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Masters Degrees (Food Law)

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This course is particularly suitable for people who work for regulatory bodies, whether in legal departments or as field or enforcement officers, environmental consultants, planners, solicitors, barristers, those who work in regulated industries, such as waste or water, and academics. Read more

About the course

This course is particularly suitable for people who work for regulatory bodies, whether in legal departments or as field or enforcement officers, environmental consultants, planners, solicitors, barristers, those who work in regulated industries, such as waste or water, and academics.
•This course is delivered in partnership with Informa Professional Academy, an organisation dedicated to working with leading academic bodies to provide high-calibre and well respected distance learning postgraduate courses
•Develop your own personal pathway on this course which combines one core module with a diverse range of optional modules
•Study at your own pace through flexible distance learning, with the option to exit at one of several points with a postgraduate award
•Boost your career prospects and differentiate yourself in a competitive job market, while remaining in full-time employment
•Engage in a wide variety of fascinating modules that look behind the key issues regarding food law

Food Law modules:

Food Law in the UK and EU – provides a foundation for further modules. You will gain an overview of the legal concepts relevant to the control and administration of the food industry, the statutory control of trading conduct and trade practices through the use of criminal law, as well as how food law is enforced. You will gain an understanding of the purposes and background of food law, both domestic and EU.

You will also select elective modules which might include:
•Food Consumer Protection Law
•Food Marketing Law
•Food Safety Law
•Food Souces Protection Law
•Negotiated Study

Dissertation
You must also undertake a dissertation, providing an invaluable opportunity to work in depth on a particular aspect of the law. You will need to enhance your technical knowledge and critical awareness in a subject of your choice. In order to obtain the LLM in Food Law it is necessary to write a dissertation with a food law theme.

Note: All modules are subject to change in order to keep content current.

Graduate Careers

This course equips you to enter legal and other work relating to food issues.

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The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Read more
The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the areas of law reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers to the regulation of charities in Ireland.

Directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines, this programme promotes reflection on the different aspects of national, European and International Law, with strong opportunities for specialization in both public and private law dimensions.
Leading this analysis and discussion, the members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the various areas of law. This is reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers, to the comparative regulation of charities and NGOs.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Master’s programmes. Of special interest to those undertaking this programme, are modules such as: Issues in Comparative Charity Law; Key Issues in Conflict of Laws; Comparative Constitutional Law; and, Regulation of Food Safety. Having completed six modules, you will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Law;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The deeper understanding and knowledge of law acquired through the programme is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful varied careers, both domestically and internationally. The legal skills acquired through the programme will be particularly useful, irrespective of the career you choose.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Economic Torts which adopts a comparative common law perspective to examine specific areas of the law of torts, such as the economic aspects to the law of torts, economic aspects of damages, commercial aspects of the law of torts and causation issues.

- Key Issues in Conflicts of Law is concerned with those laws governing legal disputes with a foreign element including jurisdiction and recognition of judgments under Brussels I and IIbis, the applicable law under Rome I & II and the use of public policy/ordre public.

- International Disaster Response Law assesses the history and emergence of international disaster response laws, rules and principles and responses to disaster relief outside of the immediate disaster area, with a particular focus on the international regime for protection of individuals.

- Regulation of Food Safety addresses how the differing interests and actors involved in the production and consumption of food interact to regulate the safety and quality of food and examines the current and future challenges in the regulation of food safety and quality.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The LLM is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers both domestically and internationally.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/apply,79280,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. Read more

MSc Food Safety

The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. The Food Safety programme of Wageningen University was the first MSc in Food Safety worldwide. The programme is unique, with a highly integrated approach to the field of food safety.

Programme summary

Wageningen University is one of the few universities in Europe able to offer education and research in all fields of food safety. This does not only include technical disciplines such as microbiology and toxicology, but also the legal, economic and communication aspects. The Food Safety programme at Wageningen University is one of the most modern and innovative in the world. Started in 2000 as the first of its kind, it is still the only two-year, full-time Master Food Safety programme offered in Europe and the only programme offering Food Safety Law. The programme prepares graduates for careers in the food industry, government or consumer organisations; the three key players in international food safety management.

The food industry is increasingly confronted with farm-to-table food safety measures, regulations, legislation and guidelines aimed at controlling food hazards. As a result, there is an increasing demand for managers with expertise in food safety evaluation who are able to survey and monitor the chemical, microbiological and physical parameters of product composition and product safety. Food safety experts are able to understand and analyse the variation in quality and safety of products. They are also able to assess the potential risks involved in the adoption of new production methods and processing techniques. Food safety evaluation concerns food constituents, agro-chemicals, environmental contaminants and natural toxins.

Food regulations are getting more and more complex, creating the need for regulatory affairs specialists in industry or in lobbying organisations. The programme is the only programme offering Food Safety Law for students with either a technical or a legal degree, thereby, fulfilling the need in society for such positions.

Specialisations

The programme offers three specialisations. All three specialisations have the courses on Food Safety Management and Food Law in common.

Applied Food Safety
This specialisation deals with the more technical (microbiology, toxicology, risk assessment) part of food safety. Food Safety Economics is also part of the programme. Thesis topics are also in these fields and graduates generally work in industry, universities and research institutes.

Food Safety Law
This specialisation is open for students with a technical or legal background. Courses focus on (international) food law, intellectual property rights and management. Theses are on food law. Graduates generally work as regulatory affairs specialists in industry.

Supply Chain Safety
This specialisation deals with safe food and ingredient supply. Globalisation leads to serious risks of contamination. In tropical countries, companies also face wars and political problems. Courses thus focus on Food Security, Risk Management in Food Chains and logistics, in addition to Microbiology and Food Law.

Your future career

The employment market is promising and all recent graduates found jobs with relative ease. The demand for university-trained professionals in this field is currently higher than the number of graduates available. Most recent graduates found jobs in the private sector, at universities or at food safety research institutes. Many graduates enter careers in government and go on to managerial positions. Due to the increased efforts of the EU in the development of national food safety organisations, there will be many more job opportunities in various European countries, both for technical as well as regulatory specialists.

Student Moath Almayman.
"The courses of the Master Food Safety consist of technical, managerial and legal aspects of food safety and are directly linked to real life situations. This in combination with the ability to perform extensive research and an internship at an international company to enhance my working experience, were reasons for me to choose this master. Even with a small population, Wageningen is a great cosmopolitan town. So many students from different backgrounds make it a very interesting place."

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Technology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. Read more

Overview

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. The MSc in Management of Intellectual Property explores the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trade marks and the other core areas within this field.

This Masters of Science is primarily aimed at science and engineering graduates who wish to pursue a career as patent or trade mark attorneys, though it is also open to graduates from all academic backgrounds who wish to study Intellectual Property (IP) at postgraduate level.

There is continued need for expertise in intellectual property law and management in industry, commerce and the innovative and creative industries, and this MSc gives you the opportunity to study IP to a high level. The programme offers a professional stream (for science and technology graduates), and a business stream, available to graduates from all fields looking to expand their knowledge of the application and management of IP.

Professional stream
The professional stream is directed towards graduates (primarily sciences and other technical industries, but also from all other backgrounds) seeking qualification as patent and trade mark attorneys.

Business stream
Students on the business stream will gain profound knowledge of the law and its operation with a view to working in areas such as the press and media, the entertainment industry, the internet and software industries, or the luxury goods industries. Further sectors where knowledge in Intellectual Property and related areas is seen as a particular advantage include governments, international organisations, universities or non-governmental institutions.

This programme will:
◦Give you a choice of two streams to suit your background; a professional stream for science and engineering graduates, and a business stream for graduates of other disciplines.
◦Offer science and engineering graduates the opportunity to gain professional exemptions from Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) and Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA).

What is Intellectual Property (IP) law?

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprising law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. This programme teaches the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trademarks and the other core areas within this field.

Why study Intellectual Property law?

The MSc Management of Intellectual Property programme was developed as we recognised the increasingly important role of intellectual property in our modern economy. There is an emerging need in industry, in commerce and in those professions concerned with intellectual property law, for science and technology graduates who have studied intellectual property law to a high level. In industry, particularly in small and medium-sized firms involved in research and development, where there is no in-house lawyer or patent agent, there is often a need for an intermediary between the firms and the external lawyer or patent agent for example; or for an executive to handle the inward or outward licensing of technology, to negotiate research and development contracts (where ownership of intellectual property is usually central to the bargaining) or generally to have a basic knowledge of current developments in the field of business law (eg. contract law, product liability law) insofar as these may relate to the firm's present or future activities.

With the introduction of the new business stream we also offer a distinct avenue for graduates from all backgrounds to gain valuable knowledge of intellectual property.

Structure of the MSc in Management of Intellectual Property

Classes usually commence mid-September with examinations in May/June. Courses are taught during the day at Queen Mary University of London campuses and usually take place between 9.00am and 5.00pm.

There is an initial Basic English Law examination which takes place two weeks after the start of the programme. Students then select which stream they wish to undertake.

Compulsory modules:

◦Study project (45 credits)
◦Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice (non-credit bearing but all students must pass this module at the start of the programme)

All students require 180 credits in total.

Professional stream students have core modules plus one free choice half module of 22.5 credits. In addition to this, professional stream students also sit two additional papers to gain exemption from the foundation papers of CIPA and ITMA, both papers must be passed to gain the exemption for either institution.

Business stream students have a free choice of 135 credits (three full modules or six half modules, or a combination of the two.)

All students are required to study the core subject units: Patent law, Copyright and designs law, Law of trade marks and unfair competition, Competition law, and Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice in term one. Occasional additional second semester options may be available.

]]Modules:]]

Read the full module descriptions on the QMUL web site.

Modules which run annually:
◦The law of copyright and design I (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦The law of patents I and II (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦Trade mark law I and II (Compulsory for Professional Stream
◦Study Project (Core Module for all students)
◦The law of competition I
◦Media law
◦Trade mark law I
◦The law of patents I
◦Intellectual property in food, biotechnology and agriculture
◦Intellectual property in the United States.

Modules which may run but cannot be guaranteed:
◦Competition law and licensing I and II
◦The law of copyright and design I and I
◦Information technology law
◦Intellectual property transactions
◦Licensing practice.

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The LLM in International Law, Globalisation and Development provides the opportunity to study the history, theories and application of the concepts of development and globalisation under international law. Read more
The LLM in International Law, Globalisation and Development provides the opportunity to study the history, theories and application of the concepts of development and globalisation under international law. The course covers contemporary topics such as foreign investment, food security, the right to development and self-determination, post-conflict and transitional countries, and conflicts over energy and resources.

This course provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, focusing on the key aspects of economic activity and environmental protection currently regulated under the auspices of the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank and other international and regional institutions. It combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective, and is ideally suited to students from a law, history, politics, business, economics or other social sciences background.

The course is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice and international development. It would also appeal to those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations, as well as in government and academic posts.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-international-law-globalisation-and-development/

Why choose this course?

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard commercial and trade law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the university, the city of Oxford and in nearby London.

- In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework, and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high flying diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law

Research is fundamental to the School of Law. Students are taught exclusively by research active staff with diverse interests and projects. Many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves and the teaching staff will be able to guide you in this decision. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers - publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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Kent’s new MA in International Heritage and Law is a distinct programme combining the study of heritage with an understanding of the legal frameworks which govern the management of our heritage. Read more
Kent’s new MA in International Heritage and Law is a distinct programme combining the study of heritage with an understanding of the legal frameworks which govern the management of our heritage.

Heritage is broad discipline, encompassing the wide spectrum of cultural inheritance from all civilisations and time periods. Heritage is also a major geopolitical issue in the world today, contributing to our sense of selves and communities, with law and development arguably the two most central issues in the field of heritage studies today. The MA engages you with both intellectual and practical approaches to key issues in heritage (including archaeology), with a particular focus on the protection of international heritage as well as development.

The programme is offered through a partnership between the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies and the Kent Law School. Over the autumn and spring terms you take a core module on heritage, and choose optional modules that cover archaeology, heritage, human rights, international law, and law and development, before undertaking an extended dissertation over the summer.

This MA is of particular interest to those who wish to study cultural heritage as an academic subject, those who wish to pursue a career in international heritage and development, lawyers who want to specialise in cultural heritage issues or heritage specialists who want to acquire a better understanding of legal issues.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/759/international-heritage-law

Course structure

This MA programme is currently in development. The proposed list of modules includes International Heritage, Archaeology and Development; alongside Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues; Artefacts in Archaeology; Research Skills in Ancient History: Understanding the City in Antiquity; Transmanche Archaeologies (themes in the Archaeology of the Transmanche Region through time); Cultural Heritage Law; International Protection of Human Rights; Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems; and Law and Development.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Core Modules:
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues (30 credits)
CL830 - International Heritage, Archaeology and Development (30 credits)
CL897 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules:
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Substantive Issues (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History: Understanding the City in Antiquity (30 credits)
CL897 - Roman Archaeology: Northern Provinces of the Empire from their Iron Age Origins (30 credits)
LW813 - Contemporary Topics in Intellectual Property (20 credits)
LW843 - International Human Rights Law (20 credits)
LW925 - Cultural Heritage Law (20 credits)
LW927 - Law and The Humanities1: Ethos and Scholarship (20 credits)
LW928 - Law and Humanities2: Current Issues (20 credits)

Study support

About the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies
Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) operates as a department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/index.html), and there are corresponding opportunities for a high level of interdisciplinary interaction (five modern languages, philosophy, theology and religious studies and comparative literature), in addition to the informal links with staff in the rest of the University researching medieval history, the history of science, and social anthropology. We have good partnerships with high-profile universities and organisations such as the Universities of Ghent and Lille 3, the Flemish Heritage Institute, UCLA, the Free University of Amsterdam and the Vrije Universitat Brussel (VUB).

We offer bursaries to enable students to participate in departmental fieldwork projects for three weeks at a time, covering travel, food and accommodation. Typically, around 30 students each year have been placed on research and training excavations in Britain, Italy (including Ostia, port of Rome) and Greece, relating to sites of Bronze Age Greek (Minoan), Iron Age, Roman, Late Antique and Anglo-Saxon date.

About Kent Law School
Kent Law School (KLS) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Careers

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop and focus their careers in law, heritage and development.

The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), the largest non-governmental organisation dealing with heritage protection (with more than 11,000 members), has highlighted the need for trained experts both in the legal aspects of heritage protection and in issues of heritage and international development.

The programme is ideal for careers in archaeology, museums and curation, preservation, conservation and the legal industries, as well as government bodies concerned with the preservation of architecture or the environment. It is also ideal for those wishing to develop a research career in heritage and law.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Understanding the development and functioning of environmental law across different levels of environmental governance is an important issue of our time. Read more
Understanding the development and functioning of environmental law across different levels of environmental governance is an important issue of our time. This requires moving beyond the traditional approach to teaching international, regional, EU and national environmental law in isolation from one other.

There's also a growing need to understand the relevance for environmental governance of the legal practices of indigenous peoples and local communities, business entities, local administrations, and transnational environmental practitioners.

The programme aims to help students critically appraise and creatively contribute to environmental regulation and governance at the international, transnational, national and local levels.

Studying this course, you'll be equipped with a wide range of expertise in environmental law, in areas like:
-Biodiversity
-Land
-Food and agriculture
-Climate change and energy
-Corporate accountability
-Environmental justice
-Water and oceans
-Human rights
-Sustainable development

You'll focus on the global dynamics of environmental law. In particular, you'll look at the mutual influences and interactions among different regulatory levels.

The programme draws both on cutting-edge academic research on global environmental law, and on first-hand professional experience in environmental law and governance at different levels.

Employability

Your ability to gain international employment is at the heart of this course. It'll equip you with the skills and expertise you need to pursue a career in:
-International organisations
-National governments involved in international, EU and/or transnational law matters
-Non-government organisations that operate at a regional, sub-national, national or international level
-Private companies concerned with international, EU and/or transnational environmental law

Work experience

We have a successful track record of helping LLM students obtain competitive international internships with United Nations organisations. These are optional, and their duration and conditions vary depending on the host organisation. They usually start towards the end of the course.

Our programme directors are currently concluding formal agreements with selected international organisations to secure a number of internships for LLM students each year.

Career advice

Our course directors will provide advice on international careers. They can give you some insider tips on how to apply for jobs with, for example, the United Nations and will be available to review job applications.

Network with other professionals

LLM students will become part of a closed alumni group on LinkedIn. This will give you the opportunity to network with other professionals in environmental law and governance. It'll also ensure you're updated on selected job opportunities.

Course content

Core classes
-International Environmental Law 1
-International Environmental Law 2
-Global Environmental Law: Issues of Sustainability and Equity
-Legal Research

Elective classes
The opportunity to select from our range of elective classes gives you the chance to pursue your personal interests and tailor your degree to your intended career path. Options include:
-EU Environmental Law 1
-EU Environmental Law 2 - External Dimensions
-International Climate Change Law
-Oceans Governance & the Law of the Sea
-Other elective classes

Learning & teaching

The course will be taught primarily through face-to-face sessions in the form of weekly interactive seminars. Seminars give you the chance to make sure you've fully understood the subject matter, but also to develop and discuss ideas with your peers, and to develop specific research interests.

You'll be expected to draw on the knowledge and skills you've developed in your undergraduate studies, as well as on other professional or academic experience you've acquired since then, and share them with fellow course participants.

In addition to taught seminars, you'll benefit from a wide-range of activities organised by the Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance to allow you to broaden your knowledge of and skills in environmental law and policy.

Assessment

Assessment is based on your performance in coursework and/or written exam papers. Students seeking award of the Master’s Degree (LLM) will need to complete a dissertation. Some of the assessments will be based on real-life assignments that the teaching staff have engaged with in the context of their practical experience in international consultancies, with a view to developing your skills of immediate relevance to global employers.

Careers

This course has been designed to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and analytical skills necessary for pursuing a career with a strong international focus. You may go on to work as:
-Legal advisors and legislative drafters for national and local governments
-Legal advisors to local, national and international think tanks and non-profit organizations
-Legal and policy officers for international organizations (United Nations, European Commission)
-Legal and policy advisors to private companies
-Associates in international and transnational environmental law firms
-PhD researchers and university lecturers

Our course directors have a track record of successfully supporting students in obtaining highly competitive international internships and jobs with reputable research institutes, international organisations and non-government organisations. Supporting activities include:
-Review of applications
-Provision of targeted career advice
-Integration of new students in a vibrant, cross-programme alumni community, so as to foster networking activities
-Collaborations on matters pertaining to environmental law after the completion of the LLM

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Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Read more
Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Food is also essential to the social body. Who eats what, who eats with whom, and whose appetites are satisfied and whose denied, are all profoundly social dynamics through which identities, relationships, and hierarchies are created and reproduced.

The SOAS MA programme in the Anthropology of Food offers students the opportunity to explore historically and culturally variable foodways, from foraging to industrial agriculture, from Europe and North America to Africa, Asia and South America. The programme asks students to trace the passage of food from plant to palate, and to examine who benefits, and who suffers, from contemporary modes of food production, exchange, preparation, and consumption. Students examine food policy at national and international levels, as well as the role played in its formation by the food industry.

Focus is given to the study of famine and the controversial role of food aid in securing food supplies. Debates over the impact of agricultural biotechnology on agrarian livelihoods and knowledge systems, as well as on the natural environment, are assessed. Movements toward organic agriculture, fair trade, and slow food are also analysed.

An anthropological approach to the study of food draws upon and challenges the perspectives of other disciplines, whether agronomy or nutritional science, economics or law, history or literature. Dependent upon individual interests and experiences, graduates of the programme may pursue research degrees in any number of academic disciplines, or find employment in food-related government ministries, international organizations, development agencies, or non-governmental associations, as well as in the fields of public health, education, and media, or in the catering industry.

Click here for a last of past Dissertation Titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/ma-anthropology-of-food-dissertation-titles-2006---present.html)

Click here for Alumni Profiles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/foodstudies/studentprofiles/)

Course teachers Johan Pottier, Harry G. West, and Jakob Klein were awarded the 2009 Excellence in Instruction Award by the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society. West was named joint runner-up for the SOAS Director’s Teaching Prize in 2011-2012. The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Food was named a Finalist in the Best Food Initiative category in the BBC Food & Farming Awards in 2015.

Scholarships:
Applicants for the MA Anthropology of Food may be eligible to apply for Scholarships and Bursaries (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/

Programme Structure Overview

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Food and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 147kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/file39766.pdf

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course offers students an extensive, detailed and critical knowledge and understanding of a chosen specialism within food and drink innovation. Read more
This course offers students an extensive, detailed and critical knowledge and understanding of a chosen specialism within food and drink innovation.

A limited number of funded places are available for September 2017 entry to this course. Highly-qualified Scottish and EU candidates can apply to have their tuition fees paid by the Scottish Funding Council. Numbers are limited, so candidates are encouraged to apply as soon as possible.

We also have a funded studentship available in this area. You can currently receive up to £14,500 in funding, with other opportunities opening soon.

Why choose this course?

-Our brand new Food Innovation Centre includes a cutting edge food processing lab and specialist sensory suite. The suite includes a climate controlled environment and the latest digital teaching facilities. The lab houses a spray drier, extruder, micro-brewery, cheese vats, a rheometer, a freeze drier and much more.
-Apply your own specialist capability and develop new sector-specific expertise through specialist education and collaborative mixed-team working on industry-linked innovation projects.
-Learn about industry expectations as you are supported and mentored by experienced industry professionals and academic specialists.
-Follow a curriculum designed in collaboration with Scotland Food & Drink, Skills Development Scotland and Interface Food & Drink to meet the demands of the Food & Drink sector.
-Get involved with our highly successful commercial arm Food Innovation @ Abertay and with interdisciplinary researchers from across the University.

The MSc Food & Drink Innovation offers a unique postgraduate experience, specifically designed in discussion with industry bodies: Scotland Food & Drink, Skills Development Scotland, Interface Food & Drink. As postgraduate students, highly talented individuals will work in mixed-discipline teams to develop innovative solutions pertinent to challenges faced in the contemporary food and drink industry.

Working closely with academic staff who are highly experienced in the food & drink industry and academic teaching, and under the guidance and mentorship of food & drink industry representatives, you will develop professional skills and knowledge relevant to the food & drink industry.

During the course of your studies, you will ultimately be expected to demonstrate applied excellence in your specialist area, as well as professionalism, flexibility, the ability to adapt within team working situations, and creativity and innovation towards product development. This intensive programme will expose you to a breadth of practice encountered in the food & drink industry, ideally preparing you for an exciting and creative career in a vibrant and expanding sector.

Join our Graduate School

Our Graduate School is a dedicated facility providing support, training and professional development opportunities to our vibrant postgraduate community. Specially designed to promote integration and inculcation of interdisciplinary working in our next generation of researchers, postgraduates study and learn together at Abertay - from Environmental Management to Law, Psychology, Bioscience, Economics and Business, Cybersecurity and Computer Games Development.

When you join us as a postgraduate student or researcher, you’ll be joining a community of creative, like-minded scholars and will automatically be provided with access to our dedicated study and social spaces – a forum in which you can meet, work and learn with other researchers and postgraduates from across the University. You’ll benefit from training and professional development opportunities as well as support with funding applications, placement opportunities, teaching support, public engagement and outreach activity.

What you study

A key component of the MSc Food & Drink Innovation is to foster creativity through enquiry-based learning, where mixed-discipline teams of students will develop solutions to industry-posed problems. Industry-linked innovation projects will be developed by multidisciplinary teams of students, mentored and supported by experienced industry practitioners and academic researchers, and underpinned by high-level sector specific modules and education.

With activities ranging from 'pitch and crit' sessions, where solution conceptions are pitched to a panel for critique, to the development of prototyped solutions, teams are mentored and supervised by academics and industry practitioners to facilitate the development of specific professional skills and a broader understanding of the Food & Drink industry.

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With more than one million companies incorporated in Delaware, there is no better place to pursue a master of laws in corporate law and finance than Delaware Law. Read more
With more than one million companies incorporated in Delaware, there is no better place to pursue a master of laws in corporate law and finance than Delaware Law. Our location in Wilmington – often referred to as the “Corporate Capital of America” – gives you a front-row seat to courts and law firms on the leading edge of corporate law.

Offered through our Institute of Delaware Corporate and Business Law, the LLM in corporate law and finance is designed to prepare you for a successful future in today’s fast-paced global marketplace.

The master of laws in corporate law and finance degree is open to U.S. attorneys, as well as foreign-trained attorneys, which brings diversity and opportunity for career growth by establishing relationships with colleagues from around the world.

Visit the website http://delawarelaw.widener.edu/prospective-students/graduate-programs/llm-in-corporate-law-finance/

Degree Requirements for Foreign-Trained Attorneys

- Degree Requirements for U.S. Attorneys

To earn a LLM in corporate law and finance, students must complete 24 semester hours of coursework at the graduate level, in corporate-related areas like commercial law, business acquisitions, or intellectual property. Graduate courses in corporate law and finance are worth between two and four semester hours of credit. At least 18 of the 24 semester hours must be completed in residence at Delaware Law, although students may complete this residence requirement as either a full-time or part-time student. Students may also earn graduate credit through one of the law school’s study abroad opportunities.

In order to qualify for the LLM, students must complete all program requirements within four years from the date of matriculation.

Required courses for graduates of ABA-approved law schools:

- Business Organizations
- Business Principles
- Securities Regulation
- Colloquium or Seminar: Advanced Corporations

Elective Courses

Beyond the required courses, LLM students may choose corporate-related upper-level courses in the Delaware Law catalog to fulfil the electives requirement. The electives needed for graduation must be in corporate-related areas, such as commercial law, business acquisitions, antitrust, international business, intellectual property, and taxation. Course offerings and credits per course are subject to change from year to year.

Visit the Cost of Attendance page for tuition rates and other fees. Students enrolled in the seated program must have money to cover living expenses such as rent, food, books, health insurance, and other costs, and fund their travel to Delaware. We recommend that students budget $50,000 if they wish to complete the program in one academic year.

Visit the Graduate Programs Admissions page for admissions eligibility (http://delawarelaw.widener.edu/prospective-students/graduate-programs/graduate-programs-admissions/).

For more information, contact our Graduate Programs Office (http://delawarelaw.widener.edu/prospective-students/graduate-programs/contact-us/).

Find out how to apply here - http://delawarelaw.widener.edu/prospective-students/graduate-programs/graduate-programs-admissions/

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The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development aims to equip you with the marketing, organisational and management skills you will need to make innovative contributions to the development of local economies, with particular emphasis on co-operatives, social enterprises and food businesses in Ireland and overseas. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development aims to equip you with the marketing, organisational and management skills you will need to make innovative contributions to the development of local economies, with particular emphasis on co-operatives, social enterprises and food businesses in Ireland and overseas.

It is aimed at graduates from a wide range of disciplines who are interested in careers in co-operative organisations, food marketing or rural development. The Postgraduate Diploma is a full-time course that extends over 9 months. It leads to a one year MSc (masters by research) in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development in a second year.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckp01/

Course Details

This course takes an interdisciplinary, problem-centred approach to teaching and learning. It also integrates an eight week work placement, giving you the opportunity to travel if you want to. You are qualified to take up a wide range of employment opportunities on graduation.

[[Format]

The Postgraduate Diploma uses a unique combination of teaching and learning methods and emphasises practical skills and learning as well as developing a solid grounding in theoretical and applied concepts. This includes lectures, ‘capstone’ seminars (involving interactive staff and student discussion and debate), field visits, case study analysis, project-based fieldwork (one week is spent conducting research in a designated location on a designated topic), analysis of new food products in class, guest lectures, group work and web-based resources.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development is delivered over 9 months.

Core Modules

Students take 50 credits as follows:

FE6109 Co-operative Organisation: Theory and Concepts (10 credits)
FE6111 Co-operative Organisation: Theoretical Application and Practice (5 credits)
FE6112 Rural Development: Theory and Practice (10 credits)
FE6113 Rural Development: Application and Practice (5 credits)
FE6115 Food Marketing and the Consumer (5 credits)
FE6116 Marketing Strategies for Local Development (5 credits)
FE6104*Practical Training Placement (10 credits) - Students will be placed for a minimum of eight weeks during the Summer in a relevant work environment.

*As part of FE6104 Practical Training Placement, a report must be submitted for the Autumn Examination on a date specified at the beginning of the academic year. Programme leadership will be provided by the Department/Associate School of Food Business and Development in association with the Centre for Co-operative Studies.

Elective Modules

Students take 10 credits from the following:

FE6114 Introduction to Food Marketing (5 credits) (for students who have not previously studied Marketing) OR
FE4205 Consumer Behaviour in Food Markets (5 credits) (for students who have previously studied marketing)
AND
FE4002 Global Food Policy (5 credits) OR
FE4008 Food Security and the Developing World (5 credits) OR
any other 5-credit module which may be made available by the School of Food Science, depending on the prior qualifications and interests of each student and subject to the approval of the Programme Leader.

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/PGDiplomas/food/page01.html

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of continuous assessment – e.g. essays, case studies, group work, project work, presentations, reflective journal – and end-of-year written examinations.

Careers

This course provides a good critical education for those entering into a wide range of administrative, business and personnel appointments in the private, public and third sectors. It also offers a thorough and stimulating grounding in organisational studies to anybody interested in pursuing an academic career in this field.

Examples of employment destinations of graduates include Bord Bia, Concern, local authorities, Food Safety Authority, LEADER companies, VEC, HSE, IRCSET, Farm Relief Services, teaching, financial services and many more.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. Read more
Food Regulatory Affairs is an interdisciplinary subject area - integrating science, law and food/health policy as applied to the regulation of the entire food chain from pre-harvest to the consumer. International perspectives on Food Regulatory Affairs have become increasingly important particularly since the formation of the World Trade Organisation and the international acceptance of Codex Alimentarius standards. This part-time programme provides postgraduate training in Food Regulatory Affairs together with a specialism in Veterinary Public Health (VPH) and is particularly designed for veterinarians employed in the food sector who wish to develop their career in this field but who are unable to undertake study on a full-time basis. In addition, the programme fulfils the additional requirement for the training of official veterinarians as set out in European Regulation 854/2004.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/msc-food-regulatory-affairs-veterinary-public-health-pt-el

Course detail

- Description -

This is a part-time programme which is entirely internet delivered. European and global experts in veterinary and food science, law, economics, and policy contribute to the programme. The awards are granted jointly between Ulster University (UK), and University College Dublin (IRL).

- Purpose -

This programme provides students with broad knowledge and understanding of food regulatory affairs and promotes their ability to assess available evidence and data, make sound judgements and communicate findings effectively to all stakeholders in the food chain – producers, regulators, industry and consumers. Relevant EU food regulatory policy is integrated within the lectures and translated into a coherent regulatory framework so that students will grasp the complex idea of total regulation of the food chain from primary production through to consumer health issues. Core domains of VPH are addressed in relation to the regulatory responsibilities of the veterinarians and the protection of animal health and welfare and human health.

- Teaching and assessment -

Teaching is through online lectures, online discussions, individual support, video and internet links with staff, independent learning, and work in small groups.

The assessment methods are designed to test both knowledge and skills, and include, but are not limited to, critical evaluations of current literature, problem-based case studies, and development of an online scientific discussion board.

Career options

The academic content of the programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of legislative, policy and scientific aspects of food regulatory affairs as well as to acquire skills to disseminate and implement knowledge in practice. This leads to excellent employment opportunities in government (EU and international) and non-government organisations, and in the European and international agri-food industry.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects. Read more

How we teach

Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects.

Facilities and equipment

A new £1m Sediment-Solute Systems lab enables geochemical analysis of aqueous and solid phases, especially in the context of biogeochemistry. We have equipment for chromatography, UV spectrometry and flow injection/auto analysis.

Our sample preparation facilities enable digestion, pre-concentration by evaporation under vacuum, and tangential flow filtration. There are alpha and gamma counters, a laser particle sizer and a luminescence dating lab. Field equipment includes automatic water samplers, weather stations, data loggers and environmental process characterisation sensors.

We have high-quality petrological microscopes for examining geological samples. We have labs for spectrometry and for palaeontological preparation, and you’ll also have access to specialist facilities in other departments at the University.

Laptops, camcorders, tape recorders and transcribers are available for your fieldwork. Our postgraduate computer labs have networked workstations for GIS research and climate modelling, ARC/INFO, ERDAS software and specialist software for remote sensing. GIS facilities are also provided by the £5m Informatics Collaboratory for the Social Sciences.

Our new postgraduate media GIS suite has facilities for Skype, video conferencing, web design, video editing and creative media.

Fieldwork

Most of our courses involve fieldwork. The MPH, MSc and MA International Development take students on a 10-day field trip where they put their research skills into practice. Recent classes visited the West Pokot region of Kenya, urban and rural areas of Nepal, the suburbs of Cairo and India.

Core modules

Theory and Debates in Food Security and Food Justice; Research Design and Methods; Food Security and Food Justice Field Course – 2015/16 Hong Kong; Dissertation with Placement; Professional Skills for Food Security and Food Justice.

Examples of optional modules

Ideas and Practice in Development; Policy and Practice; Global Politics of the Environment and Climate Change; Understanding Environmental Change; Poverty, Place and Inequality; Soil and Sustainability; Global Justice; The Politics of International Law,

Cities of Diversity; Planning for informality; Governance and Participation in the Global South; Global Social Policy and Governance; Disaster and Emergency Management; Advanced Languages 2; Open Source GIS and Spatial Data Analysis.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered through a combination of workshops, lectures, seminars and practicals.

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The MSc/PgDip programme in Food Safety and Control addresses the key issues of food control, from both the food producers and food law enforcement points of view, recognising the equally important needs of distributors, retailers and of course, consumers. Read more
The MSc/PgDip programme in Food Safety and Control addresses the key issues of food control, from both the food producers and food law enforcement points of view, recognising the equally important needs of distributors, retailers and of course, consumers.

The course covers the knowledge and skills required for the successful introduction and implementation of systems of control, such as those based on the accepted principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), and other international quality management standards.

The responsibility of assuring the safety of food lies primarily with government and the industry. In today's food industry, all aspects of the production, storage and distribution of food must be effectively controlled, not only to assure safety and wholesomeness, but also to ensure efficient and consistent manufacture at the lowest possible cost. Consumers are demanding a greater assurance of safety as well as more information on which to base their choices. Students are expected to take on demanding roles in a wide range of food control activities in both the private and public sectors upon graduation, while gaining an internationally recognized qualification.

EU study opportunity

EU study opportunities exist with the University of deLorraine Nancy, France, and Universidad Politécnica deValencia (UPV), Valencia, Spain.

Excellent scholarship opportunity

Students who have accepted an offer for a place on this course are encouraged to apply for LSBU's Frank Brake scholarship. Find out more about the Frank Brake scholarship:
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/scholarships/frank-brake-scholarship

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/food-safety-control-msc

Modules

Year 1:
All modules are assessed through a mix of formal examination and coursework. Each module represents 200 hours of learning time with up to 40 hours of class contact time.

- Food regulation and sustainability
Food legislation is an essential element for an effective food safety and control. The module deals with legislative control at various levels, embracing national and European Union legislation and also international approaches to harmonisation. It also provides an awareness of the different types of food standards, and their implications for manufacturers, retailers and consumers. It also addresses the policy issues in sustainable food production and management.

- Food composition and safety
This module comprises of selected topics that are directly relevant to food safety and control. It considers the complex chemical composition of foods, the chemical safety of foods, quality parameters, and develops the skills to interpret and use data. The common themes throughout the module are the choice of suitable, appropriate and cost effective analytical methodology, and the correct interpretation of analytical results.

- Food microbiology and hygiene
This module is designed to help you develop an understanding of food microbiology, to appreciate the principles of food microbiology and explore both microbial food spoilage and food borne microorganisms. You'll be able to critically analyse the means by which food can be processed safely from a microbiological standpoint, and the methodology that is applied to achieve this. Emphasis will be given to the development, application and use of microbiological criteria for foods and their limitations.

- Food quality management
This module introduces the principles behind all effective quality management systems (QMSs) employed in the modern food industry. Quality of product or service does not just happen; it has to be planned and managed. Systems used by small as well as large companies are covered.

- Food product development management
This module examines the management processes involved in the design and development of new safe food products. Students work together in small groups and adopt an allocated role within the group. The groups respond to a product development brief by designing and developing a new food product or an extension of an existing product. You'll prepare an individual portfolio describing your experience and contribution and make a group presentation of your product to a panel of external guests as a 'commercial pitch'.

- Food control operations
This module outlines the rationale, philosophy and concepts of modern food control, introducing the precautionary principle, the scope ranging from 'farm to fork', and the requirement of risk assessment. The principles of control based on prevention rather than detection and self-regulation are underlined throughout. Modern tools, techniques and procedures in food control are also introduced, illustrating the scope, applications and potential benefits of effective food control. You'll learn how to draw up specifications, identify safety hazards, conduct risk assessments, determine product shelf life, apply the commonly used statistical quality control techniques as well as use basic sensory evaluation methods. In the end, you'll have a broad and comprehensive grounding in modern food control operations.

- Research methods
This module aims to equip you with the knowledge and skills required for scientific research and systematic investigation. You'll learn how to ask the right questions, develop meaningful research proposals and evaluate objectively and independently research findings. Emphasis will be given to ethics, background information search, planning, experimental design, data collection and analysis. Principles of scientific methods, objective reasoning, idea formulation and model building will also be included. In data analysis, you'll be introduced to the most common statistical techniques covering both parametric and non-parametric tests.

- Project
The Project forms the climax of the MSc Food Safety and Control programme. It's the opportunity for you to demonstrate your grasp of food control in its widest sense, and produce documentary evidence of that grasp. The project provides the opportunity for you to apply your knowledge in an integrated fashion to a particular challenge in the management and control of food safety. We always try to help you match your project intention with your career aspirations and where possible use our networks to enable you to work on real commercial problems within an industrial placement.

The course has been developed to provide:
- A thorough understanding of the scientific principles on which both the safe handling of food and food control procedures are based

- An appreciation of the importance of the proper control of manufacture, storage and distribution, and the means by which it is achieved in the production and sale of safe food

- An understanding of the food industry's responsibilities to the interests and welfare of the consumer

- Opportunities to consider the social and economic contexts in which the industry operates

- An intellectually stimulating and coherent programme relevant to both your needs and those of the food industry

- A detailed understanding of the philosophy and methodology of research

- The best possible opportunity to develop personally and professionally

- The knowledge and skills necessary to enhance your career prospects.

Employability

The programme covers the knowledge and skills required for the successful introduction and implementation of systems of control such as those based on the accepted principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), and other international quality management standards. This opens up numerous and diverse opportunities in food safety and control.

You'll study all areas of food safety, ranging from microbiological, chemical and physical safety in the different modulesand throughout the programme.

The course will open up a wide range of career opportunities including roles in: product development; quality control; food safety and quality management; catering and retailing; technical auditing; and food law enforcement. Some of our graduates have gone on to PhD degrees.

Recent employers include Kerry Foods, Leathams, Bakkaver, Kraft Foods, Tesco, Asda, Marks and Spencer, Harrods and local authorities.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

You'll be encouraged to undertake a work-based project or dissertation.

Teaching and learning

You'll make extensive use of the Virtual Learning Environment, so materials are available whenever you need them. Personal tutoring support, extraclinics offering support outside lecture and tutorial sessions are available.There's a major focus on the practical applications of knowledge, supported byhands-on laboratory exercises. Various assessment methods are used in modules across the course.

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Food security is of critical concern globally, and the development of food systems that provide food of high quality and quantity in a sustainable way, is now a research and policy priority. Read more
Food security is of critical concern globally, and the development of food systems that provide food of high quality and quantity in a sustainable way, is now a research and policy priority.

The MSc in Agroecology and Food Security is designed to equip professionals and graduates with the knowledge to critically analyse and assess the relationships between agroecological food production and management, farming systems, climate change economics and the environment.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Run by Coventry University's Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) whose mission is to create resilient food systems worldwide:
-Draws on the outstanding range of academic and practical expertise of CAWR staff plus world-renowned guest lecturers
-Is designed for students from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and from the natural and social sciences (e.g. previous experience of agriculture not necessary)
-Provides unique content in terms of its cutting edge focus on transforming the food system through alternative paradigms, concepts, and methodologies to enable real and equitable change
-Is based at the UK’s national centre for organic horticulture in 10 acres oforganic gardens

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course will provide you with the knowledge of the major agricultural production systems found in different parts of the world and the main theoretical approaches to understanding contemporary food systems.

The course covers a range of subject areas including:
-Food security
-Agroecological production systems
-Clean energy, climate and carbon
-Agroecological techniques and practices
-Stabilisation agriculture
-Management of natural and environmental hazards
-Environmental impact assessment
-Ecological management and assessment
-International environmental law
-Remote sensing and digital image analysis
-Project management

For each module, teaching normally takes the form of weekly 'face-to-face' contact at the University (including lectures, workshops, seminars and exercises) throughout each semester, with associated directed and self directed study, which may be undertaken off-campus.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

All students undertake an individual research project, which may be associated with an appropriate organisation or company in the UK or overseas. Equipped with a detailed understanding of food systems and a range of appropriate practical skills your potential for employment will be strong.

Opportunities present themselves in national and international government agencies, non governmental policy, research and development organisations, the private sector including food companies and the farming sector.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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