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Masters Degrees (Computing In Education)

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Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015). All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015).

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

School and Local Authorities are increasingly seeking to employ teachers with not only high levels of competence and skill in classroom practice, but practitioners who have advanced subject knowledge for teaching and enhanced knowledge of systems and theories relevant to education. Therefore, the aims of this program are:

to enable student teachers to develop a critical understanding of issues and theories that impact upon classroom practice in teaching, learning and assessment in secondary schools;
to support student teachers in their exploration and critical reflection on their own and others practice in relation to national and regional priorities and policies and current research relevant to the Key Stages for this programme;
to promote student teachers' practical teaching skills and subject knowledge for teaching across the relevant Key Stages for this programme, making links with relevant theory to inform practice.

The programme aims to further develop students' existing transferable skills in communication, literacy, numeracy and critical reasoning.
It is suitable for those who wish to gain employment as teachers and who aspire to progress to leadership and management roles in schools or in the wider world of education. It will provide an excellent foundation for progression to either higher academic or advanced professional qualifications.

Course Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Primary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 5-11. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Primary course is structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based.

The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I
This module covers the following GPE themes:
Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.
Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.

2. Education Studies II
This module aims to develop understanding of the learning, teaching and assessment of the National Curriculum for Key Stage 1 & 2, in the Core (English, Mathematics and Science) and Foundation subjects (Computing, Physical Education, History, Geography, Religious Education, Art and Music).
The primary focus will be on developing approaches to maximise the impact you can make on pupil progress (TS2). This module focuses on special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and ways to meet the differentiated needs of a range of pupils in relation to theoretical perspectives and real-life classroom applications and strategies are addressed.

3. Education Studies III (Curriculum Enhancement)
The following range of Curriculum Enhancements are usually offered: Bilingualism, Culture & Identities (BCI), Mathematics, Mathematical Thinking, Physical Education, Talk, Science, Computing
This unique module aims to develop curriculum expertise in the chosen area, whereby student teachers can:
research and develop innovative skills and projects within the context of their curriculum enhancement study and school setting;
apply the skills and principles of highly effective planning, teaching and assessment principles of National Curriculum focus areas, using a broad range of learning, teaching and assessment resources and approaches;
explore and develop skills in ‘specialised’ cross-curricula approaches.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go on to work as teachers.

We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools and Pupil Referral Units (PRUs). This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list. The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006. We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.

The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email .

Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Primary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Primary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:
Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities (Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning experiences in vibrant multicultural schools.

Beyond ITE, for early career teachers we offer the Masters in Teaching (MAT), where students can utilise their 60 PGCE Masters level credits to continue their postgraduate studies part-time, whilst also meeting the requirements outlined for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) and early career development. Where schools have qualified for Enhanced Partnership status with Brunel University London, NQTs in those schools have access to the first year MAT module for free, illustrating our commitment to supporting NQTs into and through their first year of teaching. We also offer a Masters in Education (MAEd), a Doctorate in Education (EdDoc) and PhD postgraduate routes through the Department of Education. This continuum of provision ensures a commitment to teacher education and professional learning at all stages and the growing community of professional practice strengthens our Partnership.

Staff are nationally and internationally recognised for their research, and liaise with government and other agencies on education policy issues. The Department of Education is host to a number of research centres, including the Brunel Able Children’s Centre. The process of learning is informed by cutting-edge research by staff in the strands of: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Pedagogy and Professional Practice (PPP).

You can take advantage of free access to our excellent University Academic Skills service, ASK.

We have an award winning Professional Development Centre.

Our library has been nominated for national awards for its outstanding provision.

We have on-site volunteering opportunities through our Brunel Volunteers provision.

Our Disability and Dyslexia Service team have an excellent track record of support for students.

Our Union of Brunel Students provides you with a range of additional support and a broad range of extra-curricular opportunities and social events.

There is excellent University-wide access to PCs and the Internet, as well as free loan of media equipment and music/recording studios, and web space on the University server.

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This course is ideal if you are a teacher or educator in a variety of subjects. It will not only improve your knowledge of new technologies and computer science, but also how to use these to enhance your classroom learning. Read more
This course is ideal if you are a teacher or educator in a variety of subjects. It will not only improve your knowledge of new technologies and computer science, but also how to use these to enhance your classroom learning.

Why choose this course?

Recent changes to the curriculum for primary and secondary computer science has left many educational professionals with gaps in their ICT knowledge. This innovative new course aims to bridge these gaps with practical technical knowledge supported by critical analysis of computing science in education and teaching.

What will I study?

Some of the modules you can take include the following.

1. Developing Digital Literacy in the Classroom: Examine the role and importance of digital literacy in the classroom by testing an area of your own practice to raise the digital skills or awareness of learners.
2. Computational Thinking in the Curriculum: an introduction to computing as a subject in schools and using programming in the classroom. It includes practical programming sessions.
3. Creativity and Innovation using Technology: Focus on how to use technology to enhance the classroom experience and academic progression.
4. Programming for the Classroom: Study standard programming languages and their uses in more depth.
5. Engaging Learners in Computer Science: Develop innovative strategies to teaching topics in Computer Science, such as artificial intelligence, ethics, crime and social networking. Learn to critically analyse new developments and how to engage your learners with them in the classroom.
6. Anticipating and Responding to Technological Change in an Educational Setting: Review the changes in education and technology and their impact on effective teaching and learning.
7. Research Skills or Research in a Professional Context: Develop your practical skills and critical understanding of research, strategies, methods and techniques.
8. Dissertation: Produce a substantial piece of academic writing around a negotiated and agreed research focus.

How will I learn?

This is a demanding and exciting programme that requires you to immerse yourself in reading, thinking and discussion alongside practical ICT sessions. Hands-on sessions will be run in our specialist computing labs by expert tutors from both our teaching and computer science teams, giving you access to the latest thinking from both areas.

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This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Read more
This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Students with an interest in topics covered by our research teams will find this is an excellent opportunity to get involved in progressive research.

Why study MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The MSc Computing Research degree is designed for graduates with a good degree in Computing or a related subject who wish to gain deep knowledge of research methods and experience of working in an active research environment.

The School of Computing provides a distinctive, balanced and enjoyable learning environment, matched to the future needs of both society and the computing field. Its research has strong foundations in mathematical and logical techniques, and in probabilistic and machine learning algorithms that are applied in its work on computer vision and multi-agent systems. In its applied research, the multi-disciplinary School has an international reputation in computer support for older and disabled people, healthcare computing, space systems and interaction design. All these areas of research have been developed through strong, long-term relationships with other leading academic institutions worldwide, and in collaboration with professional and industrial partners. The School is also active in commercialising its research, with several recent spin out companies fostering an entrepreneurial atmosphere.

The School of Computing has four major research groups:
Assistive and Healthcare Systems
Computational Systems
Interactive Systems Design
Space Technology Centre

What's so good about MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The University of Dundee is at the forefront of computing research. We currently have 23 academics and 35 researchers working alongside our 27 PhD students. Since January 2008 our school of computing has generated 313 publications and counting. In this time, we've produced 129 projects totalling more than £12.3 million in funding making Dundee a great place to come to engage in computing research.

We encourage a professional, inter-disciplinary and user-centred approach to computer systems design and production, and will enable you to develop the skills so that you can undertake independent research and participate in proposal development and innovation.

Our facilities

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

Postgraduate culture

The School of Computing maintains a friendly, intimate and supportive atmosphere, and we take pride in the fact that we know all of our students - you're far more than just a matriculation number to us. We have a thriving postgraduate department with regular seminars and guest speakers.

How you will be taught

We know how important it is to be at the leading edge of computing and so you will learn from research-active staff in the School of Computing. Leading researchers teach you and small class sizes mean that they really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

What you will study

You study three taught modules, during the period January-March, making your module selections with your advisor, as follows:
Computing Research Frontiers
One of: Designing Innovative Research OR Research Methods
One of: Human Computer Interaction OR Multi-agent Systems and Grid Computing

Subject to examination performance, you then progress to the individual research project which runs from May to December. You will be based with one of the research groups within the School of Computing:

Assistive & healthcare technologies
Computational systems
Interactive systems design
Space technology centre

How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Careers

Our students are highly employable:
They develop the expertise that employers want from computing graduates - our Industrial Advisory Board includes experts from a range of industries including Amazon, Scottish Enterprise Tayside, NCR, Chevron and Microsoft
They are prepared for a wide range of good career prospects in computing - the UK faces a massive shortage of graduates qualified to fill the 120,000 new jobs in computing and IT every year

Graduates may also choose to continue to a PhD in the School of Computing or elsewhere.

Computing at the University of Dundee is ranked 21st in the UK according to most recent Times Good University Guide and 12th in the UK according to the Guardian University League Table 2009. The University of Dundee has powered its way to a position as one of Scotland's leading universities with an international reputation for excellence across a range of activities. With over 18,000 students, it is growing fast in both size and reputation. It has performed extremely well in both teaching and research assessment exercises, has spawned a range of spin-out companies to exploit its research and has a model wider-access programme.

Dundee has been described as the largest village in Scotland which gives an indication of how friendly and compact it is. With a population of 150,000 it is not too large but has virtually all the cultural and leisure activities you would expect in a much larger city. It is situated beside a broad estuary of the river Tay, surrounded by hills and farmland, and for lovers of the great outdoors it is hard to imagine another UK location that offers so much all year round on land and water. The University is situated in the centre of Dundee, and everything needed is on the one-stop campus: study facilities, help, advice, leisure activities... yet the attractions of the city centre and the cultural quarter are just a stroll away.

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Our Computing PGCE is designed to allow computing professionals and graduates to become inspiring secondary school teachers. The course emphasises learning through critical reflection on theory, practice and discussion with colleagues. Read more

Our Computing PGCE is designed to allow computing professionals and graduates to become inspiring secondary school teachers. The course emphasises learning through critical reflection on theory, practice and discussion with colleagues. The course covers topics such as how pupils learn, how assessment can improve learning and teaching, how to plan and deliver outstanding lessons.

Key benefits

  • Our course, judged Outstanding by Ofsted, is taught by one of the strongest team of computer science education tutors in the country.
  • You have the opportunity to work with tutors who are actively engaged in research and development in computer science education.
  • King’s is home to Computing at School (CAS) which is at the forefront of developing computing subject knowledge amongst teachers across the Greater London Area. Trainees benefit from collaboration with CAS staff.

Description

The PGCE Computing is a full-time course that consists of four required modules and two blocks of teaching experience based in secondary schools within London and the South East. You will complete the course within ten months, studying September to June. You must take modules totalling 120 credits to meet the requirements of the qualification.

You’ll engage in education, pedagogy and professional studies sessions and curriculum workshops. These will take place in both university and school settings, and will develop your expertise in general educational and

professional issues, and subject pedagogy.

You’ll gain the skills and understanding to take up positions in schools as a teacher of your subject with the potential to contribute fully to the life of the school. The course carries the Accreditation of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Course purpose

Our programme is for computing/ICT specialists wishing to train to be teachers of pupils aged 11-18 in computing to GCSE level and computer science to A-level. It will lead to the Department for Education's (HM Government) Standards for QTS which are assessed through teaching practice observation, portfolios and written assignments.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

You can typically expect:

  • the equivalent of over 50 days of academic sessions at King’s (typically three hours in the morning and/or afternoon spread throughout the academic year)
  • approximately 120 days of teaching placement.* This includes a short period of placement in primary schools (typically four days)
  • a number of one to one tutorials totaling five to seven sessions across the year
  • two visits from a tutor whilst on placement to observe lessons and monitor progress
  • regular** meetings with a mentor, who will be a member of staff at your placement school, whilst on placement
  • written feedback on all credit-bearing assignments within four weeks of the deadline.

*This 120 day figure represents the standard number of placement days. In certain cases, following assessment by course tutors and mentors, students may be required to undertake a greater number of placement days to demonstrate their ability to meet the Teacher Standards.

**Typically each trainee will have a meeting with their mentor during each week they are on placement. In certain circumstances the frequency may vary.

The types of learning commitment encompassed within the course vary depending on modules. For this course one credit represents the equivalent of 10 hours of learning and engagement.

Assessment

  • The 45-credit honours-level module will be assessed by a combination of a written portfolio (equivalent to 8,000 words) and assessment of your teaching practice against the Teaching Standards as set out by the government’s Department for Education. Progress in meeting the teaching standards will be monitored through three progress reports that will be completed by staff at the placement school.
  • The 30-credit master’s-level modules will each be assessed by a written assignment of 6,000 words heavily based on in-school research that trainees undertakes.
  • The 15-credit honours-level module will be assessed by an assignment focusing on data collection methods in the school environment.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect.

Location

Students undertake placements in secondary schools that work in partnership with King’s College London. Partnership schools are located across central London and the Greater London area. Whilst every effort is made to place PGCE trainees in local schools, due to the changing nature of initial teacher education and limited availability of placements in certain subject areas, trainees should be prepared to travel to their placement schools throughout the Greater London area and beyond.

Students also organise their own short placement at a state primary school. Further information on this short placement is provided in the offer holder pack and during the course

School direct Route: Students undertake teaching placements in secondary schools selected by their Lead School. Whilst every effort is made to place PGCE trainees in local schools, due to the changing nature of initial teacher education and limited availability of placements in certain subject areas, trainees should be prepared to travel to their placement schools throughout the Greater London area and beyond.

Career prospects

The majority of trainees go into teaching or other areas of education; many become heads of departments or members of senior management teams; some take up careers in educational administration in the advisory or inspection services.



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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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This Masters in Bioinformatics (formerly Bioinformatics, Polyomics and Systems Biology) is an exciting and innovative programme that has recently been revamped. Read more

This Masters in Bioinformatics (formerly Bioinformatics, Polyomics and Systems Biology) is an exciting and innovative programme that has recently been revamped. Bioinformatics is a discipline at the interface between biology, computing and statistics and is used in organismal biology, molecular biology and biomedicine. This programme focuses on using computers to glean new insights from DNA, RNA and protein sequence data and related data at the molecular level through data storage, mining, analysis and graphical presentation - all of which form a core part of modern biology.

Why this programme

  • Our programme emphasises understanding core principles in practical bioinformatics and functional genomics, and then implementing that understanding in a series of practical elective courses in semester 2 and in a summer research project.
  • You will benefit from being taught by scientists at the cutting edge of their field and you will get intensive, hands-on experience in an active research lab during the summer research project.
  • Bioinformatics and the 'omics' technologies have evolved to play a fundamental role in almost all areas of biology and biomedicine.
  • Advanced biocomputing skills are now deemed essential for many PhD studentships/projects in molecular bioscience and biomedicine, and are of increasing importance for many other such projects.
  • The semester 2 courses are built around real research scenarios, enabling you not only to gain practical experience of working with large molecular datasets, but also to see why each scenario uses the particular approaches it does and how to go about organising and implementing appropriate analysis pipelines.
  • You will be based in the College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences, an ideal environment in which to train in bioinformatics. Our College has carried out internationally-leading research in functional genomics and systems biology.
  • Some of the teaching and research scenarios you’ll be exposed to reflect the activities of 'Glasgow Polyomics', a world-class omics facility set up within the university in 2012 to provide research services using microarray, proteomics, metabolomics and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Its' scientists have pioneered the 'polyomics' approach, in which new insights come from the integration of data across different omics levels.
  • In addition, we have several world-renowned research centres at the University, such as the Wellcome Centre for Molecular Parasitology, the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research and the Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, whose scientists do ground-breaking research employing bioinformatic approaches in the study of disease.
  • You will learn computer programming in courses run by staff in the internationally reputed School of Computing Science, in conjunction with their MSc in Information Technology.

Programme structure

Bioinformatics helps biologists gain new insights about genomes (genomics) and genes, about RNA expression products of genes (transcriptomics) and about proteins (proteomics); rapid advances have also been made in the study of cellular metabolites (metabolomics) and in a newer area, systems biology.

‘Polyomics’ is an intrinsically systems-level approach involving the integration of data from these ‘functional genomics’ areas - genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics - to derive new insights about how biological systems function.

The programme structure is designed to equip students with understanding and hands-on experience of both computing and biological research practices relating to bioinformatics and functional genomics, to show students how the computing approaches and biological questions they are being used to answer are connected, and to give students an insight into new approaches for integration of data and analysis across the 'omics' domains.

On this programme, you will develop a range of computing and programming skills, as well as skills in data handling, analysis (including statistics) and interpretation, and you will be brought up to date with recent advances in biological science that have been informed by bioinformatics approaches.

The programme has the following overall structure

  • core material of 60 credits in semester 1, made up of 10, 15 and 20 credit courses.
  • optional material of 60 credits in semester 2: students select 4 courses (two 10 credit courses and two 20 credit courses) from those available.
  • Project of 60 credits over 14 weeks embedded in a research group over the summer.

Additional information about the programme can be found in the Bioinformatics MSc Programme Structure 2017-18.

Please note: students undertaking the three month PgCert will also be required to take two exams in March/April.

Career prospects

Most of our graduates embark on a University or Institute-based research career path, here in the UK or abroad, using the skills they've acquired on our programme. These skills are now of primary relevance in many areas of modern biology and biomedicine. Many are successful in getting a PhD studentship. Others are employed as a core bioinformatician (now a career path within academia in its own right) or as a research assistant in a research group in basic biological or medical science.

A postgraduate degree in bioinformatics is also valued by many employers in the life sciences sector - eg computing biology jobs in biotechnology, biosciences, neuroinformatics and the pharma industries.

Some of our graduates have entered science-related careers in scientific publishing or education. Others have gone into computing-related jobs in non-bioscience industry or the public sector.



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The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Read more
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Covering topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques, it produces graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well-equipped to proceed to doctoral research or directly into employment in industry, the professions, and the public service. It also provides training for the academic researchers and teachers of the future, encouraging the pursuit of research in computational methods for science and technology disciplines, thus being an important gateway for entering PhD programmes containing a substantial component of computational modelling.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpscm

Course detail

The MPhil in Scientific Computing has a research and a taught element. The research element is a project on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. The taught element comprises of core lecture courses on topics of scientific computing and elective lecture courses relevant to the science or technology topic of the project. Most of the projects are expected to make use of the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

The students will attend lecture courses during Michaelmas Term (some courses may be during Lent Term) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for continuation to a PhD programme or employment, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners who are working with the participating Departments and may be sponsoring the research project.

There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively.

Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments on the core courses 25%; written examinations on the elective courses 25%.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project.

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core lectures are on topics of high performance scientific computing numerical analysis and advanced numerical methods and techniques. They are organized by the Centre for Scientific Computing and are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their dissertation and for their general education in scientific computing.

In particular, their objective is to introduce students to the simulation science pipeline of problem identification, modelling, simulation and evaluation - all from the perspective of employing high-performance computing. Numerical discretisation of mathematical models will be a priority, with a specific emphasis on understanding the trade-offs (in terms of modelling time, pre-processing time, computational time, and post-processing time) that must be made when solving realistic science and engineering problems. Understanding and working with computational methods and parallel computing will be a high priority. To help the students understand the material, the lecturers will furnish the courses with practical coursework assignments.

The lectures on topics of numerical analysis and HPC are complemented with hands-on practicals using Linux-based laptops provided by the course (students may bring their own), as well as on the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

Appropriate elective lecture courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor. While every effort is made within the Departments to arrange the timetable in a coherent fashion, it is inevitable that some combinations of courses will be ruled out by their schedule, particularly if the choices span more than one department.

Continuing

For continuation to a PhD programme in Scientific Computing, students are required to gain a Distinction (overall grade equal or greater than 75%).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MSc in Computing is perfect for students looking to develop upon their previous computing-based qualifications from courses such as Computing, Information Technology, Information Systems, Software Engineering or related disciplines. Read more
The MSc in Computing is perfect for students looking to develop upon their previous computing-based qualifications from courses such as Computing, Information Technology, Information Systems, Software Engineering or related disciplines. This course provides the opportunity and guidance necessary for students to build upon their existing knowledge and gain the skills necessary to succeed in both commercial computing and research.

Why study MSc Computing at Dundee?

This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of computing and software development to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research.

"The intersection of business models and IT requires people with varied experience, professional versatility, multidiscipline knowledge and technology understanding – a hybrid professional, in other words."
Diane Morello, Vice President and Gartner Fellow, Gartner Inc, 2008

What's so good about MSc Computing at Dundee?

This course is highly flexible, adapting to your skill level to create a programme tailored to suit you. We encourage a professional, inter-disciplinary and user-centred approach to software design and production, and will enable you to develop the skills so that you can undertake a major software development project.

In keeping with our theme of flexibility, this course offers its students a wide choice of individual projects to choose from.

Our facilities

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

How you will be taught

We know how important it is to be at the leading edge of computing and so you will learn from research-active staff in the School of Computing. Leading researchers teach you and small class sizes mean that they really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

Industrial collaboration is part of our ethos too, so we regularly include guest experts from industry.

What you will study

You select six taught modules, three per semester, during the period September-April. You will make module selections with your advisor, and this will be partially dictated by your background and previous study.

The typical list for students with limited computing background is shown *. Any module which has a significant overlap with your previous education will be disallowed, for students with a computing-related degree this will usually include most of the modules shown +.

The six taught modules will be chosen from topics such as the following:

Software Development+
Technology Innovation Management
Computer Vision
Computer Graphics
Computing the User Experience
Big Data Analysis
Database Systems
Secure Internet Programming
Software Engineering+
Agile Engineering
Computing Research Frontiers
Research Methods
Human Computer Interaction and Usability Engineering


Subject to examination performance, you then progress to the MSc project which runs from May to September, or to a Diploma project lasting 9 weeks.

Please note that some of the modules in the programme are shared with other masters programmes and some of the teaching and resources may be shared with our BSc programme. These joint classes offer a valuable opportunity to learn from, and discuss the material with, other groups of students with different backgrounds and perspectives.

How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Coursework is often very practical, eg writing computer programs, designing interfaces, writing reports, constructing web sites, testing software, implementing databases, analysing problems or presenting solutions to clients.

Careers

Career opportunities in software development, website design, network support, database development and research, working as computer systems manager, data processing manager, software engineer, computer analyst & programmer, computer & IT consultant.

Our students are highly employable:
They develop the expertise that employers want from computing graduates - our Industrial Advisory Board includes experts from a range of industries including Amazon, Scottish Enterprise Tayside, NCR, Chevron and Microsoft
They are prepared for a wide range of good career prospects in computing - the UK faces a massive shortage of graduates qualified to fill the 120,000 new jobs in computing and IT every year

Computing at the University of Dundee is ranked 21st in the UK according to most recent Times Good University Guide and 12th in the UK according to the Guardian University League Table 2009. The University of Dundee has powered its way to a position as one of Scotland's leading universities with an international reputation for excellence across a range of activities. With over 18,000 students, it is growing fast in both size and reputation. It has performed extremely well in both teaching and research assessment exercises, has spawned a range of spin-out companies to exploit its research and has a model wider-access programme.

Dundee has been described as the largest village in Scotland which gives an indication of how friendly and compact it is. With a population of 150,000 it is not too large but has virtually all the cultural and leisure activities you would expect in a much larger city. It is situated beside a broad estuary of the river Tay, surrounded by hills and farmland, and for lovers of the great outdoors it is hard to imagine another UK location that offers so much all year round on land and water. The University is situated in the centre of Dundee, and everything needed is on the one-stop campus: study facilities, help, advice, leisure activities... yet the attractions of the city centre and the cultural quarter are just a stroll away.

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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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Taking heritage management into the 21st century. Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education. Read more
Taking heritage management into the 21st century

Why choose this course?

Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education.

It draws on the Archaeology department’s strengths in both Archaeological Information Sciences and Cultural Heritage Management – offering a unique qualification that combines the theoretical and ground-level study of heritage management with practical training in new technologies, from database systems and virtual-reality modelling to social media platforms.

You will be working with a team of technology pioneers and computing scholars, who lead the field in researching and developing interpretative content and digital applications for the heritage sector worldwide.
• Gain practical experience in new and mobile technologies used to publish, archive, analyse, visualise and interpret archaeological information.
• Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
• Develop essential IT knowledge and skills required in heritage-sector careers.
• Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The course draws on the skills and expertise of leading scholars in heritage management, interpretation and digital media, alongside staff from the Archaeology Data Service, which has been the UK digital archive for heritage data since 1997. It also has strong links with museums and other cultural heritage institutions in York, and work placements are a key feature of the programme.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Explore how digital technologies are used to present and curate heritage information.
• Gain experience of using the digital and internet technologies in disseminating, publishing and archiving heritage information.
• Develop your practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other heritage analysis and visualisation technologies.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Digital Heritage course is designed for people seeking professional training in digital archiving, visualisation, museums and heritage sector curation, interpretation, and education. It is ideally suited for graduates of Archaeology, History, Art History, Museum Studies, Education, Anthropology, Cultural Studies and related fields, and for candidates with proven IT experience.

What can it lead to?

The skills developed on this course lead graduates into careers in archaeological computing, archive management, education, marketing and IT services for commercial organisations, museums and the public sector. Equally, the course can be a stepping stone to further research at doctoral level.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, offering you the chance to apply your digital skillset in a professional or academic setting.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the heritage sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the heritage sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual-reality modelling).

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other work providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

Graduates of the MSc in Digital Heritage will be well equipped to work in IT-related roles in heritage management or presentation, in museums and education, and with a range of other heritage organisations.

By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research in the field of digital heritage;
-Critically evaluate claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem;
-Locate and use relevant information on the internet and add materials to it;
-Create an electronic text;
-Design and implement a simple relational database;
-Create effective applications in CAD and VR;
-Evaluate the cultural significance of sites, places and artefacts;
-Recognise areas of potential conflict in heritage management and museum practice;
-Evaluate the implications of stakeholder values and interests for heritage management and heritage interpretation/education;
-Appraise the utility of interpretative and educational media both on site and in museums.

The course opens the door to a wide range of careers in heritage-related organisations and in many other sectors, including:
-Archive management
-Museum curation
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. Read more
Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. In Neuroscience it is being increasingly used to study the physiological correlates of mental processes. In Clinical practice it plays a prominent role in the detection and diagnosis of neurological and psychiatric illnesses and in the evaluation of new treatments. The techniques are getting increasingly sophisticated and as a result there is a high demand for well-trained professionals.

Our Neuroimaging MSc is one of only a few programmes dealing with modern neuroimaging in the UK. It is exceptional in its focus on practical and biomedical aspects of Neuroimaging. The success of the program is reflected in the success of our students with 60% either in further higher education, or fully employed in the first year after degree completion. This figure rises to 100% within 3 years of the degree.

The Neuroimaging MSc is designed to provide students with the background knowledge and technical skills to design, analyze and evaluate imaging data. The Neuroimaging MSc focuses on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based techniques, including functional MRI, anatomical imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, and Spectroscopy. Imaging techniques will be discussed with reference to relevant applications. The programme puts a strong emphasis on practical skills. In a dedicated computer lab, the students will learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Under supervision of our world-class academic staff, students will design their own imaging based studies, which will be run using the in-house 3T MRI scanner. Additional classes will provide students with a broad scope of professional skills.

The Neuroimaging MSc is especially suited for:
students interested in pursuing an Academic career in the field of Neuroimaging;
students looking to find a job as research staff in industry or academic labs involved in translational research;
medical professional, looking to develop skills in a new emergent technology and research field;
students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science who want to move into cognitive or clinical neuroscience;
students with a background in psychology or biology who want to improve your technical skills for a neuroscience career.

Content
The core of the Neuroimaging MSc consists of two modules on Neuroimaging. The first module concentrates on methodological aspects. It includes an introduction to the physics of MR imaging, the physiological basis of functional signals, processing and analysis of imaging data and the design of research studies. The second module provides an in-depth introduction to a number of specialized imaging techniques used to understand the biology of brain function in health and disease. The latter module aims to illustrate the use of imaging in the context of translational and clinical studies of disease processes affecting the human brain.

Both modules combine formal lectures, and computer-based laboratories, in which students learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Weekly practical labs and programming classes are held in a dedicated computer laboratory available to all students. The work done in the lab sections constitute 50% of the grade in first module, and 30% of the grade in the second module. The latter also includes student-led discussion of published scientific and clinical research.

In the weekly Bangor Imaging Group (BIG) meeting, academic staffs, postdocs and students discuss current research. All MSc and PhD students propose their research here.

Additional optional modules provide an in-depth view of several content areas of cognitive and clinical neuroscience (see below). Students are also welcome to attend weekly review of clinical scans performed at the local hospital for the purpose of patient recruitment and a monthly neuroradiology conference where cases of clinical interest are discussed. Journal-clubs and research meetings concerning fMRI, EEG, and TMS methodologies are open to all students.

Students are also required to take at least one additional module in advanced statistics or advanced computing. The module Communicating Research completes the curriculum by training students in a broad scope of professional skills.

The Bangor Imaging Unit houses a state-of-the-art 3T MRI machine, available for student projects. Setups for the measurement of eye-movement, arm and hand movement, and physiological parameters are also available.

In the beginning of the year you will choose your academic supervisor. The supervisor will be responsible for helping you plan, design and draft your research thesis. From your project proposal you will review the relevant literature, and formally outline your study. In the weekly Bangor-Imaging Group meeting we learn about and discuss proposed, ongoing and completed studies and important new publications in the field. Moreover, all MSc and PhD students present their proposed plan of research in this forum. Thus, you are tightly integrated into the research environment at the Bangor Imaging Unit, and profit from interactions with older PhD students, post-docs, and other supervisors. Your final research project is conducted over the summer months, most likely using the in-house, research-dedicated 3T MRI scanner. The course ends with the successful submission of your research thesis.

Structure
The Neuroimaging MSc consists of two parts. Part one comprises taught modules over two semesters. You are required to take the two core modules in Neuroimaging, which include a large component of laboratory work. You will also choose two 'content' modules, each designed to provide knowledge and promote understanding in a specific core area of neuroscience. You also take three 'skills' modules designed to hone your research skills. In addition, you will partner with one of the academic faculty in order to jointly develop a research proposal for your thesis. On successful completion of Part One, you'll proceed to Part Two (in the third semester), when you will carry out your research study and write your thesis.

Research Thesis
The thesis is the 'crown' of the Neuroimaging MSc and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others.
Career Prospects

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Learn how to share your enthusiasm for computing to inspire the next generation of students. This course enables you to gain qualified teacher status (QTS) with a subject specialism in secondary computing, enabling you to teach in secondary schools and post-16 colleges. Read more

Learn how to share your enthusiasm for computing to inspire the next generation of students. This course enables you to gain qualified teacher status (QTS) with a subject specialism in secondary computing, enabling you to teach in secondary schools and post-16 colleges.

Computing teachers are in high demand, so the job prospects on qualification are excellent. As computing is a priority subject, you could be eligible for a tax free bursary of up to £25,000.

On the course you develop the skills, knowledge and understanding to teach pupils of all abilities by

  • enhancing your subject knowledge and skills
  • developing an understanding of the different pedagogical methods required to be an effective computing teacher
  • learning to use relevant literature, research and educational theories relating to teaching computing and the wider curriculum
  • using a variety of techniques to assess and monitor pupil progress
  • learning about the ways schools and the education system function
  • understanding different techniques and approaches to classroom and behaviour management
  • learning how to plan effective lessons and develop resources which will enable all students to engage with your lessons
  • learning about the wider role of teachers in school
  • applying your skills and knowledge in a school setting
  • developing your evaluation and reflection skills
  • meeting QTS standard for teaching.

You complete two periods of school-based training in 11–16 or 11–18 settings. This allows you to experience the full progression through at least two key stages. In total you spend around 120 days on school-based training.

While on placement you benefit from excellent support and mentoring from a university-trained mentor as well as continued support from your university based tutor. Many students also manage to secure positions in the schools they have trained in.

All of our practical sessions take place in a purpose built computing classroom, which replicates the teaching environment typically found in schools.

During the course, you complete either the PGCE or the professional graduate certificate in education (ProfGCE). Both qualifications will earn you QTS but the PGCE also gives you 60 masters level credits, which you can use towards a masters degree.

By the end of the placements you are able to show how you meet the qualified teacher status standards that are required by this course.

Many of the mentors at our partnership schools have strong connections with the University, a number of them having studied here themselves. Many are also active in the local community of computing teachers to which all students on the course are invited, thus boosting opportunities for networking and understanding current issues in computer teaching.

Expert university based tutor

Our university based tutor has considerable teaching experience in schools and maintains classroom practice via the delivery of outreach sessions in partnership schools. This tutor has held positions as assistant head, as well as head of department and mentoring his own PGCE students. This classroom experience brings a great deal of reality into teaching sessions.

School Direct

Apply for a place through the School Direct scheme for a dedicated route into a job after graduation. During School Direct, the school or partnership of schools that you've applied to will be much more involved in your selection, recruitment and professional development as there is the expectation that you will be employed by them once qualified.

For more information visit our School Direct page

Course structure

Modules:

  • developing and reflecting on professional practice in secondary computing
  • learning and teaching in context in computing
  • block placement 1
  • block placement 2

We support your work in schools with a programme of preparation and support. You experience various school placements, including at least two continuous blocks of time on teaching practice. These are in two different schools and usually require some travelling within the region.

Assessment

  • academic assignments including practice based essays
  • individual and group work
  • presentations and reports
  • preparing teaching materials and plans
  • teaching practice

Employability

We have an excellent graduate employment record. One hundred per cent of last year's PGCE graduates are teaching. The government is currently interested in increasing computer science in schools, so qualified computing teachers are in demand and there is a shortage of teachers to cover this area.



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All part-time students must register for the PG Diploma in the first instance. MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education. The MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education programme aims to challenge your thinking and develop your practice as a surgical educator. Read more
All part-time students must register for the PG Diploma in the first instance

MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education

The MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education programme aims to challenge your thinking and develop your practice as a surgical educator. The programme offers a sound theoretical background to the principles of surgical education, an introduction to educational research methods, and the opportunity for intellectual growth and development within a stimulating and supportive environment. Its face-to-face nature enables dynamic discussion amongst your peers and tutors and fosters a community atmosphere from which to collaborate and develop your educational interests.

Programme structure
The PG Diploma consists of Modules 1-7, is available in part-time study mode only, and is delivered over a ten-month period.

The MEd qualification consists of eight modules (Modules 1-8), completed in full or part-time study mode.

The programme comprises five core modules (Modules 1-5) each consisting of one week intensive contact teaching time with further private study required to complete module preparation, coursework and assessment.

The modules consist of:

Module 1 - Policy and context of surgical education (mid October)
Module 2 - Introduction to learning and teaching (late November)
Module 3 - Introduction to assessment and appraisal (mid January)
Module 4 - Introduction to simulation and technology enhanced learning (late February)
Module 5 - Theory and practice of learning, teaching and assessment (late March)

Modules 1-5 are assessed by extended writing. Module coursework can be done in a range of formats but is typically carried out in small groups, often during the module.

Module 6a/b - Surgical Education Specialty Stream and Design Project: Selected at the beginning of the course this module provides an opportunity for students to study an area of interest at greater depth. The module includes individual study, three days face-to-face teaching (mid May 2017), and assessment.

Module 7 - Reflection for Surgical Education Project: Spans the PG Diploma stage and draws on learning across the modules to produce a reflective portfolio on teaching and learning.

Those continuing on to the MEd, or doing the MEd in full-time study mode, will also complete:

Module 8a/b - Research methods (8a) and educational research project (8b): Comprises a taught educational research methods element (8a) and conducting an individually supervised research project, written up as a dissertation (8b).

Part-time MEd students complete Module 8 during year-two of the course (e.g. in November).

Entry requirements

Minimum academic requirement:
Normally a 2.1 UK honours degree in a science, engineering, computing, healthcare or education subject plus basic computing experience. We also accept international qualifications of an equivalent standard. For guidance see our Country Index.
Additional requirements
Normally three years’ relevant experience in a healthcare field and/or relevant teaching/education development and research experience are necessary to take full advantage of this challenging programme.

English language requirements
All candidates must demonstrate English language proficiency for admission to Imperial College. Standards of proficiency are available on the College website.

Is this programme for you?
This programme is designed to: produce graduates equipped to further careers in healthcare and surgery –related education;

Our graduates are positioned to take increasing educational responsibility in Universities, Trusts and professional bodies.

Career prospects
We anticipate that graduates of this programme will be well placed to advance their careers in a range of directions. Many are likely to be fairly senior in their ‘first’ profession; for this group the programmes will represent professionalisation for their existing role. Participants are likely to be seeking career advancement through possession of an appropriate degree at Masters level for careers in royal colleges, NHS trusts (or their national equivalents) and in universities, for example in academic departments of surgery.

Key benefits

The PG Dipoma and MEd programmes in Surgical Education aim to challenge your thinking about surgical education. They embrace surgical education’s interdisciplinary nature by engaging, not only clinical educators, but also scholars from the social sciences, humanities and craft professions to illuminate teaching and learning in surgery. The PG Dip programme develops new areas of teaching to reflect contemporary research and scholarship, and ensures that the themes of surgery and education are always linked.

The MEd component provides the opportunity to learn research skills and carry out a research project under supervision.



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Industry and commerce have an increasing need for IT-enabled decision makers and business-aware IT professionals. This postgraduate degree is designed to meet that need. Read more
Industry and commerce have an increasing need for IT-enabled decision makers and business-aware IT professionals. This postgraduate degree is designed to meet that need. The degree aims to give students a firm grounding in the knowledge, skills and understanding of computing, software development with a user-centric approach and the global business environment.

Why study MSc Computing with International Business at Dundee?

The MSc in Computing with International Business offers students a practical mix of technical computing modules such as internet programming and software development and business modules like economics for business managers and international business strategy.

At the University of Dundee we have a flexible approach to Computing with International Business. This course can be tailored to suit students with a strong computing background or those with less experience seeking to develop their skills while simultaneously developing their business acumen.

We encourage a professional, inter-disciplinary and user-centred approach to software design and production, and enable you to develop research skills so that you can undertake a major software development project.

What's great about Computing with International Business at Dundee?

International Business at the University of Dundee is well known abroad and as a result, there is a strong multicultural aspect in these classes. Students from countries all over the world like India, China Nigeria and more come here to study giving you the opportunity to work alongside people with a multitude of different ideas, skills and experiences.

The University of Dundee is at the leading edge of computing giving you the opportunity to take advantage of tutelage from leading researchers in an informal and supportive environment.

Your studies will take place in the Queen Mother Building, the University of Dundee’s award-winning epicentre of computing, which boasts an array of conventional and specialised equipment.

The start date is September each year. The MSc course lasts for 12 months and the PGDip lasts for 9 months.

- Degree Combinations
Computing with International Business with Work Placement MSc

How you will be taught

We know how important it is to be at the leading edge and so you will learn from research-active staff. Leading researchers teach you and small class sizes mean that they really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

Industrial collaboration is part of our ethos too, so we regularly include guest experts from industry.

What you will study

You select six taught modules, three per semester, during the period September-April. You make module selections with your advisor, and this will be partially dictated by your background and previous study, plus any timetabling restrictions.

The typical list for students with limited computing background is shown *. Any module which has a significant overlap with your previous education will be disallowed, for students with a computing-related degree this will usually include most of the modules shown +.

Four Computing modules from:

Software Development+
Technology Innovation Management
Computer Vision
Computer Graphics
Computing the User Experience
Big Data Analysis
Database Systems
Secure Internet Programming
Software Engineering+
Agile Engineering
Computing Research Frontiers
Research Methods
Human Computer Interaction and Usability Engineering

Two Business modules from:

Corporate Finance
Performance Management and Reporting
Operations Management and Change
Business Accounting for Non-specialists
Principles of Marketing Practice
International Business Strategy
Global Marketing
Human Resource Management Strategies
Marketing Management and Strategy
Strategic Management Accounting
International Human Resource Management

Subject to examination performance, you then progress to the MSc project which runs from May to September, or to a Diploma project lasting 9 weeks.

Please note that some of the modules in the programme are shared with other masters programmes and some of the teaching and resources may be shared with our BSc programme. These joint classes offer a valuable opportunity to learn from, and discuss the material with, other groups of students with different backgrounds and perspectives.

How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Coursework is often very practical, eg writing computer programs, designing interfaces, writing reports, constructing web sites, testing software, implementing databases, analysing problems or presenting solutions to clients.

Careers

Career opportunities in software development, website design, network support, database development and research, working as computer systems manager, data processing manager, software engineer, computer analyst & programmer, computer & IT consultant.

Our students are highly employable:
They develop the expertise that employers want from computing graduates - our Industrial Advisory Board includes experts from a range of industries including Amazon, Scottish Enterprise Tayside, NCR, Chevron and Microsoft

They are prepared for a wide range of good career prospects in computing - the UK faces a massive shortage of graduates qualified to fill the 120,000 new jobs in computing and IT every year

Computing at the University of Dundee is ranked 21st in the UK according to most recent Times Good University Guide and 12th in the UK according to the Guardian University League Table 2009. The University of Dundee has powered its way to a position as one of Scotland's leading universities with an international reputation for excellence across a range of activities. With over 18,000 students, it is growing fast in both size and reputation. It has performed extremely well in both teaching and research assessment exercises, has spawned a range of spin-out companies to exploit its research and has a model wider-access programme.

With a population of 150,000 Dundee is not too large but has virtually all the cultural and leisure activities you would expect in a much larger city. It is situated beside a broad estuary of the river Tay, surrounded by hills and farmland, and for lovers of the great outdoors it is hard to imagine another UK location that offers so much all year round on land and water. The University is situated in the centre of Dundee, and everything needed is on the one-stop campus: study facilities, help, advice, leisure activities... yet the attractions of the city centre and the cultural quarter are just a stroll away.

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