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Masters Degrees (Holocaust)

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The unique, multidisciplinary MA Program in Holocaust Studies is dedicated to creating and nurturing a new generation of Holocaust researchers and educators. Read more

The unique, multidisciplinary MA Program in Holocaust Studies is dedicated to creating and nurturing a new generation of Holocaust researchers and educators. In addition to a rigorous and varied curriculum with leading academics and researchers, our students gain professional experience through internship opportunities at a variety of Holocaust related institutions, seminars, a foreign study tourand volunteering opportunities with Holocaust survivors to help foster personal relationship and dedication to the field of Holocaust Studies.

What you will study

The program offers courses on the history of the Holocaust period and WWII as well courses on psychological aspects of trauma, the anthropology of memory, genocide and crimes against humanity, international law, museum studies, Holocaust education, and cultural expressions of the Holocaust in film and literature. Language instruction in Yiddish and German is also offered. Both thesis and non-thesis tracks are available.

Please click here for a list of courses currently offered.

Careers

Graduates of the program are well placed for pursuing careers in academic Holocaust research and archiving, as well as a variety of roles within the sphere of Holocaust education at museums, education facilities.

Courses

  • Anthropology of Memory
  • The Holocaust Remembrance and its Impact on the Memory Politics of Genocide 
  • Literature of the Holocaust
  • Visual Culture and the Holocaust
  • From Silence to Omnipresence-Holocaust in the Curriculum
  • From Violence to Tolerance: Psychological Aspects in Holocaust Education
  • Holocaust Education for Democratic Values
  • The Final Solution
  • German Jewry Under the Nazi Regime
  • The Jews of Poland in the Second World War and the Holocaust
  • Nazi Germany
  • The Second World War
  • Holocaust in the Former Soviet Union
  • The Specter of Genocide
  • German Language Course
  • Yiddish Language Course
  • Holocaust Museums: Three Continents, Three Generations
  • Practical Training in Curating
  • Psychological Aspects of the Memory of the Holocaust
  • Research Design and Thesis Writing
  • Research Methods for Holocaust Studies
  • Research Forum Course

Please click here for more information on the courses currently offered.

Faculty

The experienced program faculty staff hold expertise in a variety of disciplines from within the field of Holocaust Studies. The department is headed by Professor Arieh Kochavi, who is the Head of the Strochilitz Institute for Holocaust Studies as well as a professor in the Department of History at The University of Haifa, and who to-date has published five books on historical aspects of the Holocaust in both English and Hebrew. For a full list of faculty staff and their fields of interest please click here.

Scholarships

The program offers scholarships based on academic merit and/or financial need. For details please write to Dr. Yael Granot-Bein at . This program is also eligible for MASA scholarship. More information on scholarships may be found here.



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The Royal Holloway MA in Holocaust Studies is unique; not only are we the only university in the UK to run an MA course solely dedicated to the field of Holocaust Studies but the Royal Holloway . Read more

The Royal Holloway MA in Holocaust Studies is unique; not only are we the only university in the UK to run an MA course solely dedicated to the field of Holocaust Studies but the Royal Holloway Holocaust Research Institute  is the leading academic centre of its kind in Europe. We are internationally recognised for our research, teaching, public advocacy and creative work. This is an ideal MA if you are pursuing an advanced interest in the Holocaust, it will provide you with a further set of skills and a qualification, it also has a highly successful track record as a springboard to doctoral research.

The Research Instiutues’s mission is to promote research into the Holocaust, its origins and aftermath, and to examine the extent to which genocide, war and dictatorship can be understood as defining elements in the history of the twentieth century. It is an international forum bringing together researchers working on different aspects of the Holocaust in a range of disciplines, including history, literary and language studies, film and media studies, philosophy and sociology. 

You have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives with a choice of topics, ranging from the more traditional, historical focus and others which examine the cultural, social, political and religious afterlife of the Holocaust. This degree brings together expert academics from across Royal Holloway, including EnglishModern Languages and History and is taught at the Wiener Library in central London and at our Egham campus.

Our distinctive features include:

Course structure

Core modules

  • History of the Holocaust
  • Interpreting the Holocaust
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Representing the Holocaust in British and American Literature
  • Film,Television and The Holocaust
  • A Transnational Holocaust
  • Genocide - Comparative Approaches

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and a dissertation. 

The dissertation must be between 14,000 - 16,000 words and is mainly written in the third term and the summer (with a deadline in early September). Students are expected to develop a topic together with their supervisor(s) during the Spring Term. Topics can be taken from various areas, such as the history and representation of the Holocaust or its impact on literatures in different countries, public and visual culture, mass media and digital narratives, and film.

On completion of the course, graduates will have advanced knowledge and understanding of:

  • the most important aspects of the history and historiography of the Holocaust
  • significant intellectual trends in cultural though, philosophy, and representation arising from the Holocaust
  • methods and concepts of various disciplines (historical, literary, philosophical and others)

Your future career

On completion of your MA in Holocaust Studies at Royal Holloway you will have developed and finessed skills, such as research, analysis and presenting, which will appeal to future employers. Your degree also demonstrates that you enjoy being challenged and that you understand complex issues. On graduation you will be ideally placed to develop your career in areas relating to the Holocaust and have a solid foundation for PhD studies.

  • Our Careers team will work with you to enhance your employability and prepare you for the choices ahead. Their support doesn’t end when you graduate; you can access the service for up to two years after graduation.
  • Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in academia, charities (such as the Holocaust Educational Trust), museums and the media.


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Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme will immerse you in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides. Read more

Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme will immerse you in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides.

You have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives with a choice of optional modules - some which have a more traditional, historical focus and others which examine the cultural, social, political and religious afterlife of the Holocaust and other genocides.

Course details

We are able to offer a unique combination of expertise in the study of the Holocaust and of genocide across a variety of disciplines, including historical studies, conflict and war studies, memory studies, literary studies, translation studies, and film studies.

In addition to taking modules directly related to the Holocaust and/or genocide, you therefore also have the opportunity to take alternative disciplinary approaches and study modules that are relevant to, but not directly related to, the topic.

All students will take two core modules:

  • Research Skills in the Study of Holocaust and Genocide: Methodologies and Sources
  • Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

MA students will also take an additional module: Dissertation Preparation and Guided Reading (Holocaust and Genocide). See below for full details of core modules.

Certificate students will take one optional module, while Diploma and MA students will take three optional modules, from a wide range of related Masters-level options within the College of Arts and Law, as well as within the Department of Political Science and International Studies (College of Social Sciences). An indicative list of options is provided below.

Certificate students are advised to take a module which directly relates to the study of Holocaust and/or genocide, chosen in consultation with the programme leader. MA and Diploma students also have the option to choose up to two of their modules from the wider College; again, this should be done in consultation with the programme leader.

Assessment

Core modules are each assessed by 4,000-word written assignment. Assessment of optional modules will vary depend on options chosen.

MA students will also complete a dissertation – this can either be a written or placement-based dissertation. If you choose to complete a written dissertation its length will be 15,000 words.

Learning and teaching

The Research Skills module is taught in an intensive three-day block, to be supported by self-directed e-learning.

The dissertation preparation module is taught via a combination of seminars and individual supervision sessions, while other modules are generally taught via weekly seminars over ten weeks.

You will be given opportunities to come into contact with experts working in their subject areas, and begin networking with such experts and your postgraduate peers, through activities such as our annual colloquium on Holocaust and genocide.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

This programme will enable you to develop your independent learning skills, develop your written and oral communication and show evidence of these to specialist and non-specialist, practitioner and academic audiences.

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Theology and Religion

Birmingham’s Theology graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills including: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Many of our graduates go into careers in churches of various denominations. Other students use their transferable skills in a range of employment sectors, including publishing, education and social work. Employers that our graduates have gone on to work for include: Church of England; Methodist Church; NHS; and University of Birmingham.



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Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme will immerse you in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides. Read more

Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme will immerse you in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides.

You have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives with a choice of optional modules - some which have a more traditional, historical focus and others which examine the cultural, social, political and religious afterlife of the Holocaust and other genocides.

Course details

We are able to offer a unique combination of expertise in the study of the Holocaust and of genocide across a variety of disciplines, including historical studies, conflict and war studies, memory studies, literary studies, translation studies, and film studies.

In addition to taking modules directly related to the Holocaust and/or genocide, you therefore also have the opportunity to take alternative disciplinary approaches and study modules that are relevant to, but not directly related to, the topic.

All students will take two core modules:

  • Research Skills in the Study of Holocaust and Genocide: Methodologies and Sources
  • Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

MA students will also take an additional module: Dissertation Preparation and Guided Reading (Holocaust and Genocide). See below for full details of core modules.

Certificate students will take one optional module, while Diploma and MA students will take three optional modules, from a wide range of related Masters-level options within the College of Arts and Law, as well as within the Department of Political Science and International Studies (College of Social Sciences). An indicative list of options is provided below.

Certificate students are advised to take a module which directly relates to the study of Holocaust and/or genocide, chosen in consultation with the programme leader. MA and Diploma students also have the option to choose up to two of their modules from the wider College; again, this should be done in consultation with the programme leader.

Assessment

Core modules are each assessed by 4,000-word written assignment. Assessment of optional modules will vary depend on options chosen.

MA students will also complete a dissertation – this can either be a written or placement-based dissertation. If you choose to complete a written dissertation its length will be 15,000 words.

Learning and teaching

The Research Skills module is taught in an intensive three-day block, to be supported by self-directed e-learning.

The dissertation preparation module is taught via a combination of seminars and individual supervision sessions, while other modules are generally taught via weekly seminars over ten weeks.

You will be given opportunities to come into contact with experts working in their subject areas, and begin networking with such experts and your postgraduate peers, through activities such as our annual colloquium on Holocaust and genocide.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

This programme will enable you to develop your independent learning skills, develop your written and oral communication and show evidence of these to specialist and non-specialist, practitioner and academic audiences.

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Theology and Religion

Birmingham’s Theology graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills including: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Many of our graduates go into careers in churches of various denominations. Other students use their transferable skills in a range of employment sectors, including publishing, education and social work. Employers that our graduates have gone on to work for include: Church of England; Methodist Church; NHS; and University of Birmingham.



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More and more colleges and universities, public, private, and parochial schools are adding Holocaust and genocide studies to their curriculum. Read more
More and more colleges and universities, public, private, and parochial schools are adding Holocaust and genocide studies to their curriculum. And more and more teachers, librarians, museum curators and administrators are realizing the importance of preparing themselves for the study of these subjects.

With this in mind, a Master of Arts degree in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been developed to help scholars pursue the study of the Holocaust and other genocides and to seek answers as to how they may be prevented. Because this study involves more than the history of the development of genocides, various departments are supplying courses that provide greater understanding of the forces leading to them.

Curriculum

The Masters Degree requires thirty credits. A thesis, if preferred, will fulfill six credits.

Core modules:

• HIS 545 Holocaust
• HIS 546 Genocide in Modern History
• HIS 523 History of Modern Germany
• HIS 543 Jews in Modern European History

To see what Electives are available please visit the website:

https://wcupa.edu/arts-humanities/holocaust/academicPrograms.asp

History Skills

With your history degree, you can do anything and go anywhere, because the skills you learn here can take you far:

Investigation: One of the most important skills our history students learn is the skill of investigation, from the art of asking good questions that help define the problem at hand, to the research skills in finding sources, to the skills of analysis and interpretation historians apply to our subject. Perhaps most importantly, you will learn the skill of effectively using evidence to draw conclusions.

Collaboration: We all must learn to play nice with others. The skills of collaboration, communication, and compromise are all significant ones that you must gain to join any sort of future work force. We practice them here in the classroom, working on group projects and presentations, leading and following while gaining skills in flexibility and adaptation.

Problem Solving: Our students leave campus as creative problem solvers, who can think imaginatively not only about past events, but about the world today. The ability to think critically and creatively about the past will give you the skills to help solve the problems we face today and in the future.

21st Century Skills: History majors also learn many digital skills necessary for any future job. Our students work on digital history projects, building websites and creating multimedia presentations, editing video and audio. You can claim ownership of the projects you create, listing them on resumes and talking about them in job interviews. Students also become savvy online researchers, capable of discovering, evaluating, and aggregating the vast wealth of available sources.

Careers

A history major need not mean commitment to a life in poverty. Recent studies suggest that history majors fair well in salaries. WCU history graduates have found employment in a broad range of professions and occupations, including:

• high school teachers
• university professors
• lawyers and judges
• ministers
• museum professionals
• archivists
• librarians
• journalists
• screenwriters
• law enforcement officers
• business
• public officials (in the United States Congress as well as the Pennsylvania General Assembly)
• fundraiser/ development officer
• non-profit administrator
• editor

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This course allows graduates to pursue research in the field of Holocaust and Genocide studies. The degree comprises independent research and a course designed to develop knowledge of key research skills and practices. Read more
This course allows graduates to pursue research in the field of Holocaust and Genocide studies. The degree comprises independent research and a course designed to develop knowledge of key research skills and practices.

Why choose this course?

Recognised internationally for their distinctive focus on the world, International Relations and History at Nottingham Trent University offer vibrant and dynamic research environments specialising in the understanding of international politics and historical events.

Award degrees are available in the following subject areas:

Holocaust Studies
Holocaust and Memory
Post Holocaust Genocide
Genocide Studies
Comparative Genocide
Film, Literature and Genocide.

Special features

In the School of Arts and Humanities our academics have a wide range of research interests including film, literature, media representations, the role of language and journalism as well as international relations and history. Many of our scholars work touches upon aspects of Holocaust, genocide and memory, providing an ideal intellectual community for anyone wanting to explore these ideas further.

You will join a thriving postgraduate community of researchers in International Relations and History and a unique student support structure with a dedicated team of tutors and supervisors.

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A certificate in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been developed to help scholars pursue the study of the Holocaust and other genocides and to seek answers as to how they may be prevented. Read more
A certificate in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been developed to help scholars pursue the study of the Holocaust and other genocides and to seek answers as to how they may be prevented. Because this study involves more than the history of the development of genocides, various departments are supplying courses that provide greater understanding of the forces leading to them.

Curriculum

A Certificate of Studies requires 15 credits.

Core modules:

• HIS 545 Holocaust
• HIS 546 Genocide in Modern History

Students will also select four electives. Please visit the website to see what electives are available on this course:

https://wcupa.edu/arts-humanities/holocaust/academicPrograms.asp

Learning Outcomes

Graduate history courses at WCU enhance the ability of students to:

Construct generalizations and interpretations that demonstrate an advanced knowledge of historical eras, change over time, and key historical concepts in the history of the United States, Western Civilization, and global civilization.

Communicate effectively at the graduate level (in both oral and written presentations) their advanced knowledge of history in reasoned arguments supported by historical evidence and an appreciation of multiple causes, effects, and perspectives.

Locate, distinguish between, and assess primary and secondary sources, and to analyze and interpret a variety of written, oral, visual, and material evidence at an advanced level (Information Literacy).

Connect their advanced knowledge of historical events and topics to a broader context (historical, historiographical, political, global, or with contemporary life and issues).

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The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. Read more

The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. This programme will enable you to study the subject in detail, to update your knowledge, and to become familiar with the use of personal accounts, including interviews and testimonies. You will be taught by experts in the field, and you will carry out your own research in your favourite area.

You will study in depth some of the key issues in the military, political, and social history of the Second World War, such as strategy, diplomacy and politics of Axis and Allied forces, the war in the air, the victory campaign in the West, and the war in the East, including life under German occupation, the fate of societies under the conditions of total war, and last but not least, the Holocaust.

Why Wolverhampton?

Our part-time Master’s programme will enable you to explore the history of the Second World War. Special consideration will be given to military conflicts, societies at war, and the Holocaust.

You will be guided by a team of historians with the highest international reputation, led by Professor John Buckley and Professor Johannes-Dieter Steinert. The team includes Professor Gary Sheffield, Professor Stephen Badsey; and you will in addition be taught by other international scholars such as Professor John Gooch, Professor Martin Alexander, and Dr Peter Gray.

You will benefit from our international scholarly activities, among them the multidisciplinary conference series “Beyond Camps and Forced Labour. Current International Research on Survivors of Nazi Persecution” (Imperial War Museums, London), “Children and War: Past and Present” (in association with the UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict), battlefield tour/study trips to Normandy and the Low Countries and the University of Wolverhampton’s oral history programme and archive.

Career path

Successful completion of the course will enhance your career prospects and could lead to a specialised career in museums, education, armed forces, or as a battlefield guide, along with more general arts-related careers.

It will be particularly relevant to researchers, teachers, journalists, political and central government professionals, civil servants, military professionals, charity and campaign workers.

Attainment of the MA degree could also lead to doctoral research.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate critical and analytical understanding of key issues and debates in the history of the Second World War and Holocaust.
  • Demonstrate the ability to negotiate, design and undertake independent research based on primary sources.
  • Exercise critical, evaluative and analytical skills in relation to historiographical debates and sources.
  • Communicate effectively at an appropriate level for a Masters programme.


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Religion and faith are major influences on social, cultural and political life around the world. This interdisciplinary MA draws on a range of perspectives to study the public roles of religious communities and individuals. Read more

Religion and faith are major influences on social, cultural and political life around the world. This interdisciplinary MA draws on a range of perspectives to study the public roles of religious communities and individuals.

You’ll think about theological and philosophical responses to issues in the public sphere, the place of religion in public policy on issues such as discrimination and multiculturalism, and the bonds that tie individuals to their communities. Using approaches from sociology, religious studies, theology, history, anthropology and philosophy among others, you’ll also learn about the research process.

Core modules will introduce you to key issues and approaches, and you’ll choose from optional modules to explore topics that suit your interests such as religion and gender, Muslims and multiculturalism, or remembering the Holocaust. Guided by experts in an active research environment, you’ll gain an insight into the significance of religion in the public sphere.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module that develops your understanding of the research process, equipping you with a range of skills from different disciplines. You’ll learn about interviewing and other forms of fieldwork as well as working with legal and historical documents, the use of theory and ethics among others.

A second core module in the following semester will build your knowledge of the role of religion in public life, focusing on issues such as the meaning of secular and post-secular society, tolerance and religious freedom, multiculturalism and globalisation. By the end of the year, you’ll be able to showcase the knowledge and skills you’ve gained with your dissertation – an independently researched project on a topic of your choice – and you can even choose to extend your dissertation to go into greater depth.

You’ll also have the chance to select from a range of optional modules. These will allow you to specialise in topics that suit your interests, from religion and global development to Islam in the modern world. You’ll take two optional modules if you do the standard dissertation, or you can swap one for the extended dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

There are three compulsory modules throughout the year including the Dissertation (60 credits). You’ll then choose two optional modules, or just one if you select the Extended Dissertation (90 credits).

  • Religion and Society: Research Process and Methods 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Modernity and the Jews 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • Sin, Public Discourse and Public Life 30 credits
  • Religions and Global Development 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • Muslims, Multiculturalism and the State 30 credits
  • Religion, Politics and the Future: From Apocalypse to Utopia 30 credits
  • Theology and Public Life 30 credits
  • Research Project (Theology and Religious Studies) 30 credits
  • Special Options in Theology and Religious Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Religion and Public Life MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Religion and Public Life MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules use a combination of lectures and seminars, which allow you to discuss the issues arising from your lectures and reading. Independent study is also an important element of this programme, as it allows you to develop your skills and gives you space to form your own ideas.

Assessment

We also use a range of assessment methods. These usually include essays, but some modules may involve project reports and presentations. Modules taught by other Schools within the University may also use different methods.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with diverse and in-depth subject knowledge, as well as strong political and cultural awareness. These are all valuable in a wide range of careers – and you’ll also have advanced skills in areas such as analysis and interpretation, oral and written communication, and different types of research.

Graduates pursue careers in a variety of sectors including the charity sector, NGOs, education, local government, civil service and policy work, business and legal services, the media and social work. Many also continue their studies at PhD level, and even pursue academic careers after this.

We offer plenty of support to boost your employability, including an impressive array of research training offered by the School, the University Library and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute. The School also has a dedicated postgraduate employment advisor who can offer tailored careers advice.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The MA in English covers literature and popular culture in their historical contexts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a focus on literature post-1800. Read more
The MA in English covers literature and popular culture in their historical contexts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a focus on literature post-1800. It provides you with the opportunity to undertake a comparative study of literature, history and popular culture and develop research skills and methodologies. The programme will appeal if you are interested in combining the study of ‘serious’ literature with popular writing, women’s literature, and topics such as Empire, American national identity, the Victorian period, Holocaust and Second World War, approached as interdisciplinary case studies from the perspective of literature, history, popular culture and print culture. The course enables you to work across subject boundaries and provides excellent preparation if you wish to pursue a PhD in the future.

What will I study?

The programme consists of two compulsory modules (20 credits each), four optional modules (20 credits each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credits). You will be guided to a combination of optional modules focusing on literature and popular culture, or a combination of literature modules and modules on a historical topic or theme.

If you are interested in literature, the available options cover texts from the sixteenth century to the present day, with a predominant focus on literature post-1880. Themes include gender, popular culture, ‘transgressive’ women’s writing, masculinity, print culture, humour, the gothic, and various theoretical and critical perspectives.

History-related modules focus on themes from the last three centuries, including topics such as Empire, the Holocaust and the Second World War, approached as interdisciplinary case studies involving the study of history, literature and culture (especially popular culture).

How will I study?

You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and guided independent learning. Taught sessions take place between 6pm-9pm on weekday evenings. If you are studying full-time you will attend two evenings per week and if you are studying part-time you will attend one evening per week.

[[How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through a combination of assignments which, depending on the modules you choose, may include essays, critical reviews, critical diaries, presentations and research-based projects, and a dissertation.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by a team of specialist tutors who are active researchers and committed teachers with interests in literature, popular culture, genre studies, modern history, women’s studies, history and print culture.

What are my career prospects?

Graduates in the humanities with a higher degree find employment in a wide variety of careers such as teaching, arts organisation and management, the heritage industry, publishing, advertising, journalism, libraries and learning centres, and management/administration.

Alternatively, upon successful completion of the programme, you may wish to apply to progress onto a research degree such as an MPhil or PhD.

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The MA in History and Culture will appeal if you have interests that cross the boundaries of history, popular culture, print culture and literature and would like to pursue this combined focus. Read more
The MA in History and Culture will appeal if you have interests that cross the boundaries of history, popular culture, print culture and literature and would like to pursue this combined focus.

The programme seeks to understand the modern world through perspectives derived from the study of history, literature, popular culture and print culture. You will pursue thematic subjects, such as empire, propaganda and gender, and examine select interdisciplinary ‘case studies’ such as the Victorian city, the Second World War and the Holocaust.

You will gain experience of the advanced study of history, develop the practical skills necessary to undertake work across subject boundaries and receive training in transferable research skills and methodologies. On graduation, you will be well placed to pursue a research-based higher degree, such as a PhD, should you wish to do so.

What will I study?

The programme consists of two core modules (20 credits each), four optional modules (20 credits each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credits).

You will be guided to a combination of optional modules focused upon the interdisciplinary study of modern and contemporary history or a combination of these modules with others which have a strong literature and popular culture content.

You may combine period studies, focused, for example, on the Victorian period, the Second World War and the Holocaust, with more generic modules concerned with subject such as ‘transgressive women’ and empire.

How will I study?

You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and guided independent learning. Taught sessions take place between 6pm-9pm on weekday evenings. If you are studying full-time you will attend two evenings per week and if you are studying part-time you will attend one evening per week.

How will I be assessed?]]

You will be assessed through a combination of assignments which, depending on the modules you choose, may include essays, critical reviews, critical diaries, online discussions, presentations and research-based projects and a dissertation.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by a team of specialist tutors who are active researchers and committed teachers with interests in history, literature, popular culture and print culture.

What are my career prospects?

Graduates in the humanities with a higher degree find employment in a wide variety of careers such as teaching, arts organisation and management, the heritage industry, publishing, advertising, journalism, libraries and learning centres, and management/administration.

Alternatively, upon successful completion of the programme, you may wish to apply to progress onto a research degree such as an MPhil or PhD.

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Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History). (MA title is subject to approval). The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. Read more
Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History)

(MA title is subject to approval)

The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. It trains scholars towards undertaking independent research on Jewish history, culture and thought in Europe. You will consider patterns of inclusion and exclusion and questions of citizenship and emancipation. The MA will introduce you to a wide range of sources for European Jewish studies. Particular attention will be paid to the Jewish response to modernity and problems around issues of assimilation and identity. The role of antisemitism and the origins of the holocaust are central, as is Jewish intellectual history, in particular the ideas of eminent Jewish thinkers about the place of Jews and Judaism in premodern and modern society.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module, three modules chosen from a series of options and an individually supervised dissertation. Students will also take a non-assessed research methods module. Part-time students
take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year.

Optional modules may include:

Modern Jewish History and Culture
Christians and Jews in Europe: Perceptions and Encounters, 1100-1600
Jews, Power and Intellectual History
Antisemitism and the Holocaust
Modern European Jewish Literature
Hollywood and the Second World War
Understanding Religion Historically
Overcoming Nazism

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About this programme. Students will understand why history is taught in schools, how pupils learn and make sense of the past, and how to teach history in an exciting way that develops learners. Read more

About this programme

Students will understand why history is taught in schools, how pupils learn and make sense of the past, and how to teach history in an exciting way that develops learners. There are five key themes underpinning the programme: 'diverse histories', 'history for all', 'historical thinking', 'engaging with history' and ‘ becoming a professional history teacher'. These themes reflect our location in the capital, the wide range of schools and students that we work with and our ambition to engage, challenge and enlighten all learners.

Students undertake two level 7 (Master’s-level) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level (level 7) modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE).

Core modules

  • History in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)
  • Learning, Teaching and Assessing History (30 Master's-level credits)
  • Professional Practice

Optional modules

  • There are no optional modules for this programme

Placement

Students spend most of their time (120) days in schools, working with history mentors who support them through two school placements. We are fortunate to have a good choice of schools to work with, within our regions inside the London Orbital Motorway (M25). The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning

Teaching at UCL-IOE is mostly through seminars and workshops in your teaching base group of about twenty trainee teachers, with additional keynote and subject lectures, tutorials and directed study days, as well as time spent in placements. Assessment is by practical teaching, assignments and portfolio tasks.

Students will also record their progress in a Career Entry and Development Profile statement. This will form part of an ongoing portfolio charting the student's continuing professional development.

Further information on modules and programme structure is available on the department website: PGCE History

Funding

Bursaries are available for some subject programmes to students who meet the eligibility criteria. To find out what funding may be available to you, please visit the Department for Education funding page.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the UCL Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as history teachers and heads of department in schools, while others have jobs as history educators in museums and archives. Graduates in this area can also be found working as senior leaders in schools.

Employability

Graduates of the Secondary PGCE programme are highly employable and sought after by schools and colleges in London and beyond. Almost all graduates secure their first teaching post by the time they finish the PGCE programme. Graduates of the programme also have great career prospects, with many becoming Head of Department or a Head of Year within 2-5 years, often acting, in their schools, as mentors to new PGCE student teachers. Many of our graduates become senior teachers (such as Assistant Headteachers or Head of a Faculty) in 5-8 years of graduating, and some are now Headteachers. Others have developed their careers as subject specialist teachers and educators, both becoming lead teachers in the classroom and researching, writing and advising other teachers themselves. The Secondary PGCE Programme is a springboard into a rewarding career, not just as a skilled teacher, but as an educational leader.

Why study this programme at UCL?

Students will be joining the largest History PGCE programme in the country, allowing them to benefit from a team of tutors with a wide range of expertise and interests. Students will also be able to develop strong peer networks across tutor groups and share ideas, resources and advice.

The IOE History PGCE offers students unique opportunities such as placements at museums or other historical sites, in order to develop understanding of learning history outside the classroom.

The IOE also hosts the Centre for Holocaust Education and the First World War Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme and we provide the opportunity to complete a full two-day teachers' programme in Holocaust Education as part of the PGCE. Moreover, we have strong links with the history department at UCL and their specialist units like the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership.

Accreditation:

Students who successfully complete this programme will be recommended for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).



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School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established History PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance. Read more

School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established History PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance.

About this programme

Students will understand why history is taught in schools, how pupils learn and make sense of the past, and how to teach history in an exciting way that develops learners. There are five key themes underpinning the programme: “diverse histories”, “history for all”, “historical thinking”, “engaging with history” and “becoming a professional history teacher”. These themes reflect our location in the capital, the wide range of schools and students that we work with, and our ambition to engage, challenge and enlighten all learners.

Students undertake two Master’s-level (level 7) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE).

Core modules

  • History in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)
  • Learning, Teaching and Assessing History (30 Master's-level credits)
  • Professional Practice

Optional modules

  • There are no optional modules in this programme.

Placement

Students spend most of their time (120 days) in schools, working with history mentors who support them through school placements. The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placement at the host school or alliance. Assessment is by the observation of practical teaching, assignments and a portfolio (which links into continuing professional development in the induction year).

Further information on modules and programme structure is available on the department website: School Direct (Tuition Fee): History

Funding

Bursaries of up to £9,000 are available to students who meet the eligibility criteria for the History programme. To find out what funding may be available to you, please visit the Department for Education website.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the UCL Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as history teachers and heads of department in schools, while others have jobs as history educators in museums and archives. Graduates in this area can also be found working as senior leaders in schools.

Employability

Graduates of the Secondary PGCE programme are highly employable and sought after by schools and colleges in London and beyond. Almost all graduates secure their first teaching post by the time they finish the PGCE programme. Graduates of the programme also have great career prospects, with many becoming Head of Department or a Head of Year within 2-5 years, often acting, in their schools, as mentors to new PGCE student teachers. Many of our graduates become senior teachers (such as Assistant Headteachers or Head of a Faculty) in 5-8 years of graduating, and some are now Headteachers. Others have developed their careers as subject specialist teachers and educators, both becoming lead teachers in the classroom and researching, writing and advising other teachers themselves. The Secondary PGCE Programme is a springboard into a rewarding career, not just as a skilled teacher, but as an educational leader.

Why study this programme at UCL?

History, according to the current national curriculum, “should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past”. Our aim is to equip students to do just that, developing their ability to plan meaningful historical experiences for pupils in the 11-16 age range, to teach effectively and to assess their own and their pupils’ achievements.

Students will be joining the largest History PGCE programme in the country, allowing them to benefit from a team of tutors with a wide range of expertise and interests. Students will also be able to develop strong peer networks across tutor groups and share ideas, resources and advice. The IOE History PGCE offers students unique opportunities such as placements at museums or other historical sites, in order to develop understanding of learning history outside the classroom.

The IOE has one of the largest groups of university-based history education specialists in the world and hosts the Centre for Holocaust Education and the award-winning First World War Centenary Battlefields Tours Programme. The programme draws on this expertise, for example, providing the opportunity to complete a full two-day teachers’ programme in Holocaust Education as part of the PGCE.

Accreditation:

This route leads to the award of QTS (Qualified Teacher Status).



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The MA in English Literary Studies will give you the opportunity to pursue literary topics and genres from a wide selection of authors and periods. Read more

The MA in English Literary Studies will give you the opportunity to pursue literary topics and genres from a wide selection of authors and periods: from Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and Eighteenth-Century fiction to Victorian print culture, Modernisms and Modernities, Literature and Law, Holocaust Literature, and postcolonial world literatures.

The programme can be taken over one year full time or two years part time.

Introducing your degree

The programme will empower you to conduct advanced-level research and independent critical thinking; to make effective use of archives, manuscripts, and research libraries; and to examine how literature shapes the public understanding of diverse fields such as climate change, economics, medicine, religion, and more. Not only will you emerge with an internationally-recognised masters degree from a top Russell Group university, you will also acquire the critical thinking and writing skills that will give you the competitive edge, either as a future scholar or as a professional in careers such as writing, broadcasting, teaching, and public administration.

Overview

The MA is a broad-based programme that allows you to explore the interrelations of text, theory, and culture across the field of English literary and cultural studies. The flexible structure is designed to give you an advanced understanding of the study and practice of academic English literary studies in terms of cultural analysis, textual interpretation, and theoretical method.

The MA in English Literary Studies will enable you to work independently in the field, to explore a range of periods and genres of English literature and culture as well as creative writing, and to evaluate unique archival resources. It will develop your knowledge and understanding of critical and research methods, raise your awareness of the historical and critical reception of literature in various periods, and help you explore the role of literature in a contested cultural framework.

View the programme specification document for this course.

Career Opportunities

An MA in English Literary Studies is excellent preparation for a career in teaching, publishing and arts administration. Graduates of our programme go onto professional careers in writing (from journalism to fiction), education, international PhD programmes, teaching, broadcasting, and varied work in the creative industries. Former graduates and alumni return to give talks throughout the year, and you will help you make the most of the opportunities here.

A number of our graduates have gone on to careers in teaching, journalism, media and found the year-long course invaluable in shaping and developing their voice.



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