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The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Read more
The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense which includes not only environmental issues strictly speaking but also all the links that they have with other areas such as natural resources, human rights, economic development trade or intellectual property rights.

The SOAS degree offers a distinct mix of modules that covers all the main areas of environmental law in their international and national dimensions. The international and global nature of many environmental issues makes the international law component a key part of the MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development. We offer all the general topics that make up the core of international environmental law. Additionally, we focus specifically on the North-South dimension of international environmental issues given the key role this plays in most international environmental negotiations.

The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development specifically seeks to put international environmental law in its national context and examines the broad legal frameworks negotiated at the international level in the context of their implementation in selected countries of the South. It thus provides a much more grounded context to the study of environmental law.

Further, we also study the legal regimes of individual countries of the South to provide much more specific analysis of the discipline at the level of its implementation in specific contexts. The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development gives specific emphasis to different regions of the South, including South Asia, China and sub-Saharan Africa.

For further information about the general structure of the MA in Law programme at SOAS, please visit the General MA in Law (MA in Legal Studies) page (http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/maintcomplegstud/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/ma-in-environmental-law-and-sustainable-development/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Environmental Law and Sustainable Development specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Water and Development: Conflict and Governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific - 15PFFH011 (0.5 Unit)
- Global Energy & Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
- Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. Read more
The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense which includes not only environmental issues strictly speaking but also all the links that they have with other areas such as natural resources, human rights, economic development trade or intellectual property rights.

The SOAS degree offers a distinct mix of modules that covers all the main areas of environmental law in their international and national dimensions. The international and global nature of many environmental issues makes the international law component a key part of the LLM in Environmental Law. We offer all the general topics that make up the core of international environmental law. Additionally, we focus specifically on the North-South dimension of international environmental issues given the key role this plays in most international environmental negotiations.

The LLM in Environmental Law specifically seeks to put international environmental law in its national context and examines the broad legal frameworks negotiated at the international level in the context of their implementation in selected countries of the South. It thus provides a much more grounded context to the study of environmental law.

Further, we also study the legal regimes of individual countries of the South to provide much more specific analysis of the discipline at the level of its implementation in specific contexts. The LLM in Environmental Law gives specific emphasis to different regions of the South, including South Asia, China and sub-Saharan Africa.

For further information about the general LLM at SOAS and a list of all the modules, please visit the General LLM description (http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llm/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmenvlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Environmental Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Water and Development: conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Water Law: justice and governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Global Energy and Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit)
- Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific - 15PFFH011 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

The department

In the Department of Criminal Justice, undergraduate and graduate programs are designed to meet the constant demand for law enforcement and criminal justice professionals. Our programs also provide an excellent pathway toward the study of law.

Our core curriculum thoroughly explores the theory and practice of the criminal justice system. But you will customize your study through elective courses that focus on a particular area of interest. Our full-time faculty is an internationally renowned group of academic professionals, and our adjunct professors are working criminal justice professionals, including attorneys, judges and law enforcement officials.

The LIU Post Department of Criminal Justice was one of the first on the East Coast to establish an internship program. All criminal justice majors intern in the field, and have access to an extraordinary network of criminal justice professionals, making it possible to be offered positions upon graduation.

Criminal Justice students may have the opportunity to spend a semester in Washington, D.C., participating in the Justice Semester at American University, or studying Forensic Psychology at George Washington University.

M.S. in Criminal Justice

The 36-credit Master of Science in Criminal Justice offers an in-depth, 21st century curriculum geared toward forensics, law and society, criminal behavior, cyber crime, terrorism and criminological theory. In addition to our core curriculum, electives are available but not limited to areas such as terrorism, law, high technology, forensics, security, and fraud. The program prepares students for modern-day careers in criminal justice, including cyberspace crime detection, law enforcement management systems and homeland security.

Courses are taught by a distinguished faculty that includes published authors, researchers and widely-consulted authorities on the American and world criminal justice systems. Adjunct faculty members are working professionals in the field and include attorneys, judges and law enforcements officials. Our professors will engage and inspire you to exceed your expectations.

Alumni of our program are employed in a wide variety of professional positions: law enforcement officers, federal agents, security officers, prosecutors, corrections counselors, judges, attorneys, private security professionals, homeland security agents, forensic technologists, crime lab technicians, emergency managers, FBI agents and social service representatives.

Forensic Psychology Semester: George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

The Department of Criminal Justice is proud to announce an articulation agreement with George Washington University concerning Forensic Psychology. Eligible criminal justice graduate students may take forensic psychology courses in Washington, D.C. for a semester. Completed credits will be applied towards the student’s plan of study. To find out more about the George Washington University Program contact the Department of Criminal Justice.

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The MSc in Environmental Governance trains students to grasp some of the key environmental challenges of our time by developing their skills to apply sophisticated, critical and interdisciplinary sustainability and environmental theories at multiple scales and in different geographical contexts. Read more
The MSc in Environmental Governance trains students to grasp some of the key environmental challenges of our time by developing their skills to apply sophisticated, critical and interdisciplinary sustainability and environmental theories at multiple scales and in different geographical contexts. As part of the programme, students have a unique opportunity to collaborate and engage with cutting-edge researchers and world leading experts on environmental governance, political ecology, Marxist political economy and urban sustainability.

The MSc in Environmental Governance is targeted at three audiences: future leaders interested in pursuing a career in environmental policy regulation and urban sustainable management; those wishing to develop further their academic career by pursuing a PhD; and environmental professionals wishing to deepen their knowledge.

Aims

-Interdisciplinary and sophisticated academic rigour: The course is highly interdisciplinary, exposing you to ideas and practices developed in a range of subject areas such as geography, environmental studies, politics, economics and development studies, rather than one alone. Our curriculum covers theories and interdisciplinary practices of environmental governance and offers you a comprehensive introduction to how human-use of the non-human world is organised at multiple scale and what the effects of this are.

-Inclusive and collaborative research environment: The degree offers collaboration with the internationally renowned Society-Environment Research Group (SERG) . This group involves more than ten researchers from the School of Environment, Education and Development , with distinguished records of theoretical, empirical and applied research in a range of geographical and environmental settings. This includes work on water and energy governance in Europe, Africa and South-East Asia; social, environmental and climate justice and equity in Central and Eastern Europe, smart cities and urban sustainability in the UK - to name but a few.

-Knowledge transfer and employability: We combine training in theory and critical thinking with more practical and applied elements. Our range of `real world' practitioners gives you the opportunity to liaise with external organisations on live policy problems and enhance your employability.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 24 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director first and also seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Career opportunities

The course responds to a growing need for social, economic and political experts in the environmental field, and our graduates are highly employable in what is an expanding sector. Graduates of this course possess theoretical knowledge, political understanding and practical research skills, preparing you for careers in either the public, private or voluntary environmental sectors, or for further research on environmental governance within a university or think-tank environment.

You will be equipped to work for organisations like the Environment Agency, the United Nations Environment Programme, the Soil Association, and the Department of Environment Food and Agriculture, among many others. Our students have been particularly successful in obtaining funded PhD places and gaining employment with private consultancies and international NGOs.

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This programme examines development planning in the context of environmental concerns in urban areas of the Global South. It challenges mainstream approaches to development, focusing instead upon transformative action for environmental justice. Read more
This programme examines development planning in the context of environmental concerns in urban areas of the Global South. It challenges mainstream approaches to development, focusing instead upon transformative action for environmental justice. Many of our graduates go on to help shape future sustainable development agendas in local government, international agencies and civil society organisations.

Degree information

The focus of this degree is the complexity and variety of current environmental problems in urban regions, their causes and impacts, and the possibilities and limitations of environmental planning and management. Students learn how to respond to processes that generate social and environmental change, and how to develop strategies to steer urban environmental planning towards sustainability and environmental justice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one or two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), one or two optional modules (30 modules), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules
-The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
-Environment and Sustainable Development in Practice
-Urban Environmental Planning and Management in Development

Optional modules
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-NGOs and Social Transformation
-Food and the City
-Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Policy
-Socially Sensitive Development in Practice
-Social Development and Poverty Reduction: From Theory to Practice
-Managing the City Economy
-Housing policy, programme and project alternatives
-The City and Its Relations
-Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management

Not all modules may be available.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme comprises reading, essay writing, critical discussion and project work, facilitated through lectures, seminars, workshops, extensive fieldwork and discussions with practitioners covering theoretical and practical tasks and case study analysis. Assessment is through coursework, examinations, and the dissertation.

Careers

Most previous graduates of this programme are now engaged in professional activities, ranging from local and national government, consultancy firms and national and international NGOs, to United Nations programmes and international aid agencies the world over.

Examples of organisations where graduates are employed include:
-Public Sector: DEFRA and DfID (UK), Ministerio das Cidades (Brazil) and many other local government organisations
-International Agencies and NGOs: UNEP, UNDP, UN-Habitat, JICA, GIZ (former GTZ), InsightShare, Save the Children, and WWF
-Think tanks, academic and research organisations: IIEED, Stockholm Environment Institute, Resources for Development Center, WaterWise and the Arab Academy for Science, Technology & Maritime Transport
-Private companies: HappoldConsulting, EcoSecurities, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, Dialogue by Design, and BioRegionalQuintain.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Ethical Trading Specialist, Tesco
-Research Analyst, WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature)
-Research Associate, Rethinking Cities Ltd.
-EngD Technologies for Sustainable Built Environments, University of Reading
-Graduate Project Officer, Leicester City Council and studying Certificate in Permaculture, Permaculture Association

Employability
Our programme equips students with several interdisciplinary and transferable skills including report writing, data collection and analysis, communication, research and project management skills and teamwork.

Our students network with diverse organisations in the UK and internationally, and in the field they may work directly with local public and private partners. Academic staff are involved in research, consultancy and development practice, influencing global debates on development such as UNFCCC negotiations, the Sustainable Development Goals and the UN Habitat III agenda. Students can meet alumni and other individuals and groups forming part of this network, which is concerned with issues of socially just and sustainable development in the Global South.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme offers an in-depth theoretical and practical understanding of socio-environmental change, equipping graduates with the skills required to face global challenges in urban regions while being sensitive to local contexts.

For the last 60 years the Development Planning Unit at UCL has championed forms of development planning that promote social justice in the context of rapid urbanisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The programme provides opportunities to interact with leading thinkers in development planning and students will join an international network of researchers and practitioners.

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This is a unique and innovative interdisciplinary programme taught through subject areas that include law, anthropology, english, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology and the creative arts. Read more

WHAT IS THE PROGRAMME?

This is a unique and innovative interdisciplinary programme taught through subject areas that include law, anthropology, english, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology and the creative arts. Module choice within the programme will permit you to build your own personalised portfolio of knowledge and learning within the area of conflict transformation and social justice. You will be taught by academics and practitioners whose expertise is both national and global and who offer research-led teaching in areas of conflict such as South/Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Southern Europe, South America and Northern Ireland.

HOW ARE WE DIFFERENT?

This MA provides the opportunity to undertake study across the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and beyond. You will be able to choose modules across ten disciplines and will benefit from an enriched, interdisciplinary learning environment. You will engage with core theories, concepts, issues and debates within conflict transformation and social justice, as well as with modes and forms of conflict and the legal and human rights aspects of conflict transformation and social justice.
Students will critically examine the key conceptual, moral, legal, political and cultural issues that define conflict and its relationship to transformation and social justice. Study will be framed by a core module that will draw together the various disciplinary approaches and methods. Those methods will also be taught via bespoke training modules within the Faculty’s postgraduate taught programme.

This interdisciplinary environment may provide a gateway to PhD research.

PROGRAMME DETAILS

Students are required to complete THREE compulsory taught modules:
Global Concepts and Practices of Conflict Transformation and Social Justice (20 CATS), Conducting Research in Conflict Transformation and Social Justice (20 CATS), and Making Knowledge Work (20 CATS), as well as the triple-weighted dissertation (60 CATS).

The remaining 60 CATS points will be taken via module choice from the following Schools: English, Creative Arts, Law, Politics, International Studies and Philosophy, History and Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work. Students must pass all taught modules equating to 120 CATS points before being able to complete a dissertation.

The taught modules are delivered during two 12 week semesters

A student cannot take more than 40 credits in any School. Where a student wishes to take more than 40 credits in a particular School, it is recommended that they apply for the Masters programme in that School.
Within each stream students must take modules from at least two Schools.

STRUCTURE OF THE PROGRAMME

The optional modules are structured into three streams. You will be able to specialise in one stream that will permit you to explore different disciplinary approaches to and perspectives on related and overlapping subjects.

Stream 1: Conflict Transformation
In Stream 1, you will be able to focus on conflict via reading across definitions, forms, expressions and manifestations of conflict, conflict transformation and social justice. This could include, for example exploring notions such as terrorism, territoriality, behaviouralism, performance, scale, ethnicity, gender, environmental resource competition, youth and class.

Stream 2: Asserting Social Justice, Inclusion and Rights
Stream 2 will give you the opportunity to link skills development to the understanding of conflict transformation via a human rights and/or social justice frame. The Stream relates to rights of assembly, human rights abuse, social injustice, environmental conflicts, disempowerment and social, gendered, youth-centred and other exclusions.

Stream 3: Religion, Society, Peace-building and Conflict
In Stream 3 you will work on understanding religion/faith-based coexistence and inter/intra faith approaches to peace-building that relate to the concepts of ‘peace via religion’, ‘peace without religion’ and ‘peace with religion’. The practice of religious/faith based approaches will be taught around the importance of faith in conflict transformation, religion/faith-based NGO examples and approaches.

Full details on the course can be found in our course booklet: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/filestore/Filetoupload,470694,en.pdf

SPECIAL FEATURES

Only global MA programme on conflict transformation and social justice.
Only MA programme in the field to be interdisciplinary across all the humanities and social sciences in order to offer a fully rounded and multilevel analysis of the subject whilst offering optional modules for specialisation.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

A list of FAQs are available to assist you by clicking here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/StudyWithUs/MastersinConflictTransformationandSocialJustice/FrequentlyAskedQuestions/

BE PART OF AN INTERDISCIPLINARY LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Learn more about the Institute here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/AboutUs/

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Our future hangs in the balance. Humanity is developing at speed causing widespread environmental, economic and social challenges for sustaining life on Earth. Read more
Our future hangs in the balance. Humanity is developing at speed causing widespread environmental, economic and social challenges for sustaining life on Earth. It’s vital for us to change and adapt in all aspects of how we work and live.

If you’re future-conscious and want to transform society through sustainable solutions, this is your chance to learn the skills you’ll need. It’ll give you the training, language and tools to be a leader in a rapidly growing field. You’ll explore the trends, issues and science underlying global sustainability problems, and learn how to evaluate, analyse and collaborate across sectors to influence, motivate and effect positive, sustainable change.

Get hands-on, real-world experience through an internship, interdisciplinary or research project to help drive innovation, and be taught by global and professional experts from multiple disciplines and sectors, who are leading the environment and sustainability agenda in Australia and internationally.

Combine your industry experience or previous study with a strong foundation in understanding sustainability challenges, and use it to advance sustainability solutions in your sector. You’ll have the skills to provide strategic leadership in policy formulation, governance and regulatory advice, management and capacity-building in sectors as diverse as business, government and not-for-profits.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2017/environment-and-sustainability-s6002?domestic=true

Overview

The Master of Environment and Sustainability allows you to specialise in one of five areas.

Please select a specialisation for more details:

Corporate environmental and sustainability management

All organisations are impacted by social and environmental sustainability issues to some degree. To enable them to respond they need to understand the national and international regulatory environment, the business case for sustainability, effective strategic responses and sustainability measurement approaches.

The Corporate Environmental and Sustainability Management specialisation explores the complex mix of social, environmental and economic sustainability challenges and opportunities faced by organisations. You will explore how global and national environmental regulation influences organisations’ transition to sustainability. You will learn how to design, implement and facilitate strategies and solutions in corporate management for sustainable and accountable development.

Environment and governance

Governments, markets and civil society play important and inter-related roles in the governance of the environment. The term environmental governance is used to capture the full range of actors and organisations involved. Understanding how change occurs from the scale of the individual through to the broader society, and from local to national and international scales of governance is key to effective environmental governance.

There are a broad range of contexts in which transitions to more sustainable practices are needed, including environmental policy and analysis, planning, consulting, education, advocacy and management.

The Environment and Governance specialisation will develop your understanding of policy and governance to enable change and responsible action to support sustainability. You will learn to critically analyse problems of environmental governance and sustainability to enable informed solution development.

Environmental security

The challenges of global environmental security are diverse—from energy shortages, loss of biodiversity, extreme temperatures, emerging infectious diseases and food and water insecurity. Society must be equipped to deal with these challenges, with solutions supported by the best scientific evidence.

Globally there is a growing need for professionals with science literacy skills to interpret and translate the evidence about environmental security that is crucial to a wide variety of sectors and stakeholders.

The Environmental Security specialisation will provide you with the knowledge and understanding to guide the sustainable use of resources and protection of the natural environment, and to integrate this into policy and management.

International development and environment

Some of the hardest hit by changes in our environment are in developing nations. This requires tailored solutions that encompass economic change, social equity and environmental protection. To achieve sustainable development in poor and developing societies we need to move beyond conventional approaches toward transdisciplinary solutions that bring together academic and other kinds of knowledge, human rights, social justice and goals of ecological sustainability.

There is a growing demand for a new generation of practitioners to work in the sustainability and community sector, who are engaged and committed to sustainable development in a global context.

The International Development and Environment specialisation will develop your knowledge and skills to analyse the causes of poverty, disadvantage and environmental change, and work effectively with a wide range of groups to plan and implement development that is environmentally sustainable.

Leadership for sustainable development

The grand challenges that our society faces require innovative solutions and transformative change. Now and in the future, we need people who embrace complexity, inspire action and influence behaviour to develop solutions for a better world.

Worldwide there is a growing demand for professionals from a range of disciplines, organisations and sectors that are able to collaborate, lead and deliver change for sustainability.

The Leadership for Sustainable Development specialisation will equip you with cutting-edge theoretical insights, analytical skills and practical capacities to guide, influence and lead processes aimed at creating positive social, environmental and economic outcomes.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/science

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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Study human rights, policy development and climate change with this masters in Climate Justice. This is a practical study of climate justice and you will develop practical skills, approaches and methodologies for addressing climate justice in future work. Read more
Study human rights, policy development and climate change with this masters in Climate Justice

This is a practical study of climate justice and you will develop practical skills, approaches and methodologies for addressing climate justice in future work. Graduates from this programme move to a wide range of careers in organisations including development organisations, UN and associated bodies, local government, academia and research organisations.

This course has several different available start dates and study options - please view the relevant web-page for more information:
JANUARY 2017 (Full Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02846-1FTAB-1617/Climate_Justice_(January)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2017 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02847-1PTAB-1617/Climate_Justice_(January)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

SEPTEMBER 2017 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02847-1PTA-1718/Climate_Justice_(Part-time)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Full time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02846-1FTAB-1718/Climate_Justice?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02847-1PTAB-1718/Climate_Justice_(Part-time)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

Programme Description

Climate Justice is an increasingly important global topic and is expected to grow as climate issues impact more people, requiring domestic and international policy making to focus more on values, ethics and justice.

The programme provides a core range of areas to suit the professional development needs of the modern climate and development professional. This will be achieved through exposure to specialist climate justice topics together with a range of core modules which aim to develop generic professional skills applicable to dealing with the complexity of climate justice issues.

The aim of the masters is to provide in-depth understanding, analysis and knowledge about the principles that underpin climate justice - human rights, development and climate change.

The programme is tailored to provide a practical angle to climate justice to allow students to graduate with a Masters which provides them with practical skills, approaches and methodologies for addressing climate justice in their future work plans.

Career prospects

Graduates from this programme could move on to a wide range of careers with organisations including development organisations, UN and associated bodies, local government, academia and research organisations.

Assessment

Students will be assessed via a combination of coursework, oral presentations, on-line discussions, computer based exercises, case study analysis, reports and a final dissertation.

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation stimulates a critical awareness of the operation of international environmental law and policy, and features a particular focus on topics that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You develop a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy, and the contexts within which international law operates.

You study the theoretical, social, political and scientific perspectives that underlie the substantive areas of law, as well as the practical situations in which international environmental law operates. Graduates of the LLM take with them the knowledge and expertise required to pursue a professional or academic career in this contemporary and developing discipline.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and three defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW852 European Union Environmental Law and Policy

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW888 Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law

Assessment
The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit Us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Following a specialisation in International Criminal Justice enables you to develop a critical understanding of the operation of international and transnational criminal justice, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You learn about the main legal instruments and institutions that provide for international co-operation and prosecution of international, transnational and national crime and the impact of human rights and combine this with critical reflection of the broader context and of the effectiveness of law.

There is co-operation with the MA in Criminology, run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. In addition to available law options, you may choose one module from the MA in Criminology. This includes modules on terrorism and sociological theories of violence and gender and crime in a globalised world.

You are also encouraged to participate in the activities of the Kent Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL).

International Criminal Justice will be of particular interest to those who work, intend to work, or have an interest in the fields of international and transnational criminal justice, criminal justice and human rights more broadly.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW843 International Human Rights Law

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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There is growing public concern over environmental issues. Both public and private sectors are subject to growing environmental obligations. Read more
There is growing public concern over environmental issues. Both public and private sectors are subject to growing environmental obligations.

We need to achieve global sustainability in the context of increasingly complex regulatory settings. This means there could not be a more crucial time to study this area of the law.

Our course prepares you for the challenges lawyers face in helping to regulate environmentally harmful behaviour. You study both theoretical issues and practical ‘law in action’.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through taught modules over the autumn and spring terms. The course combines core modules and specialist options, so you gain a solid theoretical, methodological and practical foundation while also having the opportunity to explore your particular interests.

You undertake a supervised dissertation in the summer. You will be assessed through a range of formats including briefing papers, presentations, case scenario analyses and essays.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

The LLM in Environmental Law is taught by faculty members with strong expertise and experience in the areas of:
-International environmental law
-International trade law, the environment and development
-Environmental governance
-Property law aspects of sustainability
-International, regional and national biodiversity conservation law
-Liability for natural resource damage

Careers

You'll finish the course with a thorough grounding in the role of environmental law in the pursuit of global sustainability. You will also have a high level of understanding of environmental problems, and the role that law plays in trying to tackle these challenges.

This will enhance your prospects of achieving employment or advancement in:
-Private legal practice
-Public legal practice (government departments and agencies) international or regional organisations
-Environmental NGOs.
-You'll also be prepared for work in a wide range of other positions, such as policy work. It may also act as a springboard to further, doctoral-level research.

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation is designed for people who already work, or intend to work, within the criminal justice system, whether for the police, probation service, prison service or other organisations, or those with an interest in such matters. It covers criminal law and procedure in the UK, internationally and comparatively. It examines criminal justice systems from a range of perspectives, including the management of organisations, human rights, the psychological and sociological causes of criminal behaviour and social and economic perspectives.

There is close co-operation with the MA in Criminology run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. Students on the LLM and MA can take modules from both programmes. Criminology has specialists in many areas including criminological theory, research methods, youth crime, gender, cultural criminology and terrorism.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/114/criminal-justice

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in Law in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW871 Policing

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. Read more

Overview

The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a 60,000 word thesis.

The DCrim builds on the established and very successful UG and PGT provision in Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School to provide a specialist route for professionals and managers working in the field of criminal justice, or in related fields, who wish to embark on doctoral study located within their own professional discipline and practice. Indeed, this programme focuses on practitioners and professionals in criminal justice (e.g. policing, courts, probation, prison work, alternative sanctions, community sanctions, service providers in the sphere of drugs and addiction, and so on) or related fields of work and practice (e.g. local authority and third sector service providers in the sphere of crime prevention, security, community building and offender rehabilitation; private providers in the above or related spheres; non-governmental action in a variety of spheres such as environmental action, human rights policy and activism, and so on). This list is not exhaustive. Practitioners and professionals working in fields and organisations as diverse as (e.g.) Amnesty International and (e.g.) the Police all share a common sphere of work which is structured around problems and issues of deviance from legal norms.

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/sspp/postgraduatetaught/criminology/professionaldocorate/

Course Aims

- Promote an understanding of research evidence and methodologies relevant to professional practitioners.

- Develop a critical awareness of the policy context in which professional practice takes place.

- Enable participants to undertake a research study of relevance to their professional activities.

Course Content

Module 1 (30 credits) Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher (EDU-40106)
Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

Module 2 (30 credits) Critical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice
Assignment: Theoretical perspectives essay

Module 3 (30 credits) Research methods and evaluation (EDU-40103)
Assignment: A general research methods critique

Module 4 (30 credits) The pilot study (EDU-40105)
Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

Module 5 (60 credits) Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal (EDU-40107)
This is a summative assignment comprising a written research proposal and an oral presentation

Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis
This will be up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis

Teaching & Assessment

The programme is assessed by four formative assignments, one summative assignment and a Research Thesis.

Additional Costs

Additional costs for textbooks, inter-library loans, photocopying, printing, and potential overdue library fines.

No other additional costs for this postgraduate programme are anticipated.

Award Pathway Option

Upon successful completion of the taught part of the DCrim programme and a 15-20,000 word mini-thesis, students may be awarded an MRes (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The devastation of the environment and ecosystems is of increasing concern across the world. In addition to the impact of climate change and reduced biodiversity, both legal and illegal economic activity is a challenge to legal frameworks and agencies at national and international levels of governance.. Read more
The devastation of the environment and ecosystems is of increasing concern across the world. In addition to the impact of climate change and reduced biodiversity, both legal and illegal economic activity is a challenge to legal frameworks and agencies at national and international levels of governance.

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