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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You will be lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK as ranked by the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to teach part-time in the School.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/177/criminology

Research areas

Our research areas are listed below; wider research areas are also available from our European partner institutions.

- Crime, Control and Culture

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research. The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Staff research interests

Kent’s world-class academics provide research students with excellent supervision. The academic staff in this school and their research interests are shown below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the school to discuss your proposed research and potential supervision prior to making an application. Please note, it is possible for students to be supervised by a member of academic staff from any of Kent’s schools, providing their expertise matches your research interests.

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/).

- Dr Phil Carney:

Lecturer in Criminology; Erasmus and International Co-ordinator; Kent Co-ordinator, Common Study Programme in Critical Criminology

Photographic theory; spectacle; radical criminology; cultural criminology; critical visual culture; post-structuralist critical theory; desire and power; the micropolitics of fascism.

- Dr Caroline Chatwin:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology; Director of Studies for Undergraduate Criminology

European drug policy; young people and victimisation; drug use and subcultural studies.

- Dr Simon Cottee:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology

Sociology of crime and deviance; sociology of intellectuals; terrorism and apostasy; coercion; political violence.

- Professor Chris Hale:

Professor of Criminology

How political debates around law and order have affected responses to crime; quantitative analysis of crime data, especially the relationships between crime and fear of crime with wider economic and social changes; evaluations of new interventions and crime reduction strategies; policing; youth crime.

- Dr Jonathan Ilan:

Lecturer in Criminology

Cultural criminology; street culture; urban ethnography; media and crime; youth crime; justice and policing.

- Professor Roger Matthews:

Professor of Criminology; Director of Studies for Postgraduate Criminology

Penology, community safety and crime prevention, prostitution, armed robbery, punitiveness, left realism. Recent publications include: Prostitution Politics and Policy (2008); Doing Time: An Introduction to the Sociology of Imprisonment (2009).

- Professor Larry Ray:

Professor of Sociology

Sociological theory; globalisation; race and ethnicity; violence.

- Dr Simon Shaw:

Lecturer in Criminal Justice Studies; Director of Studies

Youth crime; youth justice; politics of crime; criminal justice policy-making.

- Emeritus Professor K. Stenson:

Professor of Criminology

Criminological theory, risk and governance, youth crime.

- Professor Alex Stevens:

Professor of Criminal Justice; Deputy Head of School (Medway)

The politics and practice of criminal justice, with a specific emphasis on national and international drug policy, youth justice, gangs, organised crime, probation practice and the use of evidence in policymaking.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course, accredited by the Institute of Healthcare Management, examines the social, political and economic context within which health and social services operate, locating this within the advanced study of social policy. Read more
This course, accredited by the Institute of Healthcare Management, examines the social, political and economic context within which health and social services operate, locating this within the advanced study of social policy. A particular feature of the curriculum is its focus on policy, management and collaborative working structures in the context of regulation, evaluation and accountability frameworks for service delivery.

More about this course

The course is designed to meet the needs of those working in health and welfare services as practitioners, managers or administrators.

The student group is therefore multidisciplinary, and most course members combine study with full-time work. The course is also suitable for graduates with a research interest in the changing nature of health and social care in the new mixed economy of welfare.

The course has recently been re-validated and re-focused. It now offers increased opportunities for you to combine your study of health and social policy with specialist modules in evaluation, management, social work practice, regeneration or public health.

Your learning is structured around weekly contact time with the teaching team and is complemented by your independent work based on guidance supplied in lectures, group work, and interactive workshops. Blended learning, enquiry based learning and problem based learning will be used to help you comprehend theoretical concepts.

You are assessed via essays, seminar papers, mini-projects, reports and management exercises.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institute of Healthcare Management.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Health and Social Care Management and Policy Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Impact Assessment (core, 20 credits)
-Management of Health and Social Services (core, 20 credits)
-Strategic Planning and Change Management (core, 20 credits)
-Understanding the Policy Process (core, 20 credits)
-Children and Families: Policy and Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Contextualising Management (option, 20 credits)
-Cross Cultural Management (option, 20 credits)
-Ethical Issues in Healthcare (option, 20 credits)
-Health in the City (option, 20 credits)
-Housing Strategy (option, 20 credits)
-Managing Change in Organisations and Systems (option, 20 credits)
-Managing Self and Others (option, 20 credits)
-Measuring and Monitoring Performance (option, 20 credits)
-Partnership Working (option, 20 credits)
-Perspectives of Ageing (option, 20 credits)
-Project Management (option, 20 credits)
-Researching Communities (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)

After the course

This qualification will enhance the career prospects of those working in many settings where knowledge and skills in health and social care management or policy making is relevant. Graduates from our existing programmes report improved career choices and advancement as a result of learning acquired on this programme.

Many have gone on to careers as drug and alcohol rehabilitation managers, managers of learning disability services, primary care trust business development managers, day centre managers, sure start programme managers, health visitor managers, prison service managers, residential and nursing care home managers, advisors in local authorities, community care managers, managed policy research, policy makers.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013. Read more
Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013.

Course overview

Do you want to contribute to the discovery and development of drugs that could potentially improve the health and well-being of millions of people? The UK has long been a leader in this complex technical area, in which each new drug requires around $1 billion of development work.

Our research-led teaching and state-of-the-art facilities make the University of Sunderland one of the UK's top locations for pharmaceutical science. Our strong links with the pharmaceutical industry ensure a flow of guest speakers and good contacts for your chosen Masters project/dissertation. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

The course covers advanced pharmaceutics, pharmaceutical analysis, drug design, pharmacology, proteomics and pharmacogenomics. You will also cover regulatory processes for medicines, in line with ICH guidelines. The course is a direct response to employers’ search for postgraduates who have a mix of theoretical and practical skills and who will push boundaries in drug development.

With a Masters course, it’s important to consider the relevance of the research interests of tutors who will supervise your dissertation. At Sunderland, our interests include pharmaceutical analysis, process chemistry, various drug discovery programmes, and drug delivery systems, including those for large biological pharmaceuticals. Our academic team have produced some ‘world-leading’ research, according to the latest Research Excellence Framework (2014).

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. The topic of the project / dissertation is negotiated to fit both your personal interests and the expertise of Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Essential Research and Study Skills (20 Credits)
-Fundamentals for Pharmaceutical Science (20 Credits)
-The Pharmaceutical R&D Cycle and its Regulation (20 Credits)

Choose four out of the five following modules
-Advanced Pharmacology (15 Credits)
-Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis (15 Credits)
-Advanced Drug Design (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutics (15 Credits)

Choose one Masters option
-Double Project (60 Credits)
Or
-Double Dissertation (60 Credits)
Or
-Single Project (30 Credits) and Single Dissertation (30 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, open learning, laboratory work and group work.

The Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working and problem solving. Assessment methods include laboratory reports, oral presentations, case studies, critical reviews, examinations and the Masters project.

Facilities & location

This course is based in the Sciences Complex at our City Campus, which boasts multi-disciplinary laboratories and cutting-edge equipment thanks to multi-million pound investments.

Facilities for Pharmaceutics
We have pharmaceutical-related equipment for wet granulation, spray drying, capsule filling, tablet making, mixing inhalation, film coating and freeze drying. As well as standard pharmacopoeial test methods, such as dissolution testing, friability and disintegration, we also offer highly sophisticated test methods. These include rheometry, thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy), tests for powder flow, laser diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, image analysis and laser confocal microscopy.

Facilities for Medicinal Chemistry
Our state-of-the-art spectroscopic facility allows us to confirm the structures of new molecules that could be potential pharmaceutical products and to investigate the structures of potential medicinal substances that have been isolated from plants. We are equipped with Liquid Chromatography-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mass Spectroscopy (LC-NMR/MS) platforms; this is an exceptional facility for a university. We also have low and high resolution mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and elemental analysis equipment. Our facilities allow you to gain hands-on experience of a wide range of analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy, which are of great importance in determining both ionic/metal content of pharmaceuticals and simple chemical structures respectively. You will also gain experience of revolutionary protein and DNA separation techniques, as well as Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (x8) and Gas Chromatography for separating all kinds of samples of pharmaceutical or biomedical interest.

Facilities for Pharmacology
Our highly technical apparatus will give you first-hand experience of the principles of drug action and the effects of drugs on pharmacological and cellular models. As a result, you gain a better understanding of the effects of drugs on specific receptors located throughout the human body and related physiological effects.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on pharmaceutical and biomedical science, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your studies include:
-Embase, which is a complex database covering drug research, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, toxicology, clinical and experimental human medicine, health policy and management, public health, occupational health, environmental health, drug dependence and abuse, psychiatry, forensic medicine and biomedical engineering/instrumentation
-PsycINF, which includes information about the psychological aspects of medicine, psychiatry, nursing, sociology, pharmacology and physiology
-PubMed, which contains life science journals, online books and abstracts that cover fields such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine and health care
-Science Direct, which offers more than 18,000 full-text journals published by Elsevier
-Web of Science, which covers a broad range of science areas

Learning Environment
Sunderland Pharmacy School has a rich heritage in scientific studies and our degree courses are extremely well respected in the industry. We are fully plugged into relevant medical and pharmaceutical industry bodies, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people. Your Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company, including working at their sites.

Employment & careers

Graduates from this course can pursue a variety of careers in the following areas; Drug Design, Pharmaceutical Analysis and Research, Pre-clinical Research in Experimental and Biological Studies, Formulation and Product Development, Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics, Clinical Research, Product Registration, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

Previous Sunderland graduates have been employed in companies such as GSK, Eisai, Reckitt Benckiser, Merck, Sharp & Dohme and Norbrook Laboratories.

Some students may apply for a PhD programme or those who already hold a Pharmacy degree can pursue MSc/PG Pharmaceutical Sciences for the Overseas Pharmacist Assessment Programme (OSPAP) and go through one-year pre-registration training.

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If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017. Read more
If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017.
http://www.shu.ac.uk/VCAwardJanuary2017

Study on a course designed for social sciences graduates who plan to work or complete research in sociology, social policy, and governmental and commercial organisations. The fundamental research methodologies you learn give you the skills to develop or start your career as a researcher in these areas. Our staff offer a wide range of research specialisms for you to benefit from, encompassing sociology, social policy, politics, criminology, education studies, urban studies, youth studies and cultural studies.

During this course we introduce you to social research methods and strategies, and the supporting theories and philosophies. You can also develop areas of specialist interests and integrate these into your methodological training. On a number of the modules, you meet and discuss research issues with students from our other MRes courses and doctoral level researchers.

This course is for you if you have a first degree in any discipline within social sciences and plan to
-Work in areas of social policy and sociology.
-Carry out research in these and related subject areas such as health, crime and policing, leisure and education policy, town planning or environmental studies.

If you are already working in the field, you and your current employer may see this course as a professional development opportunity, giving you the skills to further your career and current practice.

Our staff are currently involved in research areas including
-Labour market and occupational studies.
-Public health.
-Discourse and identities.
-European, international and comparative politics and policy.
-Social statistics.
-Policing studies.
-Criminology.
-Urban studies.
-Labour history.
-Drug use and rehabilitation.
-Housing studies.
-Environment and sustainability.
-Visual ethnography.
-Education and social class.
-Poverty and inclusion.
-Ethnicity and religion.
-Media and impact on diversity and equality.
-Social activism.
-Sexualities and gender.
-Teenage pregnancy and parenting.
-Youth studies, youth work and volunteering.
-Work and family life.
-Charities, volunteering and the non-profit sector.

You study a range of research methodologies throughout the course including:
-Interview-based narrative and biographical research.
-Case study and ethnography.
-Media analysis.
-Surveying and sampling.
-Statistical analysis of large data sets.

You critique current developments in research methodology then design and conduct your own pieces of original research.
The MRes includes a research-based dissertation, which may become a pilot study towards a PhD. Several recent MRes students have gone onto doctoral level study, in fields such as education and inequality, and activism and sport.

For an informal discussion about this course, please contact Dr Bob Jeffery by e-mail at

This course is hosted by the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School. The Graduate School website provides a communication hub for students and staff engaged in research, information about our research work, and useful contact information.

You can take individual modules as short courses or combine them towards a PgDip/PgCert Research Methods in Sociology, Planning and Policy.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mres-sociology-planning-and-policy

Course structure

Full time – 1 year
Part time – typically 3 years
Depending on your route and start date (September or January), classes run in the evenings and/or in blocks of study during the day. Please contact us for more details.

Course design
You need 180 credits for the MRes
You choose up to 120 credits from the following modules:
-Qualitative methodologies and interviewing skills
-Qualitative research designs and ethnography
-Discourse and linguistic theory and analysis
-Survey design
-Introduction to survey analysis
-Multivariate statistical analysis
-Philosophies of research and design
-Research philosophies in today's sociology

You may choose to substitute 30 credits from another course within our MRes programme.

To gain the MRes you must present a 60-credit research-based dissertation in an area of your choice. This piece of work is supervised by our staff and gives you the opportunity to demonstrate the skills you have learned and your understanding of the research process and philosophies.

Assessment
Includes: essays, research projects, presentations, research proposals.

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You are lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible.

A key feature of the MA Criminology is its involvement in a Common Study Programme. The Common Study Programme is a biannual student-centred conference at which students are invited to present papers, meet students and staff from other countries and exchange ideas.

The School has international links with colleagues and institutions and our current Visiting Professor of Criminology, Jeff Ferrell is an example of this extended network. Professor Ferrell is based at the Texas Christian University, USA where he is Professor of Sociology. He is a leading proponent of cultural criminology and has conducted research on urban culture, graffiti and media.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/173/criminology

Course structure

The programme involves:

- the sociological study of crime and its application to criminal justice and social policy

- the study of issues at the cutting edge of current criminological debate with a strong emphasis on the cultural context of crime

- advanced criminological theory and research methods as applied to crime and criminal justice.

It also offers opportunities for you to develop your career in the areas of criminal justice, policy development and academic research.

We are constantly developing the modules available to you in line with current issues and staff expertise. Each year we announce new choices, for example we are currently working on developing a module convened by Dr David Redmon which looks at documentary film-making from a social science perspective.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. You will be required to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO869 - Theories of Crime (20 credits)
SO870 - Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
SO875 - Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
SO881 - Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
SO882 - Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)
SO885 - Social Suffering (20 credits)
SO940 - Prisons and Penal Policy (20 credits)
LW870 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (20 credits)
LW871 - Policing (20 credits)
SO824 - Sociology of Violence (20 credits)
SO825 - Terrorism and Modern Society (20 credits)
SO830 - Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (20 credits)
SO867 - Foundations of Sociology (20 credits)
SO868 - Critical Criminology (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by six coursework essays and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a post-graduate programme in criminology of the highest standard with teaching that is informed by internationally recognised research and scholarship

- give you a comprehensive overview and understanding of contemporary debates in criminology and criminal justice including those around diversity and inequality

- involve you in a critical analysis of crime and punishment in relation to developments in social theory, sociology and social policy

- provide an understanding of the social processes that influence the relationship between individuals, groups and institutions

- focus on the relevance of social science for the analysis and assessment of crime and criminal justice policy

- provide you with an advanced understanding of the ways in which quantitative and qualitative research methodologies may be used to study crime and criminal justice

- give you a critical awareness of the political and populist influences on criminal justice policy

- enable you to understand the emergence of social problems (including crime) and the responses of welfare and criminal justice institutions, including analysis of the theoretical, political and economic underpinnings of these responses

- build on the University’s close European ties by providing the potential for students to participate in the European Common Study programme in Criminology.

Research areas

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research.

- Crime, Culture and Control:

The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Enhance your understanding of the processes involved in people becoming substance users and problematic substance users and broaden your career options. Read more
Enhance your understanding of the processes involved in people becoming substance users and problematic substance users and broaden your career options.

About the programme

Addiction problems involve an interaction between the drug, the individual and the environment. This programme provides a critical perspective on substance use and misuse and looks at the evidence base for policies and interventions within the area. Full-time, part-time and distance learning study is available. Study modes are supported by the virtual learning environment, Moodle.

Applicants with a 2.1 honours degree in a relevant subject can study the MSc in one calendar year. Students successfully completing the PG Diploma can progress to the MSc in the subsequent academic session.

Pg Cert Addiction Practice (part-time) 9-21 months; Pg Dip Alcohol and Drug Studies (full-time/part-time) 9 months/up to 36 months; MSc Alcohol and Drug Studies (full-time/part-time) 11 months.

Practical experience

Postgraduate Diploma students can opt to complete a placement in a research setting or a service/workbased setting, or the module ‘Alcohol/ Drugs: Policy/Practice Review’.

Your learning

Postgraduate Certificate in Addiction Practice (3 modules at SCQF Level 11)
• Understanding Substance Use and Addiction
• Change and Intervention Methods
• Placement

Postgraduate Diploma: Alcohol and Drugs Studies (6 modules at SCQF Level 11)
• Understanding Substance Use and Addiction
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Change and Intervention Methods
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Evidence Science & Policy
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Local to Global
• Placement (in current workplace, or an alcohol/drug setting, or a research setting) or Alcohol/Drugs: Policy/Practice Review
• Research Methods – investigates research design and application

MSc (9 modules at SCQF Level 11)
Students will additionally complete a triple module research dissertation with supervised guidance and present their findings in a thesis.

Our Careers Adviser says

Many full-time students quickly find employment on graduation. Part-time and distance learning students use their qualifications for career enhancement or to develop specialisms in social work, health/ medicine or criminal justice.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info. Many part-time and distance learning students seek funding support from their employers. Independent applications can be made to Alcohol Research UK for either full-time or part-time/distance learning study routes: http://www.alcoholresearchuk.org

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

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Understand crime and policy in a global context. The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. Read more
Understand crime and policy in a global context.

Overview

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. You'll study an increasingly important feature of society: transnational crime and the responses taken by states and non-state actors.

You'll engage with the reality of global crime and criminal and related social policies from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will explore global policy analysis and criminal justice with an international approach. You'll also be trained in research methods.

Course content

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is based around a combination of crime, social policy and research training modules. You'll start with an introduction to major theories, institutions and debates in global policy analysis and criminal justice. You'll also get a solid grounding in the core methods of social research. You'll progress to more advanced analysis of global crime and justice, exploring diverse global crimes ranging from drug and human trafficking to corporate and state crimes. You'll also spend time in workshops designed to help you gain the communication and presentation skills you need to disseminate your research in your own research project.

Most people study for full-time for 12 months, but part-time study over 24 months is also available.

Modules
In the autumn term you'll take two compulsory modules:
-Policy Analysis - Crime and Justice
-Introduction to Social Research Methods

In the spring term you'll take another compulsory module that builds upon your earlier study:
-Global Crime and Justice

In the spring term you'll also choose one optional module from:
-Global Social Policy and Global Social Problems
-Comparative Social Policy - Governance, Management and Delivery
-Globalisation and Social Policy

In the summer term and summer months you'll take part in the Graduate Dissertation Workshop. This will give you the chance to develop your research interests and participate in a group project with other students who have similar interests. You will also use this time to work on your individual research project.

Careers

The MA in Global Crime and Justice develops the skills that employers need in a number of areas, especially criminal justice, crime policy analysis and research methods from a global perspective. You'll also find you develop transferable skills that will allow you to progress to different career areas or to continue your studies at PhD level.

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This master's degree is designed for those who want to expand their knowledge and understanding of these drug and alcohol issues, including policies and interventions, within a comparative context. Read more
This master's degree is designed for those who want to expand their knowledge and understanding of these drug and alcohol issues, including policies and interventions, within a comparative context. It is relevant to policy makers and practitioners, and to students and researchers working in, associated with, or preparing to enter this field.

Over the course of the programme you will gain the knowledge and skills required to investigate and analyse drug and alcohol use, problem use, addiction, and their responses, from a multi-disciplinary and cross-national perspective.

The master's is being run jointly by four universities: Middlesex University; Aarhus University (Denmark); University del Piemonte Orientale "A. Avogardo" (Italy); and Universitas Miguel Hernandez de Elche-Alicante (Spain). With access to a group of European teachers and students, you will have opportunities to share research findings as well as experiences and personal knowledge about your own countries. You will also have the chance to study in partner universities or undertake placements in Europe and international agencies and gain career development through utilising work-based learning approaches and internships.

The programme is taught primarily through distance learning methods complemented by some face-to-face tuition. The 'Introduction to Drug and Alcohol Studies' induction is delivered as a four-and-a-half-day face-to-face intensive study block at one of the partner institutions (In 2017, this will be held at Universitas Miguel Hernandez de Elche-Alicante in Spain). It brings together staff and students from the other countries delivering the programme. Please note that travel and accommodation expenses are self-funded.

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The programme offers a comprehensive understanding of social sciences media and cultural analysis. Read more
The programme offers a comprehensive understanding of social sciences media and cultural analysis. Interdisciplinary in conception, it provides students with a critical introduction to key areas of media and cultural analysis, including the media and political economy; modernity and post-modernity; and cultural ‘difference’, prejudice and power.

While there are several core modules, students undertake research directly related to their specialist interests in the dissertation. There are also a number of optional modules, covering such areas as globalisation, visual cultures, media and nationalisms, citizenship, digital media, popular music, cultural policy, and consumption.

Core study areas include media and modernity, the politics of representation, production and reception analysis, media and cultural industries, textual analysis research techniques and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include citizenship and communications, media, nations and nationalisms, global communications, digital futures, media and cultural work, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/media-cultural-analysis/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Media and Modernity
- The Politics of Representation
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Media and Cultural Industries
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Digital Futures
- Media and Cultural Work
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economics
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

Our students go on to work in media, marketing and PR divisions of major public and private institutions. They also go on to work in mainstream media careers such as journalism and broadcasting.

The comprehensive theoretical introduction to media, communications and culture that the programme provides makes it an ideal stepping stone into a research career. Many of our students have also gone on to do PhDs in media, communications and culture in the UK and abroad.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/media-cultural-analysis/

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Global media and cultural industries are important sources of employment and economic growth internationally. They are also important carriers of meaning about the world. Read more
Global media and cultural industries are important sources of employment and economic growth internationally. They are also important carriers of meaning about the world. This programme focuses on the growth of these global industries and the roles that states play in governing them. The products of media and cultural industries are increasingly produced, governed, and consumed transnationally.

The programme draws on the enduring strength of transnational and comparative research as well as research in the political economy of communication within the Department.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis, and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, political marketing, heritage industries, and capitalism and culture.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-medial-cultural-industries/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Media and Cultural Industries
- Digital Futures
- Media and Cultural Work
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
- Politics of Representation
- Media and Modernity
- Communication and Citizenship
- Sex Industries
- Global Communications
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Media, Nations, and Nationalisms
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economics
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to enhance specialist knowledge and methodological expertise of relevance to professionals working in communications, to students interested in media and cultural studies, and those wishing to progress to a research degree in these fields.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-medial-cultural-industries/

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This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Read more
This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Smartphones; social networking, blogging and tweeting; online shopping; communication by email; and the delivery of news, film, music and e-books over the Internet: these are just some of the most striking ways in which the digital is penetrating and transforming contemporary society.

The programme is delivered by a diverse interdisciplinary team with a strong profile in, for example, digital culture, media, sociology, anthropology and communication studies.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, and marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Futures: explorations in new media
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Digital Economies
- Digital Methodologies
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Media and Cultural Industries
- The Politics of Representation
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Media and Cultural Work
- Tourism, Culture and Society
- Sex Industries
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to develop specialist understanding of contemporary developments in digital media and culture. This will be relevant to anyone pursuing a professional career in this rapidly growing sector and to those with an interest in these significant social changes. Students will also acquire research skills which will be of value in both media-related and academic careers.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

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Communication lies at the heart of politics and is essential to understanding it in contemporary media saturated countries. Read more
Communication lies at the heart of politics and is essential to understanding it in contemporary media saturated countries. This course focuses on political communication in a global context, looking at the development of message production, transmission, and reception across nations as well as key theories, themes and controversies.

In a multi-country perspective, it examines the strategies used by political advocates to build and maintain support, especially during election campaigns, and analyses the relationships between key political actors, media actors and citizens, as well as exploring the wider issues of influence and representation. The course draws on the enduring strength of the School’s research specialism in political communication and media studies.

Core study areas include global communications, marketing politics, politics of representation, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis, and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-political-communication/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Global Communications
- Marketing Politics
- Politics of Representation
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Communication and Citizenship
- Sex Industries
- Global Communications
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economies
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to enhance specialist knowledge and methodological expertise of relevance to professionals working in communications, to students interested in global political communication and to those wishing to progress to a research degree in these fields.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-political-communication/

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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. This programme, approved by the appropriate professional/regulatory bodies, provides a distance learning option for qualification as a non-medical prescriber. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

This programme, approved by the appropriate professional/regulatory bodies, provides a distance learning option for qualification as a non-medical prescriber.

Eight contact days cover communication and diagnostic skills. Other topics on the syllabus include the legal, policy, professional and ethical aspects of prescribing, plus pharmacology and patient assessment and monitoring.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/740/independent-supplementary-prescribing

About Medway School of Pharmacy

Medway School of Pharmacy is one of the few regional schools of pharmacy in the UK, a collaboration between the University of Kent and the University of Greenwich.

The impetus for the formation of the Medway School of Pharmacy came from the local community, who recognised the shortage of qualified pharmacists in all branches of the pharmacy profession in Kent.

The School is now recognised as an established school with accreditation from the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Graduates are employed in health disciplines in Kent and the south-east and more broadly across the UK.

Course structure

You can take the Master’s programme as a stand-alone PCert in Independent/Supplementary Prescribing, or as one pathway into the Medicines Management programme, by studying prescribing as either the first or second year of the Medicines Management PDip.

On successful completion, the School will notify the appropriate professional/regulatory body that you have qualified as an independent/supplementary prescriber.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is by Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), assignments, case-study analysis, multiple-choice questions, short answer paper, narrative based on portfolio entries and attendance at a period of learning in practice.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- prepare pharmacists to practice as supplementary prescribers

- prepare nurses and midwives to practice as supplementary/independent prescribers

- develop the knowledge and skills required by an allied health professional to practice as a supplementary prescriber

- meet the standards set by the respective professional or regulatory body as required within the legislative framework.

Research areas

Chemistry and drug delivery
This group has laboratories with dedicated state-ofthe art drug delivery, nanotechnology, spectroscopy, chromatography and organic synthesis facilities. It brings together researchers in medicinal chemistry and drug design, nanotechnology and materials science, drug delivery and pharmaceutics encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to research. Research covers synthesis and biological evaluation of potential anti-cancer agents, structurebased drug design, QSAR predication of ADMET properties, controlled release, particle engineering, powder technology, pharmaceutical technology, and novel drug delivery systems, with a focus on respiratory drug delivery.

Biological sciences
This group is housed in recently refurbished laboratories with dedicated state-of-the-art molecular biological, electrophysiological, tissue culture and microscopy facilities. The research is divided into four main themes; infectious diseases and allergy; neuroscience; renal and cardiovascular physiology; and pharmacology. Examples of current work include: investigation of the use of non-pathogenic virus ‘pseudotypes’ to study pathogenic RNA, study of the properties of neuronal potassium channels and their modulation and the development of new therapies for patients that have developed acute kidney injury in collaboration with a major pharmaceutical company.

Pharmacy practice
This group conducts research in two areas: public health and medicines optimisation, with a particular focus on cardiovascular diseases and mental health. Work in public health includes studies in physical exercise, alcohol, cardiovascular screening and spirometry testing, plus pharmacovigilance. Studies in medicines optimisation include work in dementia, bipolar disorder and stroke, with an emphasis on the patient perspective.

Careers

Graduates who obtain their PhD from Kent or Greenwich are highly sought after by prospective employers, both within the UK and overseas. Destinations for doctoral graduates include university academic departments, research institutes and leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies.

The taught postgraduate programmes are designed to promote the continuing professional development by providing sought-after skills. The programmes are beneficial for those who wish to develop their skills and/or to take the next step in their career.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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How does a disease develop in a patient or model system? Which substances can influence this process? How is effective medication designed and tested? Can you cure diseases with stem cells?. Read more
How does a disease develop in a patient or model system? Which substances can influence this process? How is effective medication designed and tested? Can you cure diseases with stem cells?

You study the causes and pathophysiology of diseases and intervention with drugs. The programme is interdisciplinary covering the whole range of drug development disciplines. From basic drug target discovery to molecular modeling of targets. And from synthesis andanalysis, pharmacology, toxicology and biopharmacy to clinical pharmacoepidemiology and post marketing surveillance.

The main feature of the programme are research projects in which you will learn about conducting research by actually doing it. You will independently perform experiments and go through the whole process of conducting science developing skills such as studying scientific literature, formulating hypotheses, designing and performing experiments, and interpreting and presenting your results. The programme therefore is a good preparation for a PhD programme or for independent practice of science in a future job.

You can either choose to design your programme tailored to your individual research interest or choose a specialisation. Available specialisations:Toxicology and Drug Disposition, with focus on adverse drug reactions and toxicokinetics of drugs, or Pharmacoepidemiology which studies intended and unintended effects of drugs in daily life.

Why in Groningen?

- Groningen drug research is among the best in the world
- Unique interdisciplinary cooperation between clinical, preclinical and pharmaceutical research fields
- Specialisations: Toxicology and Drug Disposition | Pharmacoepidemiology

Job perspectives

When you have finished the Master's programme in Medical Pharmaceutical Sciences you have multiple career options. You are optimally prepared to start a research career but you can also choose for a position that links science to business and policy.

Researcher (usually as a PhD) in a variety of organisations:
- Universities
- Academic and general hospitals
- Pharmaceutical, biomedical industries and food industries

Positions linking medical pharmaceutical sciences to a business or policy strategy in:
- Governmental and semi-governmental institutions such as the Medicines Evaluation Board or the Ministry of Health and Welfare
- Societal and patient organisations

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Humber’s Regulatory Affairs graduate certificate program focuses on developing the concepts, skills and techniques required to work in regulatory affairs in the pharmaceutical, medical device or biotechnology industries. Read more
Humber’s Regulatory Affairs graduate certificate program focuses on developing the concepts, skills and techniques required to work in regulatory affairs in the pharmaceutical, medical device or biotechnology industries. You will gain knowledge of the regulatory system, legislation, procedures and practices which relate to the development, manufacture, quality assurance and marketing of health-related products.

The importance of internationally harmonized regulations and future trends in the industry will be examined by analyzing relevant international and Canadian legislation and regulations. You will study a wide range of regulations and standards including good manufacturing practices, good laboratory practices, good clinical practices, good documentation practices, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the Canadian Food and Drugs Act, the Environmental Protection Act, principles of regulatory compliance and inspections, drug establishment licensing, and related standards and guidelines. Teamwork and communication skills are emphasized and you will acquire information technology skills that assist communication and data management specific to regulatory affairs.

You will become familiar with the steps necessary for product submission; how to assemble documents and statistical evidence; the complexity of product registration, negotiation and follow-up, and how these are linked to the federal government and provincial formularies.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:
• Describe the government processes within the Canadian health care system and provincial formularies.
• Explain the roles and responsibilities of a regulatory professional in industry.
• Explain the concepts in pharmacoeconomics as they relate to the socioeconomic aspects of health care and health care products.
• Explain Canadian and international health care legislation and regulations including (as examples) Good Manufacturing Practices, Good Laboratory Practices, Good Clinical Practices, Good Documentation Practices, International Standards Organization (ISO), Food and Drug Act Regulations, the Environmental Protection Act, Regulatory compliance/inspection, Drug Establishment Licensing and related standards and guidelines.
• Describe international harmonization of regulations and the impact on manufacturing and the submission process.
• Explain the Product Development Process.
• Outline the Quality Control Process.
• Demonstrate information technology skills in the use of software applicable to regulatory affairs submissions, in document and database management systems, in data correction techniques and in the use of the Internet for research.
• Define drug (prescription and non-prescription)/medical device/biologic submission process requirements.
• Prepare a drug/medical device/biologic submission to the Therapeutic Products Program (TPP) including supplemental documentation.
• Demonstrate the problem solving process as it relates to pharmacovigilance and post-marketing surveillance.
• Demonstrate effective interviewing and negotiating skills in managing a clinical study.

Modules

Semester 1
• REGA 5020: Health Care Legislation, Regulation and Guidelines
• REGA 5021: Product Development-Premarket
• REGA 5022: Product Development-CMC
• REGA 5023: Medical Products Safety
• REGA 5024: Communication
• REGA 5025: Pathophysiology and Pharmacology

Semester 2
• REGA 5030: Management of Regulatory Submissions
• REGA 5031: Management of Global Regulatory Submission
• REGA 5033: Regulation of Food Products and Agrichemicals
• REGA 5034: Medical Devices
• REGA 5035: Provincial Formularies and Reimbursement Policy
• REGA 5036: Emerging Biotechnology

Semester 3
• REGA 5040: Internship
• REGA 5041: Integative Seminar

Work Placement

Following two academic course-based semesters, students complete a three-month placement that provides opportunities to apply and integrate theoretical knowledge and skills into real-world work settings. Most placements are in the following sectors: pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device organizations, government agencies or food industries.

Your Career

Our graduates work in a spectrum of fields such as pharmaceutics, biotechnology, medical devices, natural health product industries or in government.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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