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Masters Degrees (Environmental Journalism)

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UBC Journalism is a unique, boutique journalism masters program in one of the most beautiful, diverse and progressive cities in the world. Read more

About UBC Journalism

UBC Journalism is a unique, boutique journalism masters program in one of the most beautiful, diverse and progressive cities in the world. It is one of only four masters-only journalism programs in North America, and the only graduate journalism program in western Canada.

Faculty members come from the highest levels of major media organizations, as well as leaders in digital journalism and media scholarship. We pride ourselves on our one-on-one approach with students, working closely with the aspiring journalists who go through our program, and often continuing to mentor them long after they graduate.

The Master of Journalism degree is a full-time, intensive program that runs over five semesters, including a summer internship. It is designed to provide graduates with professional experience and academic grounding, to help students succeed as a journalist in any medium. Students learn everything from long-form writing to web, video and audio production, social media analytics, investigative reporting skills and critical analysis of news.

Our distinctive approach to journalism education has two components: academic specialization and applied training. This involves creating a program of study focused on an academic area — relevant to your background and interests —along with courses in media theory and ethics. Paired with the academic training is hands-on work with professional equipment alongside experienced professionals.

Students have the opportunity to study with excellent scholars in disciplines throughout the University of British Columbia, a university consistently ranked in the top 40 academic institutions in the world.

The Graduate School is modeled on a small Liberal Arts college with small class sizes and one-on-one attention. Students have contact with professors both in and outside of the classroom on a regular basis. Faculty and staff mentor students on freelancing opportunities, international internships and career options.

Degree Requirements

The program of study for the M.J. degree in Journalism is challenging and requires full-time study. Students are required to complete between 42-45 credits of course work, including a three-month internship.

Students learn to be journalists across all media — print, online, television and radio — in the first year. Most programs separate training by medium. We believe that in today’s digital environment, graduate journalists have to be proficient across many media platforms.

Therefore, theory and practice are integrated across the curriculum. This means applying ethics, media theory and academic knowledge to the journalism skills of interviewing and reporting in a real-time multimedia environment.

Journalism training starts in the first week of classes when students are assigned urban beats in Vancouver as part of our core Integrated Journalism course. This course is taught by a team of faculty: senior journalists working both locally and internationally as well as media studies professors.

Theory and graduate-level research is integrated into the curriculum through assignments and course content, as well as in specific courses such as Media Ethics and Media Law. There is also an option to complete an academic research or thesis project.

Specialization

Students specialize in key disciplines relevant to their professional careers. These include but are not limited to: environmental and health studies, international relations and political science, arts and cultural studies, English, sports, economics and science.

Students also engage issues surrounding race, gender and ethnicity through partnerships with other UBC departments.

Students take these specialties in courses outside of the School in order to obtain the knowledge necessary to report on an increasingly complex public sphere.

Popular academic specialties include: International Journalism and Political Science, New Media and Society, Solutions-Focused journalism and Science Journalism, which includes specialties in environment, health and social issues, as well as media theory.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Journalism
- Specialization: Journalism
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Journalism

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The course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of how media work across a variety of social, cultural, economic and political contexts. Read more
The course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of how media work across a variety of social, cultural, economic and political contexts.

We focus on the academic study of journalism, but also offer opportunities for the development of professional skills through optional modules in the second semester and through research.

The course provides insights into how journalism is changing in a globalised context, exploring key debates and issues in journalism studies today. It also provides training in the use of a range of research skills in journalism studies, to support academic scholarship in the field of journalism studies.

You will learn to assess how media are linked to forces of globalisation, political institutions, global responses to war and conflict, and environmental challenges, amongst others.

You will explore the roles of new information and communication technologies, their opportunities and challenges, their democratic potential and their regulation

We will consider issues of citizenship, race, gender, ethnicity and class that are shaping contemporary forms of news media content.

This programme offers knowledge and expertise for a career in the journalism, media and communication industries or as a foundation for PhD research.

This programme is not designed as a vocational degree and does not provide training in Journalism. You should not consider this degree as a professional qualification towards becoming a journalist.

Distinctive features

• The course is designed for those with no previous experience in journalism and for mid-career journalism practitioners wanting a period of reflection to deepen their understanding of journalism practice.

• It aims to promote an awareness of the place and importance of journalism in the contemporary world, and in local and global contexts.

• It attracts students from all over the world, providing a rich and diverse environment for academic study and critique.

Structure

The taught component of the course amounts to 120 credits and is taught across two semesters (Autumn and Spring) from the end of September to the beginning of June and combines core and elective modules.

You will submit a dissertation at the end of August. The dissertation carries 60 credits.

Core modules:

Introduction to Journalism Studies
Mediatised Conflict: The Politics of Conflict Reporting
Politics of Global Communication
Putting Research into Practice I
Putting Research into Practice II
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions
Big Data, Society and Everyday Life

Teaching

You will be taught through lecture and seminars series which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career Prospects

Graduates of MA Journalism, Media and Communications are employed in a range of occupations in journalism, media and communication institutions both in the UK and globally, taking on a variety of leading roles.

As an academic course focusing on critical analysis, this programme also provides a perfect starting-point for PhD research and prepares students for careers in research institutions, both at university and other public or private institutions.

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The LLM programme in Environmental Law aims to give law graduates and others a conceptual understanding of the main legal issues related to environmental protection and more widely, sustainable development. Read more
The LLM programme in Environmental Law aims to give law graduates and others a conceptual understanding of the main legal issues related to environmental protection and more widely, sustainable development. You will be encouraged to critically evaluate current research and practice in the field.

Why study Environmental Law at Dundee?

Interest in and concern about environmental issues is accelerating and the law has a crucial part to play in shaping our response.

Both public and private sectors are becoming subject to increasingly onerous environmental obligations, from detailed rules on pollution control to wider duties in relation to biodiversity and climate change, whilst environmental impact assessment is now an everyday requirement.

This course will prepare students for the challenges lawyers face in understanding the impact of the physical changes, and to help legislate for the future and to support those grappling with the increasingly complex regulatory setting.

Here at Dundee, the research expertise of the Law School's staff covers all aspects of environmental law and this is reflected in the diverse range of modules offered.

Registered students also have full access to all the electronic databases available to the University, enabling study to be undertaken at times and places to fit your own convenience.

What's so good about Environmental Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course has been developed for those individuals with a background in law who wish to specialise and expand upon their existing knowledge and ability in the area of environmental law.

The taught LLM can be taken over one or two years. The programme can be started in September or January and attendance at class in Dundee is required (two or three classes a week for full-time students; one for part-time students)

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

The programme aims to give law graduates and others a conceptual understanding of the main legal issues related to environmental regulation as well as knowledge of the subject sufficient to encourage the critical evaluation of current research and practice in the field. Students can choose from a range of modules designed to develop their knowledge and understanding of issues connected with the environment and the law. Possible modules include Sustainable Development, Environmental Regulation, Ecosystems & International Law and Environmental Justice.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes.

While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

Find out more about legal careers from our Careers Service.

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Gain the writing and reporting skills necessary for success as a journalist in the digital age. Through the graduate degree in the field of journalism you. Read more
Gain the writing and reporting skills necessary for success as a journalist in the digital age.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

Through the graduate degree in the field of journalism you:
-Master the latest reporting, writing, and technical skills for traditional and digital media.
-Build greater confidence surrounding multimedia communication, identifying and pitching stories, and connecting with editors.
-Learn techniques for conducting incisive interviews, gathering salient information, and writing compelling narratives with with clarity and style.
-Build knowledge of the legal requirements and ethical responsibilities in journalism.
-Develop deeper understanding in focused topic areas, such as international security, nonprofit management, legal studies, and environmental policy.
-Compliment your journalism coursework with marketing and business communications courses to prepare for a career in business, nonprofit management, or consulting—because all industries need to tell compelling stories.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The master’s degree includes 12 courses, with at least one on campus.

-Get started. You begin by completing three admission courses from the program curriculum. This is your opportunity to demonstrate your commitment and ability to perform well as a Harvard student.
-Apply to the program. While you are completing your third admission course, you submit your application. We have application periods in the fall, spring, and summer.
-Continue your studies, online and on campus. As you progress through the program, you choose from courses offered on campus or online, in the fall, spring, or summer. To fully experience Harvard, you are required to take at least one course on campus as part of your degree. Short, intensive on-campus options are available.
-Complete your capstone project. You apply knowledge and skills obtained in the program to complete a significant journalism project under the direction of a professional in the field. You'll conduct an in-depth investigation of a single topic and emerge with a portfolio of publishable work that can include short digital media pieces, as well as longer news or magazine articles.
-Graduate with your Harvard degree. You participate in the annual Harvard Commencement, receiving your Harvard University degree: Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) in extension studies, field: Journalism.

COST

Affordability is core to our mission. Our 2016–17 graduate tuition is $2,550 per course; the total tuition cost of earning the graduate degree is approximately $30,600.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

The Student Financial Services staff can assist you in identifying funds that will help you meet the costs of your education. You can find more information here: http://www.extension.harvard.edu/tuition-enrollment/financial-aid

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This Master’s is designed to offer the practical and theoretical training in journalism needed by those with an interest in science and environmental issues to communicate their subject to the public. Read more
This Master’s is designed to offer the practical and theoretical training in journalism needed by those with an interest in science and environmental issues to communicate their subject to the public.

There is demand for science journalists who can report on issues such as health or the environment accurately and succinctly. You will have the opportunity to learn how to take scientific news and turn it into engaging stories, without resorting to sensationalism or technical jargon.

There are opportunities for you to work on community radio, student
newspapers and magazines and to participate in our professional placement scheme. Students have previously worked for BBC Focus magazine, New Scientist and the Vegan Society.

You may also have the opportunity to hear from leading names in the journalism industry. Previous speakers include Channel 4 Science Editor Tom Clarke, naturalist and broadcaster Chris Packham and Sense About Science founder Lord Taverne.

Students on this programme are expected to complete an assessed work placement as part of the Research and Professional Placement module.

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This programme explores the relationships we hold with our ‘wild’ environments, and how these evolved. You will develop a knowledge of environmental debates from both cultural and scientific perspectives, and learn to communicate environmental issues using a variety of tools and strategies. Read more
This programme explores the relationships we hold with our ‘wild’ environments, and how these evolved. You will develop a knowledge of environmental debates from both cultural and scientific perspectives, and learn to communicate environmental issues using a variety of tools and strategies. It is suitable for students with or without a specialism in literary or environmental studies.

Why this programme

◾This programme focuses on the emerging subject area related to ecocriticism and green studies in order to better understand environmental issues from multiple perspectives.
◾Teaching is closely linked with the Solway Centre for Environment & Culture, a research centre providing opportunity for further research and collaboration.
◾The School of Interdisciplinary Studies is one of the UK’s foremost pockets of expertise in interdisciplinary environmental teaching and research.
◾The programme connects its activities to the wider environment in applied ways through fieldtrips, including the Galloway and Southern Ayrshire Biosphere Reserve, the Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park, the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park, and the Lake District National Park. Dumfries & Galloway is also home to the world-class Crawick Multiverse, designed by the internationally renowned land artist Charles Jencks.
◾Dumfries & Galloway, in south west Scotland, is an ideal location for environmental study and research. The unspoilt beaches, hills and forests provide a stunning and diverse outdoor classroom, while the region’s thriving artistic community, which specialises in environmental art, is a great source of inspiration.
◾The degree features a programme of guest speakers from relevant fields and publications.

Programme structure

You will take three core and three optional courses. There is a choice of project work: you can choose to engage with a particular contemporary environmental issue or case study, or to undertake a personal interaction with the features of a particular location, examining notions of place creatively. You will also undertake a dissertation, through which you can develop and demonstrate independent research skills or a work placement where you will undertake research in a relevant organisation or company.

Core courses
◾Environmental communication*
◾Environmental politics and society*
◾Reading the environment: old and new world romanticisms
◾Writing the environment: modern and contemporary nature writing.

*You must take at least one of these courses.

Optional courses
◾Climate change: impacts on ecology
◾Environment, technology and society
◾Environmental ethics and behavioural change
◾Tourism, sustainability and climate change.

Career prospects

Graduates are prepared to enter fields from environmental journalism and education, to public relations, advertising and consultancy roles. The interdisciplinary nature of the programme means your skills are also tailored towards emerging fields such as negotiating between scientific fact and cultural understanding of climate change, and the ‘anticipatory history’ that must inform landscape management in the future. Graduates have gone on to work for environmental NGOs, ecological arts organisations, and undertaken further study at PhD level.

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The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology located in dedicated radio/television studios and multimedia newsrooms you work to real deadlines to make news programmes and upload your work to the internet. Your tutors are award-winning journalists with decades of front-line experience in national and international news. Every day starts with an editorial conference and the degree programme balances focus on journalism as practical reality with intense academic study and reflection.

This programme is especially designed for those students who do not intend to practise journalism in the United Kingdom.

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Journalism and Free Expression and Practical Multimedia Journalism introduce you to the intellectual and professional challenges of reporting for newspapers, radio, television and the internet. You choose optional academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Reporting Conflict; Communication and Humanitarianism, Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

You may choose to complete a dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

JN800 - Reporting (45 credits)
JN802 - Practical Multimedia Journalism (45 credits)
JN804 - Dissertation in Multimedia Journalism (30 credits)
JN814 - Journalism and Free Expression (30 credits)
JN815 - Political Reporting (15 credits)
JN816 - Propaganda-Media, Manipulation and Persuasion (15 credits)
JN806 - Reporting Conflict (15 credits)
JN807 - Advanced Multimedia Storytelling (15 credits)
JN808 - Communication and Humanitarianism (15 credits)
JN813 - Sports Journalism (15 credits)

Assessment

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- teach the professional and academic skills required to practise multimedia journalism to those wishing to pursue a career in the news industry

- educate you to think critically about the ethics, duties and responsibilities of journalism in democratic societies and in emerging democracies and thus improve the quality of journalism as a profession

- produce graduates with a courageous and principled vision of the purpose of journalism and its constitutional value in contemporary democratic societies

- develop a detailed and systematic understanding of particular forms of journalism and their historic and contemporary role in the shaping of culture and society

- develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the impact of new technologies on journalism

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills and research skills

- foster lifelong learning skills that will enable you to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to journalism and society

- bring scholarly and critical insights to bear on the subjects, activities and processes associated with multimedia journalism

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Centre for Journalism and elsewhere.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, documentary film, journalism technology, democracy, propaganda, global media

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Our students have obtained jobs at places such as Sky News, The Daily Mail, BBC Newsround and the Huffington Post.

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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry.

Research programmes are best suited to students who have a clear and original idea of a topic that they would like to investigate in detail. The MA by Research entails producing a 40,000 word thesis; the MPhil programme demands a high level of research and analysis resulting in a dissertation of 50,000 words (MPhil).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/111/journalism

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

All first-year research students attend a Methodologies and Research Skills seminar. Through the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Centre provides training in methods of using sources and can assist in funding applications.

We welcome research applications across the range of expertise in the Centre and from all over the world.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, journalism technology, democracy

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

The resources for journalism research at Kent are led by the Drill Hall Library at Medway. The journalism collection includes a comprehensive range of texts on the history, principles and practice of journalism. Specialist resources include a complete microfiche archive of popular newspapers of the Second World War. Students have access to online full-text journals plus extensive online newspaper resources. The Centre subscribes to all relevant UK journals. Research students have access to the SCONUL access scheme to visit and borrow from other UK libraries. The Drill Hall Library contains more than 250 study spaces, 370 computers and more than 150,000 items.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); The Media, Politics and Public Life, Slow Living, Informing Voters? Politics, Media and the New Zealand Election 2008, Politics and the Media (Geoffrey Craig); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills

Careers

A postgraduate research degree in Journalism provides you with qualifications for a teaching career in Journalism or a related discipline. It can also provide you with expertise that can assist in a journalism career in a particular area of reportage. Other career options include public policy research, media promotions and public affairs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This university Master's degree provides fundamental and specific knowledge on environmental law. It pays special attention to the different branches of the discipline and also deals with various non-legal subjects related to technical, geographic, economic and business aspects of the environment. Read more
This university Master's degree provides fundamental and specific knowledge on environmental law. It pays special attention to the different branches of the discipline and also deals with various non-legal subjects related to technical, geographic, economic and business aspects of the environment.

Student Profile

The master's degree is designed for students with previous training in the field of law, political sciences and public administration, economics, business sciences and other related fields. In general, the master's degree can be useful for graduates in other areas of the social sciences, and also the environmental sciences and biology. The master's degree is also suitable for candidates from other knowledge areas, and it intends to add new academic knowledge, and more skills and qualifications to their professional and vocational experience.

Career Opportunities

The URV's Faculty of Legal Sciences is responsible for the University Master's Degree in Environmental Law, an official degree acknowledged by the European Higher Education Area.

The interdisciplinary nature of the University Master's degree in Environmental Law provides students with the chance to access a wide range of careers. They can also decide to continue their academic training by enrolling in the doctoral programme in Law. Among the career opportunities open to them are the following:
-Public administration (town councils, provincial councils, district councils, chambers of commerce and other authorities): working as environmental experts.
-Non-governmental organizations: providing technical and legal advice.
-Private companies: providing technical and legal advice.
-Environmental advocacy: providing technical and legal advice; environmental conciliation and mediation.
-Environmental consultancy and auditing.
-Environmental journalism.
-Environmental research and doctoral studies.
-Environmental education.
-Teaching and research in universities and other research centres.

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The MA in Environmental Humanities brings humanities and sciences together to build creative responses to environmental challenges. Read more
The MA in Environmental Humanities brings humanities and sciences together to build creative responses to environmental challenges. This is an innovative interdisciplinary MA led by world-class environmental humanities scholars, where we bring arts, humanities and social science into critical conversation with ecology and conservation.

On this pioneering course, you’ll acquire new research skills, as well as a more holistic understanding of environmental issues. You’ll address specific issues such as climate change and biodiversity loss, alongside broader ideas about human relationships with place, technology and the more-than-human world, drawing insights from across a wide range of disciplines and cultures.

COURSE STRUCTURE

Core modules, taught by world-leading specialists, offer intensive introductions to new disciplinary perspectives, through critical focus on key concepts such as ‘the Anthropocene’, the idea that Earth has now entered a new geological era, indelibly shaped by human activities.

A wide choice of optional modules enables you to learn new approaches while also consolidating existing expertise in subjects such as geography, literary studies, philosophy, ethics, religious studies, environmental studies, or conservation. This is a transformative course which is very much yours to mould to your own needs, incorporating multi-disciplinary research methods training that will enable you to proceed to doctoral studies in either humanities or social sciences, should you wish to do so.

MODULES

In trimester one, you'll study the core module, Environment Humanities, as well as optional module(s).

In trimester two, you'll study Interdisciplinary Research Methods for Environmental Humanities, Research Methods for Social Science, as well as optional module(s).

Trimester three will focus on your Dissertation or Creative Project.

For more information on modules, please refer to the course handbook via the website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-environmental-humanities/

TEACHING METHODS

Teaching methods vary with the modules chosen, but will primarily take the form of small-group intensive workshops and seminars, supplemented by lectures and other activities as appropriate. If you choose creative writing or practice modules you will be intensively mentored by established practitioners.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is primarily based on written assignments, but can also include assessed creative practice where appropriate.

For more information on assessment and teaching methods, please refer to the course handbook via the website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-environmental-humanities/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Career opportunities for graduates with an MA in Environmental Humanities include:

• Working in socio-environmental research and education.
• Local, national and international conservation organisations.
• Environmental film, TV, and other media.
• Environmental journalism, art and creative writing.
• Eco-tourism
• Private companies with a strong sustainability agenda.
• Local, national and international governmental agencies concerned with conservation, climate change, and sustainable development.

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The Environment, Politics and Globalisation MA, MSc is an interdisciplinary course offering a unique combination of theoretical and relevant policy subjects to give you indepth knowledge and critical awareness of the politics and geographies shaping environments, both now and in the past. Read more

The Environment, Politics and Globalisation MA, MSc is an interdisciplinary course offering a unique combination of theoretical and relevant policy subjects to give you indepth knowledge and critical awareness of the politics and geographies shaping environments, both now and in the past. You will examine local case studies as well as global environmental issues, politics and policies from a variety of perspectives to gain a textured understanding of this contested and vital area of study. 

Key Benefits

  • You will study a unique combination of theoretical and policy-relevant modules.
  • Excellent tutorial support, extensive programme-specific interactive teaching and regular classroom discussions.
  • You will develop skills in the appropriate use and application of quantitative and qualitative methods.

Description

The Environment, Politics & Globalisation MA, MSc is a demanding and stimulating course, with an emphasis on developing your analytical and research skills.

You will study Globalisation and the Environment, as well as optional modules covering topics such as Climate: Science and History, Geopolitics, Power and Place, Environmental Actors and Politics, and Disasters and Development. If you choose to follow the MSc research pathway, you will study Advanced Quantitative and Spatial Methods in Human Geography.

The Environment, Politics and Globalisation course is aimed at providing students with an in-depth and critical awareness of the politics and geographies shaping environments at a range of interrelated and ever shifting scales. In this context the course involves a broad and reflexive interpretation of the terms ‘environment’, ‘politics’, and ‘globalisation’. It aims to enable students to develop the skills required to engage with both cutting edge academic literature and grounded policy scenarios so that they can participate in the dynamic and contested environmental arena. These aims are achieved by the unique combination of theoretical and practical modules that draw on staff environmental expertise, along with internships with participating environmental organisations. You will be required to obtain the minimum of 180 credits to complete the course.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete. You will take the combination of required and optional modules over this period of time, with the dissertation in your second year.

Course purpose

For those seeking to develop their intellectual and practical skills to engage in both academic debates and the practical construction of environmental policy and politics at national and international scales.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Per 20-credit taught module:

Lectures, seminars and feedback: Typically 20 hours

Self-study: 180 hours (some modules may involve lab work or e-learning which would require less self-guided learning).

Dissertation:

Lectures, seminars and feedback: Usually four dissertation workshops/ tutorials and five contact hours of one-to-one or group consultation with supervisors.

Self-study: 587 hours.

Assessment

Performance on taught modules in the Geography Department is normally assessed through essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to undertake further graduate study. Others have gone on to work as research assistants for international development agencies as well as pursuing careers within government agencies, teaching and journalism.



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This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation. Read more
This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation.

You will study topics including human rights and humanitarian intervention, the world economy and the changing global order, global governance and the United Nation system, the growth of global networks and movements, global security, conflict resolution and peace-building, international relations and law, global poverty and development, and the politics of sustainability and environmental decline. Because globalisation transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries, our MA takes an interdisciplinary approach to challenge conventional political and international relations approaches.

There are two core modules: Globalisation and Global Politics, and Conflict, Security and Human Rights. You can also select two optional modules to focus on an area of particular interest, for example human rights and humanitarian intervention, global environmental politics, the Middle East, conflict resolution, genocide, international relations theory, the nature of warfare, and global ethics.

Course structure

On the Globalisation: Politics, Conflict and Human Rights MA, you will:

• study key developments and issues in relation to politics, conflict and human rights.
• consider these areas within the context of contemporary globalisation
• be encouraged to develop an informed and critical understanding of contemporary globalisation
receive close tutorial support.
• be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

The programme is founded on the notion that politics, conflict and human rights must now be understood in the context of contemporary globalisation.

Modules

Globalisation and Global Politics:

This module begins by examining a range of approaches to globalisation and global politics before exploring the processes, institutions and ideologies that are widely considered to be driving them. For example, economic globalisation is studied in relation to the financial crisis of 2008 and wider debates about global economic disorder. In particular, the emphasis is on fostering an informed understanding of contemporary globalisation through study of critical theories, debates about power, patterns of global poverty and inequality, and development responses.

In relation to claims about a shift in global power, the rise of China and its implications for the Asia-Pacific Region and the rest of the world are explored. At an institutional level, the Human Rights Council, the International Criminal Court and the European Court of Human Rights are examined. The politics of global sustainability is considered in relation to the formation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Finally, the politics of a transnational/global movement is investigated through the study of La Via Campesina.

Conflict, Security and Human Rights:

This module examines contemporary conflict, security and human rights debates in relation to globalisation and the evolution of global politics. Areas and issues examined include: the relationship between global security and international relations theory; conflict resolution theory and the prospects of conflict resolution in Syria; state building and peace-building in Somalia; and a global NGO (Amnesty International) dedicated to monitoring conflict and human rights abuses.

Environmental security is considered within the context of global environmental decline, focusing in particular on Moscow’s apparent resource-based approach to international relations. As for human rights, the major theories and critiques are examined, with specific reference to humanitarian intervention and the emergence of the concept of human security. In this vein, the politics of movement under contemporary globalisation is explored by studying the Geneva Convention and the rights of refugees.

PLUS

Research Methods
Dissertation

PLUS Two from:

Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
Cultural and Critical Theory (International Relations Theory)
Global Environmental Politics
Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles
Legacies of Warfare
Global Ethics
A Learning and Teaching option

Careers and employability

This MA is relevant to careers in the public sector, teaching, the media, the legal profession, business, journalism, management and human resources, as well as to further research. You may also seek work in development, charities, non-governmental organisations and the environment, as well as the European Union and the United Nations.

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Biodiversity, evolution and conservation are of growing importance due to climate change, extinction, and habitat destruction. Read more
Biodiversity, evolution and conservation are of growing importance due to climate change, extinction, and habitat destruction. This new research-led programme is run in collaboration with the Institute of Zoology and the Natural History Museum, providing a rigorous training and unparalleled opportunities across the full breadth of pure and applied research in evolutionary, ecological, and conservation science.

Degree information

Taught modules will focus on cutting-edge quantitative tools in ecology, evolutionary biology, genetics, bioinformatics, systematics, palaeobiology, conservation, biogeography and environmental biology. Seminars, journal clubs and the two research projects will provide students with diverse opportunities for experience at UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment & Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. There are no optional modules for this programme. The programme consists of three core taught modules (60 credits) and two 16-week research projects (120 credits).

Core modules
-Research Skills (15 credits)
-Current Topics in Biodiversity, Evolution & Conservation Research (15 credits)
-Analytical Tools in Biodiversity, Evolutionary and Conservation Research (30 credits)

Dissertation/report
All students undertake two 16-week research projects, which each culminate in a written dissertation, and poster or oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, presentations, assigned papers, as well as data analysis and interpretation. The seminar series includes mandatory seminars at UCL, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology (Zoological Society of London). Assessment is through essays, project reports, presentations and practicals. The two research projects are assessed by dissertation, and poster or oral presentation.

Careers

This programme offers students a strong foundation with which to pursue careers in academic research, environmental policy and management, applied conservation, public health, or scientific journalism.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Intern, ZSL Institute of Zoology
-PhD in Evolutionary Biology, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL)
-PhD Researcher (Evolutionary Biology), University of Edinburgh a

Employability
This programme provides students with a strong foundation to pursue careers in academic research, environmental policy and management, applied conservation, public health, or scientific journalism.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is an innovative collaboration between three globally renowned organisations: UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment & Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London.

By consolidating research expertise across these three organisations, students will gain a unique and exceptionally broad understanding of ties among different fields of research relating to the generation and conservation of biodiversity.

The MRes offers diverse research opportunities; these include the possibility of engaging actively in fundamental and applied research and participating in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (based at the Natural History Museum) or the EDGE of Existence programme (based at the Zoological Society of London).

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You will undertake advanced studies in political sociological analysis and this programme is ideal preparation for a research degree. Read more

You will undertake advanced studies in political sociological analysis and this programme is ideal preparation for a research degree. It assumes an undergraduate training in sociology and/or political science, or a cognate discipline, or relevant professional experience such as journalism.

Course detail

The programme is distinctive in its focus upon social and political movements, protest, and the less conventional and institutionalised forms of political action and participation, environmental politics and globalisation, but students with interests in other areas of more conventional and institutionalised politics are well catered for.

You will gain an understanding of the interaction and interdependence among social and political institutions, processes and action, especially collective action. The programme begins with a focus upon protest and social movements, and in the second term you may choose to focus upon either or both of environmental politics and / or processes of global social change and questions of political order. There is a wide range of optional modules from which to choose, and at the end of the programme, you should have a much enhanced understanding of processes of social and political change and the theoretical and methodological approaches to their interpretation and study.

Purpose

Depending upon your choice of option modules, the programme will also give you:

  • An understanding of the theoretical problems of political sociological inquiry and their relationship to research practices
  • Knowledge of the methodological procedures used to investigate a wide range of practical and substantive issues
  • Skills in practical research-related tasks
  • Awareness of the range of secondary data available and the ability to evaluate its utility for your research
  • The opportunity to develop transferable employment-related skills through group work, presentations and the use of information technologies
  • An enhanced capacity to undertake independent research.

The programme is also designed to enhance your professional development. We place considerable emphasis on the socialisation of graduate students into a research community. This is reflected in our pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning. There is less didactic teaching and more emphasis on structured seminars with greater participation from students. Class sizes are generally much smaller than at undergraduate level and you will be taught by established members of the academic staff, many of whom are internationally recognized leaders in their particular fields of inquiry. This facilitates close working relationships between staff and students. You will also be encouraged to participate in the staff/graduate seminar which allows MA and research students the opportunity to become more fully involved in a professional research culture, and to meet visiting speakers from many universities in Britain and beyond.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Social and political movements
  • Environmental politics 
  • Social and political change / globalisation
  • Research design and data collection
  • Using secondary and qualitative data

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/134/political-sociology#structure

Career options

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global. Read more

Why take this course?

The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global.

This is what our course sets out to do and thanks to our close proximity to many types of temperate marine habitats and internationally protected conservation areas, we offer the perfect location for investigation.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Research at our internationally-renowned Institute of Marine Sciences or carry out microbiological work at the University’s Field Centre for Environmental Technology at Petersfield Sewage Works
Rear coldwater species for restocking programmes or trial fish food at Sparsholt College’s National Aquatics Training Centre
Study abroad through Erasmus or various other conservation and research schemes

What opportunities might it lead to?

You’ll be taught by leading international researchers and the course has been designed with strong input from outside agencies including environmental consultancies, a range of government bodies and industry. This ensures your training links directly to UK and international employment opportunities.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Consultancy work
Government-based research
Conservation
Teaching
Further study

Module Details

You will cover a variety of topics in advanced laboratory and field skills, and choose from units that cover marine ecology, aquaculture, ecotoxicology and pollution, and scientific journalism. A large amount of your time will also be spent on the research project that will enable you to apply the skills and knowledge you have gained.

Core units are:

• Research Toolkit: This covers a range of key professional skills for research methods (communication skills, ethics and report writing), advanced field skills (boat sampling, taxonomy, and marine and freshwater sampling methods), advanced laboratory skills (genomics, monitoring and pollution monitoring methods) and remote sensing technology (such as GIS).

• Research Project: Your final project allows you to select from a range of marine and freshwater projects provided by staff within the School, government research laboratories, NGOs and private research companies. During the project you will write literature reviews and develop skills in data analysis and presentation.

Then choose any three optional units from:

• Ecotoxicology and Pollution: This provides an introduction to environmental toxicology using model and non-model organisms.

• Aquaculture: This unit focuses on the principles of aquaculture production, global production and diversity of aquaculture species. It is taught by academic staff and staff from the National Aquatics Training Centre at Sparsholt College. Areas covered include larval culture, diseases and pathology, feeding and growth, reproductive manipulation, and business and management.

• Marine Policy, Planning and Conservation: Planning and Conservation: This unit explores contemporary debates on coastal and marine management with a specific focus on marine policy, planning and conservation.

• Science and the Media: Science communication is increasingly becoming an important part of science. This unit firstly addresses the skills required by scientists to effectively communicate with the media and general public and secondly, provides an understanding of the skills needed for a career in science journalism.

• Subtidal Marine Ecology: Selected topics of current interest in marine ecology, incorporating both theory and applied aspects, culminating in a week-long practical field course in the Mediterranean Sea. The unit carries an additional cost for the field trip, and requires a minimum level of training and experience in SCUBA diving to participate.

Programme Assessment

Hands-on laboratory-based work teamed with field trips means that practical learning underpins the theory learned in lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You’ll also find that some aspects of your course may be taught online using our virtual learning environment.

You will be assessed using a range of methods from exams to coursework and presentations, with great opportunities to present your final-year projects to industry and researchers from other departments and organisations.

Student Destinations

Once you have completed this course, you will be particularly well placed to enter a wide range of interesting and rewarding careers in the UK and abroad. We will ensure you have all the relevant knowledge and skills that employers require, giving you the opportunity to either pursue a scientific career, enter the teaching profession, or further study should you want to continue your research.

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