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Royal Holloway’s Holocaust Research Centre is the leading academic centre of its kind in Europe and we are internationally recognised for our research, teaching, public advocacy and creative work. Read more
Royal Holloway’s Holocaust Research Centre is the leading academic centre of its kind in Europe and we are internationally recognised for our research, teaching, public advocacy and creative work.

The Research Centre’s mission is to promote research into the Holocaust, its origins and aftermath, and to examine the extent to which genocide, war and dictatorship can be understood as defining elements in the history of the twentieth century. It is an international forum bringing together researchers working on different aspects of the Holocaust in a range of disciplines, including history, literary and language studies, film and media studies, philosophy and sociology.

The MA Holocaust Studies is taught by staff from several different Royal Holloway Departments, including English, Modern Languages and History. Courses are taught both at the Wiener Library in central London and the Royal Holloway Egham campus.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/maholocauststudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Holocaust Research Centre has a very active research culture which features lectures from the leading figures in the field. Recent speakers have included Robert Jan van Pelt, Ulrich Herbert, Reinhard Rürup, Dina Porat, Saul Friedländer, Geoffrey Hartman and Jeffrey Herff.

- We host several workshops each year on cutting edge research and regular international conferences.

- Our core staff, which includes internationally recognised scholars Peter Longerich, Dan Stone, Colin Davis, Zoe Waxman and Robert Eaglestone, have published over 30 books in the last five years with major presses and three books have won international prizes.

Department research and industry highlights

In responding to the Holocaust we research in a range of disciplines, including history, literary studies, theory film and media studies and philosophy, and welcome graduates in any of these areas. We especially welcome students with interdisciplinary projects.

The research of the members of the Centre has been supported by grants from Leverhulme, the AHRC, the British Academy, DAAD, Humboldt, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and elsewhere.

Course content and structure

You will study one core course unit, three elective units and undertake a dissertation.

Core course units:
- History and Historiography of the Holocaust
This unit will introduce you to the history of the Holocaust and will focus on major historical debates.

- Dissertation
The dissertation must be between 14,000 - 16,000 words and is mainly written in the third term and the summer (deadline 1st September). Students are expected to develop a topic together with their supervisor(s) during the Spring Term. Topics can be taken from various areas, like history and presentation of the Holocaust or its impact on literature, culture, media and philosophy.

Elective course units:
- Holocaust Literature
You will consider various cultural representations of the Holocaust in British and American literature and in particular the relationship between history, testimony and literature.

- Post-Holocaust Philosophy
This unit looks at the response in European philosophy to the murder of the Jews. To what extent does the Holocaust render previous philosophy redundant?

- Documents of the Holocaust
You will study in depth crucial documents regarding the Nazi persecution of the Jews and the “Final Solution”. All documents will be presented in English translations.

- Faith, Politics, and the Jews of Europe, 1848-1918
This unit explores the emergence of conservative Jewish movements opposed to assimilation and the response to anti-Jewish movements and ideologies from the late 1870s onwards.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge and understanding of:
- the most important aspects of the history and historiography of the Holocaust
- significant questions of schools of culture, philosophy and representation arising from the Holocaust
- methods and concepts of various disciplines (historical, literary, philosophical and others).

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in academia, charities (such as the Holocaust Educational Trust) and the media. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme will immerse you in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides. Read more
Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme will immerse you in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides.

You have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives with a choice of optional modules - some which have a more traditional, historical focus and others which examine the cultural, social, political and religious afterlife of the Holocaust and other genocides.

We are able to offer a unique combination of expertise in the study of the Holocaust and of genocide across a variety of disciplines, including historical studies, conflict and war studies, memory studies, literary studies, translation studies, and film studies.

In addition to taking modules directly related to the Holocaust and/or genocide, you therefore also have the opportunity to take alternative disciplinary approaches and study modules that are relevant to, but not directly related to, the topic.

All students will take two core modules:

Research Skills in the Study of Holocaust and Genocide: Methodologies and Sources
Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

MA students will also take an additional module: Dissertation Preparation and Guided Reading (Holocaust and Genocide).

Certificate students will take one optional module, while Diploma and MA students will take three optional modules, from a wide range of related Masters-level options within the College of Arts and Law, as well as within the Department of Political Science and International Studies (College of Social Sciences).

Certificate students are advised to take a module which directly relates to the study of Holocaust and/or genocide, chosen in consultation with the programme leader. MA and Diploma students also have the option to choose up to two of their modules from the wider College; again, this should be done in consultation with the programme leader.

MA students will complete the programme with a dissertation – this can either be a written or placement-based dissertation. If you choose to complete a written dissertation its length will be 15,000 words.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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We are able to offer a unique combination of expertise in the study of the Holocaust and of genocide across a variety of disciplines, including historical studies, conflict and war studies, memory studies, literary studies, translation studies, and film studies. Read more
We are able to offer a unique combination of expertise in the study of the Holocaust and of genocide across a variety of disciplines, including historical studies, conflict and war studies, memory studies, literary studies, translation studies, and film studies.

In addition to taking modules directly related to the Holocaust and/or genocide, you therefore also have the opportunity to take alternative disciplinary approaches and study modules that are relevant to, but not directly related to, the topic.

All students will take two core modules:

Research Skills in the Study of Holocaust and Genocide: Methodologies and Sources
Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives
MA students will also take an additional module: Dissertation Preparation and Guided Reading (Holocaust and Genocide). See below for full details of core modules.

Certificate students will take one optional module, while Diploma and MA students will take three optional modules, from a wide range of related Masters-level options within the College of Arts and Law, as well as within the Department of Political Science and International Studies (College of Social Sciences).

Certificate students are advised to take a module which directly relates to the study of Holocaust and/or genocide, chosen in consultation with the programme leader. MA and Diploma students also have the option to choose up to two of their modules from the wider College; again, this should be done in consultation with the programme leader.

MA students will complete the programme with a dissertation – this can either be a written or placement-based dissertation. If you choose to complete a written dissertation its length will be 15,000 words.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course allows graduates to pursue research in the field of Holocaust and Genocide studies. The degree comprises independent research and a course designed to develop knowledge of key research skills and practices. Read more
This course allows graduates to pursue research in the field of Holocaust and Genocide studies. The degree comprises independent research and a course designed to develop knowledge of key research skills and practices.

Why choose this course?

Recognised internationally for their distinctive focus on the world, International Relations and History at Nottingham Trent University offer vibrant and dynamic research environments specialising in the understanding of international politics and historical events.

Award degrees are available in the following subject areas:

Holocaust Studies
Holocaust and Memory
Post Holocaust Genocide
Genocide Studies
Comparative Genocide
Film, Literature and Genocide.

Special features

In the School of Arts and Humanities our academics have a wide range of research interests including film, literature, media representations, the role of language and journalism as well as international relations and history. Many of our scholars work touches upon aspects of Holocaust, genocide and memory, providing an ideal intellectual community for anyone wanting to explore these ideas further.

You will join a thriving postgraduate community of researchers in International Relations and History and a unique student support structure with a dedicated team of tutors and supervisors.

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This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to Jewish history, literature and culture from Antiquity to the contemporary world, with special emphasis on the broad framework of Jewish/non-Jewish relations; studies centre on the resources of the Parkes Library and Archive, and students are taught by members of the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations. Read more

Summary

This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to Jewish history, literature and culture from Antiquity to the contemporary world, with special emphasis on the broad framework of Jewish/non-Jewish relations; studies centre on the resources of the Parkes Library and Archive, and students are taught by members of the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations.

Modules

Approaches to Jewish history and culture; relations between Jews and non-Jews through the ages; research skills 1 and 2; dissertation; plus 2 optional modules from: Britain, the USA and the holocaust, 1933-95; east side/east end: the holocaust in American film; Eastern Europeans; history of the ghetto; holocaust literature; Jewish history; Jewish immigration and settlement in Britain and North America, 1880-1920; Jews in Hellenistic Egypt; other relevant optional modules.

Visit our website for further information...



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The MA in English covers literature and popular culture in their historical contexts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a focus on literature post-1800. Read more
The MA in English covers literature and popular culture in their historical contexts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a focus on literature post-1800. It provides you with the opportunity to undertake a comparative study of literature, history and popular culture and develop research skills and methodologies. The programme will appeal if you are interested in combining the study of ‘serious’ literature with popular writing, women’s literature, and topics such as Empire, American national identity, the Victorian period, Holocaust and Second World War, approached as interdisciplinary case studies from the perspective of literature, history, popular culture and print culture. The course enables you to work across subject boundaries and provides excellent preparation if you wish to pursue a PhD in the future.

What will I study?

The programme consists of two compulsory modules (20 credits each), four optional modules (20 credits each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credits). You will be guided to a combination of optional modules focusing on literature and popular culture, or a combination of literature modules and modules on a historical topic or theme.

If you are interested in literature, the available options cover texts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a predominant focus on literature post-1880. Themes include gender, popular culture, ‘transgressive’ women’s writing, masculinity, print culture, humour, the gothic, and various theoretical and critical perspectives.

History-related modules focus on themes from the last three centuries, including topics such as Empire, the Holocaust and the Second World War, approached as interdisciplinary case studies involving the study of history, literature and culture (especially popular culture).

How will I study?

You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and guided independent learning. Taught sessions take place between 6pm-9pm on weekday evenings. If you are studying full-time you will attend two evenings per week and if you are studying part-time you will attend one evening per week.

[[How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through a combination of assignments which, depending on the modules you choose, may include essays, critical reviews, critical diaries, presentations and research-based projects, and a dissertation.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by a team of specialist tutors who are active researchers and committed teachers with interests in literature, popular culture, genre studies, modern history, women’s studies, history and print culture.

What are my career prospects?

Graduates in the humanities with a higher degree find employment in a wide variety of careers such as teaching, arts organisation and management, the heritage industry, publishing, advertising, journalism, libraries and learning centres, and management/administration.

Alternatively, upon successful completion of the programme, you may wish to apply to progress onto a research degree such as an MPhil or PhD.

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The MA in History and Culture will appeal if you have interests that cross the boundaries of history, popular culture, print culture and literature and would like to pursue this combined focus. Read more
The MA in History and Culture will appeal if you have interests that cross the boundaries of history, popular culture, print culture and literature and would like to pursue this combined focus.

The programme seeks to understand the modern world through perspectives derived from the study of history, literature, popular culture and print culture. You will pursue thematic subjects, such as empire, propaganda and gender, and examine select interdisciplinary ‘case studies’ such as the Victorian city, the Second World War and the Holocaust.

You will gain experience of the advanced study of history, develop the practical skills necessary to undertake work across subject boundaries and receive training in transferable research skills and methodologies. On graduation, you will be well placed to pursue a research-based higher degree, such as a PhD, should you wish to do so.

What will I study?

The programme consists of two core modules (20 credits each), four optional modules (20 credits each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credits).

You will be guided to a combination of optional modules focused upon the interdisciplinary study of modern and contemporary history or a combination of these modules with others which have a strong literature and popular culture content.

You may combine period studies, focused, for example, on the Victorian period, the Second World War and the Holocaust, with more generic modules concerned with subject such as ‘transgressive women’ and empire.

How will I study?

You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and guided independent learning. Taught sessions take place between 6pm-9pm on weekday evenings. If you are studying full-time you will attend two evenings per week and if you are studying part-time you will attend one evening per week.

How will I be assessed?]]

You will be assessed through a combination of assignments which, depending on the modules you choose, may include essays, critical reviews, critical diaries, online discussions, presentations and research-based projects and a dissertation.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by a team of specialist tutors who are active researchers and committed teachers with interests in history, literature, popular culture and print culture.

What are my career prospects?

Graduates in the humanities with a higher degree find employment in a wide variety of careers such as teaching, arts organisation and management, the heritage industry, publishing, advertising, journalism, libraries and learning centres, and management/administration.

Alternatively, upon successful completion of the programme, you may wish to apply to progress onto a research degree such as an MPhil or PhD.

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Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History). (MA title is subject to approval). The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. Read more
Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History)

(MA title is subject to approval)

The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. It trains scholars towards undertaking independent research on Jewish history, culture and thought in Europe. You will consider patterns of inclusion and exclusion and questions of citizenship and emancipation. The MA will introduce you to a wide range of sources for European Jewish studies. Particular attention will be paid to the Jewish response to modernity and problems around issues of assimilation and identity. The role of antisemitism and the origins of the holocaust are central, as is Jewish intellectual history, in particular the ideas of eminent Jewish thinkers about the place of Jews and Judaism in premodern and modern society.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module, three modules chosen from a series of options and an individually supervised dissertation. Students will also take a non-assessed research methods module. Part-time students
take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year.

Optional modules may include:

Modern Jewish History and Culture
Christians and Jews in Europe: Perceptions and Encounters, 1100-1600
Jews, Power and Intellectual History
Antisemitism and the Holocaust
Modern European Jewish Literature
Hollywood and the Second World War
Understanding Religion Historically
Overcoming Nazism

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History, according to the current national curriculum, "should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past". Read more
History, according to the current national curriculum, "should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past". Our aim is to equip students to do just that, developing their ability to plan meaningful historical experiences for pupils in the 11–16 age range, to teach effectively and to assess their own and their pupils’ achievements.

Degree information

Students will understand why history is taught in schools, how pupils learn and make sense of the past, and how to teach history in an exciting way that develops learners. There are five key themes underpinning the programme: 'diverse histories', 'history for all', 'historical thinking', 'engaging with history' and ‘ becoming a professional history teacher'. These themes reflect our location in the capital, the wide range of schools and students that we work with and our ambition to engage, challenge and enlighten all learners.

Students undertake two level 7 (Master’s-level) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level (level 7) modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-History in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)
-Learning, Teaching and Assessing History (30 Master's-level credits)
-Professional Practice

Placement
Students spend most of their time (120) days in schools, working with history mentors who support them through two school placements. We are fortunate to have a good choice of schools with whom we work with some outstanding mentors and strong history departments. The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placements. Assessment is by practical teaching, assignments and portfolio tasks.

Students will also record their progress in a Career Entry and Development Profile statement. This will form part of an ongoing portfolio charting the student's continuing professional development.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as history teachers and heads of department in schools, while others have jobs as history educators in museums and archives. Graduates in this area can also be found working as senior leaders in schools.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-History Teacher, Unspecified Girls' School
-History Teacher, Unspecified Public School
-History and Religious Studies Teacher, Unspecified Academy
-History Teacher, Unspecified Boys' School
-Private tutor

Employability
A PGCE from the IOE carries considerable currency in schools which, alongside the quality of training you receive, puts you in a strong position in the employment market. Last year, all those students who sought employment in a school were successful. We expect 100% success rate in gaining a post in a school by the end of the year.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Students will be joining the largest History PGCE programme in the country, allowing them to benefit from a team of tutors with a wide range of expertise and interests. Students will also be able to develop strong peer networks across tutor groups and share ideas, resources and advice.

The IOE History PGCE offers students unique opportunities such as placements at museums or other historical sites, in order to develop understanding of learning history outside the classroom.

The IOE has one of the largest groups of university-based history education specialists in the world and hosts the Centre for Holocaust Education and the award winning First World War Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme. The programme draws on this expertise, for example, providing the opportunity to complete a full two-day teachers' programme in Holocaust Education as part of the PGCE.

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School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established History PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance. Read more
School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established History PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance.

Degree information

Students will understand why history is taught in schools, how pupils learn and make sense of the past, and how to teach history in an exciting way that develops learners. There are five key themes underpinning the programme: “diverse histories”, “history for all”, “historical thinking”, “engaging with history” and “becoming a professional history teacher”. These themes reflect our location in the capital, the wide range of schools and students that we work with, and our ambition to engage, challenge and enlighten all learners.

Students undertake two Master’s-level (level 7) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE). There are no optional modules in this programme.

Core modules
-History in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)
-Learning, Teaching and Assessing History (30 Master's-level credits)
-Professional Practice

Placement
Students spend most of their time (120 days) in schools, working with history mentors who support them through school placements. The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placement at the host school or alliance. Assessment is by the observation of practical teaching, assignments and a portfolio (which links into continuing professional development in the induction year).

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as history teachers and heads of department in schools, while others have jobs as history educators in museums and archives. Graduates in this area can also be found working as senior leaders in schools.

Employability
A PGCE from the IOE carries considerable currency in schools, which alongside the quality of training you receive, puts you in a strong position in the employment market. Last year, all those students who sought employment in a school were successful. We expect 100% success rate in gaining a post in a school by the end of the year.

Why study this degree at UCL?

History, according to the current national curriculum, “should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past”. Our aim is to equip students to do just that, developing their ability to plan meaningful historical experiences for pupils in the 11-16 age range, to teach effectively and to assess their own and their pupils’ achievements.

Students will be joining the largest History PGCE programme in the country, allowing them to benefit from a team of tutors with a wide range of expertise and interests. Students will also be able to develop strong peer networks across tutor groups and share ideas, resources and advice. The IOE History PGCE offers students unique opportunities such as placements at museums or other historical sites, in order to develop understanding of learning history outside the classroom.

The IOE has one of the largest groups of university-based history education specialists in the world and hosts the Centre for Holocaust Education and the award-winning First World War Centenary Battlefields Tours Programme. The programme draws on this expertise, for example, providing the opportunity to complete a full two-day teachers’ programme in Holocaust Education as part of the PGCE.

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in European Philosophy offers one of the few Masters-level programmes in the country to specialise in the 'European' tradition in philosophy. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in European Philosophy offers one of the few Masters-level programmes in the country to specialise in the 'European' tradition in philosophy.

Drawing on core research and teaching strengths in 19th and 20th-century French and German thought, the MA gives students the opportunity to study the development of European philosophy from Kant’s critical philosophy onwards, with a focus on German Idealism, the German phenomenologists and the Frankfurt School on one side, and the French philosophical movements in the 20th Century from Bergson and the existentialist movement through to poststructuralism and psychoanalysis.

Options focus a variety of topics and thinkers, focusing on the Continental tradition in political philosophy, the Frankfurt School, the role of aesthetics in the development of European thought, and more.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/maeuropeanphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- you will be able to explore key issues, thinkers and texts from the European tradition on one of the few programmes in the country to specialise in European philosophy

- academic staff have a broad range of interests including German Idealism, the Frankfurt School, French and German phenomenology, poststructuralism, and modern European political theory

- the flexible structure of the course allows students to concentrate on European philosophy, or to also engage with a broader range of options

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- you will have access to the vibrant intellectual community provided by being a part of the University of London.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood

Course content and structure

- Programme structure
Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two courses from among:
Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit); The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit); and Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)
The unit will involve ten two-hour seminars on key figures in European Philosophy. The course will run through a number of central figures and problems from Immanuel Kant to the work of Jacques Derrida and Theodor Adorno. Texts will not necessarily be read in their entirety.

- Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)
This course will trace the development of French philosophical thought from its early assimilation of Husserl’s phenomenology to later post-modern and post-structuralist thinkers. The course is research-led, and so specific philosophers covered on the course are subject to change, but indicative philosophers would include Gabriel Marcel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, and Alain Badiou.

- Dissertation on European Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
- Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)
- Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)
- The Frankfurt School (½ unit)
- The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)
- Human Rights (½ unit)
- Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)
- Legacies of Wittgenstein (½ unit)
- Neo-Platonism (½ unit)
- Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)
- Political Concepts (½ unit)
- Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of philosophical approaches adopted in the European tradition, such as phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, and transcendental empiricism

- detailed understanding of some of the key philosophers in the European tradition

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of European philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Our political philosophers have research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/mapoliticalphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the programme allows you to specialise in political philosophy while addressing questions from both analytic and European perspectives

- the course brings together staff and students working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- the course offers a wide range of options both within political philosophy and outside of it

- the programme has close connections to the Department of Politics and International Relations which hosts a vibrant international community of postgraduate students working on a wide range of issues in politics, political theory, and international relations.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining at the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood.

Programme structure

Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two Courses from Among: Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit); Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ Unit); and Political Concepts (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit)
You will be given an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in contemporary Anglo-American political theory, enabling you to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Attention will be paid to some of the main paradigms through which such debate is structured (e.g. individualism v. community, and democracy v. justice), as well as the practical implications of more abstract ideas.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- Political Concepts (½ unit)
The course aims to give an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in applied political theory, enabling students to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Seminars will be based on short pieces of key reading thus fostering skills of interpretive analysis and focussing discussion.

Dissertation on Political Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)

Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)

Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)

The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)

The Frankfurt School (½ unit)

The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)

Human Rights (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)

Legacices of Wittgenstein (½ unit)

Neo-Platonism (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)

Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of approaches in contemporary political philosophy from Anglo-American and Continental traditions

- detailed understanding of philosophers and texts in key traditions in political thought

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of political philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. Read more
The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. It is grounded in current interdisciplinary methodologies informed by cultural and critical theory, and draws on the course team’s specific areas of expertise within social, cultural and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies and the history of ideas. The programme develops a connection between critical understanding and analysis of the past, with a practical, ‘hands-on’ emphasis upon the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. The programme incorporates interests and expertise spanning a wide range of cultural forms and practices, including oral history, life-story work and auto/biography, drama and performance, material artefacts, monuments, exhibitions, museums, written histories, imaginative literature, archival documents and records, painting, graphic design, photography, film, television, video, digital media, commemoration, and heritage.

These concerns are developed in relation to three pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus: Cultural Memory; Making Histories; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity. MA students enrol on one of these pathways; not all run every year. [For further details of the three pathways, see separate entries under these titles on this website.]

Each pathway comprises four component elements:

1: A compulsory core course unit that runs throughout the year and establishes the themes, issues and questions that characterize the field of enquiry, the theories and methods of its investigation and applies these to particular case studies:

For Cultural Memory the core course comprises: Cultural Memory: Concepts, Theories and Methods; Holocaust Memory; and Cultural Memory in Ireland.

For Making Histories the core course comprises: Public History, Heritage and the Representation of Brighton & Hove; Making the History of Slavery in the Atlantic World; and Making the History of the Second World War

For ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity the core course comprises: Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities; The Making of the Black Atlantic; and Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures.

2: Two optional units of 20 credits each, or one optional unit of 40 credits. These are usually taken from within the MA Humanities Programme, or from MA Programmes running elsewhere in the School of Humanities.

NB: these units may vary, and not all will be available in any one year. For up-to-date information, contact the Course Leader.

3. A Research Methods unit introducing relevant methods in cultural studies, historical inquiry, literary (textual) analysis, and cultural and critical theory; and guiding the formulation of a research topic with clear aims, methodology, sources, and a rationale for the intended treatment of the topic.


4: The Research Project enables students to investigate in depth a topic of their choice - a critical debate, or a body of cultural material, or an historical context - relevant to the broad concerns of the MA. Research normally leads to the production of a 20,000-word dissertation. The use of alternative modes of presentation - for example, the production of a video, an exhibition or a CD-Rom - may also be negotiated
.

Full-time students usually take two elements per term, part-time students usually take one. The pattern of study is flexible in order to allow all students to take advantage of the full range of options. Potential applicants are advised to discuss their particular interests with the Course Leader to explore how these might be accommodated. In cases where students’ preferred pathways or units are not available, there is usually scope to pursue these interests elsewhere on the programme, whether in relation to other units or through the Research Project.

A part-time student should expect to dedicate some 20 hours a week to their studies and a full-time student some 40 hours, mostly taken up by independent reading and writing. Teaching for all Core Courses normally takes place on weekday evenings and lasts 2 - 3 hours. Research Methods timetabling is negotiated with each group. The Research Project involves individual tuition at times agreed between student and supervisor.

The interdisciplinary course team are active researchers and leaders in their respective research fields. Please see their individual staff pages for further details of areas of research expertise and interest.
Visit Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA page on the University of Brighton website for more details!

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Identity and comparison are the stuff of politics in the 21st Century. They are key concepts in the School’s long-running MA programme in Comparative Ethnic Conflict. Read more
Identity and comparison are the stuff of politics in the 21st Century. They are key concepts in the School’s long-running MA programme in Comparative Ethnic Conflict. Ever since the end of the Cold War, ethnic conflicts have loomed large in the reporting of political developments around the world, although many of the world’s most intractable ethnic conflicts long pre-date the the Cold War. Admittedly, they have become more visible as a result of disappearance of conflict between the super-Powers as the prism though which all political developments tended to be viewed when fear of a nuclear holocaust was real.

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This flexible course brings together a team of distinguished tutors and a rich field of optional course units. The MA has been specially devised to study the theories, concepts and practical skills that underpin the powerful discipline of history when studied at an advanced level. Read more
This flexible course brings together a team of distinguished tutors and a rich field of optional course units. The MA has been specially devised to study the theories, concepts and practical skills that underpin the powerful discipline of history when studied at an advanced level.

You will select your own optional units to make a bespoke course – whether with a broader/thematic or more concentrated focus, depending on your individual interests. You will also take a methodology unit and a skills unit which includes visiting speakers from the fields of archives, museums, publishing and the media. Finally, the dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake original research on a topic of your own choice, under individual supervision.

This is an attractive advanced qualification, especially suitable if you are seeking employment in fields involving the professional creation, evaluation and dissemination of knowledge. It is also ideal if you are intending to proceed to the MPhil leading to a PhD in History.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/mahistory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will have the opportunity to study units from across all MA History options, giving you the chance to tailor your course to suit your interests (options include some courses taught at other London colleges).

- You will have access to some of the richest facilities for historical research anywhere in the world; in addition to the College’s substantial library collections, there are the National Archives, British Library and libraries of the University of London.

- Our academic staff are at the leading edge of their research and as such offer you an exceptional variety of expertise.

- We host an exciting range of research seminars that are open for you to participate in.

Department research and industry highlights

Noted for depth, breadth and innovation, the research output of Royal Holloway historians ranges from ancient to contemporary times, from Britain and Europe to America, the Middle and Far East and Australia, and from political history to economic, social, cultural, intellectual, medical, environmental, and gender history. In particular, the History Department has special strengths in social, cultural, and gender history, and in the history of ideas - with research that covers a notable range of countries, periods, and approaches.

We have a number of research centres:
- Bedford Centre for the History of Women
- 1970s Network
- Research Centre for the Holocaust and Twentieth-Century History
- Hellenic Institute
- Centre for the Study of the Domestic Interior

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a high level of skill in the research, analysis and presentation of complex/fragmentary data

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of the major concepts and theories that inform the subject

- an understanding of the various explanations and theories for change and continuity in history

- an understanding of the underlying social, cultural, economic, religious, ideological and political changes occurring during the periods studied.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered roles such as university lecturer, archivist, curator, journalist, librarian, PR consultant, teacher, freelance researcher, radio producer and a wide variety of other jobs within the ‘knowledge industries’. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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