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Masters Degrees (Comedy)

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The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. Read more
The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. The new 18 month part-time NFTS Diploma in Writing and Producing Comedy will enable students to develop all forms of scripted and unscripted comedy including, sitcoms, sketch shows, and panel shows for radio and tv. The course is run in partnership with Channel 4.

-The world's first Diploma course in Writing and Producing Comedy.
-Delivered in partnership with Channel 4
-Part-time, evening course
-Regular Industry speakers
-Develop and write an original show and make a taster tape.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

“This has been a fascinating job. My Tuesday evenings are a real joy. One thing I've learned is that people shine in different ways and at different times. When it comes to comedy you can't write anyone off." Bill Dare Course Tutor

Writing & Producing Comedy commences in January each year. Students are taught by the renowned comedy producer and writer BILL DARE supported by guest sessions from the people responsible for some of the UK’s most iconic UK shows including Peep Show, Father Ted, Have I Got News for You, Spitting Image, Horrible Histories and Green Wing.

The course is part-time (one evening a week and occasional Saturdays) over eighteen months and is delivered in central London. You will be expected to spend at least 8 hours a week working on assignments for the course. You will leave the course with a portfolio of material developed during the course, this could include a ten-minute taster tape of an idea you have developed, or a full script and some sketches and one-liners.

Specifically you will learn about:
-Comedy landscape
-Radio comedy
-Sketches
-Panel shows and formats
-Characterisation
-Story structure
-Narrative TV comedy
-Script editing
-Topical one-liners
-Outlines and treatments
-Pitching
-Commissioning processes
-Working with performers
-Compliance issues
-Working with writers
-Writing briefs

Students graduate able to:
-Generate comedy programme ideas
-Create a narrative comedy, sketch show or comedy entertainment show
-Pitch ideas to commissioning editors
-Work with writers and help them develop their ideas

The course advisory board includes:
-Dawson Bros – The Peter Serafinowicz Show, That Mitchell & Webb Look, Big School
-Sam Bain - Peep Show, Fresh Meat, Rev
-Richard Boden – Blackadder, 'Allo 'Allo, IT Crowd
-Gregor Cameron – Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show, Fighting Talk
-Saurabh Kakkar – Head of Development – Comedy – Big Talk
-Graham Linehan – Father Ted, IT Crowd, Count Arthur Strong
-Caroline Norris - Horrible Histories, The Armstrong & Miller Show, Dead Ringers
-John O’Farrell – Spitting Image, Have I Got News For You, Novelist
-Richard Preddy – Green Wing, Campus
-Lucy Robinson - Co-Founder Little Comet Film & TV/Head of Comedy Brothers and Sisters
-Lorna Watson & Ingrid Oliver – Watson & Oliver

"The NFTS course gave us great access to industry contacts, and we went from having no professional experience to working regularly on BBC radio and television. This diploma is a brilliant way of learning about comedy while strengthening key contacts in the TV and radio industry. It was invaluable to our career progression." Ed Amsden/Tom Coles

"I went from having a well-paid, secure, boring job in insurance, to having a badly-paid, insecure, cool job in comedy. I quit my well paid-job in insurance and ended up with a terribly-paid job in comedy. If this sounds like a good idea, then this is the course for you... Without this course I'd still just be writing jokes in my parents’ basement... Now I've got a degree they've let me move back into the main house.” Joel Pitcher

So you think you’re funny? Apply Now!

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

The NFTS want to encourage applications from the brightest and best talent out there….from all backgrounds. We are actively seeking to redress imbalances within the Industry by encouraging applications from under-represented groups, and have bursaries of £4650 on offer to 2 of the successful candidates. Bursaries help towards the cost of the course andwill be awarded to stand out talent who can demonstrate that without this funding they would not be able to afford the course, or who can demonstrate they bring a unique and distinct perspective and voice to the course.

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This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the theory and practice of stand-up comedy at postgraduate level. The University of Kent has a long history of teaching and research in comic performance, and the Templeman Library houses the British Stand-Up Comedy Archive. Read more
This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the theory and practice of stand-up comedy at postgraduate level. The University of Kent has a long history of teaching and research in comic performance, and the Templeman Library houses the British Stand-Up Comedy Archive.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/345/stand-up-comedy

Course detail

You will learn how to write and perform your own material, reflect on your work, and engage with theories comedy through workshops, seminars and supervision. Stand-up relies on a dynamic interaction between performer and audience, and for this reason live performance is a central part of the teaching strategy. You will perform regularly for audiences of up to 200 people throughout the year, developing your performance skills, honing material and increasing your understanding of this vibrant form of popular theatre. Assessment is through performances, portfolios and essays.

Format and assessment

The theoretical aspects of the programme culminate in a practice-as-research project in which you explore ideas about comedy and comic performance through both traditional academic research and creative practice.

There is a strong emphasis on professional practice, with students performing open mike spots in established comedy clubs in the UK and beyond, as well as organising their own shows. Regular teaching staff include Dr Oliver Double, a former stand-up who has published widely on comedy and popular performance. In addition to this, we have guest lectures, workshops and master classes from professional comedians, including the seminal alternative comedian Tony Allen.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions from museum positions and teaching roles to working as journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work in Pinewood Studios, The National Theatre and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, in roles including editorial assistants and even stunt doubles.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom. -Unique 12 month course,. -Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom. Read more
Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom.

-Unique 12 month course,
-Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom
-Prepares you to work in a multicamera studio environment
-Work as a Vision Mixer, or a Camera/ Lighting or Sound specialist.
-Includes a six-week internship with Sky and some of the modules are taught at Sky Studios.
-Sky also guarantees to employ at least one graduate of the course each year.
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. This intensely practical and pioneering course aims to prepare students for a successful future in multi-camera studio entertainment production. Students are taught by NFTS staff and visiting Industry Professionals and have hands-on experience of a variety of studio roles as well as in their specialisation.

Students will apply for, and be accepted onto the course in one of three craft specialisations:

I. Cameras and Lighting
Practise the core skills of TV studio camera operators, positioning the camera, framing and focus. Learn to use broadcast cameras in a multi-camera studio, repositioning and changing shot as the director demands while the vision mixer cuts and mixes the show. Learn to develop shots, moving with artists or in sympathy with music to create dynamic and exciting television. Begin to light simple interviews and more complex multi-camera lighting techniques. You’ll need a passion for pictures, quick reactions, clear and proactive thinking with excellent co-ordination and a good sense of musical rhythm.

II. Vision Mixing
Train on sophisticated broadcast vision mixing consoles, build and realise complex live visual effects to the director’s brief. Using these high-end production tools, Vision Mixing is like editing - but in real time! Cut, mix and wipe between cameras, pre-edited clips and other video sources live. Learn how to mix a variety of genres from situation comedy to fast paced entertainment and music shows adding digital effects and captioning in real time. You’ll need to be logical, quick thinking, calm under pressure and have an excellent feel for timing and rhythm, both dramatic and musical.

III. Sound (in a broadcast studio environment)
Sound carries the story, sets the mood and the tempo. It provides the enabling structure against which TV pictures can shine. Good sound is essential to a TV programme. Learn how to choose and place microphones for the best results for a variety of shows including live music. Train to use ‘Fisher booms’ - in great demand for sitcoms and soaps - to pick up drama dialogue. Mix studio sound in real time using sophisticated broadcast desks. Enhance the show with spot effects, music cues and audio processing to create atmosphere and energy. Learn how to manage TV comms including studio talkback systems allowing key production team members to communicate and collaborate effectively. You’ll need to be a quick, logical thinker, have a ‘good ear’ and a passion for high quality sound.

These are the core disciplines of multi camera studio operations and people trained at a high level in these craft areas are hotly in demand.

CURRICULUM

Students will be exposed to the creative challenge of working across a range of entertainment programming, including: Situation Comedy, Magazine Shows, Talent Shows, Panel Shows, Game Shows etc.

The award focuses on developing students’ specific capabilities, in the following areas:
-The language of entertainment television so that they can work effectively within production teams
-A high level technical understanding of their chosen specialist area
-A critical awareness of the production workflow and the impact of multiplatform on production

Modules include:
-The Grammar of Television Entertainment
-Media Technology
-Music and Magazine Programming
-Chat Shows and Panel Shows
-Comedy

The six week internship at Sky is constituted of two distinct elements. Firstly the student will shadow a Sky Production Services member of staff working in their specialisation (Vision Mixer, Sound, Camera/Lighting). This will cement the students understanding of the wide range of professional practices and competencies associated with each role. Secondly, students will undertake a range of simulated exercises (designed by the NFTS with Sky involvement) to hone their craft and understanding on the Sky equipment.

At the end of the course, students will be well placed to work professionally in their chosen job role within broadcast production. They will also have a thorough understanding of the television production process encompassing everything from the creative to the technical and the business aspects.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find. Read more
Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find.

-Unique course in UK.
-Creative and technical skills developed.
-Study in a collaborative, filmmaking environment.
-Students assigned individual editing suites.
-The NFTS is an Avid Education Partner.
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course. Postgraduate students can apply for a loan to help with their studies via the Student Loans Company Loans. A £ 10,000 loan is available to contribute to course and living costs. The Post Graduate Loan is only open to EU/EEA and UK Students who normally live in England. It is not currently available to Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland Students. Find out more here: https://nfts.co.uk/fees-funding/funding-guide

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. This course provides a thorough education in editing skills in a professional filmmaking environment. Editing students are encouraged to consider their craft as part of the whole process of film and television production and not merely as the final stage, making them true collaborators, not just efficient technicians.

The emphasis of the Editing curriculum is firmly on storytelling and the relationship between editor and director. Students learn to apply their craft to the demands of fiction, documentary and animation, creating visual narratives while working with sound, music and, where appropriate, special effects. Workshops with other departments develop concepts of visual storytelling, mise-en-scène, storyboarding, sound design, music and scriptwriting.

Editing graduates have a high rate of employment on feature films, shorts and television programmes. Many new graduates quickly become editors on independent productions or assistant editors on features or TV drama, while others gravitate to visual effects, promos and i-dents. One recent graduate was joint winner of the Best Young Editor Award at Broadcast Magazine's B+ Awards. Recent graduate editing credits include Florence Foster Jenkins, Our Kind of Traitor, The Queen, Hannibal Rising, Reprise at the cinema and Downton Abbey, Paul Merton in China, Holby City, Hustle, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Spooks on television.

CURRICULUM

YEAR ONE
With Sound Design and Composing students Abstract Film Workshop
Without Images - a sound-only project
Dramaturgy Workshop - focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance
Modules and workshops include Foundation exercises for fiction and documentary editing
Storyboarding workshop with Animation students Short documentary
Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling
Comedy Workshop - workshop using rushes from a feature film and focusing on editing for comedy and/or drama
Animation Project - developed and produced to a soundtrack Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production First Year Film - the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments

YEAR TWO
Fiction editing exercise focusing on drama editing and co-editing using complete rushes from a feature film
2nd year fiction production, shot on a digital format
Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation
Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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Reasons to study Business Management in the Creative Industries at DMU. The Business Management in the Creative Industries MSc will provide a platform for students to enhance career prospects within the creative industries through a combination of theoretical and practical learning. Read more
Reasons to study Business Management in the Creative Industries at DMU:

The Business Management in the Creative Industries MSc will provide a platform for students to enhance career prospects within the creative industries through a combination of theoretical and practical learning.

This programme is ideal for students coming from backgrounds in design, arts, media, technology design, gaming, film or other creative areas who are seeking to enhance their business skills. Students from other backgrounds who are interested in creative industries or in careers in marketing or advertising will also benefit from the course. We have expanded the range of optional modules, providing you with a greater opportunity to specialise according to your career and personal interests.

This course will develop your theoretical and applied knowledge in areas such as entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, strategy, finance, people management, brand design and the future influence of technological innovations.

You will study a range of management issues and develop relevant skills for operating and managing in the creative industries, which have seen significant global growth in recent years.

Students will have the opportunity to take part in a placement or an internship as part of the Executive Company Project or participate in an Entrepreneurship Project providing the opportunity to prepare a full business plan under the guidance of an academic supervisor and industry mentor. Alternatively, students can pursue a Creative Research Project which is a 'hands-on' live design project or more traditional dissertation. All of the project options allow you to apply knowledge from the course to a real-world business environment.

If you are interested in this programme but are unsure of your eligibility to apply, please send your CV/resume or profile to for review.

•Option to pursue an Executive Company Project, Entrepreneurship Project, Creative Research Project or Dissertation

•Personal leadership mentoring and career coaching

•World-leading academics from the faculties of business, arts, humanities, design and technology

•Unique learning environment headquartered in the Great Hall of Leicester Castle

•Regular presentations by leading business figures

•Networking and peer support as a result of being part of a small, exceptionally talented tutor group

•Modules that have been developed in partnership with business, with the objective of providing students with key skills needed to lead and succeed in today’s global business environment

•Access to the postgraduate wing of the £35million Hugh Aston Building which has its own café and store

•Access to a high tech 24/7 high-tech library with a choice of learning environments. This in addition to new amenities such as the QEII Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre

•Mentoring and one-to-one academic support from leading academics, at the forefront of their fields

•Excellent contact hours of 15 or more hours per week

•Emphasis on the development of business-relevant cultural awareness, including optional language study Valuable links to Leicester’s Curve Theatre, the British Library, Channel 4, the BBC, Leicestershire TV/Channel 2020, BBC Leicester, Harborough FM, GV Gallery London, The Phoenix Partners, Global Radio Dave’s Leicester Comedy Festival, one of Europe’s largest comedy festivals, amongst others

Teaching and Assessment

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, group work and self-directed study. Assessment is through coursework (presentations, essays and reports) and usually an exam or test.
Your precise timetable will depend on the optional modules you choose to take, however you will normally attend around 15 hours of timetabled taught sessions (lectures and tutorials) each week. We expect you to undertake at least 15 further hours of independent study to complete project work and research.

Course Modules

•Entrepreneurial Finance and Financial Management

•Strategic Management
•Business Creation and Innovation

•Leadership and Culture in Organisational Contexts
•Introduction to the Creative Industries
•Integrated Brand Management
•The Business of the Performing Arts
•Knowing and Developing Yourself for Professional Success
•Global IP Management

Optional modules

•Creative Technologies
•Creative Research Methods

Either

•Dissertation involves research informed by a critical discussion, relevant issues and evidence. You will evaluate research methods available, identify and critically review literature, analyse information and draw conclusions relevant to a critical area.

•Creative Research Project is a hands-on live design project or more traditional disseration.

•Executive Company Project offers an opportunity to complete a practical management project in the workplace, so you can link theory to practice and develop practical skills for leadership. You will research a management issue provided by a sponsoring organisation, supported by both academic and work-based supervisors, while engaging with the business world.

•Entrepreneurship Project gives you a chance to prepare a full business plan under the guidance of an academic supervisor and industry mentor. Alternatively, you can pursue a Creative Research project, which is a hands on, ‘live’ design project or a more traditional dissertation.

Graduate Careers

A degree in Business Management and the Creative Industries will open up a wide range of career opportunities as you develop a broad base of skills that are in great demand with global employers.
You may choose to pursue careers in brand management, account management, talent management or a variety of other roles within the creative industries.
You will benefit from access to DMU’s established Careers and Employability Team, who offer employability sessions and workshops and can advise you on your options.

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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more

Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.

You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:

• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine 

• Ancient Politics and Society

• Classical Receptions 

• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges 

• Literary Interactions

At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

If you decide to join us at Exeter you will become part of one of the largest and most successful Classics and Ancient History Departments in the UK. We have an excellent reputation for both our teaching and our research with league table rankings to match.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows;

  • Food and Culture;
  • Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context;
  • Hellenistic Culture and Society – History;
  • Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ;
  • Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity;
  • Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes;
  • Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought;
  • Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality;
  • The City of Rome (subject to availability);
  • Greek;
  • Latin;
  • Fast-Track Greek;
  • Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:

• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics

• Classical art and archaeology

• Classics in the history of sexuality

• Comparative philology and linguistics

• Food in the ancient world

• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy

• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic

• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality

• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies

• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen

• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis

• Latin literature

• Palaeography



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MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING FOR SCREEN

MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. The course is primarily for those who have had previous training or professional experience in theatre, film or television. It will build on the existing
skills of students and focus on the specific needs of the year group. Drawing on the expertise of Central’s permanent staff team and specialist professionals from the industry, the programme aims to encourage the development of creative artists with the flexibility to work across performance mediums.

Across the first two terms, students will follow rigorous training in acting, which will concentrate on core skills: voice, body and creative interpretation. The principles of the study derive from psychophysical methods, particularly the techniques of Michael Chekhov and Stanislavski. The emphasis of the training is on producing actors who have a high level of creative skills and have developed flexible
and adaptable bodies and voices, with the necessary technique to apply to a screen context.

The range of classes across these terms will include screen technique; this will essentially examine the distinction between screen and live performance. It will also cover visual storytelling, working in, and adapting to, shot size, cheating, hitting the mark, shooting contemporary scenes from television and film, and the preparation of different styles of work, including soap, drama and comedy.

Acting classes will interrogate the body and provide students with a toolbox of exercises. There is a specific focus on relaxing the body and working with ease, developing the imagination, unpicking habits, creating character, and investigating the inner life. Voice and dialect classes will encourage an understanding of the voice as an instrument and will work with a variety of text including poetry, verbatim,
classical and contemporary material. In the area of movement, there is exposure to forms, which may include jazz and historical forms of dance, physical acting approaches including Suzuki, Lecoq, yoga, and chi kung. Other classes include sight-reading, textual analysis, casting, and mock auditions led by casting directors, actors and directors. Professional preparation will involve guidance on selecting photographs, writing CVs, self-marketing and online promotion.

ASSESSMENT

Modes of assessment include practical assignments, reflective writing, presentation, written and practice-based research. For the
independent project there is an option to make a film, write a dissertation or compile a portfolio, which would include a case study
of a filmmaker and an extended research enquiry.

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During the MA in Screenwriting for Television and Film (in Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. Read more

During the MA in Screenwriting for Television and Film (in Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. You will develop a range of ideas, then go on to write film and television outlines, and several drafts of a feature film screenplay, a TV single drama, or a TV series or serial bible and sample episodes.

Commencing in September, you will be taught through a mixture of intensive writing retreats and distance learning techniques, including Skype and our dedicated online learning environment, Moodle. The course includes four week-long residential retreats throughout one year (full time), with some taking place in Central London and others at our beautiful Egham Campus, near Windsor. This structure immerses you in a creative atmosphere conducive to concentrated learning and group interaction, with Development Lab as a core module, where you will present your work in progress to the group for criticism and feedback, and experiment with co-writing.

Between retreats the course is run via distance-learning with a website, chat room and e-tutorials. This makes it possible for those living outside the UK, and those with busy working lives, such as freelancers and those in full-time employment, to take time out to attend. The course attracts a wide variety of students including those wishing to make a career change from other sectors through to established actors, comedy writers, editors, producers, novelists and many others.

You will also meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context.

  • You'll come to us for four week-long retreats, over the course of a (full-time) year. Between retreats, you'll learn from home via a website, chatroom and tutorials.
  • You'll learn as part of our creative campus, in a department with combined expertise in both Media theory and Media practice, rated in the top 10 Media Arts departments for research quality (REF, 2014)
  • You'll get to bounce your ideas off other people – core to the course is a 'writers' room' space, where students present their works-in-progress to each other for criticism and feedback. You'll also get to experiment with co-writing.
  • You'll learn from course director Ivan Levene, a screenwriter and script editor with over 15 years of experience in the industry. The teaching team includes Adam Ganz (whose dramas include Pillow Talk and Murder Without Motive), Jonathan Powell (former Controller of BBC One and Head of BBC Drama), Gillian Gordon (award-winning producer with 30 years experience) and John Roberts (BAFTA award winning director of Paulie).
  • You'll meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors. Recent speakers include experts from the BBC, Bad Robot Productions, Bankside Films, Casarotto Ramsay and United Agents as well as as well as directors such as Daniel Wolfe (Catch Me Daddy) and Sarah Gavron (Suffragette).

Course structure

  • Story and Theme
  • Development Lab
  • Contexts - Current British Film and Television Practice

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including script outlines and scenes, a completed feature film screenplay and/or TV series episode and ‘bible’, and marketing and pitch documents.

Your future career

You'll be set for a career in television and feature film screenwriting and script development. Graduates with work in film and TV include:

  • Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat, starring Cillian Murphy (2011).
  • Olivia Wakeford wrote for the feature film Baseline (2009).
  • Kay Stonham was commissioned by the BBC, and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. 
  • Adam Rolston's musical, A Sentimental Journey, on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of UK and US venues.
  • Daniel Wolfe directed and co-wrote Catch Me Daddy, released to critical acclaim in 2015.
  • Sir Lenny Henry wrote and starred in the autobiographical drama, Danny and the Human Zoo, for BBC 1.

Other students from our department have gone on to work in independent television and film production, for broadcasters like the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.



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The Cultural Events Management MSc is tailored to meet the needs of the dynamic and expanding industry of cultural events and festivals. Read more
The Cultural Events Management MSc is tailored to meet the needs of the dynamic and expanding industry of cultural events and festivals. You will explore the connections between culture and business/ management, while applying theory, key skills and knowledge to practical experience in the industry. At the heart of the course is a synergy of arts, culture, and management theory and practice, which ensures that you will deepen your understanding of, and competence in, developing and managing cultural and/or commercial events.

You will have an excellent learning experience combined with intensive study and research options with key professionals in the field, such as the British Arts Festivals Association, Festival Republic, Glastonbudget, Spark Children's Art Festival and many more. You will also work with teaching staff at the cutting edge of research and new ideas in the field, as well as helping to organise and run our annual week-long festival, Cultural Exchanges.

You will receive one-to-one tutorial support, participate in lively workshops, seminars and lectures, and have the opportunity to research individual festivals and events. Contact time is nine hours per week. Assessment methods include essays, portfolios,
presentations, proposals, reports, and a dissertation. The course also provides encounters with a wide range of professionals in the events field through the various guest lectures and study workshops.

DMU is linked to festivals and events across Europe through its membership of the European Festivals Research Project. It is also linked to the annual Leicester Comedy Festival, which started as a DMU student project in 1993. The Cultural Events Management staff run their own Cultural Exchanges festival and the team are involved in research on festivals from music festivals such as Latitude and Summer Sundae Weekender, which creates opportunities for your own research projects and work placements. One major feature of the MSc is that staff offer modules within their research specialisations, giving you the opportunity to be at the cutting edge of new discoveries and developments within the field.

Within the UK alone it is estimated that there may be up to 25,000 festivals and events with a strong cultural dimension. When one adds to that the increasing number of commercial events, it is clear that there is a substantial market for our graduates in the UK and globally. Many people employed in the festivals sector travel from one festival to another on three-four month contracts. Over and above that, there are of course major sporting events such as the Olympics, or the commercial expos which all provide employment opportunities.

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The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. Read more
The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. The School has distinctive expertise in offering practice based MPhil and PhD programmes tailored to your individual interests as well offering the more traditional degree based on the written thesis or a mixture of the two. Research expertise in the School is organised around four groups.

The Body, Space and Technology Research Group make specific and focused interventions in the fields of physical and virtual live performance practices. The group publishes its own online journal and pioneers new developments in both theoretical and practical fields. Performances arising from the research are given regularly in London and internationally. The group’s current project ‘Advanced Interactivity in the Arts’ is investigating digital technology and its impact on performance; motion capture; live video; granular synthesis; web-based applications; body based performer techniques.

The Contemporary Writing Research Group includes researchers and practitioners across the genres and forms of contemporary fiction and poetry. There are four practising creative writers, and a creative writing fellow. Research specialisms in the group include: contemporary poetics, the New York School of Poets, music and writing, popular fictions, postcolonial, multicultural and feminist writing. The group has staged a number of international conferences, including: British Braids (2001), Jewish Women Writers (2002) and Contemporary Writing Environments (2004).

The Contemporary Music Practice Research Centre covers the interfaces between genres of composition and improvisation, technology and human performance, music and society, movement and sound, and between text and music. The group staged a conference, ‘Interfaces – Where Composition and Improvisation Meet’ in December 2000 and hosted the 2001 Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, which was attended by a large number of international delegates. The theme of the conference was ‘Music and Power’.

The Screen Media Research Centre includes researchers working in many areas of film, television and new media including documentary, British, European and Hong Kong cinema; Hollywood and American independent cinema, political film, cult cinema, animation and representations of gender and sexuality; and generic territories including horror, science fiction and comedy. The group has staged international conferences including ‘The Spectacle of the Real: From Hollywood to Reality TV and Beyond’, in January 2003.

The School has a growing postgraduate community and offers a range of resources to support research. Students also benefit from the recently opened Graduate Centre which provides a dedicated space to meet with fellow postgraduate students. The School also has opportunities for part-time teaching for postgraduates with relevant skills. All postgraduates can apply for financial help to give conference papers and other research related activities.

Awards
The School of Arts may be able to offer a limited number of bursaries or fee waivers. Other financial awards may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and other funding bodies. Some of these funding packages cover tuition fees (at UK/EU rates) and living expenses for the duration of study; others cover the fees, or contribute in other ways towards the cost of study.

MPhil and PhD research supervision is available and includes the following areas:

Drama/Performance Studies
Aesthetic potential of digitised technology for performance (artificial intelligence, motion capture, 3D-modelling and animation)
Somatic practice and performance composition
Interdisciplinary performance
Live capture (sound, film) plus performance
Solo performance and new performance writing

English/Contemporary Writing
Contemporary literature
Creative writing
Twentieth century literature
Victorian literature
The Renaissance
Modern American literature
Popular literature
Postcolonial literature
Contemporary literary theory
Literature and mourning
Innovative, marginal and non-traditional texts
All aspects of literary theory

Film/TV Studies
Five themes provide major strands within which most of the research is organised:
Cult Media and Transgression
Spectacle, Documentary and the Real
The Politics of Representation and Cultural Identity
Dominant and Alternative Cinemas
Videogames and Digital Media

Music
Composition
Improvisation
Electronic music and live electronic transformation
Meeting points between popular, world and ‘classical’ cultures
‘Digital arts’ – the interfaces between different forms of electronic media and live performance
Music in education and community

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This interdisciplinary course is designed for well-qualified graduates who wish to extend their interest in medieval studies. Read more
This interdisciplinary course is designed for well-qualified graduates who wish to extend their interest in medieval studies. The flexible structure of the course allows students to construct their degree around their particular areas of interest, while acquiring both the technical expertise to investigate primary medieval documents and an insight into the complexities of medieval culture generally. Students will have the opportunity to be taught not only by Trinity staff but also by visiting lecturers from other internationally renowned institutions.

Students take four core courses:

Research Methodology;
Medieval Thought;
Medieval Culture and Society;
and a language chosen from: Elementary Classical Latin, Medieval Latin, Old English, Middle English, Italian, Medieval German, Medieval French, Old Irish.

Two options are also chosen. Currently the subject areas include:
Chaucer; Language and Genre; Varieties of Comedy in Dante and Boccaccio; 'Wild' Women in Medieval Literature; Old English Prose; Arthurian H; Courtly love song in Medieval Europe, Early Medieval Ireland; Text and Image; Old English Heroic Poetry; The Unruly Middle Ages; Medieval Philosophy.

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Get the training, connections and experiences you need to make your mark in television. Recognised with the Creative Skillset Tick of approval, GCU's MA Television Fiction Writing is the only full-time master's programme focusing solely on scripting for the UK. Read more

Get the training, connections and experiences you need to make your mark in television. Recognised with the Creative Skillset Tick of approval, GCU's MA Television Fiction Writing is the only full-time master's programme focusing solely on scripting for the UK.

Created in close collaboration with industry to maximise your employment opportunities, our programme offers you the full range of industry experiences - and supports you in developing your own original drama or comedy.

  • Instruction from both academic experts and top TV scriptwriters in British television
  • Chance to contribute to programmes currently airing on British TV
  • Individual mentoring from experienced television executives
  • Direct access to producers and commissioners
  • Year of mentoring from a London agent
  • Support from a professional script doctor
  • Opportunity to graduate with several projects ready to take to market

We'll teach you to story conference, storyline and edit scripts - all with direct input from the BBC, STV and other independent producers and writers. And you'll benefit from GCU's global reputation for academic excellence - combining academic theory with practical skills in a thriving and diverse community that shares a belief in the common good.

What you will study

There are four main strands to this Masters:

Story and Script Techniques (2 modules)

You will study storytelling and narrative, genre, character and voice, developing your critical and evaluative skills as well as your creative writing talents.

Writing for Existing Long Running TV Drama (2 modules)

You will gain a thorough understanding of how creative and writing processes work on long running dramas such as soap operas or medical dramas and then write your own mock storylines and scripts.

Creating Original TV Drama (2 modules)

You will tackle the challenge of creating your own original drama in the context of current commissioning trends.

Researching TV Drama Markets

You will explore the terrain of the TV fiction market, the main channels (home and abroad) and commissioning policies and audiences in order to enhance their market readiness.

Creative Skillset Tick

The Creative Skillset Tick is a kitemark of quality, showing the courses that best prepare students and apprentices for a career in the creative industries.

To be awarded the Tick a course has to undergo a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the creative industries and it is only given to courses that have the strongest links with industry.

Your career

With the hands-on experience offered in our MA Television Fiction Writing, you'll graduate uniquely prepared to launch an exciting new career in the field. GCU has built a reputation amongst employers including Warner Bros. Entertainment UK and Shed Productions for training creative and accomplished professionals who leave the programme ready to make meaningful contributions to television. You may also choose to pursue further academic work.



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UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. Read more

UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. No prior knowledge of a Nordic language is required, though students can opt to consolidate their language or translation skills, or to start Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish from scratch.

About this degree

Optional modules include advanced translation skills, Nordic cinema, Nordic literature in global perspective, the transnational politics of the region, and material cultures as well as modules on Viking and medieval Scandinavia. Assessed modules are supplemented with workshops and a summer school providing opportunities for networking and career development in publishing, translation, film-making, and the heritage and creative sectors.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality

Optional modules

Students choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Advanced Scandinavian Translation
  • Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme 95
  • Introduction to Old Norse
  • Crime and Small Communities in Nordic Literature
  • Advanced Old Icelandic Literature
  • Sources for the Viking Age

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and reading and language classes. Student performance is assessed through written examination, coursework, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: Scandinavian Studies MA

Careers

An MA in Scandinavian Studies offers prospects for employment in the private as well as in the public sector, whether in Scandinavia or in the English-speaking world. Former graduate students in the department are to be found in a range of challenging careers, which include work in IT and management, museums and university teaching.

Employability

In the UK and abroad, the Nordic countries are increasingly recognised for the success of their political and social model, and for their film, literature, food and design. Our MA graduates bring their deep understanding of Scandinavian culture to careers in which knowledge of the region is key: publishing, the arts, commerce and information management. Expertise in Nordic languages is rare in the UK, and employer demand is accordingly high. Our MA allows students to hone their Nordic language skills or to try a new language. Many of our graduates launch careers with translation companies and as freelancers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Scandinavian Studies is the largest independent Scandinavian department in the UK. Our research and teaching encompasses the languages, literatures, cultures, histories and politics of the entire Nordic region, ranging from the Viking Middle Ages to the present day.

Facilities are excellent: UCL boasts possibly the best Scandinavian Studies library outside Scandinavia, and students also have the outstanding collections of the British Library close at hand. Excellent links with universities in mainland Scandinavia, Iceland and Finland provide further benefits.

The department is home to the Viking Society for Northern Research, a leading publisher of Old Norse texts and monographs on medieval Scandinavia.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This wide-ranging and flexible programme offers students the opportunity to develop their understanding of the cultures of the Hispanic world at an advanced level. Read more

This wide-ranging and flexible programme offers students the opportunity to develop their understanding of the cultures of the Hispanic world at an advanced level. As a pathway of the Language, Culture and History MA, students can combine their interest in Hispanic Studies with optional modules from Gender Studies, Translation Studies, and Comparative Literature.

About this degree

The programme offers a broad range of optional modules in Hispanic cultures from the early modern period to the present day, alongside relevant training in research skills and methodologies. Students develop a knowledge and understanding of the key aspects and complex concepts used to understand Hispanic literature, film and culture.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality

Optional modules

Students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Spanish Film
  • The Works of Jorge Luis Borges
  • The Conquest of Mexico
  • New Argentine Cinemas
  • How to Make an Eight-Minute Documentary
  • Advanced Translation from and into Spanish

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on a literary, cultural or historical topic, which culminates in a 12,000-word dissertation (taught pathway) or 18,000-word dissertation (research pathway), written in Spanish or English.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, classes and tutorials. Students are encouraged to undertake independent reading both to supplement and consolidate what is being taught. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including long essays, take-home exams, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: Hispanic Studies MA

Careers

This programme may lead to further research, or to employment in which a broad familiarity with Spanish and Latin American culture is an asset.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • PhD in Spanish Literature, University of Oxford

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Spanish & Latin American Studies features staff who are nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field, who publish in their specialist areas and are active researchers. The department regularly hosts a number of events including conferences, research seminars, symposia and a documentary film course in Cuba.

Our location in London provides access to numerous cultural and social events relating to the Spanish-speaking world, its literature, films, history and politics. We encourage active participation in the events of the Instituto Cervantes and the Institute for the Study of the Americas, both of which provide access to excellent resources to enhance your studies.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Italian Studies MA is a pathway in the faculty-wide MA in Language, Culture and History, offering an extensive range of modules in Italian literature, history and literary theory. Read more

The Italian Studies MA is a pathway in the faculty-wide MA in Language, Culture and History, offering an extensive range of modules in Italian literature, history and literary theory. Students can take this flexible, interdisciplinary programme as self-contained study or as preparation for a research degree.

About this degree

The programme introduces students to texts from a variety of periods in Italian history and places them within a historical and philosophical framework. Students develop subject-specific, professional skills necessary for the pursuit of their chosen options, including sourcing material, fieldwork techniques, bibliographic skills and linguistic skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme offers two pathways: taught and research.

Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality.

Optional modules

Students choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Medieval and Renaissance Italian
  • Renaissance Texts: Resources and Research Techniques
  • Dante: Divina Commedia
  • Genre in Italian Cinema
  • Italy: A Difficult Modernity
  • Advanced Translation from and into Italian
  • Contemporary Italian Cultures

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, tutorials, seminar-presentations, film screenings, and visits to research libraries including the British Library, the Warburg Institute, Institute of Historical Research and Senate House. Students are assessed by a variety of methods: unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: Italian Studies MA

Careers

The programme will be of interest both to those who wish to enhance their knowledge of Italian culture for professional purposes - in the fields, for example, of education, media, commerce and tourism - as well as to students wishing to pursue their studies at doctoral level.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Public Relations (PR) Associate, Nudge Factory
  • Press Officer, MLPR
  • PhD in Italian Poetry, UCL

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Italian is the original home of Italian studies in Britain, and has a distinguished record in the field of graduate studies and research. Students benefit from UCL's excellent Italian resources, including the Rotton and Ogden collections, and the Castiglione and Dante collections.

UCL's central location enables easy access to London's exceptional resources including the specialist collections of Italian material in the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes. The British Film Institute Library holds major Italian film periodicals and numerous books on Italian cinema, and the nearby British Library houses the largest collection of early printed books in the world.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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