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Masters Degrees (Computational Physics)

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Doctorate study in Computational Physics is an opportunity to engage in rigorous scholarly pursuit, and to contribute original research to a body of academia. Read more
Doctorate study in Computational Physics is an opportunity to engage in rigorous scholarly pursuit, and to contribute original research to a body of academia.

At the School of Mathematics and Physics, you will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge of computational physics, while developing your research skills and working with specialists. Computational Physics is a fundamental area of study that underpins a vast array of topics. During your research, you may have the opportunity to develop national and international collaborations.

Research in Computational Physics covers a broad spectrum, including the distinct areas of nanostructured soft matter, active matter, materials science and molecular biophysics. You benefit from dedicated academic supervisors, in-depth training programmes and specialist computational facilities.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Main Research Areas:
-Nanostructured Soft Matter
-Active Matter
-Materials Science
-Molecular Biophysics

For detailed information about the School’s research activity please visit: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/smp/research/

How You Study

You can benefit from specialist computational facilities, training programmes to enhance your research skills and support from dedicated academic supervisors. You will be supported and encouraged to submit papers to international scientific journals, present your findings at conferences and share knowledge with colleagues across the University.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic.

Career and Personal Development

This research programme is designed to allow you to expand your knowledge and expertise in an area of specific interest. It provides the opportunity to develop an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers across the broad spectrum of computational physics-related industries and in academia.

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At the School of Mathematics and Physics, you will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge of computational physics, while developing your research skills and working alongside specialists. Read more
At the School of Mathematics and Physics, you will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge of computational physics, while developing your research skills and working alongside specialists.

Computational Physics is a fundamental area of study that underpins a vast array of topics. During your research, you will have the opportunity to work with specialists in the field and may have the chance to develop strong national and international collaborations.

Research in Computational Physics covers a broad spectrum, including the distinct areas of nanostructured soft matter, active matter, materials science and molecular biophysics. You benefit from dedicated academic supervisors, in-depth training programmes and specialist computational facilities.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research Areas:
-Nanostructured Soft Matter
-Active Matter
-Materials Science
-Molecular Biophysics

How You Study

You can benefit from specialist computational facilities, training programmes to enhance your research skills and support from dedicated academic supervisors. You will be supported and encouraged to submit papers to international scientific journals, present your findings at conferences and share knowledge with colleagues across the University.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The MSc by Research involves writing a Master's thesis under the supervision of a member of academic staff on a topic to be agreed with your supervisor. The MSc by Research is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic.

Career and Personal Development

This research programme is designed to allow you to expand your knowledge and expertise in an area of specific interest. It seeks to provide an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers across the broad spectrum of computational physics-related industries and in academia.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computational Mechanics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has gained a significant international profile as one of the key international centres for research and training in computational mechanics and engineering. As a student on the Master's course in Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics, you will be provided with in-depth, multidisciplinary training in the application of the finite element method and related state-of-the-art numerical and computational techniques to the solution and simulation of highly challenging problems in engineering analysis and design.

Key Features of Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics MSc

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering is acknowledged internationally as the leading UK centre for computational engineering research. It represents an interdisciplinary group of researchers who are active in computational or applied mechanics. It is unrivalled concentration of knowledge and expertise in this field. Many numerical techniques currently in use in commercial simulation software have originated from Swansea University.

The Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course is a two-year postgraduate programme run by an international consortium of four leading European Universities, namely Swansea University, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Spain), École Centrale de Nantes (France) and University of Stuttgart (Germany) in cooperation with the International Centre for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE, Spain).

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will gain a general knowledge of the theory of computational mechanics, including the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, appreciate the worth of undertaking a computational simulation in an industrial context, and be provided with training in the development of new software for the improved simulation of current engineering problems.

In the first year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will follow an agreed common set of core modules leading to common examinations in Swansea or Barcelona. In addition, an industrial placement will take place during this year, where you will have the opportunity to be exposed to the use of computational mechanics within an industrial context. For the second year of the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics, you will move to one of the other Universities, depending upon your preferred specialisation, to complete a series of taught modules and the research thesis. There will be a wide choice of specialisation areas (i.e. fluids, structures, aerospace, biomedical) by incorporating modules from the four Universities. This allows you to experience postgraduate education in more than one European institution.

Modules

Modules on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study the following core modules (together with elective modules):

Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Continuum Mechanics
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Industrial Project
Finite Element Computational Analysis
Entrepreneurship for Engineers
Finite Element in Fluids
Computational Plasticity
Fluid-Structure Interaction
Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics and Transient Analysis
Reservoir Modelling and Simulation

Accreditation

The Erasmus Mundus Computational Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

See http://www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

This degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Links with Industry

On the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course, you will have the opportunity to apply your skills and knowledge in computational mechanics in an industrial context.

As a student on the Erasmus Mundus MSc Computational Mechanics course you will be placed in engineering industries, consultancies or research institutions that have an interest and expertise in computational mechanics. Typically, you will be trained by the relevant industry in the use of their in-house or commercial computational mechanics software.

You will also gain knowledge and expertise on the use of the particular range of commercial software used in the industry where you are placed.

Careers

The next decade will experience an explosive growth in the demand for accurate and reliable numerical simulation and optimisation of engineering systems.

Computational mechanics will become even more multidisciplinary than in the past and many technological tools will be, for instance, integrated to explore biological systems and submicron devices. This will have a major impact in our everyday lives.

Employment can be found in a broad range of engineering industries as this course provides the skills for the modelling, formulation, analysis and implementation of simulation tools for advanced engineering problems.



Student Quotes

“I gained immensely from the high quality coursework, extensive research support, confluence of cultures and unforgettable friendship.”

Prabhu Muthuganeisan, MSc Computational Mechanics

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics
Condensed Matter and Material Physics
Analytical Laser Spectroscopy
Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence
Lattice gauge theories, QCD
Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory
Field Theory in curved spacetime
Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Read more
The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Though it may be taken as a free-standing qualification, most students take this programme as a pathway to the MSc. This pathway forms the first year of a two-year programme with successful students (gaining a merit or distinction) progressing onto the MSc Physics in second year.

Key benefits

- King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.

- Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".

- The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".

- Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/physics-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Students will undertake a total of 120 credits, from the following modules:

- Mathematical Methods in Physics III
- Statistical Mechanics
- Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics
- Particle Physics
- Optics
- Solid State Physics
- General Relatvity and Cosmology
- Fundamentals of Biophysics and Nanotechnology
- Introduction to Medical Imaging
- Laboratory Physics II
- Computational Lab
- Nuclear Physics
- Quantum Mechanics for Physics I
- Mathematical methods in Physics
- Symmetry in Physics
- Electromagnetism
- Astrophysics

- Course purpose -

For students with an undergraduate degree or equivalent who wish to have the experience of one year in a leading UK Physics Department, or who may not be immediately eligible for entry to a higher degree in the UK and who wish to upgrade their degree. If you successfully complete this programme with a Merit or Distinction we may consider you for the MSc programme.

- Course format and assessment -

The compulsory modules are assessed via coursework. The majority of the other optional modules avaiable are assessed by written examinations.

Career prospects

Many students go on to do a higher Physics degree, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Particle Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Theoretical Particle Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of Theoretical Particle Physics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena. Read more
What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena.

With the expertise in basic research that you will gain in the programme, you can pursue a career in research. You will also acquire proficiency in the use of mathematical methods, IT tools and/or experimental equipment, as well as strong problem-solving and logical deduction skills. These will qualify you for a wide range of positions in the private sector.

After completing the programme, you will:
-Have wide-ranging knowledge of particle physics and/or astrophysical phenomena.
-Have good analytical, deductive and computational skills.
-Be able to apply theoretical, computational and/or experimental methods to the analysis and understanding of various phenomena.
-Be able to generalize your knowledge of particle physics and astrophysical phenomena as well as identify their interconnections.
-Be able to formulate hypotheses and test them based your knowledge.

The teaching in particle physics and astrophysical sciences is largely based on the basic research. Basic research conducted at the University of Helsinki has received top ratings in international university rankings. The in-depth learning offered by international research groups will form a solid foundation for your lifelong learning.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The understanding of the microscopic structure of matter, astronomical phenomena and the dynamics of the universe is at the forefront of basic research today. The advancement of such research in the future will require increasingly sophisticated theoretical, computational and experimental methods.

The study track in elementary particle physics and cosmology focuses on experimental or theoretical particle physics or cosmology. The theories that form our current understanding of these issues must be continuously re-evaluated in the light of new experimental results. In addition to analytical computation skills, this requires thorough mastery of numerical analysis methods. In experimental particle physics, the main challenges pertain to the management and processing of continuously increasing amount of data.

The study track in astrophysical sciences focuses on observational or theoretical astronomy or space physics. Our understanding of space, ranging from near Earth space all the way to structure of the universe, is being continuously redefined because of improved experimental equipment located both in space and on the Earth’s surface. Several probes are also carrying out direct measurements of planets, moons and interplanetary plasma in our solar system. Another key discipline is theoretical astrophysics which, with the help of increasingly efficient supercomputers, enables us to create in-depth models of various phenomena in the universe in general and the field of space physics in particular. Finally, plasma physics is an important tool in both space physics and astronomy research.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme includes two study tracks:
-Particle physics and cosmology
-Astrophysical sciences

Courses in the programme have been compiled into modules. Both study tracks contain a mandatory core module that includes a research seminar. The study tracks are divided into specialisations that focus on astronomy, space physics, particle physics or cosmology. Courses typically include lectures, exercises, group work and research literature and end in examinations and/or final assignments. In addition, some studies can be completed as book examinations.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master’s programme is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be completed in two years. The degree consists of:
-90 credits of Master’s studies, including a Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-30 credits of other studies from the Master’s programme or other degree programmes.

In addition, your studies include a personal study plan as well as career orientation and planning. You might also take part in a traineeship, elective studies offered by the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, or studies offered by other degree programmes.

Career Prospects

A Master’s degree in elementary particle physics or astrophysical sciences provides you with excellent qualifications for postgraduate education in research or for a career in diverse positions both in Finland and abroad. As a Master’s graduate you could begin a career in research and development in industry as well as in universities and other research institutes that enable you to conduct independent research on a topic that interests you.

Potential employers and career opportunities include:
-Research institutes in Finland and abroad (basic scientific research).
-Universities and universities of applied sciences (teaching).
-Industry, particularly high technology companies (applied research and development, managerial duties).
-Software production, e.g., the game sector.
-Diverse planning and consulting positions.

Master’s graduates from equivalent study tracks under the previous degree system have embarked on careers in:
-Research and teaching positions in Finnish universities and research institutes.
-Research and teaching positions abroad, for example at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research), ESA (the European Space Agency), ESO (the European Southern Observatory), and NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration).
-Administrative positions, for example at the Academy of Finland or the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation (Tekes).
-The business sector.

The strong theoretical and analytical skills you will acquire in the programme are in great demand in fields such as:
-Data analysis (industry, media companies, game companies, financing).
-Industrial research, development and consulting (at, e.g., Nokia, Ericsson, Apple, Sanoma, Spinverse, Supercell, Nielsen, Valo -Research and Trading, Planmeca, Reaktor, Comptel, and Goldman Sachs).

Internationalization

Our multilingual Master’s programme is highly international. The Department hosts a large number of international students and staff members. In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science provide many opportunities for international engagement:
-Student exchange at one of the destinations available through the Faculty or the University.
-International traineeships.
-English-language teaching offered by the Faculty.
-Master’s thesis project as a member of one of the international research groups operating under the programme.
-Cooperation with international students enrolled in the programme.
-International duties in subject-specific student organisations or the Student Union of the University of Helsinki.
-Language courses organised by the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki.

The Faculty of Science is a top research institute in its fields among European universities. Its partners include many leading international research institutes, such as the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

As a student at the Faculty of Science, you will have the opportunity to complete a research traineeship period at, for example, CERN in Geneva. By completing a traineeship at one of the internationally active research groups on campus you will be able to acquaint yourself and network with the international scientific community during your Master’s studies. The international student exchange programmes available at the University provide numerous opportunities to complete part of your degree at a university abroad.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Nanotechnology (Physics) enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

For MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) programme you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

This MSc by Research in Nanotechnology comes under the Nano-physics and the life sciences research area at Swansea. The fundamental understanding of the electronic, structural, chemical and optical properties of materials on the nano-scale is essential for advances in nanotechnology, in particular the development of new devices via the incorporation of novel materials. Advances in experimental physics underpin these developments via characterisation and quantification of quantum phenomena which dominate at these length scales.

The Nanotechnology research concentrates on two main areas: determining properties of materials (e.g., graphene) on the nano-scale using scanning probe based techniques; the development of imaging and laser based spectroscopic techniques to study biological samples (e.g., imaging of cellular components and bacteria).

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This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Read more
This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Students gain an understanding of scientific principles and practices that are used in hospitals, industries and research laboratories through lectures, problem-solving sessions, a research project and collaborative work.

Degree information

Students study the physics theory and practice that underpins modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical science. The programme covers the applications of both ionising and non-ionising radiation to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and disorder, and includes research project, workplace skills development and computational skills needed to apply this theory into practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma of eight modules (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Clinical Practice
-Medical Imaging (Ionising)
-Ultrasound in Medicine
-Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Biomedical Optics
-Research Project
-Professional Skills module
-Treatment with Ionising Radiation
-Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions & Dosimetry

Optional modules
-Biomedical Engineering
-Computing in Medicine
-Programme Foundations for Medical Image Analysis

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project within the broad area of Physics and Engineering in Medicine which culminates in a report up to 10,000 words, a poster and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, tutorials, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework and assignments, a research dissertation and an oral examination.

Careers

A large percentage of graduates from the MSc continue on to PhD study, often in one of the nine research groups within the department, as a reult of the skills and knowledge they acquire on the programme. Other graduates commence or resume training or employment within the heaalthcare sector in hospitals or industry, both within the UK and abroad.

Employability
Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the forefront of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students on this programme receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer. The department is also a collaborator in the nearby London Proton Therapy Centre, currently under construction.

Students have access to a wide range of workshop, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays, radiation dosimetry, and implant development.

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The MSc in Data-Intensive Physics has been designed to provide you with the skills and knowledge needed for a career in a range of areas including academic research as well technical, development and engineering positions in related scientific fields. Read more
The MSc in Data-Intensive Physics has been designed to provide you with the skills and knowledge needed for a career in a range of areas including academic research as well technical, development and engineering positions in related scientific fields. By combining data analysis and computational techniques with a core science discipline, the course is intended to satisfy the increasing demand for well-qualified postgraduates who are equipped with the expertise to respond to a range of challenges arising from this exciting field.

The course is delivered by members of our Data Innovation Research Institute, which was recently established to conduct research into the aspects of managing, analysing and interpreting massive volumes of textual and numerical information.

A key component of the course is a 3 month summer project, which will be based either in our School of Physics and Astronomy, or with one or more of our external partners. The project will focus on the application of modern data science methodologies to a problem in Astrophysics (such as star formation, galaxy formation or gravitational waves), providing the hands-on experience needed to succeed in the dynamic field of Data-Intensive Physics as well as wider aspects of data science.

Distinctive features

Central to the design of the course is the opportunity for you to acquire real research experience in connection with world-leading scientists, greatly enhancing your CV and prospects for employment or further study.

As well as providing a solid core in all the necessary elements of Data Science, the programme allows a choice of elective modules and project work that can be tailored to suit whatever specialism you are interested in, whether that be gravitational waves, star or galaxy formation or cosmology.

You’ll join a well-established and growing cohort of MSc students and be based in a dedicated teaching facility that encourage a “research group” community atmosphere that has been praised by students and external examiners.  You’ll also have the opportunity to interact with students on related courses such as our MSc Data Science and Analytics.

Structure

The MSc Data Intensive Physics is a two-stage (120 credits taught, 60 credits research project) Postgraduate Taught programme delivered over three terms (autumn, spring, and summer) for a total of 180 credits.

• Autumn term (60 credits, taught)
You will undertake three core modules (50 credits total) covering core skills and one elective module of 10 credits in a physics specialism of your choice.

• Spring term (60 credits, taught)
You will undertake two core modules (40 credits total) covering core skills and two elective modules of 10 credits each covering a physics specialism of your choice.

You must successfully complete the 120 credits of the taught component of the course before you will be permitted to progress to the research project component.

• Summer term (60 credits, research project)
The summer term consists of a single 60 credit research project module of 3 months’ duration.  You will be required to produce a research dissertation and present your research to the School in order to complete this module.

Core modules:

Pattern Recognition and Data Mining
Informatics
Advanced Experimental Techniques in Physics
Study and Research Skills in Physics
Data Analysis
Data-Intensive Physics Research Project

Career Prospects

Typically, an MSc degree in Data-Intensive Physics will open up opportunities in the following areas:

• Theoretical, experimental and computational doctoral research;
• Numerate, technical, research, development and engineering positions in related scientific fields;
• Physics, mathematics and general science education.

Placements

There will be a flexible number of external projects each year for the summer research project module, which may be carried out in the School with external supervision, or involve some work at a collaborating institute.  The number and nature of these project will vary from year to year and will be assigned according to student choice in consultation with the external supervisor(s); some such projects may require specific optional modules to have been taken. Choosing an external project should not have any implications for your visa status if you are an international student.

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This is a one year full-time or two or more years part-time taught course. Students take 60 credits of Mathematical Physics from the level 4 and level 3 modules. Read more

Overview

This is a one year full-time or two or more years part-time taught course.

Course Structure

Students take 60 credits of Mathematical Physics from the level 4 and level 3 modules. Modules include Computational Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Mathematical Methods, Condensed Matter Theory, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Particle Physics, Quantum Information Processing, Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics, Electromagnetic Theory and Statistical Methods.

Career Options

The course provides a solid foundation in Theoretical Physics/Applied Mathematics for students who wish to pursue careers in science, engineering, commerce and technology. Graduates gain employment in a wide range of occupations including research, teaching, actuary, banking, software development, computational physics and computer modelling/simulation.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHQ55 Part-time

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This is a one year full-time or two or more years part-time taught course. Students take 60 credits of Mathematical Physics from the level 4 and level 3 modules. Read more

Overview

This is a one year full-time or two or more years part-time taught course.

Course Structure

Students take 60 credits of Mathematical Physics from the level 4 and level 3 modules. Modules include Computational Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Mathematical Methods, Condensed Matter Theory, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Particle Physics, Quantum Information Processing, Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics, Electromagnetic Theory and Statistical Methods.

Career Options

The course provides a solid foundation in Theoretical Physics/Applied Mathematics for students who wish to pursue careers in science, engineering, commerce and technology. Graduates gain employment in a wide range of occupations including research, teaching, actuary, banking, software development, computational physics and computer modelling/simulation.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHQ54 Full-time

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Antimatter Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Antimatter Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Antimatter Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Antimatter Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.
The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group (AMQP) at Swansea University comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources.

The Particle Physics Theory Group (PPT) has fourteen members of staff, as well as postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, the Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

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The Institute for Adaptive and Neural Computation (IANC) is a world-leading institute dedicated to the theoretical and empirical study of adaptive processes in both artificial and biological systems. Read more

Research profile

The Institute for Adaptive and Neural Computation (IANC) is a world-leading institute dedicated to the theoretical and empirical study of adaptive processes in both artificial and biological systems. We are one of the UK’s largest and most prestigious academic teams in these fields.

We foster world-class interdisciplinary and collaborative research bringing together a range of disciplines.

Our research falls into three areas:

-machine learning
-computational neuroscience
-computational biology

In machine learning we develop probabilistic methods that find patterns and structure in data, and apply them to scientific and technological problems. Applications include areas as diverse as astronomy, health sciences and computing.

In computational neuroscience and neuroinformatics we study how the brain processes information, and analyse and interpret data from neuroscientific experiments

The focus in the computational biology area is to develop computational strategies to store, analyse and model a variety of biological data (from protein measurements to insect behavioural data).

Training and support

You carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up in 2008 to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

The research you will undertake at IANC is perfectly suited to a career in academia, where you’ll be able to use your knowledge to advance this important field. Some graduates take their skills into commercial research posts, and find success in creating systems that can be used in everyday applications.

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The Masters in Physics. Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Physics: Advanced Materials include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of advanced materials.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Nano and atomic scale imaging
◾Research skills
◾Solid state physics
◾Extended project.

Optional courses include
◾Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
◾Detectors and imaging
◾Environmental radioactivity
◾Nuclear power reactors
◾Semiconductor physics
◾Statistical mechanics.

For further information on the content of individual courses please see Honours and Masters level courses.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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