of migrants setting in the city Glasgow is host to the UK’s largest population of refugees and asylum seekers under dispersal policy. Across the city there is a large number of organisations working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in a variety of ways. Within this distinctive context, GRAMNet - the University of Glasgow’s internationally renowned Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network - brings together researchers, practitioners, NGOs and policy makers with a focus on examining the social and cultural effects of migration. At its heart is a focus on social and intercultural values, social justice and critical engagement with questions around migration. The network’s reputation for developing and applying innovative participatory methodologies to address complex questions is internationally renowned.

For

Background and Aims

please check out the website http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/backgroundandaims

[[Career Prospects ]]
http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemres/#/careerprospects

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This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Read more
This programme provides a comprehensive introduction to understanding contemporary research on global migrations and social justice. Unique in Scotland, it addresses questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes.

Why this programme

● The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics, ethics, as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.

● You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.

● It offers innovative and wide ranging learning and teaching approaches from lectures and seminars, to project work, workshops and field based activities, along with assessment methods with practical options for collaborative and arts-based projects.

● The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.

● The programme features guest lectures and input from leading migration academics as well as practitioners working in this area.

Programme structure

You will take three core and three optional courses as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project. Courses will be delivered via lectures and seminars supported by appropriate multi-media material, such as monographs, videos, podcasts, journal articles, reports and survey data. Coursework will involve project work, workshops and field based activities.

The dissertation options have been designed to bring together practice and academic learning, allowing you to reflect on the experience of being directly and actively engaged with service providers and asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, working alongside them to explore how research may be transformative for organisations, individuals and communities.

Core courses

• Global migrations: histories, structures, experiences
• Public social science for social justice
• Research design.

Optional courses

• Access, equity, health
• Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
• Immigration and asylum law
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet migrations
• Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
• Racism and modernity
• Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language .
• Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of • Social & Political Sciences.

Resources and facilities

In addition to a long history of large communities of migrants setting in the city Glasgow is host to the UK’s largest population of refugees and asylum seekers under dispersal policy. Across the city there is a large number of organisations working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in a variety of ways. Within this distinctive context, GRAMNet - the University of Glasgow’s internationally renowned Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network - brings together researchers, practitioners, NGOs and policy makers with a focus on examining the social and cultural effects of migration. At its heart is a focus on social and intercultural values, social justice and critical engagement with questions around migration. The network’s reputation for developing and applying innovative participatory methodologies to address complex questions is internationally renowned.

Please refer to the website for

Background and Aims

http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/globalmigrationssocialjusticemsc/#/backgroundandaims

Career prospects

On completing the programme, you will be equipped to apply your learning to a wide range of opportunities locally, nationally and internationally. This might include working with policy-making bodies, local and national governments, community organisations, NGOs and third sector organisations. The emphasis on applied learning makes this programme relevant to a range of professional settings where graduates may be working with asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, for example in education, social work, housing, equalities, campaigning and advocacy work, community development, human rights advocacy work, social research. It will also provide the necessary foundations for further study through doctoral research.

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The Diploma provides you with the necessary qualification to pursue a law traineeship. It is the first step towards a career as a solicitor or advocate within Scotland. Read more
The Diploma provides you with the necessary qualification to pursue a law traineeship. It is the first step towards a career as a solicitor or advocate within Scotland. Our goal is to equip you with the hands-on skills necessary to practise law in the 21st century. We create opportunities for you to develop a professional network which will support you throughout your career.

Why this programme

-Designed by practising lawyers, our programme replicates the work that you will do when you commence your traineeship.
-The Glasgow Legal 40, highly experienced legal alumni of the university, supports our Diploma students through mentorship and by attending our networking events.
-We work with employers to ensure that our programme meets their requirements, enabling you to commence your traineeship with the necessary skills and knowledge.
-You will receive one to one in-person feedback from tutors on every course.
-Our library of filmed resources has been developed in collaboration with the judiciary and our tutors. It includes material such as court hearings, covering criminal trials, proofs, debates, motions and a judicial review as well as a mediation, collaboration and negotiation.
-You will attend Glasgow Sheriff Court and appear before sheriffs to deliver pleas in mitigation; police officers attend the university to take part in court cases.
-Our 200 tutors are all highly experienced legal practitioners. They are dedicated, enthusiastic, and keen to share their experience with the next generation of lawyers.

Programme structure

You will take five core and three optional courses. This allows you to select courses which suit your areas of interest or meet the requirements of your future employers in the legal profession. Courses are delivered through a combination of on-line resources, e-modules, lectures and by small group tutorials (12 or less). Our team of highly experienced, enthusiastic and committed tutors, almost all of whom are practising solicitors or advocates, are all focused on ensuring that you meet the requirement of a “Day 1 ready trainee” by the end of each course.

Core courses
-Civil litigation (incorporating advocacy, rules of procedure, evidence, negotiation and pre-action protocols)
-Commercial awareness
-Conveyancing (incorporating purchase, sale and commercial leases)
-Criminal litigation (incorporating advocacy, evidence and procedure and negotiation)
-Private client (incorporating wills, trusts, deeds of variation and guardianship)

Optional courses
-Advanced civil litigation (incorporating advocacy, remedies, debates, proofs and appeals)
-Advanced criminal litigation (incorporating advocacy)
-Commercial contracts
-Commercial conveyancing
-Contemporary Scottish public law
-Corporate
-Family law (incorporating negotiation, mediation, collaboration and litigation)
-Human rights (incorporating topics such as employment, asylum and immigration, criminal, children's hearing referrals)

Students contemplating a career as an advocate at the Scottish Bar are able to take courses in International Private Law and/or Roman Law at no additional cost. These courses are compulsory entry requirements for the Faculty of Advocates.

Career prospects

Upon successful completion of the programme you will be eligible to progress through your traineeship to work as a solicitor or advocate within Scotland. The Diploma in Professional Legal Practice is a requirement for entry into these roles in the legal profession, in addition to providing employment opportunities in related legal disciplines.

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The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study. Read more
The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study.

The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues. The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of the mentally disordered offender and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

The programme is accreditated by The British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology

Embedded within the programme are a series of optional work experience opportunities that staff members promote among the cohort. Although these opportunities will not attract course credits or extend the period of student registration, staff endeavour to generate a range of relevant opportunities and work with colleagues in the careers service to ensure that necessary paperwork and insurance are in place.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/criminologyandsociology/coursefinder/mscforensicpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues.

- The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offenders and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

- The assignments that we use are not only exams and traditional academic essays but also include professional reports, oral presentations and written reflections which enable you to build important skills that are critical for your future career as a forensic psychologist.

- The programme is accredited by the MSc British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology.

- We deliberately limit student numbers to ensure high standards and to enable us to develop a good relationship with each of our students.

Department research and industry highlights

The programme is delivered by a team of leading academics with expertise in their fields. The core teaching staff is made up of:

- Dr Emily Glorney is a Registered Forensic Psychologist with over 15 years of experience working in forensic practice and conducting research across secure hospitals and prisons. Emily is currently working on collaborative research projects with Broadmoor Hospital, exploring the meaning of religion and sprituality in the recovery pathways of patients and developing a quantitative observation system for the alerting of aggressive and violent behaviour.

- Professor Rosie Meek is a Chartered Psychologist and prison researcher, conducting qualitative and quantitative research throughout the UK and internationally. She works closely with a range of Criminal Justice agencies, including prisons and Immigration Removal Centres, a broad range of third sector organisations that work directly with offenders, and the Ministry of Justice. Her specialisms include prison healthcare and education, the role of the voluntary sector in reducing reoffending and promoting desistance, and the evaluation of prison-based interventions and programmes. Dr Meek’s most recent book ‘Sport in Prison’ has been used by those responsible for developing physical activity policy in prisons in England and Wales.

- Dr Laura Mickes is a Cognitive Psychologist who specialises in modelling human memory. Laura was part of the team that developed a widely-used statistical method for use in eyewitness identification research. Her current research is dedicated to identifying and developing procedures that enhance eyewitness accuracy, where she works with Identification Officers at the Metropolitan Police.

- Professor Amina Memon is a Chartered Psychologist with over 25 years of experience in higher education and research. Her research in the area of psychology and law spans cognitive, social and forensic domains. Her work is firmly grounded in policy and practice, for example she studies how to maximise the accuracy, truthfulness and credibility of witness statements, has contributed to training of the police and judiciary and has served as an expert witness in family court cases and criminal trials. Professor Memon’s background in human rights had led to her extending her research to third sector organisations such as Asylum Aid, Plan UK and Freedom From Torture.

- Dr David La Rooy is a Chartered Psychologist. He is an internationally recognised memory expert, expert in investigative interviewing techniques, and conducts research that has influenced the training of child forensic interviewers, the police, lawyers and judges around the world in how best to interview victims of child abuse. He has co-edited two volumes for the 'Wiley Series in the Psychology of Crime, Policing and Law.'

Course content and structure

The programme is made up of the following six core courses (Four delivered in the Autumn term and two in the Spring term) and the dissertation which is undertaken throughout the year.

The programme confers Stage 1 of a two-stage process of professional training in forensic psychology that is assessed by the British Psychological Society (the second stage of professional training is subsequent and external to the MSc Forensic Psychology programme at Royal Holloway). International students would be welcome on the programme of study.

The British Psychological Society requires that core knowledge domains are incorporated into the course so as to reflect the diversity of research and practice in forensic psychology. The unique selling point and emphasis of the programme at Royal Holloway is defined by the multidisciplinarity of the teaching (jointly by forensic psychologists and those carrying out research relevant to forensic psychology in the departments of Psychology and Law) and the research strengths of both departments.

Core course units:
- Research Based Practice in Forensic Psychology
- Young People in the Criminal Justice System
- The Legal Process
- Aspects of the Investigative Process
- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
- Statistics for Research
- Dissertation

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Excellent interpreting facilities, from European Commission-standard soundproof booths to broadband, AV recording, mock conference equipment and built-in work placements make this vocational course ideal for anyone wishing to train as a professional interpreter. Read more
Excellent interpreting facilities, from European Commission-standard soundproof booths to broadband, AV recording, mock conference equipment and built-in work placements make this vocational course ideal for anyone wishing to train as a professional interpreter. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Interpreting MA is a vocational course grounded in theory and practice and specifically set up to train professional interpreters. The course offers you an opportunity to acquaint yourself with the theoretical and professional frameworks of interpreting applied to a range of interpreting types: Public Service Interpreting and Conference Interpreting. Remote Interpreting (telephone and video-conferencing) is embedded in the course.

A key part of the course is a work placement during which you will perform live interpreting tasks under supervision and shadow professional interpreters at work. The course offers a wide range of language combinations paired with English: German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Chinese, Japanese. Further language combinations with English may also be available, such as Arabic, subject to demand, staff expertise and availability. In the past we have offered Romanian, Dari and Lithuanian.

Students on the course benefit from excellent interpreting facilities. Our Interpreting Suite is equipped with six AIIC (Association Internationale des Interprètes de Conference) standard soundproof booths, each with audio and video digital recording facilities. The Interpreting Suite facilities are the same as those used in Brussels for the European Commission and each booth is equipped with broadband and audio-visual digital recording. Conference Guest Speakers and events are filmed and stored on our virtual platform, so that students can revisit the events.

Students will also benefit from the use of our virtual platform to access teaching materials and documentaries, presentations for conferences and recordings of mock conferences. They will be able to chat and exchange their views in forums on the virtual platform, which is accessible from any computer with an internet connection. They will also be able to present their written assessment via the virtual platform, from a computer with an internet connection.

You will be assessed by a variety of coursework, interpreting exams, presentations, essays, and independent work and a research project (at MA level).

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
Conference Interpreting 1 (core, 20 credits)
Conference Interpreting 2 (core, 20 credits)
Interpreting Theory and Research for Interpreters (core, 20 credits)
MA Research Project (core, 60 credits)
Public Service Interpreting (core, 20 credits)
The Interpreter's Professional Environment (core, 20 credits)
The Interpreter's Skills and Tools (core, 20 credits)

After the course

Career prospects for graduates are excellent, with many proceeding to work as in-house or freelance interpreters and typically finding positions in translation and interpreting agencies; international, European and national organisations and bodies; Local Authorities, Hospitals, The Police, Immigration Services and Refugee and Asylum organisations. Chartered Institute of Linguists. Students who pass the PSI module with 60% automatically get accreditation for the DPSI, interpreting and sight translation tasks.

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