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Masters Degrees (Eco Design)

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This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect. Read more
This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect.  It shares many of the design elements of our established MArch (Master of Architecture/ Part 2) programme, but provides greater flexibility in terms of study choices, allowing you to engage with the interests of our research staff. 

In the programme, we will focus on using design-led research to inform your learning and investigation. You will develop your existing design skills by focussing on how design thinking might address current global challenges. This approach offers an intense and lively forum for the exploration and discussion of design issues. This is why we place particular emphasis on using design as a means to conduct research. Researching through design is a creative activity that closely integrates the process of designing with the act of researching, so that they can mutually inform each other.  You will explore problems by making and testing design propositions, introducing and developing established knowledge as and when required.  Through project work, you will draw on knowledge from many disciplines.

You will work in small groups called ‘design units’ under the guidance of an experienced tutor and also work independently to develop a research-focussed approach to your studies. This will require you to question and evaluate evidence and think creatively and iteratively. Emphasis will be on individual discovery and personal reflection as a learning process.

Distinctive features

• Study in one of the top Schools of Architecture in the UK
• Supported by the School’s award-winning Design Research Unit Wales (DRUw) 
• Learn from notable design-led practitioners; currently more than 50% of our design programmes are delivered by practising architects
• Perfect for students who prefer a more practical/active approach to learning through our focus on investigation through design
• Choose from a range of optional modules to supplement your learning in areas of interest to you and develop important skills in design-based research

Structure

This programme is available on a one year full-time basis. You will be based in the Welsh School of Architecture for the duration of the programme. The taught element of this programme is structured around a 60 credit design module, where you will use techniques of research through design to explore an issue of interest related to one of the School’s design units.  This will normally run between October and April and will conclude with a final presentation in front of a panel of reviewers. Your work in the design studio is complimented by a 30 credit module analysing architectural precedent, and a choice of optional study modules.

You will usually start the dissertation element of the programme in May and complete this over the summer. The dissertation is the culmination of your design research throughout the programme.  The dissertation usually comprises of a documented design project, accompanied by a 5000 word critical commentary.  Support for developing the necessary skills of research through design will be provided during the taught elements of the programme.

During your year on the programme, you will focus on developing a design-research agenda, defining and establishing your own position in architectural design. The topics covered are usually structured around thematic studios, or ‘units’ led by design tutors who have expertise and interest in specific areas of research and/ or practice. The themes are often related to areas of research expertise within the School and may be run in conjunction with the units offered on the MArch programme.

You will undertake analysis of architectural precedent within the studio environment and choose 30 credits worth of optional modules, chosen from a list of subjects based on the research interests of the staff in the school. This list is reviewed on an annual basis. You can choose any combination of 10 and 20 credit modules for your option. 

For your dissertation you will work independently using the skills that have been developed during the taught programme to develop a critical research argument through design.  This will involve completing a design thesis project. You will be expected to supplement this with a 5000 word critical written commentary.

Core modules:

Architectural Design and Research
Analysis of Precedent
Design Thesis (Dissertation)

Optional modules:

Issues in Contemporary Architecture
Design Principles and Methods 3
Earth and Society
Low Carbon Footprint
Climate Comfort & Energy
Architectural Technology 3a

Assessment

Design projects and related exercises are assessed continuously, often through pin-up reviews and symposia where feedback is given. At the end of the year, a portfolio of all design-related work is presented for formal examination by panels of reviewers.

Optional modules are usually assessed through written examination and coursework submitted during the semester. Please read the module descriptions for your chosen optional modules to find out more about the ways they are assessed.

The criteria by which assessments are made are contained in the School’s Teaching Handbook, in project and coursework documentation, and explained at introduction to the various modules and design projects.

Career Prospects

Whilst many of our graduates will choose to undertake a career within architecture or other built environment professions, the programme provides a large number of transferable skills which will be of benefit across a wide range of professions.  The focus on independent, project based learning is welcomed by employers in that it provides graduates with skills in creative thinking, conceptual organisation, critical reflection and taking initiative.

Fieldwork

During the course we go on a range of study trips in the UK, Europe, or further afield. On these trips we will organise guided visits to buildings that demonstrate how principles taught in the programme are applied in revolutionary large-scale eco-buildings. You will also have the opportunity to meet architects and built environment professionals who collaborate with the School. In the past, students have travelled to Barcelona, Venice, Rome and the Ruhr Valley, amongst other places.

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The Masters in Urban Design course combines students' existing strengths with focused design training to produce urban designers capable of managing the complex problems of development, urban space and form. Read more
The Masters in Urban Design course combines students' existing strengths with focused design training to produce urban designers capable of managing the complex problems of development, urban space and form.

The certificate and diploma stages of the Masters in Urban Design course introduce theoretical concepts and practical methods of urban design. They will enable you to understand processes of urban design production and consumption, and to develop skills and techniques for communicating three-dimensional urban design.

Why choose this course?

Our graduates have very high success rates in gaining employment and have secured posts in both the public and private sectors, in planning, architecture, landscape and urban design practices; undertaking design, consultancy and research work. Several have also gone on to take up senior posts in universities in the UK and abroad. This is the longest established programme of study in urban design in the UK, and consequently has a vast network of graduates across the globe.

Staff are engaged in world-leading research (69% either world leading or internationally excellent in REF 2014) which feeds directly into the teaching and studio work. A major strength of the course is its multidisciplinary, collegiate, team-based approach to project work and presentation.

Based in Oxford, we are well located for access to both this historic city, to London and other urban centres in the UK.

This course in detail

The Masters in Urban Design is offered as a linked PGCert/PGDip/MA. The aim of the PGCert and PGDip stages is to provide a framework of current knowledge and skills in urban design and masterplanning.

The PGCert stage of the course focuses on the basic concepts and theory of urban design, establishing a solid grounding in the practical realisation of design qualities in a case site situation.

The PGDip stage increases the emphasis placed on the application of more specific design skills in differing contexts, through live projects and a more in-depth examination of design history. Theory and new research are provided through a series of history and theory lectures and seminars.

The aim of the MA stage is to provide an opportunity for developing urban design research skills through individually selected topics in theoretical and practical fields of study in urban design.

The MA dissertation gives students the opportunity to explore in depth a subject related to urban design, and to integrate the various elements of the course. Past topics for the MA include local identity, transport and design, public art and urban design, urban coding, environmental design, digital cities, and eco-towns.

The course is structured around nine modules.

Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the module lists you choose from may vary from the ones shown here.

The PGCert stage of the course consists of the following compulsory modules and is worth 60 level 7 credits:
-Urban Design Studio I
-Urban Design Theory I
-Urban Design Practice I and II
-Urban Design Studio II

The PGDip stage of the course consists of the following compulsory modules and is worth 120 level 7 credits:
-Urban Design Theory II
-Urban Design Issues II
-Urban Design Development Seminars
-Research Methods in Design

The MA stage of the course consists of the following compulsory module:
-Master's Dissertation

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with urban design in practice.

Lectures provide the framework, essential background and knowledge base for the course, while you are encouraged to probe deeper into different topics by further reading and review.

Analysis, synthesis and application of material introduced in lectures are demonstrated through studio sessions, workshops, seminars and practical project work. Site visits and a fieldwork component are an important component.

Careers and professional development

Our graduates have very high success rates in gaining employment and have secured posts in the public sector, private consultancy, the voluntary sector, and research and teaching areas.

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We welcome enquiries from anyone who would like to carry out research in any aspect of design or in technology in education- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-design/. Read more
We welcome enquiries from anyone who would like to carry out research in any aspect of design or in technology in education- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-design/

Current studies include:

eco-design and forecasting trends
the design of multi-sensory retail environments
curriculum development in design
the role of awkward space in cities
pupil assessment in design and technology education
reflexive drawing and the connection between representation and creativity
social theory in a world of designed objects
harnessing memes to disseminate design ideas
Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths.

Practice-based MPhil

The MPhil can be linked to design practice.

A practice-based MPhil explores new approaches to, or applications of, existing knowledge by means of practice.

In either case, your final presentation will include both an original, creative practice component and a thesis that will contextualise this practice.

Since the practice component of your research constitutes a significant part of the final examination, the thesis requirement is reduced.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

Design Star Centre for Doctoral Training

Goldsmiths is a member of the Design Star Centre for Doctoral Training, which brings the Department of Design together with other leading design departments at the University of Brighton; Loughborough University; The Open University; and the University of Reading.

It aims to develop future intellectual leadership in design: research leaders of the future who are equipped to make a difference to contemporary social concerns, knowledge production and creative practices. This requires an approach to research training that places diversity and interdisciplinarity at its core.

Design Star brings together world-class research in:

design for industry
interaction design
design process
communication design
sustainable design
design history
curation
creative practice.

Its spread of design disciplines is linked by a common approach to design that encourages the integration of history, theory and engagement.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Design.

Design at Goldsmiths is ranked:
-1st in the UK (The Guardian University Guide 2016)
-12th in the world (QS World University Rankings by subject 2015)

We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for designers, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

Critique the status quo

We want you to go on to have your own self-sustaining practice that can change over time, so you’ll learn about design not just as a commercial enterprise, but also as a way to question and critique the status quo.

The freedom to experiment

You don’t have to know what kind of a designer you’ll be: we give you the time and the freedom to experiment, use tools, explore materials and discover different modes of making. Many of our students have already worked in the design industry and are keen to develop their theoretical understanding of the discipline, and have the opportunity to explore their practice without the confines of commercial restrictions.

Industry leaders

Our graduates are industry leaders: many have gone on to work at top organisations and design companies such as Pentagram, Dyson and Selfridges, while many others have set up their own studios and enterprises.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Visual portfolio

For the purpose of the initial application it is recommended that you prepare a portfolio of material documenting your previous work. This could be provided as a web link, DVD or whatever is the best way to disseminate your practice.

Research proposals

The proposal should typically between 1,000 and 2,000 words (not including references) long. The key consideration in drafting the proposal should be clarity.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our. MA Product Design course. provides a conceptual process and context for the development of creative and innovative products. Read more

Our MA Product Design course provides a conceptual process and context for the development of creative and innovative products. This includes the study of socio-cultural and economic issues, new technologies and creative visual language in relation to your practice.

As a student on our course, you'll undertake individual research projects using an integrated product design process. You'll also develop and communicate design solutions which align with design criteria and respond to broader issues such as lifestyles, markets or the information economy.

On this course you'll benefit from seminar sessions with visiting professional product designers. They'll provide critical feedback to advance your design concepts to prototype stage, in order to ready them for final exhibition and commercial manufacture.

You'll also have seminar sessions with visiting professional product designers, who provide critical feedback to advance your design concepts to prototype stage, ready for final exhibition and commercial manufacture.

The Centre for Sustainable Design is based at our Farnham campus, too. This research centre facilitates discussion and research on eco-design, and broader sustainability considerations, in product and service development.

Industry Partners

Our range of industry contacts include:

-Industrial Design Consultancy

-TheAlloy (product and interaction consultants)

-IDEO (design consultants)

-Philips

-Kenwood/De'Longhi.

And recent guest lecturers include:

-John Gertsakis, product ecology

-Philip Davies

-Stuart Heron, Design Director.

Careers

Our course will equip you with a host of valuable and transferable skills. Graduate opportunities exist within:

-Product design practice

-Independent design studios

-Specialist design consultancies

-Design teams in manufacturing industry

-Design management

-Environmental management

-Service design sectors.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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This course is a research and project-based programme; designed to assist the enhancement of the quality of our cities by bringing innovative design into a new relationship with the latest theoretical research on the special structure of urban form. Read more
This course is a research and project-based programme; designed to assist the enhancement of the quality of our cities by bringing innovative design into a new relationship with the latest theoretical research on the special structure of urban form. The course provides students with an understanding of the complex relationship between spatial and design issues and social and economic urban processes. It addresses urban design as a mode of research and practice that shapes urban environments and responds to urban problems.

The course will enable you to develop the mechanisms and tools, which can effectively be implemented to secure and deliver projects for the long-term benefit of its city and people. It emphasises the importance of design creativity and focuses on drawing, physical and computer modelling as tools for analysis, exploration, communication and design.

Students will develop:
the ability to plan and undertake an individual project
interpersonal, communication and professional skills
the ability to communicate ideas effectively in written reports, verbally and by means of presentations to groups
the ability to exercise original thought design experimentation and creativity
application of theory to specific projects

Previous dissertation projects have included:
Eco Cities: The Search for Sustainable Urbanism
The Urban Design of Innovation
Tall Buildings and Urban Design

Scholarship information can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/graduateschool/funding/index.aspx

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Could you see yourself designing high performance bikes, working with racing car teams or producing ground breaking medical components? You could follow in the footsteps of some of our graduates and begin shaping your own exciting career in mechanical engineering. Read more
Could you see yourself designing high performance bikes, working with racing car teams or producing ground breaking medical components? You could follow in the footsteps of some of our graduates and begin shaping your own exciting career in mechanical engineering.

You will distinguish yourself professionally with a degree accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IoM3) for Chartered Engineer status. You can apply to either of these institutions for membership as a Chartered Engineer.

Key features

-Open the door to a successful future. Our graduates have gone on to work for Ferrari, Honda, British Cycling, Rolls-Royce, Williams Grand Prix Engineering, Activa, Babcock Marine, Princess Yachts and more.
-Primed for your career: 82 per cent of our students are in a professional or managerial job six months after graduation. (Source: unistats)
-Benefit from an optional 48 week paid work placement.
-Distinguish yourself professionally with a degree accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IoM3) for Chartered Engineer status. You can apply to either of these institutions for membership as a Chartered Engineer.
-Develop a strong foundation in mechanical engineering principles and materials science.
-Choose from specialist modules in composites engineering, design and manufacture.
-Experience modern laboratory facilities for practical work which is a core part of the degree.
-Benefit from working on industrially relevant problems within composite materials and design of composite structures.

Course details

Year 1
In Year 1, you’ll acquire a sound foundation in design, mechanics, materials, electrical principles, thermo-fluids, mathematics and business, learning by active involvement in real engineering problems. You‘ll undertake a popular hands-on module in manufacturing methods. Modules are shared with the MEng and BEng (Hons) in Mechanical Engineering and the MEng and BEng (Hons) Marine Technology.

Core modules
-MECH120 Skills for Design and Engineering (Mechanical)
-THER104 Introduction to Thermal Principles
-BPIE115 Stage 1 Mechanical Placement Preparation
-MECH117 Mechanics
-MECH118 Basic Electrical Principles
-A5MFT1 Mech BEng 1 MFT Session
-MATH187 Engineering Mathematics
-MATS122 Manufacturing and Materials
-MECH121PP Team Engineering (Engineering Design in Action)

Year 2
In Year 2, you’ll build your knowledge of composite materials in preparation for specialist modules in the final year. The central role of design integrates with other modules like structures and materials. You'll also study modules on thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, business dynamics, mathematics and control and quality management.

Core modules
-BPIE215 Stage 2 Mechanical Placement Preparation
-CONT221 Engineering Mathematics and Control
-HYFM230 Fluid Mechanics 1
-STRC203 Engineering Structures
-MECH232 Engineering Design
-MFRG208 Quality Management l
-MATS234 Materials
-THER207 Applied Thermodynamics
-STO208 Business for Engineers

Optional placement year
In Year 3, you're strongly encouraged to do a year’s work placement to gain valuable paid professional experience. We will support you to find a placement that is right for you. Our students have worked for a variety of companies from BMW Mini, Bentley, Babcock Marine to NASA. A successful placement could lead to sponsorship in your final year, an industrially relevant final year project, and opportunities for future employment.

Optional modules
-BPIE335 Mechanical Engineering Related Placement

Year 4
In Year 4, you’ll specialise in composites design, engineering and manufacture. You’ll undertake an group design project. Additional modules of study include statistics and quality management. You'll also develop your knowledge and skills through an in-depth project on a topic of your choice.

Core modules
-HYFM322 Computational Fluid Dynamics
-MFRG311 Quality Management II
-MATS347 Composites Design and Manufacture
-PRME307 Honours Project
-MATS348 Composites Engineering
-MECH340 Engineering Design

Final year
In your final year, you'll extend your existing skills in engineering design, analysis and control theory. Broaden your knowledge by studying subjects such as entrepreneurship, advanced information technology, robotics and marine renewable energy. You’ll also work in a design team with students from other engineering disciplines working on projects such as design, materials and environmental issues related to bioenergy production, gas/nuclear power stations, energy from the sea and eco villages.

Core modules
-MECH532 Applied Computer Aided Engineering
-MECH533 Robotics and Control
-MECH534 Product Development and Evaluation
-MAR528 Mechanics of MRE Structures
-PRCE513 Interdisciplinary Design
-MECH544 Data Processing, Simulation and Optimisation of Engineering Systems

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The Department of Chemical Engineering is seeking to appoint an MPhil/MRes student to conduct research for Eco-Innovation Cheshire and Warrington Industry Collaboration programme. Read more

The Department of Chemical Engineering is seeking to appoint an MPhil/MRes student to conduct research for Eco-Innovation Cheshire and Warrington Industry Collaboration programme. This studentship is part funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

 

Background

The proposed project will investigate the design of a continuous bioreactor for maximum capture of CO2.

Autichem Ltd has developed a new type of flow reactor (DART). DART is designed to be a fully scalable technology with capacities from miso scale (10ml) to industrial scale. 

It is proposed that the MPhil/MRes project runs for 1 year and will utilize DART to achieve a process design for the optimized capture of CO2.

 

Summary of research tasks and work programme

Using the Autichem Ltd’s DART technology as the continuous process platform, the projects objectives will be, but not limited to the following:

·        To convert a batch process to a continuous process

·        To research and understand the possibilities of applying closed loop control to a continuous process.

·        The design an industrial scale process that is based on the knowledge gained during the research and testing phases of the project.

Project Deliverables

The project should aim to deliver the following:

·        A process design for a lab scale flow reactor system based on Autichem Ltd’s DART reactor

·        Data which demonstrates the successful operation of the process in the prototype DART reactor system at lab/pilot scale.

·        A detailed process design for an industrial scale system

·        All research documents relating to the development of the reactor and associated control system.

·        3 off research posters which provide insight into the operation of the process in the DART system and which can be used to promote what has been achieved. These could, for example, be on the general topic areas of: converting batch to continuous; control of a continuous process and scaling up a continuous process to industrial scale.

 

Skills and knowledge

·        A fundamental understanding of continuous process design at industrial scale.

·        Experience with bio process development

·        Knowledge of working with micro organisms

Funding

This MPhil attracts a tax exempt stipend of £15,000 per annum. Post graduate fees are funded for UK/EU based students. International students will be required to make an additional contribution to their post graduate fees.

 

Application process

A completed University of Chester Postgraduate Research Degree (MPhil) application form including contact details of two referees (at least one must be familiar with your most recent academic work).

 Candidates should apply online via the University of Chester  https://www.chester.ac.uk/research/degrees/studentships and specify their reference number when applying. The reference number is: RA001802

Availability for interview

Please be available for interview during the week of the 20th November 2017. Exact time and date to be agreed.

Further information

Prospective applicants are encouraged to initially contact Steve Wilkinson 01244 513921 to discuss the project further. For general enquiries contact " target="_blank">

 Closing date: 14th November 2017



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The design of low and medium-rise buildings has, for some time, taken climatic variations and sustainability into account. Read more
The design of low and medium-rise buildings has, for some time, taken climatic variations and sustainability into account. However, despite the increase in the number of large-scale buildings worldwide during the last few decades, high-rise buildings are still seen as mega-scale energy consumers with little regard for sustainable design and performance. The current environmental agenda and interest in sustainability across the globe raises the significance of mega-buildings.

On this interdisciplinary course, we focus on the principles of sustainable planning and design of mega-buildings and prepare students to specialise professionally in this field.

You will be based in the School of Architecture’s new studio for graduate students at Friary House, in Cardiff city centre. This is within 5-10 minutes’ walk of our other site, Bute Building.

Distinctive features

• Accredited by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago and by the Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE), meeting the academic requirements for CEng professional registration.

• Available on a 1 year full-time or 2 year part-time basis.

• See sustainable mega-building design in practice on a variety of national and international field trips.

• Study in one of the top schools of architecture in the UK, and benefit from exceptional facilities, such as the School’s artificial sky dome.

Structure

You can study this course on a one year full-time or two year part-time basis.

There are two stages to the course; stage one comprises taught and specialist modules totalling 120 credits, stage two will be your dissertation (60 credits).

The taught modules on this course will provide a grounding in architectural science within the context of sustainable mega-buildings. On several of these modules, you will be taught alongside students on our other architectural science master’s courses, which is a good opportunity to exchange ideas from different perspectives and broaden your group of friends and contacts.

Our taught modules will help you to explore the interdependence and relationship between social, technological and environmental issues. You will also learn how to relate these issues to the economic, political and legal contexts of planning and designing mega-buildings. We will introduce and review the latest design methods for sustainable mega-buildings in architectural, engineering and building contractor fields.

On the course, we encourage you to articulate your perspectives on sustainable design, which should enable you to become well-versed and experienced in promoting the benefits of sustainable mega-buildings.

Core modules:

Earth and Society
Low Carbon Footprint
Climate Comfort & Energy
Investigation of the Built Environment
Architectural Science Research
Sustainable Mega-Buildings Overview (Climate, Context and Culture)
Sustainable Service Systems for Mega- Buildings
Sustainable Mega-Buildings Design (Project Module)
Dissertation

Teaching

The methods of teaching we employ will vary from module to module, as appropriate depending on the subject matter and the method of assessment. We teach using a mixture of lectures, seminars, workshops, study visits, project work, and group tutorials.

In lectures and workshops we aim to make appropriate use of audio-visual support to aid learning and development of subject-specific skills. You will be given access to relevant teaching materials through the University’s virtual learning environment, Learning Central.

The specialist modules on the course include project work, where you will use mega-building case studies to build 3D physical models in the School’s workshop and Digital Fabrication Lab and can test them in the School’s artificial sky dome.

You will also be taught to use various environmental simulation software programmes, some of which have been developed in the Welsh School of Architecture.

Finally, you will research an area of sustainable mega-building design and planning of interest to you and submit a dissertation based on this research. Your dissertation will be conducted independently with supervision by a member of staff.

Assessment

Taught and project-based modules are assessed in a variety of different ways depending on the module content and learning outcomes (found in the module descriptions). We use class tests, course work (both written assignments and oral presentations or critical assessments/crits), and project work, or a combination of these to assess your progress on the module.

In the dissertation stage, your dissertation is the sole object of assessment. The dissertation is a written report on a piece of research which you have carried out in an agreed subject area under supervision.

Career Prospects

There is currently a worldwide shortage of architects and built environment professionals specialising in the field of planning and designing mega-buildings which perform sustainably. Therefore there is a rising demand for graduates from this type of course.

Typically, graduates from this course will gain employment in large-scale building design or planning companies and practices, environmental design consultancies, research and development centres, or may even set up their own companies/ practices.

Given the current intense public, governmental and professional interest in this area, employment opportunities for graduates who specialise in this field are only likely to grow and become even more attractive both in the UK and globally.

Fieldwork

During the course we go on a range of study trips in the UK, Europe, or further afield. On these trips we will organise guided visits to buildings that demonstrate how principles taught in the programme are applied in revolutionary large-scale eco-buildings. You will also have the opportunity to meet architects and built environment professionals who collaborate with the School.

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MA Textile Design at Chelsea College of Arts explores creative approaches to sustainable textiles and surface design. What students can expect from the course. Read more

Introduction

MA Textile Design at Chelsea College of Arts explores creative approaches to sustainable textiles and surface design.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- A studio-based, practice-led course

- Numerous opportunities for developing and collaborating on pioneering work within the textile industry

- Study to be underpinned by a supportive theoretical framework, as well as instruction in professional contemporary practice

- Focus and debate about environmental issues as well as the designer’s role in acting responsibly to these

- To participate in and develop skills through individual and group tutorials, workshops, online resources and postgraduate talks designed to introduce students to a range of visiting artists, designers and other practitioners

Structure

Phase 1: Analysis of practice and exploration of methodologies

Phase 2: Development and consolidation

Phase 3: Resolution

These phases are set within a credit framework of three assessed units:

- Studio practice and Advanced studio practice, which run sequentially

- Theoretical studies, which runs throughout the course.

Studio practice involves evolving and developing a personal programme of studio work and related research. Theoretical Studies provides a framework for students to develop a critical research paper, enabling them to locate their ideas and practice in relation to contemporary debate on cultural and theoretical issues.

Throughout the course students participate in individual and group tutorials, developing their skills through Personal Professional Development workshops and on-line resources while the postgraduate talks are organised that introduce them to a range of visiting artists and practitioners.

Work experience and opportunities

The Textile Environment Design (TED) project is a unique research unit based at the College that investigates the role designers play in the field of eco design and is a resource students, researchers and designers all benefit from and contribute to. Recent students have used TED's extensive library of contacts to establish a unique and sustainable craft design project based in Thailand.

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Become a sustainable engineering expert, learning to use energy and resources so that the natural environment meets the needs of future generations. Read more
Become a sustainable engineering expert, learning to use energy and resources so that the natural environment meets the needs of future generations.

You might already be in industry and are looking to develop your engineering skills for career progression, or you could be keen to further your studies before entering the profession.

Our course enables you to understand sustainability in which ever area of engineering you wish to specialise, from simulation, modelling and eco engineering, to sustainable systems design and green computing technologies, to name just a few.

Our aim is simple - to provide you with a learning experience that helps you to achieve the career you want. That's why our course is made up of option modules - it's an opportunity to tailor the course so that it reflects engineering sustainability issues that are most important to you.

Innovation will be at the heart of your studies, developing your ability to find sustainable solutions to engineering problems anywhere in the world, and equipping you with the skills to design and construct sustainable systems.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including computer science.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/sustainableengineering_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Bursting with creative solutions to sustainable challenges, your engineering skills will be in demand around the world and across many industries.

If you're currently in a junior management or technical role, you will gain the expertise to progress your career to focus more on the processes and management of environmentally sustainable engineering.

- Engineer
- Environmental surveyor and analyst
- Automation consultant
- Project manager

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will have access to a range of impressive facilities, including FlexSim Discrete simulation software, Dimension Rapid Prototyping machine, ARM development boards, concrete beam production testing, structural element testing and hydraulics equipment, to name just a few.

To meet the government objective of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by four fifths by 2050, UK businesses are increasingly looking for professionals who are experts in how energy is used in buildings. The research findings of the Leeds Sustainability Institute at our University will feed into your course and ensure what you learn reflects the latest, cutting-edge developments in sustainable engineering so you can catch the eye of such employers.

In addition to this, you'll benefit from our strong connections with business leaders and sustainability experts, many of whom provide guest talks to our students.

If you're already working in industry you will also benefit from assignments that allow you to focus on your own place of work, enabling you to apply what you learn straight away in your current role.

Modules

Work Based Learning (option module)
Provides a foundation upon which to develop engineering skills and protocols through a work based or work simulated environment.

Final project
Carry out an in-depth research project, presented in a dissertation, into an area of sustainable engineering.

ICT and Environment (option module)
Examine the environmental impact of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in an industrial / commercial setting.

Project Management (option module)
Develop the ability to initiate, plan, execute, manage and sign off a project.

Simulation and Modelling (option module)
Use discreet event simulation and 3D modelling techniques to construct virtual factories that use automated systems.

Sustainable Systems Design (option module)
Review current trends in building services systems design, focusing upon design approaches, sustainability considerations, electrical systems and lighting design.

Engineering Systems Control (option module)
Study real time control issues using the latest PLC controls and emulation software.

Lean and Agile Engineering (option module)
Analyse how organisations respond to rapidly changing markets, unknown or changing product requirements.

Green Computing Technologies (option module)
Investigate, identify and evaluate technologies to minimise the energy consumption and environmental impacts of computing resources.

Sustainable Buildings (option module)
Enhance your knowledge of building and system performance in resolution of carbon reduction and achieving long-term sustainability.

Eco Engineering (option module)
Explore the environmental issues for the life cycle of a product, from raw materials to the final recycling.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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This Master's degree is designed for students who wish to practice across a broad range environmental engineering and apply new sustainable risk management strategies for complex environmental problems. Read more
This Master's degree is designed for students who wish to practice across a broad range environmental engineering and apply new sustainable risk management strategies for complex environmental problems. Water, Waste and Environmental Engineering has been traditionally referred to as public health engineering in the United Kingdom. In this postgraduate course, the technical aspects of both natural and engineering environmental systems will be covered. There will be broad interdisciplinary subjects synthesizing knowledge from a wide spectrum of science and engineering, expanding the content of public health engineering, which in the UK has traditionally been responsible for developing the infrastructure for managing water and waste.

Students will develop engineering skills and be able to design, develop and apply concepts for water and waste as a resource based on environmental sensitivity and be competent in planning, modelling, design, construction, operations, maintenance and control of both engineered and natural water and earth resources.

Students who select this postgraduate programme will gain a skill set that will enable them to progress in the fields of:

- Environmental engineering
- Desalination and water reuse
- Water resources engineering
- Hydraulics and hydrology
- Environmental fluid hydraulics
- Environmental remediation
- Waste management
- Other specialities valued in both the private and public sectors.

The MSc in Water, Waste and Environmental Engineering will incorporate solid waste management, contaminated land treatment and the use of geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on management of the earth's resources.

The programme will explain the relationship between different earth resources including hydrosystems, both 'engineered' - hydro-power plants, water/wastewater treatment plants, sewers - and 'natural' - rivers, lakes, wetlands, irrigation districts, reservoirs etc., solid wastes, brownfield land, and geo-derived primary resources and their sustainable management.

The aims of the programme are:

- To show you how to design, implement and manage sustainable, risk-reduced eco-friendly solutions for reducing the environmental impact of exploitation of earth's resources in the context of environmental engineering-related issues facing global societies

- To provide you with the skills to further your careers in these areas

- To support you in understanding the innovative and pioneering approaches in this field and to be able to apply them to the solution of real-world problems in developing novel industrially-relevant solutions.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/enggen/wwee

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Environmental Engineering and Sustainability (15 credits)
Hydrosystems Engineering and Management (15 credits)
Individual Research Project for Civil and Environmental Engineering (60 credits)
Information Technologies for Environmental Engineering (15 credits)
Research, Planning and Communication (15 credits)
Waste Management and Remediation Technology (15 credits)
Desalination and Water Reuse (15 credits)
Water and Sanitation for Developing Countries (15 credits)
Water and Wastewater Engineering (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Environmental Engineering and Sustainability (15 credits)
Information Technologies for Environmental Engineering (15 credits)
Waste Management and Remediation Technology (15 credits)
Desalination and Water Reuse (15 credits)

-Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Hydrosystems Engineering and Management (15 credits)
Individual Research Project for Civil and Environmental Engineering (60 credits)
Research, Planning and Communication (15 credits)
Water and Sanitation for Developing Countries (15 credits)
Water and Wastewater Engineering (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Teaching and learning

The number of contact hours (e.g. lectures, seminars and feedback on assignments) per module/course ranges from 50-75 hours for the one year full time programme or roughly equivalent to four hours per week per module. The expected self-study time is approximately 80-90 hours per module per year (roughly equivalent to four hours per week per module).

You will be taught by academics with a range of industrial and academia experience for each module.

Assessment

Project work, assignments and laboratory exercises in addition to substantial written examination of course materials will occur in most modules. The Environmental Engineering Research Project will require submission of a substantial final report/dissertation. Assessment of this module will involve participation in a poster and seminar presentation and a final oral examination.

Professional recognition

Accreditation will be sought from the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) and The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) including the Institution of Civil Engineers, The Institution of Structural Engineers, the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation and Institute of Highway Engineers.

Career options

Postgraduate students from this programme will find such employment opportunities as engineers, scientist and technical managers in the private sector (engineering design firms, engineering consultancy, project management, risk management and waste management), in the public sector (environmental protection engineering, regulations and standards, local government) and in non-governmental sectors (NGOs, environmental advocacy) or may wish to pursue further qualifications such as a PhD within the Faculty of Engineering and Science at the University of Greenwich to become even more specialised. Employers of environmental engineers include engineering consultancies (such as AECOM, Atkins, Mott MacDonald Group, Hyder), government agencies (such as Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency) and NGOs (such as Oxfam, Engineers without Boarders, Water Aid).

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING & SCIENCE
We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in the world of work. They also provide a range of work experience opportunities for undergraduates in areas such as civil engineering, manufacturing and business information technology.

Students also benefit from the services provided by the university’s Guidance and Employability Team, including ‘JobShop’, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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With over 50 percent of the world’s population now living in cities there has been an increasing trend to associate global issues with urban issues. Read more
With over 50 percent of the world’s population now living in cities there has been an increasing trend to associate global issues with urban issues. Cities have been seen as the causes of global problems – as sources of pollution and environmental damage; as concentrations of economic polarisation and sharpening social inequalities; as sites of privatised governance and non-democratic control. Alternatively, and increasingly, cities are seen as potential solutions to these global problems – from the benefits of urban density for reducing pollution and supporting sustainable energy regimes, through to sustainable economic transformations to reduce poverty, and as sites of experiments in new urban politics and social movements.

This course explores the dimensions of contemporary urbanisation in the context of the challenges and opportunities of contemporary processes of globalisation. There is an emphasis on analysing, from a theoretical and methodological point of view, the practical aspects of problem solving in the context of the globalised city and anticipated city futures.

We offer a programme that focuses on the changing nature of cities and urbanisation in a globalising world. It looks at the major problems and dilemmas of globalised urbanisation – urban growth and its environmental impacts, the role of cities in a globalised economic system; urban mobilities and transport systems; governing cities in a globalising world.

The course is aimed at those aiming to move onto further geographical/urban academic research or a career in a practice/policy environment (public, private, NGO, Third Sector) working on urban problems and solutions (economic, social, environmental) in an international context.

Distinctive features

• an interface between academic theory and analysis and more applied strategy, policy and practice on urban problems.
the breadth of issues (environmental, social, economic, planning and design) that you can study, as well as the geographical range (Cities of the Global North and South).

• the opportunity to cover a wide range of urban challenges or to focus on certain substantive fields (such as environmental sustainability and policy; sustainable transport systems; urban planning and design or the study of the economies of cities and regions).

• Staff who work closely with academics and urban professionals worldwide.These collaborations are embedded in the course teaching and materials.

• encouragement of participatory methods and engagement with a wide range of urban stakeholders.

Structure

The Programme lasts a year. You will take taught modules to the value of 120 credits between October and May, taking 60 credits each semester.

On successful completion of the taught component you will complete a dissertation worth 60 credits between June and September.

You will take six taught modules worth 20 credits each. Three of these modules will be core modules. The remaining three will be optional modules.

You will compete a dissertation based on original research. You will be able to specialise in different areas by choosing specific combinations of option modules and by your dissertation topic, if you wish. You will be advised at the start of the programme on the different specialist areas.

Core modules:

Planning City Futures
Advancing Urban Theory
Researching Cities for Social Change
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Development and Urbanisation Processes
Environmental Policy and Climate Change
Designing Cities
Housing in a Globalising World
Transport and the City
Planning for Sustainability
Debates in Eco-City Planning and Development
Urban and Regional Dynamics
Governing Places
Urban and Regional Development in Practice
Sustainable Food Systems
Sustainable Transport Policies

Teaching

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and computer lab and studio work where relevant.

Lectures take a range of forms but generally provide a broad structure for each subject, introduce key concepts, and convey relevant up-to-date information.

In seminars you’ll have the opportunity to discuss particular themes or topics, to consolidate and get feedback on your individual learning and to develop skills in oral presentation.

In computer lab and studio work you will have the opportunity to learn various research methods such as GIS, statistics and urban design skills depending on the modules you take.

You will practise and develop intellectual and presentational skills by participating in diverse learning activities, such as, small-group discussions, debates, oral presentations, independent research tasks and written assignments. You will also enhance your team-working skills.

Assessment

You will take six taught modules worth 20 credits each. These will be assessed by a combination of essays, presentations, group work, report writing, debates and computer lab work depending upon the core and option modules selected. The majority of modules are assessed by two different pieces of work.

Following the taught stage, you will complete a dissertation of no more than 20,000 words.

The classification of your degree is based on two-thirds of the average grade of the taught modules and one-third of the grade of your dissertation.

Career prospects

The course offers knowledge and expertise to enable you to enter a wide range of urban-related careers working in private, public and Third Sector organisations. These can range from research, policy and implementation professions careers covering elements of the urban challenges offered on the course, including urban environments and sustainability, urban and regional development, transport and housing infrastructures and aspects of planning and design. The course also enables to further study towards an academic career in geography and urban studies.

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Address urgent global issues, find just solutions for all communities. The New School is at the forefront of addressing global environmental issues, thanks to Milano's Environmental Policy and Sustainability Management (EPSM) program. Read more

Address urgent global issues, find just solutions for all communities.

The New School is at the forefront of addressing global environmental issues, thanks to Milano's Environmental Policy and Sustainability Management (EPSM) program. This program is designed to turn students' passion for environmental change and sustainability into careers with impact. Our students benefit from small, customized classes, a rigorous program of critical theory and practice, and close attention from a faculty engaged in research, scholarship, and cutting-edge professional practice. Our practice-based learning places students front and center alongside organizations working on the most pressing environmental issues of our time, from climate change and environmental justice to food systems and sustainable development.

Environmental Policy and Sustainability Management students also have access to the Tishman Environment and Design Center, a university-wide institute committed to bringing an interdisciplinary and environmental justice approach to contemporary environmental challenges. The Tishman Center's Student Scholars program provides a competitive grant that funds student-designed research and projects related to climate change, environmental, or sustainability issues. Students in the program also benefit from an array of courses and programs throughout the university, including the International Field Program, graduate courses across a variety of disciplines like economics and media studies, sustainable design at Parsons, and other Milano courses in management and policy.

Positive Real-World Impact

While studying in New York City — a global hub for major environmental and sustainability organizations — our students tackle real-world challenges at government institutions, corporations, small, innovative start-ups, companies, and nonprofits throughout the city. The EPSM program culminates in a capstone project in which students bring their knowledge and critical perspectives to a real-world challenge. For a sample of recent capstone projects, visit the Milano School blog.

Program Flexibility and Customization

Students customize their course of study in consultation with a program advisor, focusing broadly on either environmental policy or sustainability management. The program also offers further areas of specialization, including the option for students to create their own specialization by taking elective courses from across the university. The program is flexible and convenient for working professionals as well as recent college graduates. Students can study full-time and complete the program in two years, or study part-time for three to five years. There are numerous external scholarships available to graduate students with an environmental focus.

Career Paths and Professional Development

The EPSM faculty works closely with each student to provide mentorship and guidance as they explore their professional development goals. Faculty with extensive professional experience help students learn about environmental and sustainability careers and provide connections to networks of peers and professional organizations that can lead to future opportunities. The Milano School also has specialized career services staff that advise students and graduates as they search for internships, fellowships, and employment opportunities.

Students will be prepared to work in a variety of sectors, including government, nonprofits, advocacy and social change organizations, policy and research institutes, as well as and corporate and other private sector firms. EPSM graduates hold such positions as Director of Environment and Sustainability at Information Technology Industry Council, Sustainability Project Manager for the City of Orlando, Chief Sustainability Officer for the town of North Hempstead, NY; Green Business Support Specialist at the Center for Eco Technology; and Project Manager at the Sustainable Development Solutions Center. Others have started their own businesses or consulting firms, or have gone on to pursue doctoral degrees. See where some of our alumni are working. These alumni stay connected through a robust online Alumni Network group and the program hosts an annual on-campus Alumni and Student Mixer to strengthen the connections our students have with professionals pursuing their passion in the environmental field.

Internship

Internships enable students to acquire firsthand knowledge and skills that complement their degree. Full-time students who enter the program without related work experience and those planning a career change are required to complete a noncredit professional internship (400–900 hours).



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This is a flexible course which you can tailor to suit your own specific areas of interest, experience and career aspirations. You will have the opportunity to choose from a range of modules in areas such as information systems, computing and creative technologies. Read more
This is a flexible course which you can tailor to suit your own specific areas of interest, experience and career aspirations. You will have the opportunity to choose from a range of modules in areas such as information systems, computing and creative technologies.

Our modules vary in their technical nature with either a practical or theoretical focus, and we will advise on which ones are right for you.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including computer science.January entrants please note: in order to complete 12 months of academic study delivered in University term time, the total length of your programme will be 18 months to include recognised University vacation periods.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/informationandtechnology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Your employability is enhanced through our contacts with industry, our Careers Advice Service and providing you with up-to-date knowledge and skills which are in demand in this sector. You can look forward to a wide range of career opportunities in the field of internet, enterprise software development and information systems.

- Web Developer
- User Interface Designer
- PHP Developer
- IT Project Manager

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has strong links with industry to ensure content is always relevant to the needs of the sector and you are encouraged to engage with our external clients for your final project. Guest lecturers are invited to speak and you will have the opportunity to get involved with industry related events.

Modules

Dissertation (40 Credits)

Research Practice (20 Credits)

Option Modules (Semester 2) (20 Credits each)
Service Oriented Architecture; Green Computing Strategies; Systems, Designs, Innovation; Software and Systems; Critical Perspectives on Information; Mobile Application Development; Data Warehouse Models and Approaches(SAS); Intelligent Systems and Robotics; Lean and Agile Engineering; Mobile Games Prototyping; BI Principles, Data Analysis and Visualisation(SAS); Network and Convergence Architectures; Green Computing Technologies; Engineering Systems Control; Design Patterns for Web Dev.

Option Modules (Semester 1) (20 Credits each)
Database Systems; Managing Information in the Digital and Global Environment; User Experience Design; Digital Video and Audio; Mobile and Wireless Communications; Advanced Software Engineering; Eco Engineering; Software Components and Architecture; ICT and Environment; Responsive Web Development; 3D Computer Technologies; Simulation and Modelling; Network Management.

Project Management (20 Credits)

Professor Mohammad Dastbaz

Dean, Faculty of Arts, Environment and Technology

"We aim to provide innovation in curriculum, engagement with current industry practices and standards, and to give our students the experience of working with staff whose research has national and international reputation."

Mohammad is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Arts, Environment and Technology,having joined our University in June 2011 from the University of East London. A well published researcher, with over 50 refereed conference and Journal publications, his research profile includes many funded research programmes including JISC and EU FP7 projects. Mohammad’s first degree was in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He then went on to complete a PhD in the 'Design, Development and Evaluation of Multimedia Based Learning Systems' at Kingston University. In 1989 he set up one of the UK's first multimedia PC companies, 'Systems 2000'.

Facilities

- IT Labs
The University is home to a number of modern specialist IT labs equipped with all the up-to-date hardware and software our computing students could need

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in 100 acres of parkland with easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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