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Suitable for highly capable students wishing to pursue a research career in evolutionary psychology or related field. Advanced research training in a range of intellectual and practical skills associated with evolutionary and comparative approaches to the study of mind. Read more

MSc in Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology: The Origins of Mind

• Suitable for highly capable students wishing to pursue a research career in evolutionary psychology or related field.

• Advanced research training in a range of intellectual and practical skills associated with evolutionary and comparative approaches to the study of mind.

• Gain a detailed knowledge of the evolutionary and comparative literature and principal theoretical and methodological issues in this field.

• Gain the statistical and methodological skills necessary to undertake research in evolutionary psychology.

• This distinctive programme tackles fundamental issues associated with the origins of human cognition via a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches.

Features

* The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has 42 full-time academic staff, 9 technical staff, 72 research postgraduates, 18 postdoctoral researchers and 54 taught postgraduate students.

* The School has an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research and has some of the best psychological laboratory facilities in the UK. The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has consistently been ranked one of the best research departments in the UK.

* The breadth and variety of psychology and neuroscience taught in the School are particular strengths with significant opportunities to collaborate and benefit from a range of techniques applied to understanding the behaviour of humans and animals.

* Considerable contact time with researchers occurs via tutorials and research project supervision’.

Postgraduate community

The School’s size promotes a friendly atmosphere with a crossflow of ideas while providing the depth and breadth necessary to pursue major scientific programmes at an international level. We have active links with other Schools and Departments within the University, with other Scottish universities and with research institutions outside the UK.

We have a large and thriving community of research staff and postgraduate students. We believe that good teaching and good research go hand-in-hand and we take pride in our research-based culture of teaching.

Facilities

We are equipped with modern technology to perform virtually all aspects of psychological research. Facilities include laboratories in neurophysiology, psychopharmacology, psychophysics, animal learning and cognition, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and social psychology. We have extensive computing facilities for both online control of experiments and offline analysis of data.

Careers

We see postgraduate study as part of your long-term career development. Alongside the University’s Careers Centre (see page 26), we offer advice and support in planning your career. The School provides opportunities to gain experience of working in an academic context, by being involved in tutorials, laboratory classes and other aspects of academic work.

The vast majority of our postgraduates have gained postdoctoral and lecturing positions in universities across the world while others have jobs in healthcare (as researchers and clinicians), wildlife conservation, information technology and management services.

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Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. Read more
Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. How we produce, understand, acquire, and use language, and how these processes are affected by ageing and brain damage, are core topics in understanding human behaviour.

Why study Psychology of Language at Dundee?

In addition to its theoretical interest, psycholinguistics has several important applications, including how a second language should best be taught, how children should be taught to learn to read and write, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders. Such applications ensure that there is a wealth of professional career paths available to postgraduates in the area in addition to an academic career.

This course is affiliated with our world-leading Language Research Centre (LaRC).

The School of Psychology also has much specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:

Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.
Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.
Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.
Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis
Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.
Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.
Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.
Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audience
provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

"I enjoyed all aspects of the course, especially the opportunity to conduct two independent pieces of research. Furthermore, I found the taught modules very helpful and a good basis for every researcher. Most importantly, I enjoyed the support of both staff and students in a highly collaborative environment"
MSc student, 2011

Who should study this course?

The course offers students an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in their first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

The course will provide a first year of research training for students intending to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

This course is aimed at

Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of the psychology of language and communication
Graduates considering a professional training in a language-related discipline (e.g. speech pathology)
Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD.

How you will be taught

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided.

What you will study

Students will take the following modules:

Core modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation

Two advanced modules, typically from:

Gesture, Cognition and Communication
Reading Development and Disability
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Altered States of Consciousness

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.

Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields such as education, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders.

Overseas Academic Scholarships

The School of Psychology offers three Overseas Academic Scholarships of £3,000 each to overseas (international) taught postgraduate students. These awards are competitive based on academic merit and a personal statement which details and supports the applicant's interest in their chosen taught postgraduate programme. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is 30th June 2014.

A 5% discount on tuition fees is applicable for international applicants to the School of Psychology who pay the full amount (for the year), in advance, by a given deadline. Please visit our 5% discount webpage for full details.

Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage

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This course focuses upon both infant and child development, addressing a broad range of topics concerning typical and atypical development. Read more
This course focuses upon both infant and child development, addressing a broad range of topics concerning typical and atypical development. Consideration is given to diverse aspects of cognitive and social development, issues of theory in developmental psychology, and psychopathology. The course is research-led and all staff are research-active, regularly publishing in the discipline's leading journals.

Why study Developmental Psychology at Dundee?

The MSc in Developmental Psychology draws upon the recognised expertise of numerous research-active staff, and addresses a broad range of material, including the scientific study of infancy and childhood, and typical and atypical development.

The School of Psychology has specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital. Learn more about our research facilities.

A distinctive feature of this course is that students have the opportunity to participate in the Fife Education Early Years Collaboration between Fife Council and this University for their Research in Practice module. Unusually, this provides 'hands on' experience of conducting psychological research with young children. It also gives students the chance to experience at first hand psychological work conducted in 'real world' settings.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:
Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis

Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology

Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace

Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis

Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology

Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level

Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment

Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audiences

Provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

Who should study this course?

This course is aimed at:
Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of Developmental Psychology

Graduates considering a professional training in a developmental field, such as Educational or Clinical Psychology

Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD in Developmental Psychology

This course is also suitable for professionals working with children since many topics have obvious application to real-world problems (for example, attachment and its impact on behavioural and emotional development; nutrition and its role in cognitive development; the impact of marital breakdown on psychological development; etc)

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

How you will be taught

One-on-one supervision of a literature review and a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

What you will study

Core Modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research Dissertation
Research in Practice
Two Advanced Modules, typically from:

Developmental Psychopathology
Reading Development and Disability
Social, Emotional and Moral Development
Altered States of Consciousness
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Health in Groups
Evolution and Behaviour
Decision Making
Gesture, Cognition and Communication

Or One Advanced Module (from above) plus a Research in Practice module:

Fife Council Education Department Practicum Project

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only. Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs and have used the qualification to improve their chances of getting on to clinical and education psychology courses. Several students take the course to improve their chances of getting jobs as support workers in paediatric settings and Assistant Psychologists. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields of business.

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The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Read more
The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Core courses will enable you to develop an understanding of the concepts, theories, methods and principles central to criminology and the skills to apply these in the forensic and legal area. Optional courses build on this core grounding and enable you to develop an empirical insight in an area of your choice, culminating in a research project.

This approach provides you with knowledge of the changing nature of psychology, law and criminology, and professional applications. It will also develop your ability to relate theory to practice in a way that provides more informed solutions to problems, and opportunities in the workplace. There is a valuable research grounding and a broad coverage of criminological, forensic and psychological approaches to crime and criminality.

Please note that this programme does not provide British Psychological Society accreditation or recognition. This is because the programme is a criminology programme with a strand of specialist criminal / investigative / forensic psychology and is not a postgraduate psychology degree programme. The MSc Criminology & Criminal Psychology programme meets the British Criminology Society benchmarks for postgraduate taught courses.

From time-to-time we update our programmes to reflect changes in knowledge and industry standards, so the programme structure, mode and the courses and course structure can be subject to change from what is listed below. The availability of option courses also varies from year-to-year according to student preference, staff availability and may, for some courses, also depend on a student's academic performance. Until the academic term immediately prior to the academic term in which an option is listed to run, we are not able to guarantee that an option listed will be available. In addition, please note that some courses may only be open to certain students and may also involve an application process which may include successfully passing a selection process to take the course. For these reasons, the structure (i.e. the mode(s), the courses and the course structure) of the programme shown in this information is shown for illustrative purposes only.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/crim/crimpsych

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Career opportunities

This programme encompasses criminological, legal, forensic and psychological approaches. It will appeal to those with a broad interest in criminology and criminal psychological issues, including those whose future employment is likely to involve public, private and/ or non-governmental criminological or criminal justice work or applied criminal/legal/forensic psychological work in the UK or internationally. It is relevant to careers in local government, European and international institutions, and national and international nongovernmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wishing to prepare for a research degree in humanities and social sciences.

Teaching and assessment

The programme employs a range of innovative teaching and learning methods. Lectures and seminars are dynamic and interactive. Teaching and learning activities may include:

- Role play
- Real-world problem solving
- Speed debates
- Presentations
- Project supervision
- Work-based placements and tutorials.

Where possible and depending on the courses studied, one or more field trip (please note that any field trip will be a day-time trip only, not an overnight or multi-day trip).

Assessment of learning is usually based on a mixture of examination and coursework and can include presentations/group work, the submission of essays and the sitting of examinations.

Further information

If you would like more information on this programme, please contact us at .

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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You will benefit from the expertise of our leading researchers in evolutionary psychology, who have particular interests in cultural evolution and language, social learning, and mate choice. Read more

Introduction

You will benefit from the expertise of our leading researchers in evolutionary psychology, who have particular interests in cultural evolution and language, social learning, and mate choice. Our staff are also at the forefront of new developments in applying evolutionary principles to address real world issue. Students interested in comparative approaches and animal behaviour will benefit from other members of our Behaviour and Evolution Research Group whose world-leading research on behaviour and cognition in primates, dogs and elephants are also being applied to real world problems, including conservation, human-animal interaction, and animal welfare. Under the group's expert guidance you will undertake specialists modules, a research placement and a research project. You will also be able to take advantage of our on-site and overseas labs, field sites and links with industrial partners. For example, the University works closely with the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre at Edinburgh Zoo.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor Craig Roberts

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

The course provides advanced training as a preparation for a research career in Psychology, primarily for those intending to proceed to a PhD in the area of evolutionary psychology, comparative cognition or animal behaviour. It may also be suitable for meeting continuing professional development needs for those working in related applied contexts.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught within small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).
Both taught and research postgraduates are integral to our research group and expected to participate in our regular meetings. All students allocated a peer mentor are provided with appropriate office space and equipment. In addition, each student is associated with an academic from Psychology.
The individual modules contribute towards 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Strengths
Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

This course provides advanced training to prepare you for a research career in evolutionary approaches to behaviour, especially for those intending to proceed to a PhD. You will become an integral member of our lively and active research group and we will support you in making the complex transition towards being an independent research scientist. The placement also allows considerable scope for those interested in more applied areas to develop relevant skills for these careers. The course also seeks to meet the continuing professional development needs of those already working in related applied contexts.

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The MSc in Political Psychology is an exciting new programme exploring the relationships between political and psychological processes. Read more
The MSc in Political Psychology is an exciting new programme exploring the relationships between political and psychological processes. It combines modules from the School of Psychology and the School of Politics and International Relations to offer a unique interdisciplinary focus on key current issues in political psychology.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1206/political-psychology

Course detail

The programme focuses on key topics including political ideologies, government perceptions, justice and inequality, beliefs in political conspiracies, and political conflict and violence. Develop your knowledge of theory and practice by studying a range of areas such as advanced intergroup relations, public opinion, and statistics and methods.

Purpose

Gain an understanding of political psychology through academic, practical and research training, with a strong focus on quantitative methods.

Format and assessment

There are 5 compulsory modules and one option module.

The compulsory modules are:

- Advanced Statistics and Methodology
- Political Psychology
- Advanced Topics in Intergroup Relations
- Comparative Political Behaviour
- A supervised empirical or theoretical dissertation.

The option modules include:

• Advanced Topics in Group Processes
• Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology II: Applications
• Negotiation and Mediation
• States, Nations and Democracy

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000-word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Careers

School of Psychology postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

School of Politics and International Relations graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The purpose of this course is to develop and consolidate your understanding of the scientific methods that are routinely employed in Psychology. Read more
The purpose of this course is to develop and consolidate your understanding of the scientific methods that are routinely employed in Psychology. Emphasis is placed on training you in the efficient gathering and organising of information as well as the critical evaluation of theory and qualitative and quantitative evidence.

Why study Psychological Research Methods at Dundee?

The programme will lead to the award of the MSc in Psychological Research Methods (exit degrees of Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate are also available on this course). The course offers an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in your first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

You will be given practical experience of working in an active researcher's laboratory and you will also design and carry out a substantial research project under the supervision of a different member of the academic staff. You will be given the opportunity to present and discuss your findings in written, oral and poster formats in a supportive and cohesive environment. Our aim is to significantly improve your prospect for employment in a wide range of contexts where insight into human behaviour and/or rigorous evaluation of information are key elements of good decision making.

The School of Psychology has specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital. Learn more about our research facilities via our website.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:
Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.

Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.

Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.

Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis.

Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.

Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.

Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.

Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audiences
Provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

Who should study this course?

The course will provide a first year of research training for students who intend to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

How you will be taught

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

What you will study

Core Modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation
Two Advanced Modules, typically from:

Decision Making
Evolution and Behaviour
Health in Groups
Majorities and Minorities
Comparative Communication and Cognition

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.
Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs and have used the qualification to improve their chances of getting on to clinical and educational psychology courses. Several students take the course to improve their chances of getting jobs as support workers and Assistant Psychologists. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields of business.

Laura Wakeford graduated in 2010 with an MSc in Psychological Research Methods. She is now studying for a PhD here at Dundee. Laura's research focuses on the relationship between fixation location and attention during silent reading; specifically, whether word recognition proceeds in a serial or parallel fashion. The majority of her work uses the Dr Bouis Eye Tracker.

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Develop a deep insight into crime and criminal behaviour by studying this uniquely practical and applied course in criminology and forensic psychology. Read more
Develop a deep insight into crime and criminal behaviour by studying this uniquely practical and applied course in criminology and forensic psychology.

Studying applied criminology and forensic psychology at postgraduate level will allow you to develop a range of analytical and practical skills benefitting you as a practitioner or researcher.

You’ll have the opportunity of a work placement alongside specialised modules covering mediation, international criminology, assessment of offenders, child protection and advanced quantitative and qualitative research methods. These modules will give you a valuable set of skills for both employment and further research.

Your tutors will be research-active staff who are experts in their field. You’ll also benefit from external practitioners who bring their practical skills and experience to the course.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MSc-Applied-Criminology-and-Forensic-Psychology-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

You’ll develop a critical awareness of topics at the forefront of criminology and forensic psychology, and the contexts and theories that influence practice in these areas.

The applied focus of this course provides an excellent foundation in risk assessment of offenders, methods of rehabilitation, use of forensic interviewing strategies, mediation skills and facial composite construction.

Alongside these skills you’ll also learn directly from leading experts about current research and debates in criminology and forensic psychology which directly affect people at all points in the legal system.

Additionally you'll acquire excellent transferable research skills in both quantitative and qualitative methods which will enable you to carry out high quality research in a variety of contexts and with ethical integrity.

This is a one year full-time course delivered over three trimesters. You’ll learn by a variety of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials, laboratory sessions and independent study.

Modules

• Practical Forensic Psychology (assessing offenders and working with witnesses)
• Advanced Forensic Psychology (therapeutic jurisprudence and neuroethics)
• Criminal Justice in Practice
• Current Topics in Crime
• Comparative and International Criminology
• Advanced Research Skills
• Community Safety and Mediation
• Investigative Journalism
• Work Placement
• Dissertation

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

With a mix of subject specific knowledge, practical skills and technical abilities graduates will have the opportunity to develop a career in a range of occupations including:

• HM Prisons and secure units
• Probation service
• Police services
• Social work
• Court services
• Legal services
• Voluntary sector
• Community development
• Adult guidance
• Local and central government
• Academia and research
• Health services
• Forensic services
• Private practice

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture. Read more
Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture.

Comparative Literature at Kent involves the study of literature from two or more European cultures, to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of cultural practice. The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. You benefit from expert teaching from members of the Department of Modern Languages (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/index.html) and the Department of Comparative Literature (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/index.html) and thus participate in an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar.

In the Autumn and Spring terms, you take a choice of four modules, before undertaking a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend the spring term in Paris.

This programme is ideal for modern languages graduates who wish to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context; English graduates wishing to diversify their interests; and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology) who would like to apply their knowledge to literary and visual material.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/28/french-and-comparative-literature

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
FR 803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
FR998 - French Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for you to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- allow you to study modules in both modern French studies and comparative literature

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern French, European, English and American literatures and other artistic media

- enhance your comprehension and communication skills in both French and English

- develop your awareness of various critical and research methodologies and of the interplay between literature, art and cultural context

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- provide a deepening of intercultural awareness and understanding

- provide opportunities for the further development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector

- provide further development of critical, analytical, problem-solving and other transferable skills.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of French literature and thought from the 18th century to the present, with research clusters organised around the following areas: the European Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment; Ekphrasis; Franco-Sino relations; Life Writing; Medical Humanities; Philosophy and Critical Theory; French Surrealism; Cubism; the Avant-Garde; the interface between visual arts and text.

Recent publications have focused on authors, artists and thinkers including the following: Apollinaire; Artaud; Badiou; Barthes; Blanchot; Cocteau; Crébillon fils; Deleuze; Diderot; Djebar; Flaubert; Foucault; Houellebecq; Lacan; Maupassant; Mérimée; Nimier; Proust; Sade; Yourcenar; Zola.

Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS)
Founded in 2007, the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS) promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in French studies is an extremely versatile qualification that can open the door to exciting career opportunities in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work in the IT industry, academic administration, cultural management and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at UK and overseas universities.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Criminology deals with issues that are constantly in the media and attract much public interest. Read more
Criminology deals with issues that are constantly in the media and attract much public interest. Given the impact of globalising processes on crime and on society more generally in the contemporary era, the Department of Law has identified the need for a programme to deepen engagement with the global across a wide range of criminological and criminal justice issues. The MA in Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice has been developed to address this need.

At a time of global links at the level of crime threats and criminal justice responses, our view of criminal justice systems as comprising distinct national jurisdictions comes increasingly under challenge. With this increasing cosmopolitanism comes a need to examine a broad range of criminological and criminal justice issues from an internationally comparative perspective. This is what the MA programme aims to do through the unique combination of generic modules in qualitative and quantitative research methods together with theoretical awareness of key issues in comparative criminology such as the aims of comparison, the different schools of thought on comparative criminological research and the impact of globalisation. In addition, students will be provided with an opportunity to pursue their own particular interests in the comparative field through a choice of two (out of four) optional modules and through the completion of a 20,000 word dissertation.

Students must complete 90 credits in total. Full-time students complete 30 taught credits in each semester and a 30 credit dissertation must be completed during the summer.

Both full-time and part-time students also have the option of graduating with a Postgraduate Diploma instead of a Masters in Arts. The structure of the Postgraduate Diploma follows that of the Masters in Art’s structure, but students do not complete a dissertation.

Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester.

The programme will allow students to build upon their existing qualifications with a view to accessing positions within the justice and security field, with the additional advantage that students will be provided with a genuinely international and comparative outlook. Graduates may go on to work in careers within An Gardaí Síochána, the security industry, data analytics, probation, the prison service, the civil service, research institutes, academia, the NGO sector, etc.

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Criminology deals with issues that are constantly in the media and attract much public interest. Read more
Criminology deals with issues that are constantly in the media and attract much public interest. Given the impact of globalising processes on crime and on society more generally in the contemporary era, the Department of Law has identified the need for a programme to deepen engagement with the global across a wide range of criminological and criminal justice issues. The PG Diploma in Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice has been developed to address this need.

At a time of global links at the level of crime threats and criminal justice responses, our view of criminal justice systems as comprising distinct national jurisdictions comes increasingly under challenge. With this increasing cosmopolitanism comes a need to examine a broad range of criminological and criminal justice issues from an internationally comparative perspective. This is what the PG Diploma programme aims to do through the unique combination of generic modules in qualitative and quantitative research methods together with theoretical awareness of key issues in comparative criminology such as the aims of comparison, the different schools of thought on comparative criminological research and the impact of globalisation.


Students must complete 60 credits in total. Full-time students complete 30 taught credits in each semester.

The programme will allow students to build upon their existing qualifications with a view to accessing positions within the justice and security field, with the additional advantage that students will be provided with a genuinely international and comparative outlook. Graduates may go on to work in careers within An Gardaí Síochána, the security industry, data analytics, probation, the prison service, the civil service, research institutes, academia, the NGO sector, etc.

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The MSc Developmental Psychology focuses on the social, emotional and cognitive development of children and is designed for graduates and practising psychologists who wish to acquire a specialism in child development. Read more
The MSc Developmental Psychology focuses on the social, emotional and cognitive development of children and is designed for graduates and practising psychologists who wish to acquire a specialism in child development.

The School of Psychology has a growing reputation as a centre of expertise in developmental psychology, with research interests in cognitive development, language acquisition, autism, motor development, human-animal interaction, child safety and injury prevention, cultural contexts of development. Research in the School is finding immediate real-world applications. For example, studies into the misinterpretation of canine facial expressions have led to a prevention tool to reduce instances of children being bitten by dogs.

You may have access to the specialist Lincoln Babylab, which is equipped with facilities for preferential looking, listening and eye-tracking as well as a motor lab and research facilities for examining comparative cognitive development.

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The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy. Read more
The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy.

About the programme

The MSc provides you with applied and transferable social science research skills to better understand the complexities of society, the role of multiple organisations (‘actors’) in governance systems, and disciplinespecific expertise.

The programme is interdisciplinary and employability is a major theme of the MSc subject pathways so as to equip you with key applied skills for the graduate job market. Intensive workshops are delivered primarily by academic experts, with input from practitioners and non-academic specialists.

You can study for the MSc in Applied Social Science, by choosing optional modules across pathways, or opt for a specialist named degree, as follows:

- Applied Psychology:
Gives you the skills to research and examine human behaviour in various social settings i.e. education, healthcare and the workplace.

- Civil Society and Public Affairs:
Provides you with an advanced understanding of the relationship between civil society, the institutions of multi-level governance and the policymaking environment.

- Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
Gain the skills and understanding of criminal justice and youth violence to research and navigate the causes of crime and strategies for tackling criminal activity.

- Global Social Work and Social Policy:
Provides social workers, community workers and voluntary sector workers with opportunities to engage with the most innovative social work and social policy throughout the world.

Your learning

You will study core and specialist modules. Core modules include:
• Social Research Today
• Contemporary Social Issues
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

Students of the generic Applied Social Science course can also study three specialist electives.
For students studying for the various named degrees, specialist modules offered include:

Applied Psychology:
• Psychology Applied to Public Health
• Psychology in the Workplace
• Psychology Applied to Education

Civil Society and Public Affairs:
• Theories of State and Civil Society
• Politics, Power and Civil Society
• Policy and Practice

Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
• Philosophy of Crime and Justice
• Policing; Youth Violence
• Policy and Practice

Global Social Work and Social Policy:
• Comparative Social Policy
• Social Work in a Global Context; Migration and Human Rights
• Policy and Practice

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates find careers in various specialist roles particularly related to research, campaigning and advocacy across public, private, voluntary and charity sectors. Part-time students may already be working in roles related to the specialist study areas and use the MSc for career advancement.

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

Note: This named degree will only run in 2016 if MSc Policy Analysis and Global Governance is not validated for 2016 entry.

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Our Evolution and Human Behaviour MRes is a research-based course with a taught component that is equivalent to an MSc. It provides a springboard into a career that involves a working knowledge of scientific research. Read more

Course Overview

Our Evolution and Human Behaviour MRes is a research-based course with a taught component that is equivalent to an MSc. It provides a springboard into a career that involves a working knowledge of scientific research.

The course is designed for graduates with a BSc in the life sciences, psychology or anthropology. Fully qualified or intercalating MBBS or BDS students can also apply. It can be taken either as a stand-alone qualification or as an entry route onto a PhD or MD.

The taught component of the course includes training in research approaches relevant to the area of Evolution and Human Behaviour. You have the flexibility to develop your own bespoke course by selecting a set of three complementary modules. Recommended modules, include: Comparative Cognition (MMB8043); Sensory Systems (MMB8019); The Biological Basis of Psychiatric Illness and its Treatment (MMB8010)

You will also participate in training in general research principles, and other professional and key skills.

The core module on the biological study of behaviour introduces the central questions related to Evolution and Human Behaviour research (adaptive consequences, proximate mechanisms, development, and evolutionary history) and the research methods associated with each. Other relevant modules focus on: Comparative cognition; Sensory systems; Psychiatric disorders and their treatment.

Research-led seminars delivered by members of the Centre for Behaviour and Evolution cover evolutionary psychology areas such as: Human mate choice; Altruism and cooperation; Food choices and obesity; Comparative and developmental psychology of cognition.

Your research project comprises the major element of the course. This project will involve 24 weeks of research in an area of Evolution and Human Behaviour under the supervision of an expert academic researcher in the field.

The course allows you to experience an internationally competitive research area, predominantly in academia but also potentially in industry. Graduates from our programme have gone on to competitive PhD studentships, as well as jobs in psychology and in research.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/evolution-human-behaviour-mres/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/evolution-human-behaviour-mres/#howtoapply

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We have an international reputation in the development of Augmentative & Alternative Communication (AAC) devices. Read more
We have an international reputation in the development of Augmentative & Alternative Communication (AAC) devices. The main aim of the course is to provide individuals with psychology, computing, industry or clinical care backgrounds, a tailored research training that will allow them to become more efficient and effective scientist-practitioners in AAC.

Why study Augmentative and Alternative Communication at Dundee?

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) refers to strategies and techniques used by individuals who experience difficulties with communication because they have little or no functional speech. AAC can augment speech or it can provide a replacement for spoken communication. In addition to supporting expressive communication, AAC can also support the development of language and natural speech. The development of effective AAC aids is inherently multi-disciplinary and user-centred.

The School of Psychology and the School of Computing have collaborated to develop this course. The main aim of the course is to provide individuals with psychology, computing, industry or clinical care backgrounds, a tailored research training that will allow them to become more efficient and effective scientist-practitioners in AAC. This will be achieved through an enhanced understanding of:

The psychology of language and communication development
The design ethnography of AAC solutions
The engineering of AAC solutions
The effective evaluation of AAC solutions on an individual and group basis

Please note that this course does not lead to a formal qualification in Speech and Language Therapy.

The course is offered on a full time and flexible part-time basis (exit awards of PGCert and PGDip also available).

What's great about Augmentative and Alternative Communication at Dundee?

This course offers a unique approach to the study and development of AAC solutions because of our emphasis on multi-disciplinary teamwork.

Find out more on the School of Psychology's MSc Augmentative and Alternative Communication course page.

Who should study this course?

This course is aimed at engineers, teachers, practitioners and individuals with communication difficulties, plus anyone who wishes to improve the design and utilisation of AAC technology.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments.

Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided.

What you will study

Core Modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Computing Research Frontiers
Human Computer Interaction
Computing the User Experience
Research Dissertation
One Advanced Modules, typically from:

Gesture, Cognition and Communication
Reading Development and Disability
Research in Practice
Comparative Communication and Cognition
You will also be required to attend bi-weekly AAC Reading Group and Straight Talking User Group meetings.

How you will be assessed

The course will be assessed mainly by coursework. Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Recent National reviews have highlighted the need for better training in the field of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). The aim of this course is to enhance the career prospects of existing and prospective practitioners in AAC.

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