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The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. Read more
The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. The new 18 month part-time NFTS Diploma in Writing and Producing Comedy will enable students to develop all forms of scripted and unscripted comedy including, sitcoms, sketch shows, and panel shows for radio and tv. The course is run in partnership with Channel 4.

Quick Facts

- 18 Month Course
- Part-time
- Course starts in January
- Next intake: January 2017
- UK and EEA applicants only

- The world's first Diploma course in Writing and Producing Comedy.
- Delivered in partnership with Channel 4
- Part-time, evening course
- Regular Industry speakers
- Develop and write an original show and make a taster tape.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/writing-and-producing-comedy

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. Students will be taught by NFTS writing and producing tutors supported by guest sessions from the people responsible for some of the UK’s most iconic UK shows including Peep Show, Father Ted, Have I Got News for You, Spitting Image, Horrible Histories and Green Wing.

The course advisory board includes:

Ash Atalla – The Office, Cuckoo, Trollied
Dawson Bros – The Peter Serafinowicz Show, That Mitchell & Webb Look, Big School
Sam Bain - Peep Show, Fresh Meat, Rev
Richard Boden – Blackadder, 'Allo 'Allo, IT Crowd
Gregor Cameron – Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show, Fighting Talk
Saurabh Kakkar – Head of Development – Comedy – Big Talk
Graham Linehan – Father Ted, IT Crowd, Count Arthur Strong
Arabella McGuigan – Smack the Pony, Brass Eye
Caroline Norris - Horrible Histories, The Armstrong & Miller Show, Dead Ringers
John O’Farrell – Spitting Image, Have I Got News For You, Novelist
Richard Preddy – Green Wing, Campus
Lucy Robinson - Co-Founder Little Comet Film & TV/Head of Comedy Brothers and Sisters
Helen Spencer -Salford Comedy Festival, Salford Sitcom Showcase, Jesting About
Lorna Watson & Ingrid Oliver – Watson & Oliver

The course is part-time (one evening a week and occasional Saturdays) over eighteen months and is delivered in central London. You will be expected to spend at least 8 hours a week working on assignments for the course. You will leave the course with a portfolio of material developed during the course, this could include a ten-minute taster tape of an idea you have developed, or a full script and some sketches and one-liners.

Specifically you will learn about:

- Comedy landscape
- Radio comedy
- Sketches
- Panel shows and formats
- Characterisation
- Story structure
- Narrative TV comedy
- Script editing
- Topical one-liners
- Outlines and treatments
- Pitching
- Commissioning processes
- Working with performers
- Compliance issues
- Working with writers
- Writing briefs

Students graduate able to:

- generate comedy programme ideas
- write or produce a narrative comedy, sketch show or comedy entertainment show
- pitch ideas to commissioning editors
- work with writers and help them develop their ideas

So you think you’re funny? Apply Now!

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

The NFTS want to encourage applications from the brightest and best talent out there….from all backgrounds. We are actively seeking to redress imbalances within the Industry by encouraging applications from under-represented groups, and have bursaries of £4650 on offer to 2 of the successful candidates. Bursaries will be awarded to stand out talent who can demonstrate that without this funding they would not be able to afford the course, or who can demonstrate they bring a unique and distinct perspective and voice to the course.

CURRICULUM

The course is made up of a number of modules and workshops, you learn by ‘doing’ as well as understanding theory and developing a variety of practical and creative skills.

Module 1: Writing and producing sketch shows
 A sketch needs a premise, a core funny idea that is its reason to exist. As soon as a sketch begins, the audience looks for this premise and it needs to be apparent. You will learn how this works by writing sketches for different shows and getting feedback on them from established sketch performers and producers. You will have your material read by experienced sketch performers, and the chance to have your material performed for an invited audience.

Module 2: Topical one-liners, formats and panel shows. Topical one-liners for Have I Got News for You, The News Quiz and other topical shows is often the entry point for writers. You will learn by a mixture of practice, theory and feedback, the basics of writing topical jokes. You will learn how to develop your own format or panel show idea.

Module 3: Radio Comedy 
Many comedy writers and producers have worked in both television and radio with many shows starting out on radio and moving to television. It is the entry point for many established comedy writers and producers. You will develop and test your skills by developing material for Radio 4 and pitch ideas to radio comedy producers.

Module 4: Writing/Producing an existing sitcom 
You will learn about writing for a situation and a bunch of characters that already exist, concentrating on pitching appropriate story ideas to the creators of those shows. You will also learn about script editing and how to give notes.

Module 5: Writing a TV narrative comedy 
You will develop an idea for a television narrative comedy (sitcom), pitch it, and write the first draft of a script.

Module 6: Graduation project 
Working on your own, or in a pair, you will develop a sitcom, comedy drama or sketch show for TV or radio. You will write one episode, and either shoot a taster tape or have some scenes performed by professional actors or produce a radio show.

NFTS BENEFITS

Comedy course participants will have full access to the NFTS’ optional creative stimulus strands, including: Passport to Cinema (weekly screenings of classic and pre-release films in the state-of-the-art campus cinema); and NFTS Masterclasses (major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include Graham King (producer, Hugo, The Departed), Guy Ritchie (Director, Sherlock Holmes), Danny Boyle (Director, Slumdog Millionaire) and Ian Livingstone (former President and CEO, Eidos).

TUTORS

Many of the people on the course advisory board will also teach on the course. In addition the course is supported by Channel 4 commissioners and executives.

APPLY WITH

- Two TV or radio sketches of no more than 400 words each. One of these should be set on a polar landscape.
- An outline for a comedy series, no more than 600 words
- Two short proposed story outlines for an existing sitcom. Each of the 2 episode outlines should be no more than 200 words. The sitcom we want you to write for is Bluestone 42
Each of your 2 stories should have a beginning, middle and an end. Make sure you do your background research and ensure you understand how Bluestone 42 operates as a sitcom

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR WRITING AND PRODUCING COMEDY COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=656

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the theory and practice of stand-up comedy at postgraduate level. The University of Kent has a long history of teaching and research in comic performance, and the Templeman Library houses the British Stand-Up Comedy Archive. Read more
This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the theory and practice of stand-up comedy at postgraduate level. The University of Kent has a long history of teaching and research in comic performance, and the Templeman Library houses the British Stand-Up Comedy Archive.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/345/stand-up-comedy

Course detail

You will learn how to write and perform your own material, reflect on your work, and engage with theories comedy through workshops, seminars and supervision. Stand-up relies on a dynamic interaction between performer and audience, and for this reason live performance is a central part of the teaching strategy. You will perform regularly for audiences of up to 200 people throughout the year, developing your performance skills, honing material and increasing your understanding of this vibrant form of popular theatre. Assessment is through performances, portfolios and essays.

Format and assessment

The theoretical aspects of the programme culminate in a practice-as-research project in which you explore ideas about comedy and comic performance through both traditional academic research and creative practice.

There is a strong emphasis on professional practice, with students performing open mike spots in established comedy clubs in the UK and beyond, as well as organising their own shows. Regular teaching staff include Dr Oliver Double, a former stand-up who has published widely on comedy and popular performance. In addition to this, we have guest lectures, workshops and master classes from professional comedians, including the seminal alternative comedian Tony Allen.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions from museum positions and teaching roles to working as journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work in Pinewood Studios, The National Theatre and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, in roles including editorial assistants and even stunt doubles.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom. - 12 Month Course. - Full-time. - Course runs Jan-Dec. Read more
Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom.

Quick Facts

- 12 Month Course
- Full-time
- Course runs Jan-Dec
- Next intake: January 2017
- UK and EEA applicants only

- Unique 12 month course,
- Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom
- Prepares you to work in a multicamera studio environment
- Work as a Vision Mixer, or a Camera/ Lighting or Sound specialist.
- Includes a six-week internship with Sky and some of the modules are taught at Sky Studios.
- Sky also guarantees to employ at least one graduate of the course each year.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.
- Broadcast Production Course Promo 2014 (http://screeningroom.nfts.co.uk/video/broadcast-production-promo-2014?current-channel=showreels-promos)

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 07 JUL 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/broadcast-production

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. This intensely practical and pioneering course aims to prepare students for a successful future in multi-camera studio entertainment production. Students are taught by NFTS staff and visiting Industry Professionals and have hands-on experience of a variety of studio roles as well as in their specialisation.

Students will apply for, and be accepted onto the course in one of three craft specialisations:

I. Cameras and Lighting
Practise the core skills of TV studio camera operators, positioning the camera, framing and focus. Learn to use broadcast cameras in a multi-camera studio, repositioning and changing shot as the director demands while the vision mixer cuts and mixes the show. Learn to develop shots, moving with artists or in sympathy with music to create dynamic and exciting television. Begin to light simple interviews and more complex multi-camera lighting techniques. You’ll need a passion for pictures, quick reactions, clear and proactive thinking with excellent co-ordination and a good sense of musical rhythm.

II. Vision Mixing
Train on sophisticated broadcast vision mixing consoles, build and realise complex live visual effects to the director’s brief. Using these high-end production tools, Vision Mixing is like editing - but in real time! Cut, mix and wipe between cameras, pre-edited clips and other video sources live. Learn how to mix a variety of genres from situation comedy to fast paced entertainment and music shows adding digital effects and captioning in real time. You’ll need to be logical, quick thinking, calm under pressure and have an excellent feel for timing and rhythm, both dramatic and musical.

III. Sound (in a broadcast studio environment)
Sound carries the story, sets the mood and the tempo. It provides the enabling structure against which TV pictures can shine. Good sound is essential to a TV programme. Learn how to choose and place microphones for the best results for a variety of shows including live music. Train to use ‘Fisher booms’ - in great demand for sitcoms and soaps - to pick up drama dialogue. Mix studio sound in real time using sophisticated broadcast desks. Enhance the show with spot effects, music cues and audio processing to create atmosphere and energy. Learn how to manage TV comms including studio talkback systems allowing key production team members to communicate and collaborate effectively. You’ll need to be a quick, logical thinker, have a ‘good ear’ and a passion for high quality sound.

These are the core disciplines of multi camera studio operations and people trained at a high level in these craft areas are hotly in demand.

CURRICULUM

Students will be exposed to the creative challenge of working across a range of entertainment programming, including: Situation Comedy, Magazine Shows, Talent Shows, Panel Shows, Game Shows etc.

The award focuses on developing students’ specific capabilities, in the following areas:

- the language of entertainment television so that they can work effectively within production teams
- a high level technical understanding of their chosen specialist area
- a critical awareness of the production workflow and the impact of multiplatform on production

Modules include:

- The Grammar of Television Entertainment
- Media Technology
- Music and Magazine Programming
- Chat Shows and Panel Shows
- Comedy

The six week internship at Sky is constituted of two distinct elements. Firstly the student will shadow a Sky Production Services member of staff working in their specialisation (Vision Mixer, Sound, Camera/Lighting). This will cement the students understanding of the wide range of professional practices and competencies associated with each role. Secondly, students will undertake a range of simulated exercises (designed by the NFTS with Sky involvement) to hone their craft and understanding on the Sky equipment.

At the end of the course, students will be well placed to work professionally in their chosen job role within broadcast production. They will also have a thorough understanding of the television production process encompassing everything from the creative to the technical and the business aspects.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

TUTORS

The course is led by Ian Stubbs who has many years experience as a camera operator, director and producer at the BBC. Tutors include David G Croft (Shooting Stars, Live Aid, Crystal Maze), who is also Head of Television. Primary tutors are Ian Ridley (ex-BBC cameras), Richard Merrick (Sound Supervisor) and Kathryn Edmonds (Vision Mixer - National Lottery, Mock the Week). Other tutors who often teach at the school on television courses include Richard Boden (IT Crowd) Geoff Posner (Little Britain) and Steve Pinhay (SMTV, CD:UK)

In addition the course is supported by Production Services at Sky.

APPLY WITH

All applicants must provide:

- A description of a television production. Please tell us about a television production that you have been involved with or that you have observed. Please detail some of the technical production challenges which were faced in realising the project and in what ways you may have done things differently or enhanced the production. Include information on what preparation the production team would have needed to undertake. No more than one page (A4 paper).

Additionally for those who are applying for the Camera/Lighting specialisation we will need to see:

- A portfolio of photos. It should contain still photographs that you have taken. You may supply prints, digital media or a URL to a collection of your photographs. Please do not supply videos or stills taken from video files.

Or for those who are applying for the Sound specialisation please provide:

- Samples of your audio recording and/or mixing work. They should demonstrate your own, clearly identified sound work. You may supply a CD, audio files on other digital media or URLs.

Or for those who are applying for the Vision Mixing specialisation, please provide:

- A DVD, video file or URL (web link) to a YouTube or Vimeo clip that you have mixed or edited yourself or which includes vision mixing or editing which you consider to be good. If you are referencing somebody else’s work please explain why you have chosen that piece.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR BROADCAST PRODUCTION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=376

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Humber’s Television Writing and Producing graduate certificate program prepares you to work as television writers and producers and to work in the production offices and on sets of current major television shows. Read more
Humber’s Television Writing and Producing graduate certificate program prepares you to work as television writers and producers and to work in the production offices and on sets of current major television shows.

You will learn how to write, as well as create and produce, all genres of television shows from half-hour situation comedy, animation, children’s, one-hour episodic, reality and lifestyle to late night comedies, short films and screenplays. You will work with award-winning writers; producers; directors; set designers; editors; directors of photography; and development and network executives from Toronto, Vancouver and Los Angeles to learn the lucrative and creative business of television and film. Learn from well known guests, lecturers and faculty how to create, write, develop, pitch and sell the ideas that may one day lead to successful employment in writers’ rooms, production offices and on sets of major network television shows.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Outline the requirements for various scripts including Movies of the Week, Variety Television, Children’s Programming and Dramatic Series.
• Create “spec” scripts of types including Movies of the Week, Variety Television, Children’s Programming and Dramatic Series.
• Calculate profit and sales figures for given productions.
• Summarize trends in television sales, production and markets.
• Prepare strategies for pitching and packaging new products.
• Provide a critical summary of all the technical requirements associated with television production and give examples of the problems and challenges encountered in production areas such as sound, lighting, space, sets, animation needs, camera operation, make up, costume design and music.
• Perform the duties of a director or a director’s assistant.
• Demonstrate the skills of a story analyst, reader production assistant and writer’s assistant.
• Demonstrate the responsibilities and functions of a theatrical agent.
• Outline the entrepreneurial skills needed by script writers.
• Network with well-known television writers and producers.
• Exhibit team building and communication skills and profit from exercises that encourage self-understanding, peer respect and professional behaviours.

Modules

Semester 1
• BDC 5000: TV Production 1
• BDC 5001: TV Critique 1
• BDC 5002: TV Direction 1
• BDC 5003: TV Creative Producing 1
• COMM 5003: Writing for TV Comedy 1
• COMM 5004: Writing for TV Hours 1
• COMM 5005: Writing for TV Movies and Film 1

Semester 2
• BDC 5500: TV Production 2
• BDC 5501: TV Critique 2
• BDC 5502: TV Direction 2
• BDC 5503: TV Creative Producing 2
• COMM 5553: Writing for TV Comedy 2
• COMM 5554: Writing for TV Hours 2
• COMM 5555: Writing for TV Movies and Film 2

Your Career

Some of our graduates of this program are presently working as writers and producers at major television networks and major independent production companies. Some are working on popular television shows on CTV, CBC, NBC and MTV such as Big Brother, Bitten and New Girl. There are graduates currently running top animation TV series and working as literary agents in major agencies in Toronto.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Television is where most of the opportunities lie for screenwriters. Taught by a combination of academic staff and top TV scriptwriters, our students work intensively on at least two drama series currently transmitting on British television. Read more
Television is where most of the opportunities lie for screenwriters. Taught by a combination of academic staff and top TV scriptwriters, our students work intensively on at least two drama series currently transmitting on British television.

You'll learn how to story conference, storyline, write scripts and edit these dramas, shadowing the real life dramas as they transmit and benefit from direct input from the BBC, STV and other independent producers and writers.

You'll benefit from:
-Tutoring by writers actively working in British Television.
-Direct access to producers and commissioners.
-The opportunity to work on dramas presently transmitting on British television.
-Individual mentoring by experienced television executives on your original drama or comedy.
-The chance to develop your original drama or comedy beyond the course working with a professional script reader.
-Created in close collaboration with the industry to maximise employment for our graduates, we aim to produce the next generation of great television script writers.

Programme content

There are four main strands to this Masters:

Story and Script Techniques - students study story telling and narrative, genre, character and voice, developing their critical and evaluative skills as well as their creative writing talents.

Writing for Existing Long Running TV Drama - students gain understanding of how creative and writing processes work on long running dramas such as soap operas or medical dramas, and then write their own mock storylines and scripts.

Developing and Writing Original TV Drama - students tackle the challenge of creating their own original drama in the context of current commissioning trends.

Researching TV Drama Markets - students will explore the terrain of the TV fiction market, the main channels (home and abroad), commissioning policies and audiences in order to enhance their market readiness.

Through this Masters, you will gain knowledge and skills to succeeding in contemporary television drama through close exposure to the industry, some of its most successful practitioners and their professional practice in action.

However, this is more than 'skills only' training. This programme gives you space to reflect critically upon creative processes and dynamics, and upon the realities of producing work for the television industry, to become a flexible and independently minded TV scriptwriter needed for the 21st Century. In other words, our graduates not only know 'how' but also crucially 'why'.

Why choose this programme?

-Housed within Glasgow School for Business and Society, we are in an excellent position to bridge both creative development and business aware skill sets for the TV industries.
-Teaching has been developed in close collaboration with the television industry, ensuring that a real workplace context and direct market relevance is maintained. We have on going input from BBC, STV and other independent producers and writers.
-We focus solely on writing for the growing television sector which is a key element of the Scottish, UK and global economies.
-Successful students will graduate with both a Masters degree and several projects or scripts ready to take to market.
-Our learning programme is underpinned by both academic research credibility and cutting edge industry interventions.
-Competitive, industry-sponsored scholarships are available for this programme.
-It has the prestigious Creative Skillset Tick of approval.

Scholarships

A number of full fee scholarships supported by industry leaders are available for the most talented writers. We also offer packages of further financial support available for those who need it most.

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The MA in Performing Shakespeare is designed for students interested in the performance of Shakespeare and who want to study both original and contemporary practices of Shakespeare’s theatre. Read more
The MA in Performing Shakespeare is designed for students interested in the performance of Shakespeare and who want to study both original and contemporary practices of Shakespeare’s theatre. The course uses traditional and practice-based research methods for learning and offers an MA degree with choice of thesis project; written or practice-based.

The MA in Performing Shakespeare offers postgraduate students an opportunity to combine practical and contextual study to develop their expertise as artists and educators of Shakespeare. It draws upon:

• Practice-based learning
• Staff who are highly regarded specialists
• Unique flexible delivery model
• Excellent links with industry

Course structure and content

The MA in Performing Shakespeare introduces you to the historic and contemporary practices of performing Shakespeare. The course uses traditional and practice-based research methods and offers the choice of thesis project, written or practical. Regardless of which thesis project you choose, you will benefit from our links with industry specialists, resident scholars and educational opportunities with professional companies like Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the Royal Shakespeare Company.

This course gives you the opportunity to creatively apply Shakespeare performance practices to your own work and ideas, and will aid in developing your autonomous and collaborative learning and performance skills. You are also able to explore Shakespeare in-depth through a variety of research methods and are given the support and freedom to build upon your practice and research profile by completing a written dissertation or developing a Shakespeare project from start to finish. These experiences are valuable for developing actors, directors, educators, scholars and Shakespeare enthusiasts. The course will equip you with the knowledge, skills and experience to pursue a professional career in the study and/or practice of performing Shakespeare.

Most of the contact hours and foundational skills classes, workshops, seminars, and lectures take place in the first trimester (usually October – February) and these classes are likely to be scheduled in afternoon-late evening hour slots (depending on each specialist’s availability). The Second trimester (beginning about mid February) usually begins with a visit to Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the RSC in Stratford Upon Avon (both visits could be up to a week or more depending on each company’s schedule). You will find that after these off-site visits (at about March) that most of your work will be primarily independent and via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), leading into your final dissertation work; which can be produced independently and remotely should you wish. It is suggested that you prepare to be resident in Bath from October until March (depending on course scheduling) but that there will be more flexibility in your schedules as the course moves through each trimester leading to your dissertation.

Modules

Research Methods and Shakespeare Studies (30 Credits AT7000)
This module introduces you to key study skills and current historical/critical considerations of Shakespeare’s canon. The module offers a broad overview of research methodology and postgraduate research skills as a step towards either your thesis dissertation or practical dissertation project. It also functions as a key Masters level module, enabling further postgraduate research and opportunities to collaborate with postgraduate students also studying in the area of Performing Arts. The module will also explore and reflect upon a critical analysis of existing works, ideas and trends in the study of Shakespeare in a written research submission you will prepare and present for dissemination.

Shakespeare in Play and Practice 1 (30 Credits AT7001)
This is a highly practical module in which you will learn a range of foundational performance skills from BSU and external specialists in the industry and study how such skills relate to the performing of Shakespeare’s plays. Foundational performance skills will be taught such as acting, voice and movement (including stage combat). In addition, other skills and specialisms may be studied including comedy and music. You will also study and perform extracts (monologues and scenes) from Shakespeare’s plays in order to demonstrate your skills through practice and knowledge sharing.

Shakespeare in Play and Practice 2 (30 Credits AT7002)
This module is a highly practical module in which you will learn a wide range of performance skills taught by Bath Spa and external specialists in the industry. Foundational performance skills will be taught such as acting, directing, staging and voice. In addition, other technical skills may be taught including Clowning and Fooling, Stage Combat, Movement and Music. The module is taught through mostly workshops and seminars, and assessments may include presentations, performances and productions (directed and self-directed).

Shakespeare and the Globe (30 Credits AT7003)
This module covers the theoretical, historical and practical research of Shakespeare’s Theatre in classic and contemporary contexts. The module includes specialist lectures and off-site visits with Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the RSC. You will engage in independent study on topics introduced through the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and assessments may include performance projects, research assignments, literature reviews, performance reviews, and other assignments tied to your learning experience.

Performing Shakespeare Thesis (60 Credits AT7004)
In this module you will choose one of two thesis projects leading to an MA degree. If you choose the written MA project you will identify and undertake a research thesis topic that will culminate in a 13,000 word dissertation. If you choose the practice-based project you will undertake a major professional quality performance project and submit a supporting research portfolio. Tutorials to prepare for this thesis module may be conducted in the second trimester or early in the third. In this module you will engage in independent study/practice in order to develop your autonomous research and/or professional practice. You will be further supported through tutorials, meetings and the VLE.

Tutors

• Dr Terri Power (Course Director) – Performing and Staging Shakespeare
• Dr. Matthew Spring – Elizabethan Music
• Mark Langley – Voice Specialist
• Gordon Kemp – Stage Combat
• Pat Welsh – Comedy Specialist
• Dr Laura Purcell Gates – Movement Specialist
• And guest lecturers and artists

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Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find. Read more
Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/editing

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

COURSE OVERVIEW

- Unique course in UK.
- Creative and technical skills developed.
- Study in a collaborative, filmmaking environment.
- Students assigned individual editing suites.
- The NFTS is an Avid Education Partner.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

This course commences in January each year. This course provides a thorough education in editing skills in a professional filmmaking environment. Editing students are encouraged to consider their craft as part of the whole process of film and television production and not merely as the final stage, making them true collaborators, not just efficient technicians.

The emphasis of the Editing curriculum is firmly on storytelling and the relationship between editor and director. Students learn to apply their craft to the demands of fiction, documentary and animation, creating visual narratives while working with sound, music and, where appropriate, special effects. Workshops with other departments develop concepts of visual storytelling, mise-en-scène, storyboarding, sound design, music and scriptwriting.

Editing graduates have a high rate of employment on feature films, shorts and television programmes. Many new graduates quickly become editors on independent productions or assistant editors on features or TV drama, while others gravitate to visual effects, promos and i-dents. One recent graduate was joint winner of the Best Young Editor Award at Broadcast Magazine's B+ Awards. Recent graduate editing credits include Florence Foster Jenkins, Our Kind of Traitor, The Queen, Hannibal Rising, Reprise at the cinema and Downton Abbey, Paul Merton in China, Holby City, Hustle, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Spooks on television.

Tutors

Acting Head of Editing is Robin Sales, whose numerous credits include Walking On Sunshine, The Gruffalo, Miss Potter, Johnny English, Miss Brown.

Alumni

Editors Lucia Zucchetti (The Queen; Mrs Henderson Presents), Alex Mackie (Downton Abbey; St Trinian's; CSI), David Freeman (The Full Monty), Peter Lambert (A Better Life; New Moon), Nicolas Chaudeurge (Wuthering Heights; Fish Tank; Red Road), Valerio Bonelli (Hannibal Rising; Cemetery Junction; Gladiator), Nick Fenton (Submarine; The Arbor), Claire Dodgson (Minions, The Lorax, Charlie and Lola) and Ewa J Lind (Far North; The Warrior) studied here.

CURRICULUM

YEAR ONE

- With Sound Design and Composing students Abstract Film Workshop
- Without Images - a sound-only project
- Dramaturgy Workshop - focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance
- Modules and workshops include Foundation exercises for fiction and documentary editing
- Storyboarding workshop with Animation students Short documentary
- Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling
- Comedy Workshop - workshop using rushes from a feature film and focusing on editing for comedy and/or drama
- Animation Project - developed and produced to a soundtrack Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production First Year Film - the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments

YEAR TWO

- Fiction editing exercise focusing on drama editing and co-editing using complete rushes from a feature film
- 2nd year fiction production, shot on a digital format
- Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The Editing course is part of the Post Production department, where we are looking to assemble a group of students with diverse and varied backgrounds. There is no 'typical' student or perfect candidate who conforms to a mandatory list of qualifications.

You are likely to have some Industry experience or training in your chosen field. Your background may be in the arts or other media, you might be looking for a further professional qualification or wish to broaden your knowledge of film and video editing, taking you to a higher level of work.

APPLY WITH

- A DVD no more than 15 minutes running time, of material originally shot on film or video edited by you the applicant. If dialogue is not in English or the DVD does not have subtitles you should send a dialogue transcript in English via email.

- A creative video montage on DVD of found images (obtained from the television, the internet or another source) or existing film footage edited with a soundtrack. The montage should be between 2 and 5 minutes running time, edited by you the applicant. If you do not have access to an editing facility please create a montage of collected photographs which when laid out together tell a story.

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Reasons to study Business Management in the Creative Industries at DMU. The Business Management in the Creative Industries MSc will provide a platform for students to enhance career prospects within the creative industries through a combination of theoretical and practical learning. Read more
Reasons to study Business Management in the Creative Industries at DMU:

The Business Management in the Creative Industries MSc will provide a platform for students to enhance career prospects within the creative industries through a combination of theoretical and practical learning.

This programme is ideal for students coming from backgrounds in design, arts, media, technology design, gaming, film or other creative areas who are seeking to enhance their business skills. Students from other backgrounds who are interested in creative industries or in careers in marketing or advertising will also benefit from the course. We have expanded the range of optional modules, providing you with a greater opportunity to specialise according to your career and personal interests.

This course will develop your theoretical and applied knowledge in areas such as entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, strategy, finance, people management, brand design and the future influence of technological innovations.

You will study a range of management issues and develop relevant skills for operating and managing in the creative industries, which have seen significant global growth in recent years.

Students will have the opportunity to take part in a placement or an internship as part of the Executive Company Project or participate in an Entrepreneurship Project providing the opportunity to prepare a full business plan under the guidance of an academic supervisor and industry mentor. Alternatively, students can pursue a Creative Research Project which is a 'hands-on' live design project or more traditional dissertation. All of the project options allow you to apply knowledge from the course to a real-world business environment.

If you are interested in this programme but are unsure of your eligibility to apply, please send your CV/resume or profile to for review.

•Option to pursue an Executive Company Project, Entrepreneurship Project, Creative Research Project or Dissertation

•Personal leadership mentoring and career coaching

•World-leading academics from the faculties of business, arts, humanities, design and technology

•Unique learning environment headquartered in the Great Hall of Leicester Castle

•Regular presentations by leading business figures

•Networking and peer support as a result of being part of a small, exceptionally talented tutor group

•Modules that have been developed in partnership with business, with the objective of providing students with key skills needed to lead and succeed in today’s global business environment

•Access to the postgraduate wing of the £35million Hugh Aston Building which has its own café and store

•Access to a high tech 24/7 high-tech library with a choice of learning environments. This in addition to new amenities such as the QEII Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre

•Mentoring and one-to-one academic support from leading academics, at the forefront of their fields

•Excellent contact hours of 15 or more hours per week

•Emphasis on the development of business-relevant cultural awareness, including optional language study Valuable links to Leicester’s Curve Theatre, the British Library, Channel 4, the BBC, Leicestershire TV/Channel 2020, BBC Leicester, Harborough FM, GV Gallery London, The Phoenix Partners, Global Radio Dave’s Leicester Comedy Festival, one of Europe’s largest comedy festivals, amongst others

Teaching and Assessment

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, group work and self-directed study. Assessment is through coursework (presentations, essays and reports) and usually an exam or test.
Your precise timetable will depend on the optional modules you choose to take, however you will normally attend around 15 hours of timetabled taught sessions (lectures and tutorials) each week. We expect you to undertake at least 15 further hours of independent study to complete project work and research.

Course Modules

•Entrepreneurial Finance and Financial Management

•Strategic Management
•Business Creation and Innovation

•Leadership and Culture in Organisational Contexts
•Introduction to the Creative Industries
•Integrated Brand Management
•The Business of the Performing Arts
•Knowing and Developing Yourself for Professional Success
•Global IP Management

Optional modules

•Creative Technologies
•Creative Research Methods

Either

•Dissertation involves research informed by a critical discussion, relevant issues and evidence. You will evaluate research methods available, identify and critically review literature, analyse information and draw conclusions relevant to a critical area.

•Creative Research Project is a hands-on live design project or more traditional disseration.

•Executive Company Project offers an opportunity to complete a practical management project in the workplace, so you can link theory to practice and develop practical skills for leadership. You will research a management issue provided by a sponsoring organisation, supported by both academic and work-based supervisors, while engaging with the business world.

•Entrepreneurship Project gives you a chance to prepare a full business plan under the guidance of an academic supervisor and industry mentor. Alternatively, you can pursue a Creative Research project, which is a hands on, ‘live’ design project or a more traditional dissertation.

Graduate Careers

A degree in Business Management and the Creative Industries will open up a wide range of career opportunities as you develop a broad base of skills that are in great demand with global employers.
You may choose to pursue careers in brand management, account management, talent management or a variety of other roles within the creative industries.
You will benefit from access to DMU’s established Careers and Employability Team, who offer employability sessions and workshops and can advise you on your options.

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How do you build and engage audiences around films and television programmes online? The film and television industry needs people who have ‘interactive’ and ‘new media’ skills in order to maximise the potential of films and television programmes across platforms. Read more
How do you build and engage audiences around films and television programmes online? The film and television industry needs people who have ‘interactive’ and ‘new media’ skills in order to maximise the potential of films and television programmes across platforms.

Quick Facts

- 12 Month Course
- Full-time
- Course runs Jan-Dec
- Next intake: January 2017
- UK and EEA applicants only

- Delivered in partnership with Sky.
- Students work across apps, social media, games and television.
- Regular high level industry speakers.
- Develop and Produce 'digital first' content and 'digital extensions' for film and television.
- Work with students from other award-winning NFTS departments including TV. Entertainment, Documentary and Games.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 07 JUL 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/producing-digital-content-and-formats

COURSE OVERVIEW

As audiences turn into users, film and tv production companies need people who can maximise their presence online. This means you'll not only be involved in the production of content, you'll also be designing new forms of media.

Students will be taught by leading industry tutors responsible for some of the UK’s most cutting edge multi-platform projects including Got to Dance, Million Pound Drop, The Voice, X Factor, Misfits, Big Brother and Embarrassing Bodies.

The course advisory board includes:

- Matt Locke - Storythings
- Rosie Allimonos - You Tube
- Anthony Rose - Zeebox
- Martin Trickey - Head of Digital, Warner Bros TV Production
- Jody Smith - Channel 4
- Justin Gayner- Channel Flip
- Kat Hebden – Fremantle
- Jon Aird - BBC Comedy
- Will Saunders - BBC Creaitve Director, Digital

The course will be full-time over twelve months (starting in January each year) and will be delivered at the NFTS in its historic studios with some aspects of the curriculum delivered at Sky Studios. Students will create standalone digital projects and also work alongside students from Documentary, Comedy and Television Entertainment to create extensions to ‘traditional’ programmes.

Specifically you will learn about:

- Audience Behaviour across Genres
- Social Media - sharing, visibility and discoverability
- Second Screen apps
- Rapid Prototyping and Wireframes
- User testing
- Project Management
- Creative Problem Solving
- Branding and Communication
- Harnessing Digital Technologies to support Film and Television
- User Experience: human interaction, design and research
- Digital Workflows - end to end
- Understand Data and Metrics

Students graduate able to:

- Develop and pitch projects to industry professionals
- Build and manage cross platform teams
- Produce multi-platform production projects
- Exploit the opportunities presented by digital media

CURRICULUM

The course is made up of a number of modules and workshops, you learn by ‘doing’ as well as understanding theory and developing a variety of practical and creative skills.

Module: Specialist Factual
History, Science, Arts and Religious programming are fertile ground for tv companies and broadcasters to extend their programme beyond the schedule and to create deeper engagement with the subject matter. In this module you will learn about the opportunities offered by the various strands of specialist factual programming, look at best practice examples and develop a proposition for how to take a specific show - which will be set as a live project by a UK TV broadcaster - and expand it online.

Module: Game Shows
In this module you will work with Television Entertainment students to devise a Game Show that will integrate a second screen element wherein the viewing audience can actually affect and/or be integrated into the broadcast itself.

Module: Talent Shows and Live Events
Talent Shows are increasingly cross platform propositions. From online auditions, to social media feeds to support particular ‘artists’. In this module you will learn about the opportunities offered by the live ‘Talent Show’ looking at worldwide best practice examples. You will develop a proposition for how to take a specific show - which will be set as a live project by a UK TV broadcaster - and expand it online.

Module: Campaigns
Social and online media are increasingly important aspect of ‘Campaign’ television and filmmaking - from Hugh’s Fish Fight to Bowling for Columbine. In this module you will develop an idea for a campaign and consider what happens online, on TV, on film etc.

Module: Digital First Programming
In this module you will explore content that is digital first and unique to online.

Graduation Project
You will develop a digital proposition in one of the following ways i) you will partner with a Documentary, Television Entertainment or Games student to create the digital extension for their graduation project. ii) you will work on a live brief set by Sky iii) you will create your digital first proposition.

NFTS BENEFITS

Digital Content and Formats course participants will have full access to the NFTS’ optional creative stimulus strands, including: Passport to Cinema (weekly screenings of classic and pre-release films in the state-of-the-art campus cinema); and NFTS Masterclasses (major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include Graham King (producer, Hugo, The Departed), Guy Ritchie (Director, Sherlock Holmes), Danny Boyle (Director, Slumdog Millionaire) and Ian Livingstone (former President and CEO, Eidos).

TUTORS

The course is led by Louise Brown, former Head of Digital Commissioning at Channel 4, with tutors that include BAFTA and Emmy-winning Kim Plowright, and many of the people on the course advisory board. In addition the course is supported by Sky.

APPLY WITH

Please tell us about an idea you have for a digital extension to a television programme broadcast on a Sky television channel. No more than one page (A4 paper).

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR PRODUCING DIGITAL CONTENT AND FORMATS COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1045

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. You will learn the essentials (story, structure, conflict and, most importantly, comic voice) and the business of getting in the door (pitching, dos and don’ts, how to handle rewrites and writing for producers). You will graduate with the satisfaction of knowing that your experience is truly a one-of-a-kind accomplishment.

Students work on a one-to-one basis with an award-winning, internationally acclaimed writer who critiques, supports and helps improve their writing. Program faculty have made millions laugh and have included Joe Flaherty (Second City Television (SCTV), Happy Gilmore, Freaks and Geeks) and David Flaherty (SCTV, Maniac Mansion).

Your experience will span 30 weeks. Correspondence is as close as your fingers are to your laptop. No classroom here – just you and your ideas. Our advisory committee provides regular review and input to our curriculum, ensuring our program is always on the cutting edge of industry developments.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.

• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Think you have a funny premise for a TV show? How about an idea that would make a great movie? If you’ve ever dreamt about writing a comedy, make it happen. And the beauty is, you can write comedy anywhere, any time your schedule allows.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING FOR SCREEN

MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. The course is primarily for those who have had previous training or professional experience in theatre, film or television. It will build on the existing
skills of students and focus on the specific needs of the year group. Drawing on the expertise of Central’s permanent staff team and specialist professionals from the industry, the programme aims to encourage the development of creative artists with the flexibility to work across performance mediums.

Across the first two terms, students will follow rigorous training in acting, which will concentrate on core skills: voice, body and creative interpretation. The principles of the study derive from psychophysical methods, particularly the techniques of Michael Chekhov and Stanislavski. The emphasis of the training is on producing actors who have a high level of creative skills and have developed flexible
and adaptable bodies and voices, with the necessary technique to apply to a screen context.

The range of classes across these terms will include screen technique; this will essentially examine the distinction between screen and live performance. It will also cover visual storytelling, working in, and adapting to, shot size, cheating, hitting the mark, shooting contemporary scenes from television and film, and the preparation of different styles of work, including soap, drama and comedy.

Acting classes will interrogate the body and provide students with a toolbox of exercises. There is a specific focus on relaxing the body and working with ease, developing the imagination, unpicking habits, creating character, and investigating the inner life. Voice and dialect classes will encourage an understanding of the voice as an instrument and will work with a variety of text including poetry, verbatim,
classical and contemporary material. In the area of movement, there is exposure to forms, which may include jazz and historical forms of dance, physical acting approaches including Suzuki, Lecoq, yoga, and chi kung. Other classes include sight-reading, textual analysis, casting, and mock auditions led by casting directors, actors and directors. Professional preparation will involve guidance on selecting photographs, writing CVs, self-marketing and online promotion.

ASSESSMENT

Modes of assessment include practical assignments, reflective writing, presentation, written and practice-based research. For the
independent project there is an option to make a film, write a dissertation or compile a portfolio, which would include a case study
of a filmmaker and an extended research enquiry.

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PLEASE NOTE. This course will run in September 2016. This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor. Read more
PLEASE NOTE: This course will run in September 2016

This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor.

Between retreats the course is run via distance-learning with a website, chat room and e-tutorials. This makes it possible for those living outside the UK, and those with busy working lives, for instance freelancers and those in the film and TV industries, to take time out to attend. We have a wide variety of students on the course including established actors, comedy writers, editors, producers, novelists and many others.

During the MASTFiR course (MA in Screenwriting for Televion and Film - Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. You will develop a range of ideas, then go on to write film and television outlines, and several drafts of a feature film screenplay, a TV single drama, or a TV series or serial bible and sample episodes. You will be immersed in a creative atmosphere conducive to concentrated learning and group interaction; a core unit is the Development Lab, where you will present your work in progress to the group for criticism and feedback, and experiment with co-writing.

You will also meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mascreenwritingfortelevisionandfilmretreat.aspx

Why choose this course?

- in the fast-changing world of digital drama, new media and new film markets, you will become skilled in producing strong and original fiction writing.

- the course director is Ivan Levene, a practising screenwriter and script editor with over 15 years of experience in the industry. He currently has two produced feature films, and has been involved in the development of numerous other film and TV projects, including a recent major international release. Before this he worked in acquisitions and development, advancing over £15m of film and TV production from inception to marketplace. Current commissions include a supernatural thriller with Matthew Rhys, and a biopic set in Gilded Age New York about Harriet Hubbard Ayer - socialite, proto-feminist, and the first person to create an international cosmetics business.

- teaching television is screenwriting lecturer Adam Ganz, whose TV credits include Pillow Talk and Murder Without Motive; and guest lecturing in television are Gillian Gordon and Jonathan Powell.

- despite the first students only graduating in 2008, we have already had a host of successes with many of our students finding success in the industry.

- you will meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

Department research and industry highlights

- the MA Screenwriting for Television and Film Retreat course (MASTFiR) only began graduating students in 2008 but already we have had a host of successes - Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units.

Core course units:
Script Craft
This unit will focus on the acquisition of basic writing skills, and is a gateway to the ‘Story and Theme’ unit. You will explore the specifics of scene and dialogue construction, formatting and issues around research and around adaptation from source materials – e.g. plays, novels and news stories.

Story and Theme
This unit teaches the essential components of story and structure, the specific language of film storytelling and genre. It will include lectures, screenings of films and extracts, and individual and group analysis of films. You will produce ideas, formal outlines and a feature-length screenplay or TV series bibles and episode.

Development Lab
This is a discussion forum to which you bring the work above, where it is critiqued and debated from a number of points of view including aesthetic, generic, marketing, audience and budget. Development Lab is interactive and is at the core of the course; it replicates many of the development processes you will face in the film and television industry.

Contexts: Current British Film and TV Practice
This unit covers current aesthetic and generic trends in British film and television. There will also be lectures and seminars on budget, schedule, commissioning, finance, contracts, casting and marketing, and you will explore the production and marketing implications of your own screenplay projects.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- the ability to discriminate between project ideas, present ideas and drafts to others effectively, and both give and receive constructive criticism

- the understanding of the aesthetic and economic conditions of the marketplace, how their work may be viewed in terms of budget and audience, and the stages a screenplay will go through in development and production

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of the film and television screenplay- how it signifies, how it communicates meaning to the film producer, director, actor and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the processes of writing a screenplay, from initial concept to final draft

- advanced understanding of the various stages of script development and how each is documented- outlines, treatments, pitch documents and so on

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years, particularly in the context of economic and market developments in these industries

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of writing and development, and how the roles played by the various parties- producer, script editor, director and so on- shape and influence the screenplay.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including script outlines and scenes, a completed feature film screenplay and/or TV series episode and ‘bible’, and marketing and pitch documents.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, you will be well prepared for careers in television and feature film screenwriting and script development.

Our recent graduate successes include:

Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The Cultural Events Management MSc is tailored to meet the needs of the dynamic and expanding industry of cultural events and festivals. Read more
The Cultural Events Management MSc is tailored to meet the needs of the dynamic and expanding industry of cultural events and festivals. You will explore the connections between culture and business/ management, while applying theory, key skills and knowledge to practical experience in the industry. At the heart of the course is a synergy of arts, culture, and management theory and practice, which ensures that you will deepen your understanding of, and competence in, developing and managing cultural and/or commercial events.

You will have an excellent learning experience combined with intensive study and research options with key professionals in the field, such as the British Arts Festivals Association, Festival Republic, Glastonbudget, Spark Children's Art Festival and many more. You will also work with teaching staff at the cutting edge of research and new ideas in the field, as well as helping to organise and run our annual week-long festival, Cultural Exchanges.

You will receive one-to-one tutorial support, participate in lively workshops, seminars and lectures, and have the opportunity to research individual festivals and events. Contact time is nine hours per week. Assessment methods include essays, portfolios,
presentations, proposals, reports, and a dissertation. The course also provides encounters with a wide range of professionals in the events field through the various guest lectures and study workshops.

DMU is linked to festivals and events across Europe through its membership of the European Festivals Research Project. It is also linked to the annual Leicester Comedy Festival, which started as a DMU student project in 1993. The Cultural Events Management staff run their own Cultural Exchanges festival and the team are involved in research on festivals from music festivals such as Latitude and Summer Sundae Weekender, which creates opportunities for your own research projects and work placements. One major feature of the MSc is that staff offer modules within their research specialisations, giving you the opportunity to be at the cutting edge of new discoveries and developments within the field.

Within the UK alone it is estimated that there may be up to 25,000 festivals and events with a strong cultural dimension. When one adds to that the increasing number of commercial events, it is clear that there is a substantial market for our graduates in the UK and globally. Many people employed in the festivals sector travel from one festival to another on three-four month contracts. Over and above that, there are of course major sporting events such as the Olympics, or the commercial expos which all provide employment opportunities.

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The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. Read more
The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. The School has distinctive expertise in offering practice based MPhil and PhD programmes tailored to your individual interests as well offering the more traditional degree based on the written thesis or a mixture of the two. Research expertise in the School is organised around four groups.

The Body, Space and Technology Research Group make specific and focused interventions in the fields of physical and virtual live performance practices. The group publishes its own online journal and pioneers new developments in both theoretical and practical fields. Performances arising from the research are given regularly in London and internationally. The group’s current project ‘Advanced Interactivity in the Arts’ is investigating digital technology and its impact on performance; motion capture; live video; granular synthesis; web-based applications; body based performer techniques.

The Contemporary Writing Research Group includes researchers and practitioners across the genres and forms of contemporary fiction and poetry. There are four practising creative writers, and a creative writing fellow. Research specialisms in the group include: contemporary poetics, the New York School of Poets, music and writing, popular fictions, postcolonial, multicultural and feminist writing. The group has staged a number of international conferences, including: British Braids (2001), Jewish Women Writers (2002) and Contemporary Writing Environments (2004).

The Contemporary Music Practice Research Centre covers the interfaces between genres of composition and improvisation, technology and human performance, music and society, movement and sound, and between text and music. The group staged a conference, ‘Interfaces – Where Composition and Improvisation Meet’ in December 2000 and hosted the 2001 Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, which was attended by a large number of international delegates. The theme of the conference was ‘Music and Power’.

The Screen Media Research Centre includes researchers working in many areas of film, television and new media including documentary, British, European and Hong Kong cinema; Hollywood and American independent cinema, political film, cult cinema, animation and representations of gender and sexuality; and generic territories including horror, science fiction and comedy. The group has staged international conferences including ‘The Spectacle of the Real: From Hollywood to Reality TV and Beyond’, in January 2003.

The School has a growing postgraduate community and offers a range of resources to support research. Students also benefit from the recently opened Graduate Centre which provides a dedicated space to meet with fellow postgraduate students. The School also has opportunities for part-time teaching for postgraduates with relevant skills. All postgraduates can apply for financial help to give conference papers and other research related activities.

Awards
The School of Arts may be able to offer a limited number of bursaries or fee waivers. Other financial awards may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and other funding bodies. Some of these funding packages cover tuition fees (at UK/EU rates) and living expenses for the duration of study; others cover the fees, or contribute in other ways towards the cost of study.

MPhil and PhD research supervision is available and includes the following areas:

Drama/Performance Studies
Aesthetic potential of digitised technology for performance (artificial intelligence, motion capture, 3D-modelling and animation)
Somatic practice and performance composition
Interdisciplinary performance
Live capture (sound, film) plus performance
Solo performance and new performance writing

English/Contemporary Writing
Contemporary literature
Creative writing
Twentieth century literature
Victorian literature
The Renaissance
Modern American literature
Popular literature
Postcolonial literature
Contemporary literary theory
Literature and mourning
Innovative, marginal and non-traditional texts
All aspects of literary theory

Film/TV Studies
Five themes provide major strands within which most of the research is organised:
Cult Media and Transgression
Spectacle, Documentary and the Real
The Politics of Representation and Cultural Identity
Dominant and Alternative Cinemas
Videogames and Digital Media

Music
Composition
Improvisation
Electronic music and live electronic transformation
Meeting points between popular, world and ‘classical’ cultures
‘Digital arts’ – the interfaces between different forms of electronic media and live performance
Music in education and community

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