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Masters Degrees (Global Security)

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Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Read more
Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Against a background of intensifying economic, political, cultural and military globalisation, there is now a heightened awareness of terrorism and international crime as threats to global security.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree identifies the features of these respective threats and explores the challenges to national and global governance, human rights and ethics, criminality and regionalism. This course examines the character of these contemporary global threats, considers specific case studies, and contributes to the debate over how to respond intellectually and in practical policy to these major threats to global security in the post-9/11 world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-Provides learners with an integrated security perspective
-Combines traditional militarised security concerns with contemporary threats of terrorism, international crime, and non-traditional security
-Provides the opportunity to develop the necessary analytical tools to critically explore the global security environment of the new century
-Among the first course of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying the increasingly prevalent themes of terrorism, international crime and global security
-You will obtain a critical awareness of the complex and inter-connected diplomatic, legal and economic dimensions of these threats, as well as an understanding of counter-terrorist and counter-crime policies, strategies and operational responses at local, national and global levels

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

This dynamic and innovative course is aimed at both UK and international students and offers the opportunity to be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Field trips are an integral part of the course, which will include visits to EU agencies and international NGOs.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree course is among the first of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying terrorism, international crime and global security. UK and International Competitive internships will be offered to the most motivated students.

The course comprises three mandatory topics designed to establish the core agenda of the course in terrorism, international crime and global security, and six core-option subjects from which you must study at least two.

The topics included in the course are delivered as interactive and multimedia workshops. They blend case studies, practical illustrations and theoretical analysis. Each session is designed to encourage interaction and debate. This concept is equally applicable to the numerous extra-curricular activities organised to complement the subjects.

Within all sessions, we draw on our own research experience and this ensures some lively debates and reassurance that there is no ‘right way’ of undertaking research. The course team ensures that you have extensive tutorial access to discuss your relationship with the course’s subject matter and their own intellectual development and to provide structure to their studies.

The key themes of this Masters degree are addressed in courses three core subjects:
-International organized crime
-International terrorism
-Threats to global security

You then have the opportunity to supplement these compulsory subjects with optional units, broadening your understanding of the concept of global security. Typical choices include:
-Counter crime and terrorism (study trip)
-Governance for security in the developing world
-Post-colonial African politics
-Gender and international human rights
-Case study: analysing primary sources
-Trafficking in human beings

In parallel to studying the above subjects, students also design, research and write a 15,000 word Masters dissertation addressing a topic of their own choice.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security is designed for those seeking to put current security debates into some sort of academic context. In terms of career advancement, the course offers generic skills and professional development that have seen past graduates go on to jobs within:
-International NGOs
-Civil service
-Private sector
-Management
-Journalism

In this sense, the degree is not designed to promote any one specific vocation. However, the issues studied would be of particular interest to those wishing to start, or advance, a career in:
-The armed forces
-The police force
-International agencies such as the United Nations or the European Union
-Other international NGOs

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques. Read more

Overview

Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques.

This novel exciting course reflects the latest trends in security studies and is designed to provide students with the elements to become world-class global security analysts. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students and offers direct applications for policy-makers, risk professionals, and students seeking to pursue an academic path.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/globalsecurity/

Course Aims

This novel exciting programme reflects the latest trends in security studies, cutting-edge security research developed at Keele, and innovative and creative teaching methods. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students eager to develop their analytical skills on the breathtaking world of global security. The uniqueness of the programme lies on its creative approach to teaching and research designed to inspire critical thinking for the analysis of a complex world. Teaching is complemented by academic-trips intended to provide students with an opportunity to experience in situ security analysis. The overall objective of the programme is to help students to unleash their curiosity on learning and researching security.

This course aims to provide you with an up-to-date, advanced and critical introduction to the theory and politics of global security. In doing so it also seeks to promote and nurture the development of the complex analytical and conceptual skills that the study of this discipline requires. These skills are fundamental to postgraduate study and invaluable for vocational and personal development and for future professional life.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The European Union and the Global Commons
• The Politics of Global Security (recommended)
• The Theory of Global Security (recommended)
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Course Overview. The MA in Criminology and Global Security offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is both academically rigorous but will also provide you with skills to help you pursue a career in the growing fields of justice and global security. Read more

Course Overview

The MA in Criminology and Global Security offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is both academically rigorous but will also provide you with skills to help you pursue a career in the growing fields of justice and global security. It encompasses both the transferable skills of a postgraduate degree with the specialist knowledge in the field of global security. 

Why choose this course?

The MA Criminology and Global Security caters for those who wish to graduate with a specialist MA in a growing sector. 

The course includes the following modules to give you an excellent grounding in criminological issues at Masters level:

  • Criminological Theory
  • Research Methods
  • Transnational Organised Crime
  • Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Dissertation
  • Counter-terrorism

You can read more about these modules (see 'course details' for more information).

As well as providing students with subject specific knowledge and understanding, we aim to produce graduates with strong transferable skills in:

  • research
  • communication
  • analysis
  • creative problem solving

This ensures you are well-placed to seek employment with in relevant sectors.

Modules

Semester 1:

  • Criminological Theory 
  • Research Methods 
  • Transnational Organised Crime

Semester 2:

  • Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice 
  • Dissertation 
  • Counter-terrorism

Career and Study Progression

This course will particularly suit students who are interested in careers in the following areas:

  • Policing and Police Research
  • National Offender Management Service
  • Crown Prosecution Service
  • Home Office
  • Intelligence Services 
  • Policy development
  • Digital / global security 
  • Further study on an MPhil/PhD programme

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries



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Understand how global security and development are interconnected in our interdependent world. Discover how and why underlying issues such as poverty, environmental degradation, societal inequities and politics create the international framework in which security conflicts emerge. Read more
Understand how global security and development are interconnected in our interdependent world. Discover how and why underlying issues such as poverty, environmental degradation, societal inequities and politics create the international framework in which security conflicts emerge. Gain a sophisticated understanding of the dynamics that drive global politics, and the ability to use this knowledge in fields as diverse as diplomacy, journalism, finance, industry, public relations and risk analysis.

Key features

-Gain a understanding of such topical issues as global politics, the rise of religious fundamentalism, human rights, world trade, poverty and climate change.
-Take the opportunity to study the politics of several world regions – Africa, the Middle East, Europe and Asia – and critically debate their different perspectives.
-Attain invaluable research skills – by studying this programme you will be able to conduct and present an extended piece of research.
-Tailor your masters to match your career aspirations by choosing the subjects that most interest you from a range of elective modules.
-Become part of a lively research community with the opportunity for interdisciplinary discussion and collaboration. We work with the Centre for Research in Sustainable Leadership, Governance and Policy and Plymouth International Studies Centre and several of our students have gone on to work as research assistants.

Course details

You'll look at both the theory and practice of international relations in terms of the threats to, and vulnerabilities of, global security and development. Three compulsory modules will give you a basis for understanding global security, global governance and how to conduct advanced research. You'll then choose three specialised modules, giving you the opportunity to shape your degree to suit your interests. The certificate and diploma are available for those only completing part of the progression route. For the masters degree, you’ll complete a final dissertation on a specific aspect of the current security and/or development problems confronting policymakers in world politics. You’ll undertake a research and methodology module to support your masters research and equip you for your career. Learn through lectures, seminars and, in some cases, simulation exercises. Assessment of modules will be by a mixture of essays, seminar presentations, report writing, exams, and the dissertation.

Core modules
-IRL700 MA Dissertation in Global Security and Development
-IRL701 Research, Professional Skills and Methodology
-IRL702 Strategy and Security Studies
-IRL703 Critical Approaches to Global Governance

Optional modules
-IRL707 Crisis Points: America in the Middle East since 1945
-IRL705 International Relations in the Middle East: A Critical Approach
-IRL704 Sub-Saharan Africa in the Global Political Economy
-IRL706 International Relations in Practice
-IRL708 International Trade Policy and Politics

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. This programme offers you the opportunity to examine many of these contemporary threats..

Why this programme

◾You will develop your knowledge of the security challenges impacting our rapidly changing social and political environment at a local, national and global level. These range from terrorism and cyber warfare to disease, migration and climate change.
◾You can combine a broad spectrum of subject areas into your degree, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, archaeology, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
◾You will have the opportunity to take part in policy development exercises: working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.
◾The programme will also include a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.

Programme structure

You will take four core and selection of optional courses. You will also complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. In addition to the general degree programme, you have the opportunity to study one of three specialised pathways.

Core courses
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾International security and global politics
◾Research design OR Qualitative methods
◾Thematic issues in global security.

Optional courses

Pathways

Cyber security and intelligence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine how cyber issues and information communications technologies challenge the way states and citizens alike attempt to use and constrain information in a range of societies for security purposes. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Human-centred security
◾Information systems and databases
◾Systems and networks.

Social and cultural perspectives (not running in 2017-18)

Provides you with the opportunity to examine global security from a critical perspective, reflecting on social and cultural aspects and constructions of 'security'. Important to this pathway will be an interrogation of the relationship between security, vulnerability and the ethics of care. Specialised courses within this pathway include:
◾Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
◾A range of related optional courses.

Strategy and defence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine shifts in Western strategic thought in both a historical and contemporary setting. Particular attention will be given to how strategy and defence is currently developing within a new interdependent global context. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾The American way of war: from Revolution to the War on Terror
◾A range of related optional courses.

Career prospects

You can move into careers such as working with governmental and non-governmental organisations, business and international/transnational organisations. Recent graduates have gone on to work for the BBC, the United Nations, the UK armed forces, a US based research agency and UK based private security and risk analysis companies. Others have gone to undertake a PhD.

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The Masters in Physics. Global Security provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to interdisciplinary challenges in the area of global security, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Global Security provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to interdisciplinary challenges in the area of global security, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
◾The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
◾You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Global Security include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of global security.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
◾Research skills
◾Extended project.

Optional courses include
◾Advanced electromagnetic theory
◾Applied optics
◾Detectors and imaging
◾Environmental radioactivity
◾Nuclear power reactors
◾Quantum information
◾Statistical mechanics.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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Borders have become a key site and central concern of global security practices and theory, from the Mexican-United States border to the Mediterranean ports… Read more

Borders have become a key site and central concern of global security practices and theory, from the Mexican-United States border to the Mediterranean ports of the European Union.  The many facets of borders, as containers of identity, sites of power, laboratories of technology and thresholds of violence will be introduced and analysed, showing how they have never been more important.  This programme will help students navigate this complex terrain by providing a firm grounding in critical security studies and critical border studies.  Students will have the change to apply their academic insights within a work-based environment with borders/security processional through the Borders Internship module.

Course Details

The programme has three different components: Core modules, an Elective module, and an MA dissertation.

Core Modules: offer foundational knowledge and understanding in Global Security and Borders, practical experience and active learning within a work-based situation on the Borders Internship module, as well as teaching the key skills regarding how to design a research project. 

These compulsory modules include:

  • Approaches to Research Design
  • Borders Internship (double-weighted – 40 CATS)
  • Contemporary Security
  • Global Security and Borders

Elective Modules: offer the chance to specialise in a particular area of interest, build on foundational knowledge, and develop focused expertise. 

One module is to be chosen from:

  • Carbon Literacy for a Low Carbon Society and Economy
  • Conflict Intervention
  • Ethnic Conflict and Consensus: The Power of Institutions
  • Gender, Politics and Democracy
  • Global Terrorism
  • Institutions and Politics of the EU
  • International Political Economy
  • Philosophy of Conflict and War
  • The Politics of the Republic of Ireland

* This list of elective modules may vary from year to year.

Dissertation: to enable students to develop their particular area of specialism, facilitate independent learning and instil a variety of skills such as project management, detailed analysis and self-motivation, students on the MA pathway must also write a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Assessment and Feedback

A combination of seminar presentations, learning journals, literature reviews, portfolios, written essays, and a 60-credit, 15,000 word dissertation.

Learning and Teaching

Afternoon and Evening.

Average of six hours contact teaching hours per week for the first semester. In the second semester, as well as two hours contact on an Elective module, the Borders Internship module will involve three days of a work-based placement, as well as supervision with a member of academic staff.

Students should expect to spend 10-12 hours of independent study for every two hours in seminars and lectures, spread across the course of the semester. However, the second semester Borders Internship involves a more complex mix of work-based learning and supervision.

Career Prospects

All of the MA programmes offered in the School provide our graduates with the skills to pursue a wide range of careers in the private, public and voluntary sectors. In addition they provide an appropriate basis for those who wish to proceed to Doctoral-level study.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.



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This course offers you the opportunity to combine the advanced study of terrorism, transnational crime and global security through flexible, distance learning. Read more
This course offers you the opportunity to combine the advanced study of terrorism, transnational crime and global security through flexible, distance learning.

This course will allow you to acquire specialist expertise as well as a critical understanding of current research, advanced scholarship and current problems regarding terrorism, transnational crime and global security.

Through the programme you will also acquire specialist knowledge which will provide you with opportunities for career and personal development. Currently, no other MA programme in the UK offers such a rigorous programme in distance learning format. This unique programme enables you to structure your learning, and the development of transferable vocational and research skills, into the demands of your work and domestic lives.

On-line learning provides you with the control over where and when you study. Our staff are highly experienced in the teaching and utilisation of knowledge from the fields of sociology and political science, as well as practised in the development and delivery of virtual teaching and learning. You will receive guidance and support through the virtual learning process as you gain confidence and knowledge.

Course content

-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, white collar and financial crime
-Crime against humanity: State crime, war crimes and transnational terrorism
-Terrorism
-International Security
-Terrorism, Crime and Global Security: Postgraduate Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. This programme offers you the opportunity to examine many of these contemporary threats.

Why this programme

◾You will study research methods within the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School which is one of the top research training centres in the UK and benefits from ESRC recognition for many of its courses.
◾You will combine your research methods training with a range of security focused optional courses from a broad spectrum of subject areas, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
◾The programme includes a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.
◾You will have the opportunity to take part in special formative learning workshops and training days - working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course, as well as submit a dissertation.

Core courses
◾International security and global politics
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis
◾Research design
◾Thematic issues in global security.

Optional courses
◾British military power since 1945
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
◾Development, postcolonialism and environment
◾Ethics in global politics
◾Freedom, security and justice in the European Union
◾Globalisation and European integration
◾Globalisation and the new security agenda in Central and Eastern Europe
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
◾International relations theory
◾Post-Soviet Russia: renegotiating global and local identities
◾Social change and social justice: activism, social movements and democracy
◾Society, environment and the concept of sustainable development in post Soviet Russia
◾The American way of war: from the revolution to the war on terror
◾The European Union in international politics and development
◾The global criminal economy
◾The Internet and civil society.

Career prospects

The programme provides a dedicated research training pathway if you are to looking to go onto doctoral study or to seek a career within a social research field.

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Our South Asia & Global Security MA will give you a deep understanding of the interplay between the history, theory and contemporary practice of security-led issues in South Asia. Read more

Our South Asia & Global Security MA will give you a deep understanding of the interplay between the history, theory and contemporary practice of security-led issues in South Asia. You will study history, thematic analysis and case studies taught by world-leading academics from War Studies and the King’s India Institute. We will draw on the expertise of policy leaders, military professionals and experts in the private sector involved in security management to deliver high-quality and up-to-the-minute teaching. 

Key benefits

  • The Department of War Studies is unique in the UK and one of very few university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon.
  • The Department has an excellent reputation as a graduate training institution and is recognised as such by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council.
  • Taught by leading experts who bring an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policymaking bodies and institutions.
  • Our location in the heart of London beside the River Thames brings outstanding advantages.

Description

Our course incorporates history, thematic analysis and case studies and is taught by a cross-section of academics from War Studies and the King’s India Institute to give you a broad range of perspectives and experience. It also draws on policy leaders, military professionals and experts in the private sector involved in ‘security management’ to examine practical challenges. We aim to provide you with an understanding of the interrelationships between the history, theory and contemporary practice of security-led issues in South Asia (including Afghanistan) since 1947.

Course purpose

Provides a focused understanding of the interrelationships between the history, theory, and contemporary practice of security-led issues in South Asia (including Afghanistan) post 1947. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For lectures, seminars and feedback, you will typically have 2 hours per week over two 10-week terms per 40-credit module. This can be split into 1 lecture + 1 seminar or other combinations thereof. You will also have 360 hours of self-study. 

For the dissertation module, you will have 12 hours of training workshops and supervision to complement the 588 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

As part of a two-year schedule, part-time students typically take the required 40-credit taught module

and 40 credits of optional module in year 1. They will then take a 60 credit dissertation module and

40 credit optional modules in year 2. 

Assessment

Most modules will be assessed through a combination of essays, presentations, oral vivas and/or exams.

The dissertation module will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words).

Career prospects

Graduating students are prepared for further research in academia, or for careers in policy, government and international agencies. Typical career destinations have included the following:

  • Army Officer
  • Armed Forces Analyst
  • Chief Superintendent of Police
  • Civil Servant
  • Policy Officer

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The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Read more

The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the US and beyond and the analysis of intelligence collection. The M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations is offered online worldwide.

National security affairs is one of the fastest growing professions with positions open in the public sector in the federal, state and local governments and in the private sector. This program is designed for professionals in the field seeking career advancement, those who aspire to enter the field, individuals in related professions, and those retired from the military and government seeking consulting and other positions. Examples of potential students include personnel in the military, federal, state and local governments, law enforcement, corporations, and academia, as well as recent college graduates.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes. 

M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the U.S. and beyond, and the analysis of intelligence collection. Students will also develop a deep understanding of the international context in which U.S. national security issues are shaped.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes.

Following completion of the program core, students must complete 15 credits of coursework from the list of available electives. The majority of the elective offerings were developed specifically for the national security and international relations program, with a small number drawn from closely related fields. The elective list contains both courses that emphasize domestic security and courses that have a broader international focus, resulting in sufficient breadth of subject matter to allow students to tailor their choices around particular academic or professional interests.

Students interested in Cyber Security can choose to take a specific concentration in this area. Students who choose this option must complete 9 credits from the Cyber Security concentration and 6 credits from the elective list. Before choosing this option, students must secure permission from the Department of History and Political Science. After a consultation, it will be determined whether the student can enter the Cyber Security concentration, or if additional foundation courses will be required in order to enter and successfully complete the concentration.

Core Courses (21 credits)

  • NSAM 5001 - Current Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5003 - National Intelligence Collection and Analysis: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5004 - Border Protection and Military Issue (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5005 - Research and Evaluation in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5010 - US Foreign Policy and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5014 - Ethical Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5016 - International Relations: Theory and Practice (3 credits)

Electives (15 credits)

  • NSAM 5002 - Terrorists and Terrorism: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5015 - Civil Liberties and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5020 - International Law and Institutions (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5030 - American Government and Domestic Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5040 - Cyber Conflict and Statecraft (3 credits)
  • DEM 5090 - Weapons of Mass Threat and Communicable Diseases (3 credits)
  • MHS 5314 - Bioterrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5502 - Directed Readings in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5650 - Economic Statecraft in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6130 - Practicum/Internship (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6690 - Special Topics in National Security Affairs and International Relations (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6700 - Directed Thesis in National Security Affairs and International Relations (6 credits)

Optional Cyber Security Concentration

  • MMIS 0683 - Fundamentals of Security Technologies (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0684 - Information Security Management (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0685 - Information Security Governance (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0686 - Information Systems Auditing (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0687 - Information Security Project (3 credits)

Practicum

In addition to successfully completing all course work, students must pass a tabletop examination to be awarded the M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations. When a student has completed all coursework, has maintained a minimum of 3.0 GPA with no "incomplete" grades, and is a "student in good standing" with no disciplinary actions pending or disciplinary tasks to complete, the student will be eligible to take the tabletop examination. The tabletop exam is an assessment of the student's ability to integrate the knowledge and skills gained through course work.The exam tests the student's written ability to critically analyze and apply conflict assessment, theory, and research methodology to hypothetical conflict situations. The exam also tests knowledge of material specific to the academic curriculum.



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This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation. Read more

This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation.

You will study topics including human rights and humanitarian intervention, the world economy and the changing global order, global governance and the United Nation system, the growth of global networks and movements, global security, conflict resolution and peace-building, international relations and law, global poverty and development, and the politics of sustainability and environmental decline. Because globalisation transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries, our MA takes an interdisciplinary approach to challenge conventional political and international relations approaches.

There are two core modules: Globalisation and Global Politics, and Conflict, Security and Human Rights. You can also select two optional modules to focus on an area of particular interest, for example human rights and humanitarian intervention, global environmental politics, the Middle East, conflict resolution, genocide, international relations theory, the nature of warfare, and global ethics. 

Course structure

On the Globalisation: Politics, Conflict and Human Rights MA, you will:

  • study key developments and issues in relation to politics, conflict and human rights.
  • consider these areas within the context of contemporary globalisation
  • be encouraged to develop an informed and critical understanding of contemporary globalisation
  • receive close tutorial support.
  • be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

The programme is founded on the notion that politics, conflict and human rights must now be understood in the context of contemporary globalisation.

Modules

Globalisation and Global Politics

This module begins by examining a range of approaches to globalisation and global politics before exploring the processes, institutions and ideologies that are widely considered to be driving them. For example, economic globalisation is studied in relation to the financial crisis of 2008 and wider debates about global economic disorder. In particular, the emphasis is on fostering an informed understanding of contemporary globalisation through study of critical theories, debates about power, patterns of global poverty and inequality, and development responses.

In relation to claims about a shift in global power, the rise of China and its implications for the Asia-Pacific Region and the rest of the world are explored. At an institutional level, the Human Rights Council, the International Criminal Court and the European Court of Human Rights are examined. The politics of global sustainability is considered in relation to the formation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Finally, the politics of a transnational/global movement is investigated through the study of La Via Campesina.

Conflict, Security and Human Rights

This module examines contemporary conflict, security and human rights debates in relation to globalisation and the evolution of global politics. Areas and issues examined include: the relationship between global security and international relations theory; conflict resolution theory and the prospects of conflict resolution in Syria; state building and peace-building in Somalia; and a global NGO (Amnesty International) dedicated to monitoring conflict and human rights abuses.

Environmental security is considered within the context of global environmental decline, focusing in particular on Moscow’s apparent resource-based approach to international relations. As for human rights, the major theories and critiques are examined, with specific reference to humanitarian intervention and the emergence of the concept of human security. In this vein, the politics of movement under contemporary globalisation is explored by studying the Geneva Convention and the rights of refugees.

Modules

  • Globalisation and Global Politics
  • Conflict, Security and Human Rights
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation

Two from:

  • Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
  • Cultural and Critical Theory (International Relations Theory)
  • Global Environmental Politics
  • Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles
  • Legacies of Warfare
  • Global Ethics
  • A Learning and Teaching option

Careers and employability

This MA is relevant to careers in the public sector, teaching, the media, the legal profession, business, journalism, management and human resources, as well as to further research. You may also seek work in development, charities, non-governmental organisations and the environment, as well as the European Union and the United Nations.



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We live in an age where there is an urgent need for cooperative responses to address major global security challenges, as well as to transform intractable… Read more

We live in an age where there is an urgent need for cooperative responses to address major global security challenges, as well as to transform intractable inter-state and intrastate conflicts. This programme responds to that need by providing students with an advanced interdisciplinary training in the theory and practice of global cooperation and conflict resolution. We offer research-led teaching at the intersection of International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies, combined with a 5-day training programme in 'Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation'.

Our students can follow a flexible programme with a wide choice of modules (part-time students are also welcome). In addition to our three core modules, we encourage students to take our new optional module in the Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation. Overall, our programme offers interdisciplinary training focused on the role of values, emotions, and beliefs in shaping the possibilities of conflict, cooperation and security at the international level.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Course details

Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. The programme considers how political communities with different values, cultures, histories, and security conceptions can build trust in a global system.

You will gain a multidisciplinary understanding of key global security challenges (e.g. climate change, nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, and intractable conflicts inside and across state borders) and cover debates in International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies.

Topics and issues examined include:

  • The Security Dilemma
  • Face-to-face diplomacy
  • Peace building, alliances and institutions
  • Emotions in crises and conflicts
  • The psychology of radicalization, terrorism, and political violence
  • Identities of religion, gender, and nationalism
  • Game theory: the Prisoner’s Dilemma
  • The risks of nuclear war during the Cold War
  • US-Iran nuclear relations
  • The possibilities for avoiding a new Cold War with China

Our students explore cutting edge scholarship through three core modules: Fear, Cooperation and Trust in World PoliticsGlobal Cooperation in Practice, and our exclusive training programme on Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict TransformationIn addition, our  Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation examines the psychological determinants of political choices and behaviours. Our programme allows for a truly interdisciplinary training in understanding and tackling the challenges of complex international tensions.

Our MSc degree has one more distinctive feature: it is offered by the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS), a world-leading interdisciplinary research centre, in partnership with the Department of Political Science and International Studies. The ICCS has strong connections to high level practitioner networks, which offer summer internship opportunities. Our MSc students can also become members of the four ICCS Research Working Groups: TrustPolitical SettlementsInternational Political Psychology; Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems.

Who is the programme for?

Our MSc degree is designed for students interested in international relations, political psychology and security studies. Our students share a common goal: to advance their academic training, establish a policy-related career, work in government, international organizations and NGOs, or serve as mediators, negotiators and diplomats to address intractable conflicts at all levels of world politics.

You might also be interested in one of our other MSc programmes: Political Psychology of International Relations 

Learning and teaching

We advocate an enquiry-based approach to learning, which means that we encourage you to become an independent and self-motivated learner. Through the programme of study we offer, we will develop the qualities that employers value in today's university graduates - qualities that will set you apart in your future career.

To help you develop these skills, we adopt a range of teaching methods. They may include:

  • Lectures - listening to experts sharing their knowledge and discoveries in challenging and provocative ways. Students are expected to 'read-around' the subject matter of their lectures, adding to their understanding and developing their critical faculties and analytical skills.
  • Seminars - where you present and discuss your ideas and knowledge in smaller groups and debate interpretations and opinions with other students.
  • Tutorials - are your opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor, usually in small groups.
  • Workshops - are problem solving sessions facilitated by a member of academic staff; these sessions usually involve students working in groups.

More about teaching and learning at the University of Birmingham.

Employability

Our MSc students can pursue exciting and stimulating career opportunities with a range of organisations including government agencies, international organisations, the armed forces, NGOs, think-tanks, the media, the political world, and multinational corporations. Our excellent academic training is complemented by networking opportunities and voluntary work placements either at the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS)itself, or at one of our partner organisations. All our placements are offered on a competitive basis, over the summer term for a maximum of 20 days in order to allow sufficient time for the completion of your dissertation. These include:

Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS)

Our four research-focused working groups invite applications for summer placements in the following areas:



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Intelligence issues in the context of the global security framework are a vital component of the global agenda, with an ever-widening range of threats emerging and mutating across the globe. Read more
Intelligence issues in the context of the global security framework are a vital component of the global agenda, with an ever-widening range of threats emerging and mutating across the globe. This distance learning course is taught in partnership with Informa via their online learning platform. It will not only equip you to analyse these types of problems but will also help you to grasp the important inter-disciplinary links with international relations. These skills will open up countless career opportunities and enable you to engage with institutions and individuals central to this area.

More about this course

More than ever before, national governments, international agencies and major corporations recognise the need for personnel with a strong grasp of intelligence and security issues who can also demonstrate exceptional skills of research and analysis. This postgraduate intelligence and security studies distance learning programme is taught in partnership with Informa via their online learning platform. It will equip you to analyse these types of problems and help you to place them in the context of broader military, strategic and political considerations.

You will gain a solid academic grounding in the fields of security studies, terrorism and intelligence and you'll gain critical thinking skills needed to make sense of the ever-changing global security agenda. These skills will enable you to engage with institutions and individuals central to this area.

During your studies you'll explore emerging paradigms within intelligence studies, security and security studies and analyse justifications for the increasing ‘securitisation’ of social life. You'll have the opportunity to assess important security and intelligence events and issues of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and connect the conceptual basis of the discipline to some of the practical issues facing the international system.

You'll also review some of the emerging security threats and issues pertaining to law enforcement, government agencies and the private sector. These include a critical view of threats from terrorism, organised crime, radicalisation and intelligence failures and an assessment of security strategies such as horizon scanning.

To successfully complete the course you must pass each module. Assessment will incorporate coursework, online examinations, research assignments and essays. You'll be expected to participate in the virtual learning environment with tutors and fellow students.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Contemporary Issues in Crime, Safety and Security (core, 20 credits)
-History of Intelligence: Successes and Failures (core, 20 credits)
-Intelligence Analysis (core, 20 credits)
-International Financial Crime and Security (core, 20 credits)
-Security Studies (core, 20 credits)
-Security Studies Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Terrorism and Counter Terrorism (core, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is of special benefit to anyone wishing to work for a public, private or international organisation.

Typical career destinations might include the security sector, the military, local and public services, journalism or positions within institutions such as the European Union or the United Nations. In addition to this, the course is particularly valuable if you're interested in policy issues.

It is ideal for those whose career plans will involve dealing with international security affairs and would benefit from a solid academic grounding in the field.

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Your programme of study. If you are interested in the way our world has been shaped by security issues, conflict, defence policies and how business and other organisations deal with risks in different areas of the world you will be interested in Strategic Studies. Read more

Your programme of study

If you are interested in the way our world has been shaped by security issues, conflict, defence policies and how business and other organisations deal with risks in different areas of the world you will be interested in Strategic Studies. Much is discussed about our world and the challenges we face in terms of conflict but where does this conflict come from? How do different countries look at their security issues and what changes their perception of risk? You study historical issues which have lead to conflict in the world and where this conflict comes from. You look at international organisations and their contribution to global order and you look at domestic policies, ideology, historical influences which continue to play out and cultural ideological factors.

You scrutinise real world conflicts and the application of power and force, learning about global security and development. You study global defence policies, domestic and cultural factors involved in strategy.  The programme attracts a number of international students due to its international focus and graduates go on to wide ranging careers with a focus on strategic studies such as public sector, government organisations, non government organisations, charities, private business, journalism and policy work.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Strategic Theory
  • Religion, Conflict and Security

Semester 2

  • Latin America: Security Conditions and Challenges
  • The Use of Force in International Law
  • Terrorism and Counter Terrorism
  • Global Security Issues

Semester 3

  • Strategic Theory

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught in a multidisciplinary way to ensure you are provided with the full range of disciplines that make up Strategic Studies
  • You can attend seminars and events held by the Centre for European Survey Research, New Europe Centre and Centre for Global Security and Governance
  •  You learn and apply your knowledge to current and contemporary challenges internationally

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 9, 12, 21 or 24 Months Full Time to Part Time
  • September or January

International Student Fees 2017/2018

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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