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Public history refers to the pursuit of historical understanding and interpretation in the public realm. MTSU was in the first wave of American universities to embrace the study of public history and now offers a master’s degree, doctorate, and advanced certificates. Read more
Public history refers to the pursuit of historical understanding and interpretation in the public realm. MTSU was in the first wave of American universities to embrace the study of public history and now offers a master’s degree, doctorate, and advanced certificates. Students pursuing the Master of Arts in History with a concentration in Public History may choose from five tracks: historic preservation and cultural resource management, museum management, archival management, oral history, and public archaeology. Master’s candidates are exposed to the myriad career possibilities associated with each specialty, helping them select the curriculum best suited to their interests and aspirations. The program carefully balances academic historical methods and scholarship; the intellectual foundations and nature of public history; and professional development in several areas. To prepare students for professional practice, the program partners with a number of on-campus centers and initiatives, including the Center for Historic Preservation, Albert Gore Research Center, Center for Popular Music, and Walker Library digital collections.

Career

Public historians work in a wide range of professional settings with public audiences of all ages. Potential employers include archives, museums, historic organizations, historical societies, historic sites, private consulting firms, and historical agencies at all levels of government. Examples of career possibilities with an advanced degree in public history include:

Architectural historian
Archivist
Author
College professor/instructor
Consultant
Cultural heritage manager
Cultural resources manager
Digital librarian/cataloger
Historic preservation planner
Historian
Museum/collections curator or administrator
Oral historian
Public archaeologist

Employers of MTSU alumni include:

Alabama Department of Archives and History
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
American Association for State and Local History
Belle Meade Plantation
Belmont Mansion
East Tennessee Historical Society
Historic Home of T.R.R. Cobb
Historical Association of Catawba County, N.C.
History Center, Diboll, Texas
Huntsville (Ala.) Historic Preservation Commission
Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve
Land Trust for Tennessee
Manzanar National Historic Site
Maymont Foundation, Richmond, Va.
Metro Nashville Arts Commission
Mike Curb Archives
New South Associates
Ohio History Connection
President James K. Polk Ancestral Home
Rutherford County Archives
Tennessee Agricultural Museum
Tennessee Department of Transportation
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Thomason & Associates
Vicksburg (Miss.) Foundation for Historic Preservation
Williamson County Archives and Museum
War in the Pacific National Hist

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Our highly regarded Architectural Conservation programme is more than 40 years old; it is the longest-established graduate historic preservation programme in the UK. Read more

Programme description

Our highly regarded Architectural Conservation programme is more than 40 years old; it is the longest-established graduate historic preservation programme in the UK.

Whether you’re approaching the field from an architectural, historical, geological or other viewpoint, this programme will guide you through the foundations and challenges of this important means of nurturing cultural and national identity.

You will benefit from learning on our historic campus (located in Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site), along with the exhibitions and events associated with a vibrant art college.

You’ll be part of the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies (SCCS), a specialist teaching and research unit that provides the depth of expertise and resources that makes this programme one of the few of its kind in the UK to be recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation. Placements are also available through our partnerships with relevant organisations, allowing you to flex your skills in a practical setting.

Programme structure

The programme is assessed through individual written papers, group projects, presentations, and report writing. An intensive field trip to Germany (optional) will give you the chance to explore conservation issues in another setting. Following the taught courses, you will research and write a dissertation of 14,000–15,000 words on an aspect of architectural conservation.

Learning outcomes

To complete your studies, you must demonstrate your familiarity with the historical and theoretical foundations and challenges of historic preservation; the techniques of recording and research and the technologies of building repair; the influences of planning law, contemporary architecture and building economics on the historic built environment; and the special conservation challenges of Modern Movement architecture and urban planning.

You will also develop more general practical and intellectual skills, in areas such as project organisation, historical research, or graphic and oral communication.

Career opportunities

This programme aims to provide students with the broad base of knowledge and skills necessary to embark on a career in one of the many professional sub-disciplines of historic preservation, ranging from heritage management to conservation architecture.

Crucially, your qualification will be extremely well regarded thanks to its recognition by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation, the UK’s official organisation of architectural preservation professionals.

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Accredited training for building conservation professionals. The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. Read more
Accredited training for building conservation professionals

Why choose this course?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. The programme conforms with the international ICOMOS Guidelines for Education and Training in Conservation.

Having run successfully for more than 40 years, the programme is now supported by a network of specialist conservation and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally. Contributors to the course include national experts from English Heritage, Council for British Archaeology, ICOMOS-UK, Historic Scotland, and the National Trust and from a large number of local conservation and heritage organisations.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage building conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build working relationships with national and international conservation specialists and research organisations.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, practical experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

What does the course cover?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) covers the history, ethics and philosophy of historic environment conservation together with a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. It is complemented by training in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings. The practical ‘skills modules’ focus on specific aspects of professional practice, repair and conservation techniques, legislation and planning, policy, finance and managing conservation projects.

Who is it for?

This course attracts graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history and related subjects. It also appeals to experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields, who wish to advance their professional training.

What can it lead to?

The course provides the knowledge and practical skills required for a range of careers in historic building conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust and English Heritage to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) focuses on enhancing students’ employability and professional development with a combination of practical skills training and theoretical teaching. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge so that your chances of employment as a conservation professional are improved.
-Developed both intellectually and personally as a result of having dealt directly with conservation professionals and completed a sustained independent research project.
-Developed the ability to work both within a group through seminar and placement experiences, and independently through research for a dissertation.

The accredited training provided by this course has led postgraduates into varied careers in historic building conservation across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

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The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors. Read more
The MSc in Architectural Conservation is a taught course aimed at professionals and academics world-wide with an interest in architectural heritage including architects, engineers, archaeologists, art historians, geographers and surveyors.

This course is fully recognised by The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The course provides both a thorough understanding of architectural heritage and the skills required to contribute to the preservation and development of historic sites. Benefiting from its location in the historic town of Canterbury, the programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning Cathedral provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site.

Open to students and professionals with an interest in architectural heritage, the course represents an ideal gateway to a career in demanding professional fields, such as conservation-oriented architectural practice, conservation consultancy and heritage management. As the future leaders in these fields, the course’s graduates are expected to play a central role in disciplines that lie at the centre of the current economic, environmental and social agendas.

This programme is offered jointly within two faculties, Humanities and Sciences.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/362/architectural-conservation

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MSc is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice.

The programme has a varied curriculum which reflects the multidisciplinary nature of conservation. The autumn term cultivates a critical understanding of historic buildings and provides an introduction to conservation philosophy and policy. The acquisition of a strong theoretical background is the basis for the study of practical techniques for the survey and preservation of architectural heritage.

Case studies and workshops carried out in collaboration with Canterbury Cathedral introduce you to the properties of historic building materials and the techniques employed in the repair of historic buildings. This aspect of the programme benefits from cutting-edge survey equipment and the use of conservation laboratories. A conservation project offers you the opportunity to design an intervention to an existing historic site in the historic centre of Canterbury. The dissertation that concludes the programme invites you to study an aspect of the conservation cycle of your choice, employing a high standard of scholarship.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR841 - Structural Appraisal of Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR842 - The Legislative Framework (30 credits)
AR843 - Intervention at Historic Buildings (30 credits)
AR844 - Conservation Principles (30 credits)
AR898 - Dissertation: MSc in Architectural Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is mostly through coursework, with essays, reports, projects and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- ensure you are equipped with academic, professional, and personal skills and qualities that enable you to make a positive contribution related to the preservation of historic buildings.

- cultivate an appreciation of the different values that people can attach to historic buildings and places.

- promote an awareness of traditional building crafts as a valuable cultural resource.

- develop a thorough understanding of the processes that maintain and enhance historic places and the activities that change them.

- develop knowledge of the theoretical, historical, and professional context of architectural conservation.

- promote multidisciplinary collaboration and interaction with a wide range of professional bodies and individuals who have a role to play in the development of the built environment.

- ensure graduates develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to provide informed and specialist advice and to cultivate an awareness of their responsibility as consultants in the field of architectural conservation.

- understand the role that architectural conservation has to play as part of the modern ecological agenda.

- encourage the observation of the historic environment as a whole and its use as an educational resource.

- provide teaching informed by research and scholarship.

- develop an understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning.

- build on close ties within Europe and elsewhere, reflecting Kent’s position as the UK’s European university.

- promote the understanding and preservation of local and national architectural heritage.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course enables you to become a professional within the specialist field of historic building conservation. London is rich in its collection of historic buildings, and the course team places great emphasis on using these to illustrate and inform elements of the course. Read more
This course enables you to become a professional within the specialist field of historic building conservation. London is rich in its collection of historic buildings, and the course team places great emphasis on using these to illustrate and inform elements of the course. In particular, past and ongoing works at the Historic Royal Palaces, together with several national and local heritage organisations and practitioners, are used as the basis for project work.

Key features
-The course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), and on successful completion graduates will be able to register for the RICS final assessment programme. The course is also recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC).
-The course team works closely with a variety of different organisations, including Historic Royal Palaces, building preservation trusts, Historic England, specialist practitioners, craftsmen and contractors.
-The course is consciously interdisciplinary and international. Current and former students include archaeologists, architects, architectural technologists, chartered surveyors, craftsmen, engineers, and project and construction managers.
-The course provides opportunities to work alongside other postgraduates in the Faculty and the wider university, including those studying architecture, landscape architecture and building surveying.

What will you study?

The course is designed to balance strategic analysis with a good working knowledge of core techniques. You will acquire the skills and knowledge to extend your current practice and/or gain knowledge and expertise in new areas. You will work with a range of professionals and specialists to broaden your understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the field. A week-long field trip to a European city will provide the opportunity to further develop your technical knowledge and embed it within a practice scenario.

Assessment

Essays, reports, seminars, workshops, group field trip, project work, presentations, and dissertation.
Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Analysing and Condition of Historic Buildings
-Defects and Pathology, Repair and Renewal
-Legislation and Economics for Historic Buildings
-Regeneration and Conservation of Historic Environments
-Research Principles and Application
-Research Project

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The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites within the context of the wider built environment and the town planning process. Read more
The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites within the context of the wider built environment and the town planning process.

The course follows the International Commission on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines on education and training, is multidisciplinary and develops knowledge and skills in historic conservation and independent study and research capabilities.

The teaching programme covers the knowledge, skills and professional capabilities identified by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as the foundation for professional practice.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/historic-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- The course draws on the expertise of built environment teaching staff at Brookes and from the University of Oxford's Department for Continuing Education.

- Most modules include site visits and/or fieldwork, which give you direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

- The Historic Conservation team has an excellent record of research for organisations such as the EU, English Heritage and the government Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

- Visiting speakers from central and local government, conservation agencies, business and industry, consultancies, research bodies and other university departments provide further input bringing that real-world experience to the course.

- The Department of Planning is renowned internationally for its research. In REF 2014 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent.

- Oxford is internationally renowned for its cultural heritage and for the beauty and variety of its historical architecture, presenting many valuable learning opportunities for Historic Conservation students.

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the variety of topics and techniques associated with historic conservation. These include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work.

Most modules also include site visits and/or fieldwork, which provide students with direct experience of the practical application of conservation principles.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework based.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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Training for careers in heritage conservation. If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Read more
Training for careers in heritage conservation

Why choose this course?

If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Established in 1972, the course was the first of its kind in the UK, and has developed an international reputation for producing highly skilled and knowledgeable conservation practitioners.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build relationships with conservation specialists and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

The University also validates the MSc in Building Conservation and Timber Building Conservation at the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum in Sussex, more details from the Weald & Downland Museum webpage.

What does the course at York cover?

The core of the MA in Conservation Studies covers the history and philosophy of historic environment conservation, and provides a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. Theoretical elements of the course are complemented by a wide choice of short ‘skills modules’, which focus on developing your knowledge of the specialist skills that are an essential part of professional practice.

By choosing a specific set of accredited modules, you can gain the more specialised MA in Conservations Studies (Historic Buildings), which is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). As such, it offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners working towards full professional membership of the IHBC.

Who is it for?

This course attracts a vibrant mix of UK and international students. These include graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history, and related subjects, as well as experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields. We welcome the diversity of our students’ backgrounds.

What can it lead to?

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills required for a wide range of careers in heritage conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust, Historic England, English Heritage and ICCROM to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies has a strong focus on enhancing employability and professional development with a valuable combination of practical skills and theoretical understanding. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge, improving your chances of employment as a heritage-conservation practitioner.
-Developed intellectually and personally through direct engagement with conservation professionals and specialists.
-Developed the ability to work in a team through group working and placement experiences, and independently through research for your dissertation
-Received guidance on career opportunities in the conservation sector and the key networks for employment
-Worked alongside our Regional Heritage Skills Coordinator with the National Heritage Training Academy

Course postgraduates have gone on to careers in heritage conservation roles across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-INTACH (Indian National Trust)
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Chartered surveying
-Planning
-Business and administration
-Education
-International affairs
-Research

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If you have a passion and enthusiasm for the heritage of historic buildings and structures, and wish to specialise in this area, this course is ideal. Read more

Why take this course?

If you have a passion and enthusiasm for the heritage of historic buildings and structures, and wish to specialise in this area, this course is ideal.

You can explore why it is important to retain such heritage sites, the financial constraints and consequences of doing so, the methods available to restore them and how heritage can be managed to best effect.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Get involved with some of our regional regeneration projects to test and develop your ideas
Undertake studio-based design projects and engage with our other collaborative projects with academic institutions in a range of countries including Turkey, Spain and Australia
Have the opportunity to ‘earn and learn’ by working on real-life contracts through our Projects Office

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is also professionally accredited and follows the education guidelines of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS ), UNESCO and Council of Europe requirements. It is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and covers its areas of competence. It is also accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), and prepares architects and surveyors to accreditation standards (AABC and RICS Building Conservation Forum), facilitating work on English Heritage and Heritage Lottery Fund-funded projects. Students can also apply for full IHBC membership after two years of professional experience, as opposed to five years.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Conservation work
Consultancy
Regeneration projects
Heritage management

Module Details

This course uses the experience and skills of teaching staff with a proven track record in interior historic building and conservation studies, practice and research. You will also benefit from an inter-disciplinary learning environment where more than 100 postgraduate students in architecture, interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation can meet and work.

Here are the units you will study:

Practice: In this unit you will focus mainly on the practical aspects of the conservation, with an emphasis on raising awareness in conservation skills. It is delivered in collaboration with regional, national and internationals bodies specialising in conservation and is mainly fieldwork based, enabling you to analyse practical aspects and skills in different situations. Assessment is by means of submission of a number of different projects and reports related to practice.

Theory: You will learn the theoretical aspects of historic building conservation, such as historical aspects related to built heritage and relevant legislative frameworks to ensure their protection for future generations. You will look at the international historic preservation principles based on UNESCO/ICOMOS criteria.

Research Methods and Research Proposal: In this unit you will develop research skills, which will aid you throughout your course and particularly in producing your thesis. You will be asked to establish a critical position within an Outline Research Proposal. You will develop techniques, which will allow you to engage proactively within your area of study. You will be encouraged to explore methods of investigation that are responsive to, as well as inquisitive of, the conditions presented and which therefore speculate around possible critical scenarios. Implicit within these explorations is the need to investigate diverse means of representation and depiction through a variety of possible media and discourse.

Integration: This unit allows you to work in a multi-disciplinary context through groups within your own subject area and across the areas of interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation, as well as explore the interrelationships of all disciplines. You will need to work collectively on given projects or problems related to staff run studios, which explore a range of given themes. You will be introduced to these themes at the start of the course and connect to research areas within the School.

Work-Based Learning: This unit gives you the opportunity to replace a 30-credit core unit with a work-based version of that unit. Not all units can be replaced and you will need to discuss the appropriateness of a unit with tutors. Work-based learning requires you to engage in critical and reflective learning in the workplace. This will be developed through a learning contract, negotiated by you, your employer and School.

Thesis: Your thesis is a substantial research-based project that enables you to carry out an in-depth investigation into a subject area of personal interest, which is related to or developed from a theme studied during the course. The proposed research theme should have a clearly defined focus to allow for in-depth theoretical, contextual and visual research. An initial seminar programme will help you develop your research proposal, define a research question and locate suitable primary and secondary sources. You will be allocated an appropriate supervisor on the basis of this proposal, who will work with you toward the final submission.

Programme Assessment

This course is lecture and studio-based, culminating in a research-based thesis project. It will involve case study investigations, group work, discussion and planning of conservation environments, as well as independent study to develop design or research-based responses to conservation problems.

Design assessment is through studio review and taught courses are assessed by various forms of evidence-based conservation design decisions and proposals. You will also carry out an in-depth research project into an area of your choice.

Student Destinations

On completing this course, you will be equipped with specialist skills to find careers within the architectural and planning professions. You will obtain professional, legal, craft, management and administration skills relevant to historic building conservation. In addition, you’ll develop historical and technical knowledge, and understand research methodologies applicable to conservation.

The creative skills, professional competencies and expansive learning environment that we provide has also led graduates into a range of careers in marketing, advertising, journalism, virtual design and modelling through to people-centred careers such as project management.

Alternatively, you can choose to continue your studies to PhD level.

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The Msc programme Cultural Geography aims to train students to become professionally competent in the field of geography and liveability so that they can make a useful contribution to improving place-related liveability, quality of life and wellbeing in society. Read more
The Msc programme Cultural Geography aims to train students to become professionally competent in the field of geography and liveability so that they can make a useful contribution to improving place-related liveability, quality of life and wellbeing in society.

The programme deals with the qualities of a place (neighborhood, village, city, region) that add to the quality of life as experienced by inhabitants and visitors. Aspects that influence the liveability of places and communities are safety, health, quality of the residential environment (housing, facilities and services), social interaction and participation, community involvement, possibilities for recreation and tourism, quality and unicity of the landscape. Feelings of rootedness and belonging, but also curiosity and excitement about new places, positively influence the liveability of places at local, regional, national and global levels. This may support social cohesion, community resilience and the adaptive potential of people and communities to innovate.

Why in Groningen?

Groningen is the only university in the Netherlands where you can do a Master in Cultural Geography. Students are trained with the necessary critical, analytical, methodological and theoretical tools to contribute to place-related liveability in society. Career perspectives vary from governments, NGOs and corporate roles.

Job perspectives

You will find graduates of the Msc. Cultural Geography in a variety of places.

Three types of work stand out: 1. conducting scientific research or do research for a company, 2. the formulation of policy and advice and representing spatial interests, 3. the transfer of information in areas such as historic preservation, tourism, journalism, or education,. For example, you work in a municipality, a county, a consulting firm, a heritage organization, a housing association or tourist agencies.

To optimize the connection between the Master's program and the labour market, we try to stay in touch with our alumni, for example via the LinkedIn group Master Cultural Geography.

Research in the Master

The research in the Master Cultural Geography is strongly embedded in the research of its staff, on the themes of Place, Identity and Well-being.

Central focus is the lived experiences of local peoples all over the world. Topics of recent research projects are: community engagement; ageing and wellbeing; innovation and rural transformation; socio-spatial consequences of population decline; heritage; historical landscape change; perception and evaluation of nature and landscape; nature and health; death and burial; entrepreneurship and corporate social responsibility; employment opportunities; housing and the living environments of various groups within society; social impact assessment; social aspects of new technology; governance of places; social aspects of agriculture and farming; social aspects of natural resource management; and visitor and host experiences of tourism.

Our research embraces the social relations between people and places, emotional geographies, and the experience of spatial transformation and liveability. We believe that knowing one's 'place' is fundamental to the formation of human identity and to wellbeing. Forms of cultural expression such as art, architecture, ritual and language, and our understanding and appreciation of nature and landscape all interact with the physical environment in the creation of our individual and community life-stories. As such, the ways in which we construct and transform spaces and places manifest our imagination and self-awareness. In doing so, we make sense of, define, and celebrate our personal and collective identities, communities and localities.

Our research is strongly empirically embedded. During the master, students learn qualitative and quantitative research methodologies regarding place attachment, identities and liveability. In the Master thesis, there is room for innovative methods including visual methodologies and location-based applications (social or soft GIS).

The research theme of Place, Identity and Wellbeing fits within the faculty research programme 'towards Wellbeing, Innovation and Spatial Transformation' (tWIST) and the themes population decline and Healthy Ageing.

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A master’s degree in American studies from The University of Alabama gives students an opportunity to explore their interests and develop writing and thinking skills that expand career options. Read more
A master’s degree in American studies from The University of Alabama gives students an opportunity to explore their interests and develop writing and thinking skills that expand career options.

Visit the website: http://ams.ua.edu/graduate/

Course detail

The flexibility of this two-year program gives you the freedom to take an interdisciplinary approach to intriguing questions, in a department that’s small enough to allow close interaction with faculty and fellow students, yet large enough to encompass a wide range of research interests.

Pursue your interests

This program allows graduate students to build on their academic backgrounds and interests through sustained study in a particular area. Our diverse faculty teaches a broad range of topics, and the program allows students to take courses in other departments, broadening their educational opportunities.

Format and assessment

Students may select of one two options: Plan I (consisting of 24 semester hours and a thesis) or Plan II (consisting of 30 semester hours).

All students take four required courses: American Experience I and II and American Studies Colloquium I and II. Students generally take these courses in their first year of the program. The American Experience courses survey American cultural history and introduce students to some of the prevalent texts, scholars, and ideas in the field of American Studies. The American Studies Colloquium, a sustained study that takes place over the course of two semesters, gives students the opportunity to develop a publishable paper on a topic of their choosing. In the course of this project, students do independent research, undergo peer review, and revise various drafts to produce a polished final paper.

In addition to the required courses, students can select from a range of elective courses. Student need at least six hours in seminar-style courses. Although the American Studies Department offers an array of courses each semester, students may choose to take up to nine hours outside of the department.

At the end of the program, students take comprehensive exams, which test their knowledge of the material that they encountered in their particular program of study. Many students find that comprehensive exams provide an exceptional way to review the things that they have learned in the program, and these exams also provide students who want to pursue a PhD with valuable experience doing this kind of exercise.

One of the unique aspects of the program is the opportunity to design and teach a course in your second year — to develop course ideas, design the syllabus, assign readings, and actually teach a subject you’re passionate about. In recent years students have taught courses on Woodstock, Walt Disney, Ronald Reagan, and modern gay America.

Work closely with faculty

The moderate size of our department creates an environment in which faculty are open and accessible, able to build close relationships with their students. And because our program offers only a master’s degree, here you won’t have to compete with doctoral students for faculty members’ time and attention.

Career options

This program prepares students for careers in journalism, public policy, law, public relations, historic preservation, academia, nonprofit organizations and more. While many of our graduate students go on to pursue doctorates at institutions nationwide, other students build meaningful non-academic careers from their connections and experiences in the program. Additionally, many students choose to do internships, which help them make career connections and earn academic credit.

How to apply: http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Fund your studies

In the past five years (2011-2016), 90.6% of Alabama MA students have received funding. Whether supported by fellowships or graduate teaching assistantships – both of which include tuition, health insurance, and a stipend – the vast majority of our students receive financial assistance. Visit the website: http://ams.ua.edu/graduate/financial-aid/

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While the rate of deterioration and disappearance of heritage sites has accelerated due to acceleration of human progress, major technological breakthroughs have occurred to enable digital preservation, i.e. Read more
While the rate of deterioration and disappearance of heritage sites has accelerated due to acceleration of human progress, major technological breakthroughs have occurred to enable digital preservation, i.e. 3D digital capture has been developed allowing high definition, high accuracy, and high productivity associated with digital documentation. This technology has been adopted worldwide and over 3,000 international service providers are available to deploy this technology to facilitate the preservation of heritage sites. In addition, major innovations in digital image processing, 3D modelling software, broadband access, and computer hardware capabilities have allowed worldwide public access to voluminous data and information systems including 3D visualisation.

The

MSc in Visualisation (International Heritage)

is a specialist pathway in the realm of 3D visualisation at DDS. This course aims to develop the knowledge and skill sets required to deliver and conduct digital preservation of world heritage sites and to create a unique opportunity to combine architecture and heritage with state of the art digital technologies, including 3D laser scanning, digital reconstruction of historic sites and artefacts, interaction and visualisation using virtual reality facilities. It allows an ideal opportunity for documentation, maintenance, and preservation of significant cultural sites and physical heritage assets, and to reconstruct them in a real-time 3D environment for use in tourism, art, education, entertainment and science.

This pathway will enable students to understand the process of creating original 3D datasets of cultural objects and sites, to reconstruct and present immersive visualisation with interactive narratives and provide a novel approach to foster multi-disciplinary study in computer science, history, geography, culture study, archaeology, architecture, the build environment, art and design and tourist management.

The programme aims to develop the knowledge and skill sets required to deliver and conduct digital preservation of world heritage sites and to create a unique opportunity to combine architecture and heritage with state of the art digital technologies, including 3D laser scanning, digital reconstruction of historic sties and artefacts, interaction and visualisation using virtual reality facilities. It allows an ideal opportunity for documentation, maintenance and preservation of significant cultural sites and physical heritage assets, and the ability to reconstruct them in a real-time 3D environment for use in tourism, art, education, entertainment and science.

The International Heritage pathway emerged as a result of successful strategic research collaborations between the DDS and a number of partners in cultural heritage. DDS has several long-term partnerships with industry and governmental organisations and a world-leading portfolio of work. DDS and Historic Scotland have formed the Centre for Digital Documentation and Visualisation (CDDV) which specialises in the precise documentation and 3D representation of heritage objects, architecture and environments using state of the art, high resolution laser scanning technology and 3D visualisation software. The CDDV promotes and celebrates Scotland’s cultural heritage at home and abroad and enhance Scotland’s reputation for developing world class and innovative research and development. It is delivering the digital documentation of the five Scottish UNESCO World Heritage Sites and five International Heritage Sites in a five-year project known as the Scottish Ten.

The MSc in Visualisation (International Heritage) provides a high level taught programme to those emerging from a wide range of disciplines. This places graduates in a leading global competitive position to advance in research, academia, governmental and commercial organisations, gaining a greater understanding of techniques that may assist in digital heritage practices.

Although just one intake per year in September, students can attend this programme on a part-time basis.
A number of Scottish Funding Council Fee Waivers are available for this programme.

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A graduate degree in apparel and textiles enables students to pursue careers in higher education, business, and government. The program prepares students for careers in college teaching, research, extension, education administration, marketing, consumer service, product development/evaluation, and entrepreneurship. Read more

GRADUATE STUDY IN APPAREL AND TEXTILES

A graduate degree in apparel and textiles enables students to pursue careers in higher education, business, and government. The program prepares students for careers in college teaching, research, extension, education administration, marketing, consumer service, product development/evaluation, and entrepreneurship. Emphasis is placed on the development of analytical skills and problem-solving skills and equips graduate students for continued intellectual and career growth. Graduates receive the degree of Master of Science in human environmental sciences, with a major in clothing and textiles.

Visit the website http://www.ctd.ches.ua.edu/graduate-program.html

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Students in the graduate program may concentrate in the behavioral aspects of clothing; the international aspects of textiles and apparel; or historic costume and textiles. The faculty assists each graduate student in planning an individualized program suited to the student’s career goals. The program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses. A graduate course in statistics must be completed successfully. Graduate students are encourages to participate in research and service activities of the faculty as a means of developing direction for the graduate program. Since graduate courses in the department have prerequisites, students should contact the Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design for information about minimum preparation for graduate study.

PROGRAM FACULTY

At present, we have faculty doing research in the following areas:

- Dr. Marcy Koontz has been exploring the scholarship of engagement in higher education for the several years. Her work focuses on the implementation and assessment of meaningful sustainable projects that engage students in the local community - from preservation of cultural heritage resources to helping develop and implement innovative programs that address community issues from a design perspective. Her previous research focused on emerging technologies with an emphasis on the application of advanced computer graphics software in the field of apparel and textiles, and developing and constructing advanced computer-based curricula for apparel and textiles instruction.

- Dr. Amanda J. Thompson's topics of research include textile science issues, historic and archaeological textile analysis, and cultural interpretation of textiles and the crafts that support textiles. She also is working with alternative fibers and 3D printing and its use in textiles.

- Dr. Michelle (Xiao) Tong's current research interests include soft-goods branding management, E-commerce, international marketing and international trade of textiles and apparel products.

- Dr. Virginia Wimberley's research deals with application of microscopy and other analytical methodology to the analysis of pre-historic, historic and contemporary dress and textiles for their contributions to the material culture. She has worked on Native American prehistoric collections from Ohio, Georgia and Alabama. Currently she is starting an investigation of the role of clothing in sex role stereotyping by preschool children.

FACILITIES

The Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design maintains the Carolyn Stewart Historic Costume Collection and the Comer Historic Textiles Collection for use in teaching and research. The University’s research facilities include the Mary Harmon Bryant Hall which is the repository for the department’s historic costume and textile collections with the Mary Harmon Moman Doll Collection and the Wade Hall and Greg Swem Quilt Collection, as well as other University collections; Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library, which belongs to the selective Association of Research Libraries; Central Analytical Facility; and the Seebeck Computer Center. Excellent computing capabilities exist within the College. Campus agencies that foster interdisciplinary research include the Small Business Development Center, the Capstone International Center, the Hess Institute, and the Institute for Social Science Research.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Define and explore the concepts and practicalities of conservation, restoration and preservation of historic buildings. Our course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and you’ll benefit from our established links with leading organisations such as English Heritage. Read more
Define and explore the concepts and practicalities of conservation, restoration and preservation of historic buildings. Our course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and you’ll benefit from our established links with leading organisations such as English Heritage.

We’ll examine the process from the assessment of a building’s suitability for repair, through to the repair work itself, along with building maintenance, servicing, adaptation and strategic management.

We’ll cover the current legislative framework, decisions over longevity and regional styles and contexts, as well historic construction and repair techniques.

We’ll give you the preparation to embark on a career as a consultant, adviser or practitioner, while our connections with other institutions give you the opportunity to forge links with conservation schemes both at home and overseas.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/conservation-of-buildings

The aims of our course are to:
• develop your vision and understanding of what is required when undertaking the conservation of buildings;
• equip you with specialist conservation knowledge;
• provide study that will foster, inspire and enhance your technical, personal and inter-personal skills;
• develop your leadership skills, ability to evaluate challenging situations and produce solutions to problems.

You will absorb the academic, philosophical and technical aspects of building conservation, together with the underlying legislative and economic background, designed to produce competent consultants, advisors and practitioners.

Staff will have enhanced knowledge and skills of up-to-date building conservation practice, heritage management, academic awareness, and strength in networking.

On successful completion of our course you will be able to:
• understand how conservation is affected by historical, political, social, economic, legal and technical processes;
• be able to contribute to the formulation of conservation policies and their implementation, with an awareness of intended and unintended results of such policies and procedures;
• contribute to the effective running of an organisation concerned with conservation;
• apply local and general principles to the practical requirements of particular communities, their historical heritage and environment;
• compare conservation policies of various European countries with that of your own;
• forge links with conservation schemes at United Kingdom and overseas based Institutions.

Careers

We take pride in giving our graduates a great start as highly-qualified individuals whose knowledge and experience are well matched to the current needs of the industry. Career opportunities include specialist consultancy, local authority conservation and specialist statutory (building) control posts, and historic building and heritage asset management. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Built Environment PhD.

Core modules

The Science & Economics of Historic Buildings
Conservation and Legislation of Heritage Buildings
Facilities Management of Heritage Buildings
Research, Design and Methods
Surveying the Historic Building
Major Project/Dissertation

Assessment

We’ll assess you on your understanding and skill in applying the relevant technologies. These will include practical software projects and presentations, along with written assignments, and your final dissertation.

Special features

Our course is small and highly specialised. All students are taught together to enable new students to take advantage of the experience of more advanced students. We have strong links with conservationists in local authorities (including Essex County Council), conservation trusts and English Heritage, together with several EU universities.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

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Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. Read more
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. The programme combines aspects of cultural heritage - historic buildings, museums, collections, sites and landscapes - with the best preventive conservation and heritage management policies, projects, methodologies and practices.

Degree information

Students are encouraged to take a long view of preservation and heritage management, and challenged to define problems, set objectives and explore a range of sustainability issues and strategies. Concepts of value, sustainability, life expectancy, stewardship, ownership, vulnerability and risk are interwoven with the scientific study of historic materials, assemblies, technologies and systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits), a research report (60 credits) and an optional project placement (not credit bearing). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Sustainability and Heritage Value
-Heritage Materials and Assemblies
-Sustainable Strategies
-Project Planning, Management and Maintenance

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught using a variety of media and strategies including problem-based and case-based learning, discussion groups, project work, exercises, coursework and reports. Assessment is through written assignments, oral examination and the 10,000-word dissertation.

Fieldwork
A two-week study visit to Malta forms an integral part of the degree. This is hosted by Heritage Malta, the national agency responsible for the management of national museums, heritage sites and their collections in Malta and Gozo.
Travel and accomodation expenses for the visit to Malta are covered by the programme.

Careers

Most graduates are expected to assume responsibility for directing major projects within museums, libraries, archives, or organisations responsible for historic buildings and archaeological sites; or as a part of interdisciplinary architectural, engineering or project management practices. Additional career enhancement may be achieved by using the MSc as a foundation for PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Project Manager, National Trust
-Consultant to Ministry of Culture India, Advisory Committee on World Heritage Matters
-Carbon Consultant, Sturgis Carbon Profiling
-Project Planner, Transport for London
-Green Building Consultant, ECADI (East China Architectural Design & Research Institute)

Employability
The programme, which is accredited by RICS, is an internationally recognised qualification from a world-leading university that improves equips students with the skills and expertise needed to contribute to heritage projects at an advanced level.
There is an opportunity to undertake a placement at a leading heritage organisation or practice during the programme.
Students gain access to an extensive alumni network of professionals who have studied on the programme and are currently leaders in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme benefit from: international, interdisciplinary teachers who are leading professionals in their field; real-life heritage case studies as the basis for discussing complex and demanding issues; access to public stewards and private owners of heritage - in order to learn from practice and leading heritage stakeholders; a fully funded study visit to Malta; project placement opportunities with leading international heritage organisations.

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The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Read more
The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Drawing on the knowledge of interdisciplinary academic and curatorial experts, the programme combines taught and research components based on a combination of theoretical and object based approaches. Working with museum collections, archives and historic interiors you will also be given a unique insight into the curation, interpretation and preservation of historic dress and textile collections.

Why this programme

-The programme provides you with a unique opportunity within the UK to study historic dress and textiles, enabling you to develop knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in dress and textile histories in a critical and/or historical context
-Scotland has a rich textile heritage and Glasgow is the ideal city in which to study dress and textile history, as there are internationally significant object and archival collections in the city and close by, including the National Museums Scotland, Paisley Museum and Art Gallery, and the Scottish Business Archives at the University of Glasgow.
-You will have privileged access to primary source material, objects and archives, including at the University of Glasgow’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery and Glasgow Museums.
-The work placement option will enable you to develop your professional expertise within the heritage sector.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of three core courses and three optional courses running over two semesters. This is followed by a period of supervised research and writing of the dissertation which is submitted at the end of August. The dissertation is 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be an in-depth critical exploration on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

A number of study visits are built into the programme, introducing important local collections. You will also undertake a four-day study trip to see relevant collections in another UK city.

Teaching is delivered by a combination of in-house specialist and visiting scholars and experts. The lectures are enhanced by seminar discussions, some based in museums and galleries, giving you the opportunity to present your ideas and discuss them with classmates in a supportive yet challenging environment.

Core courses
-Framing Dress and Textile Histories
-Research Methods in Practice
-Museums and the Making of Dress and Textile Histories

Optional courses
-The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680 - 1815
-Understanding Textiles
-Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c.1837-1901
-Material Cultures

You may also choose from the following options run by History of Art:
-Work placement
-Independent study

Or from the following options in the College of Arts:
-A Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institution (HATII) course : 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
-A course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Career prospects

The attributes you gain will be attractive to employers from museums, the heritage sector, art dealers and auction houses. You could also get into theatre, film and television production as a costume researcher/designer. The programme also offers an excellent foundation upon which to progress to PhD studies and an academic career.

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