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Masters Degrees (Clinical Applications Of Psychology)

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This MSc course provides a dynamic and current perspective across the various areas of clinical applications of psychology. Specifically, it covers theories of psychopathology from childhood to adulthood, and clinical applications of psychology in health and wellbeing. Read more
This MSc course provides a dynamic and current perspective across the various areas of clinical applications of psychology. Specifically, it covers theories of psychopathology from childhood to adulthood, and clinical applications of psychology in health and wellbeing. The course also covers basic counselling and cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) skills, as well as the professional issues relevant to clinical practitioners.

Please note that, although this course is anticipated to significantly enhance your knowledge of the clinical applications of psychology and therefore benefit your future career – be it in clinical training and practice, research or other related areas of psychology – it does not lead to a professional qualification as a clinical psychologist, nor does it guarantee entry to doctoral-level training in clinical psychology.
-You will be taught by both clinically active psychologists as well as academics who conduct research in clinically relevant areas.
-There is a strong practical focus – across all modules, we emphasise applying the relevant theory and research to clinical practice in mental health. You will also acquire foundation counselling and cognitive behavioural skills.
-If you are already in a clinical placement, we will support you in considering relevant empirical evidence and how it may inform your work with the particular client group.

What will you study?

You will gain in-depth knowledge of theories of adult and child psychopathology, and will study the biopsychosocial aspects of health and illness. You will explore the evidence base for psychological and behavioural change interventions in mental and physical health, and will cover advanced research methodology and statistics. The course also provides opportunities for detailed and advanced study (via the dissertation) of a chosen area in clinical applications of psychology, enabling further development of your practical research skills. You will acquire basic counselling and cognitive behavioural skills, and will gain a comprehensive knowledge of the issues relevant to clinical practice, such as context and settings for clinical practitioners. You will also consider professional issues and current debates in ethics and diversity relevant to practitioners and researchers in mental health, and will learn how to apply ethical principles in both your research and via real or hypothetical clinical case studies.

Assessment

Assessment methods include essays, in-class tests, presentations, unseen examinations, laboratory reports and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Clinical Applications of Psychology
-Professional Practice
-Psychology Dissertation
-Psychopathology Across the Life Span
-Research Design and Analysis

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The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. Read more
The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. The course provides a first-rate training in clinical psychology, leading to a doctoral qualification accredited by the UK’s Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the British Psychological Society (BPS). The Course’s overarching aim is to train independently minded, scientifically-oriented and compassionate clinicians capable of taking a leadership role in health services at home or abroad.

The UCL Course is at the forefront of many of the national and local developments and innovations which impact on the profession, and many members of staff are closely involved in NHS planning at both national and local level. We aim to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills they need to become effective clinical practitioners in a rapidly changing NHS. The Course has an explicitly pluralistic ethos and exposes trainees to a variety of approaches. It also encourages practice that demonstrates an awareness of equal opportunities and a sensitivity to the multi-cultural contexts routinely encountered in clinical work in London.

The course is three years in length and consists of a mixture of taught lectures, seminars and workshops running alongside a series of 6 placements based in clinical services in and around London. The academic programme is delivered by a highly experienced team of clinical psychologists, many of whom are world-leaders in their academic and clinical fields. The clinical placements provide trainees with opportunities to develop their skills under experienced supervision in a wide variety of contexts, using a broad range of models, and with a wide spectrum of clients.

As a course that is based in one of the world’s top research-intensive universities, UCL trainees have the opportunity to conduct high-quality research under the supervision of leading scientists in the field.

Core Purpose and Philosophy of the Course http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/docs/app_docs/core_purpose_and_philosophy

Applying to the Course

The course welcomes applications from interested candidates from the UK and EU. International candidates apply directly to UCL. Further details can be found on the following webpage: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/international/

For details of the application process for UK and EU candidates, please choose from the options below.

At present trainees are full-time employees of the health service, and their University fees are paid directly by the NHS. Although there is a possibility that these arrangement may not apply to candidates entering programmes in 2017, this is unclear. As such, candidates should not be deterred from making applications.

This message will be updated as soon as more information is forthcoming.

The closing date for for receipt of applications for courses starting in Autumn 2017 is 1pm on 30th November 2016.

Further Entry Requirements

The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is a 3-year full-time programme which entitles graduates to apply for registration as a Clinical Psychologist with the Health Professions Council and as a Chartered Clinical Psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Candidates need to meet some basic academic criteria. After that, they also need to demonstrate (by gaining some relevant clinical experience) that they have some awareness of the roles undertaken by clinical psychologists, are familiar with the sorts of clients psychologists see, and have an idea of the contexts within which psychologists work. In addition, they need to show that they have the appropriate personal characteristics needed to work effectively with a wide range of potentially vulnerable individuals, and to contribute to the work of fellow professionals in the NHS or equivalent organisations.


Candidates who have not achieved a good 2.1 may need to think carefully about whether it makes sense to pursue a training in Clinical Psychology, since it is unlikely that they will be offered a place on a Doctoral Course. However, we recognise that sometimes degrees under-represent someone's academic ability - for example, illness or major life-events may have meant that there were periods when it was hard to maintain a good standard of work. If this is the case applicants need to offer clear evidence of their academic capacity in their application. This evidence must be supported by an academic referee who has monitored the candidate's work and can clearly demonstrate that certain academic achievements results underestimate the applicant's academic abilities.

Candidates with a 2.2 will not usually be accepted on the course unless there is unequivocal evidence of subsequent academic achievement equivalent to a good 2.1. In practice this means obtaining a higher degree, but the type of degree needs to be thought about carefully. Some Masters degrees will not offer enough academic challenge, making it hard for an academic referee to make the unequivocal judgment about a student's ability that a course needs. The more academically demanding a course, the more likely it is that they will be able to do this.

Graduate basis for chartered membership
In order to be considered for a place on any training course in Clinical Psychology it is essential to have Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC)with the British Psychological Society (BPS), usually at the time of applying or certainly by the time shortlisting is completed (in February). Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership is the same as Graduate Basis for Registration: all that has changed is the name. So if you previously had GBR you will now have GBC. The usual way of obtaining this is by completing an undergraduate degree in Psychology, or by taking a qualifying exam or programme which confers eligibility.

Not all Psychology programmes confer eligibility for GBC. If you are unsure whether you are entitled to GBC you should check this with your programme staff or write to the BPS (St Andrews House, 48 Princess Road East , Leicester LE1 7DR; Tel: 0116 254 9568; e-mail: ) for more details.


Relevant clinical experience
In order to have a realistic chance of being selected it is essential to gain some relevant clinical experience before applying to the course. There are several reasons for this. It gives applicants a chance to test out whether work in this field is for them - it is much better to discover this before making a major career commitment. It also means that courses know that candidates' applications are realistic, and gives them an idea of how applicants have responded to the clinical work they have undertaken. Many trainees find that they make good use of their pre-training experience during training, so it is not 'wasted' time.

We know that asking for relevant experience causes people to think twice about applying for Clinical Psychology course. It means that there is a gap between completing an undergraduate degree and starting training, with no guarantee of getting on a course. This presents a real challenge to many people, not least a financial one. There is also a risk - widely recognised by courses - that potential applicants feel themselves obliged to work for a number of years in the hope of gaining enough experience to be taken onto a course. We know that most people work for around 1-2 years before getting on a course, and in most cases this should be sufficient.

Being clear about what counts as experience is hard to specify, especially because suitable posts vary enormously. As above, and very broadly, candidates should look for experience which gives them:

. an idea of what clinical psychologists actually do
. some direct clinical contact with the sort of clients psychologists work with
. an idea of what work with clients actually entails
. a sense of the organisational context in which clinical psychology usually operates

One common route is to find work as an Assistant Psychologist. These posts are advertised in the BPS Bulletin (distributed monthly to all members of the BPS) and also (although less frequently) in other relevant publications - for example, the health section of papers such as The Guardian.

As assistant posts are in relatively short supply, it is important to emphasise that they are not the only route to gaining relevant experience. For this reason applicants should think broadly about the possible options open to them. For example, employment in a social work context or as a nursing assistant in a psychiatric unit, or as a worker in a MIND Day Centre would be extremely valuable; all would count as relevant experience. Another route is to take a post as a research assistant, though the research should usually offer at least some direct involvement in a clinical area. It is worth remembering that a very "academic" research post would not give candidates much of a sense of how the clinical world operates, or how they react to the sorts of clients seen in clinical contexts.

There is something of a myth that applicants need to build an extensive 'portfolio' of experience, with more than one client group, and with a mixture of research and clinical experience. Speaking at least for selectors at UCL, we are not looking for this. We are looking for people whose posts map onto the bullet-pointed criteria just above, and who can show (and reflect on) the benefits of this experience in the way they present themselves. Basically it is the quality of experience - and what the person makes of it - that is as important as the quantity of experience.

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Clinical and Health psychology involves applying psychological understanding to difficulties connected with mental or physical health problems. Read more
Clinical and Health psychology involves applying psychological understanding to difficulties connected with mental or physical health problems. Using this understanding, clinical psychologists assess and treat people of all ages and ability levels who are experiencing psychological distress, behavioural problems or related issues. Students taking the MSc will be introduced to the theory and knowledge that underpins effective practice in clinical psychology, will explore this in relation to a range of conditions, will gain an understanding of the range of research methods used by clinical psychologists, and will conduct their own research project in a relevant area.
How the course can further your career progression

This course will be of particular interest to:
-graduates in psychology who are aiming for a career in clinical or health psychology and who do not yet have relevant work experience. Completing the MSc provides a sound basis for obtaining employment as an assistant psychologist and later gaining entry to clinical training.
-graduates in psychology who are aiming for a career in clinical and health psychology and who have already gained relevant work experience. Completing the MSc course provides evidence of academic and research skills, which is valuable when making applications for clinical training.
- graduates in psychology or closely related disciplines who are keen to pursue research in the area of clinical or helath psychology. The MSc course is accredited as providing an appropriate research training for those wishing to progress to a PhD or to employment in a research post.
- qualified health professionals with an appropriate academic background who wish to extend their understanding of clinical psychology.

Clinical psychology training in the UK involves the completion of a three-year training programme leading to a doctorate in clinical psychology and eligibility to apply for chartered clinical psychologist status. The training is funded by the National Health Service (NHS) and almost all trainees go on to work in the NHS after qualifying. Entry to these programmes is highly competitive and applicants must have good academic and research skills as well as relevant work experience, usually two years in a paid, full-time assistant psychologist position or equivalent. The MSc aims to provide students with a profile of academic knowledge and research skills which, combined with relevant work experience, will equip them to make a credible application for clinical psychology training, either in the UK or elsewhere.

About the School of Psychology
The School of Psychology at Bangor, which was ranked in the Top 20 in the UK in the most recent Research Exercise Framework with 89% of research rated either 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent', brings together a large group of outstanding scientists with international research reputations in clinical psychology, neuropsychology and clinical and cognitive neuroscience. A number of staff also hold appointments as consultant psychologists or medical consultants with the NHS and contribute to clinical practice as well as to the training of clinical psychologists, medical students and NHS staff. The School runs its own clinical psychology training programme, leading to the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.

Key research strengths within the clinical psychology domain include dementia, neuropsychology and rehabilitation, learning disability, developmental disorders, addictions, and cognitive-behavioural approaches. Close links with other departments and with NHS services produce tremendous opportunities for collaborative clinical psychology research. The School supports the practical implementation of research findings to improve patient care by hosting groups such as the Dementia Services Development Centre Wales.

The School has an extensive library of psychological tests and measures. Participant recruitment is facilitated through the availability of research panels for neurological patients and people with dementia, as well as student and community participation panels, supported by the School’s full-time patient co-ordinator. The School has a range of specialist laboratories and researchers in the School use a wide range of the latest techniques for understanding brain-behaviour relationships, including functional brain mapping with event related potentials (ERP), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

The School has a vibrant, diverse postgraduate community. Students on our MSc programmes are drawn from a range of backgrounds and nationalities. The School is known for its friendly and informal atmosphere, which combined with excellent facilities helps to ensure that studying here is a pleasant and enjoyable experience.

Course Structure
The course includes three components: content modules, research methods modules, and a research thesis. Content and methods modules are all 20 credit modules and the research thesis is worth 60 credits. Students achieving 120 credits on the taught modules, but not completing a research thesis, may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma. The content modules are designed to provide an in-depth look at theory, evidence and practice in clinical psychology.

The course lasts one full calendar year if taken full-time and is also available part-time. During Semester 1 and Semester 2 you will combine taught modules with work on your research project. During the summer period all your time is devoted to completing and writing up the research project.

A variety of teaching approaches are used including lectures, case presentations, small-group sessions and seminars, and individual or group supervision. Assessment will include coursework and examinations, and the research thesis.

Career Prospects
This course will be of particular interest to psychology graduates aiming for a career in clinical psychology and who do not yet have relevant work experience. Completing the MSc provides a sound basis for obtaining employment as an assistant psychologist and later gaining entry to clinical training. For graduates who already have relevant work experience the course provides evidence of academic and research skills, which is valuable when making applications for clinical training. It is also an excellent preparation for graduates who are keen to pursue research in the area of clinical psychology and for qualified health professionals with an appropriate academic background who wish to extend their understanding of clinical and health psychology.

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The Masters in Clinical and Abnormal Psychology offers a comprehensive grounding in aspects of psychopathology and abnormal behaviour. Read more
The Masters in Clinical and Abnormal Psychology offers a comprehensive grounding in aspects of psychopathology and abnormal behaviour.

As well as modules that will develop knowledge of the aetiology and treatment of a range of psychological disorders and abnormal behaviours, this programme includes a substantial research element.

You will receive extensive training in research methods via a postgraduate statistics module and will complete a postgraduate dissertation in a related topic. Links with a number of agencies and the University of South Wales’ Psychology Clinic means that suitable students should have the opportunity for access to client groups in order to complete an applied dissertation.

We aim to provide students with access to clinical populations to collect psychological data in order to complete an applied dissertation. This is possible through our links with local NHS trusts and local healthcare providers. In addition, the University of South Wales has recently invested in a new psychology clinic which provides clinical and therapeutic services. Suitable students will be able to benefit from in-house research opportunities and supervised voluntary experience.

The MSc Clinical and Abnormal Psychology draws on the research and applied expertise of psychologists in the fields of developmental, clinical, health, sports and forensic psychology. You will learn about a wide range of developmental disorders including autism and conduct disorder, as well as dependence issues such as alcohol addiction and eating disorders. You will also explore interventions such as pharmacological and behavioural treatments, as well as research on depression, anxiety and personality disorders.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/836-msc-clinical-and-abnormal-psychology

What you will study

You will study 180 credits comprising of the following modules:
- Research Methods in Health Psychology: Measurement & Professional Issues (40 credits)
- Psychopathology Through the Lifespan (20 credits)
- Interventions (20 credits)
- Addiction, Dependence and Deviance (20 credits)
- Current and Historical Perspectives on Psychopathology (20 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Learning and teaching methods

The MSc Clinical and Abnormal Psychology is delivered through a variety of lectures, seminars and workshops. Some of these sessions will be led by members of the teaching team and some by external experts in clinical psychology practice. There will also be student-led sessions and some elements will be delivered online.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

While completion of this programme will not qualify you to practice as a Clinical Psychologist in the UK, nor guarantee acceptance onto a DClinPsy course; the skills that you will develop should enhance your applications for professional training programmes, Assistant Psychologist posts, or Research Assistant posts in clinical settings.

Career options:
Graduates of this masters programme will possess a diversity of skills that will enhance their applications for a range of popular training, employment, and research opportunities. These may include:

Clinical psychology doctorate programmes: These are extremely popular and competitive training courses and successful applicants are likely to have work experience in an appropriate setting as well as suitable qualifications. Applied research experience including the collection of psychological data in a clinical setting should be a useful addition to an application for further training. The extensive research training and applied dissertation completed in this MSc programme should contribute to more robust applications to Clinical doctorate programmes.

Assistant Psychologist posts: These are sought after positions with many applicants for every post; not least because experience as an Assistant Psychologist can help support an application to clinical doctorate training programmes. Successful completion of this MSc programme will suggest a commitment to a career in clinical psychology as well as the development of skills and knowledge that are more advanced than those gained during an undergraduate degree. This may help to help enhance applications for Assistant Psychologist posts.

Research Assistant posts: Excellent psychological research is extremely important in the field of clinical psychology. The extensive research focus and the dissertation completed in this programme will provide graduates with a range of research skills including the ability to critically evaluate literature, research, and applications in the field of clinical psychology, as well as experience in designing, conducting, writing up and disseminating good quality psychological research. These are transferable skills that should be valued in a range of Research Assistant posts.

Assessment methods

A range of assessment methods will be used, including examinations, essays, a systematic literature review, research reports, and case study analysis. You will also complete a dissertation of 15,000- 20,000 words. The range of teaching and assessment methods used will foster a range of skills that are transferable to the workplace and/or further professional training.

Facilities

As a student in the School of Psychology, you’ll have access to the latest learning technologies, facilities and equipment, including excellent designated facilities.

These include observation and interview rooms equipped with two-way mirror, CCTV and audio and allow research and interview practice sessions to be conducted and recorded onto DVD. We also have a custom-built air-conditioned PC laboratory which provides access to specialist software for running psychology experiments and conducting careers guidance interviews. More specialist equipment is also available in our cognitive suite and more details about this are given below.

- Cognitive suite
The cognitive psychology suite houses specialist psychology equipment. This includes eye tracking equipment which is capable of studying the eye movements of individuals whilst they complete cognitive tasks. The suite includes EEG (electroencephalogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram) facilities for recording electrical activity in the heart and scalp. There is also a driving simulator which is currently being used by postgraduate students to complete a study which examines the effects of stressors on driving performance.

- Psychology clinic facility (PAWB Wales)
As well as our excellent dedicated teaching facilities, the School of Psychology offers a wide range of psychological services to the general public. These are offered through our new PAWB Wales clinic facility and include play therapy, behaviour analysis, health and sport psychology interventions. The clinic activities support our wide range of postgraduate opportunities and undergraduate students can also get involved in some of the clinic’s work.

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The first in the world, and always on the cutting edge. Rapidly becoming one of psychology’s most transformative fields, positive psychology is the scientific study of the strengths that enable humans and organizations to flourish. Read more
The first in the world, and always on the cutting edge
Rapidly becoming one of psychology’s most transformative fields, positive psychology is the scientific study of the strengths that enable humans and organizations to flourish. Positive psychology differs from historical psychological approaches because of its unique emphasis on the empirical study of human flourishing. While the study of psychology has traditionally focused on improving the human condition by identifying and relieving what is negative in life, positive psychology complements this approach with a focus on strengthening what is positive.

The Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) program at the University of Pennsylvania was the first in the world to offer a degree in this rigorous field of study. Dr. Martin Seligman, founder of the discipline of positive psychology, created the MAPP program to educate and train students at the cutting edge of the field.

Designed for working professionals
The program's hybrid model allows you to explore the theory and practice of positive psychology without relocating to Philadelphia, so you can continue working full-time. The program includes nine courses, completed during one year of full-time study during consecutive fall, spring and summer semesters. The low-residency format consists of 10 required on-site visits to the University of Pennsylvania campus in Philadelphia, where students and faculty gather for intensive weekends of learning and networking.

Structured for real-world application
Whether you are a credentialed professional seeking to transform your workplace or career, or are building a foundation for further graduate study, the MAPP curriculum allows you to apply the topics most relevant to your interests and goals. You will receive a thorough grounding in the research methods and theoretical underpinnings of positive psychology, and learn to apply its theories and perspectives within individual and organizational settings. The program culminates with an individual capstone project that advances both your professional development and the field of positive psychology itself.

Renowned faculty and passionately engaged peers
Program alumni report overwhelmingly that their favorite aspect of the program is the exceptional group of people who make up our diverse, intellectually stimulating and intensely supportive community.

Each year, approximately 40 students enroll in the Master of Applied Positive Psychology program, including successful businesspeople, practicing psychologists and medical professionals, scientists, artists, life coaches, lawyers and more. They’re all gathered to study with a faculty composed of major pioneers in the field, who are also dedicated and personable teachers.

Flourishing after MAPP
Through their experiences in the Master of Applied Psychology program, students find a powerful new perspective on their workplaces, career plans and personal lives. Our students go on to incredibly diverse careers, applying what they’ve learned to transform their current workplaces or to begin new careers in consulting, teaching, business, healthcare, media and more.

We look forward to speaking with you about the exciting opportunities at MAPP and discussing how our program can help you achieve your personal and professional goals.

Courses and Curriculum

The Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) curriculum is designed to train you in the history, theory and research methods of positive psychology, as well as its application in professional settings.

The program consists of nine courses, completed during one year of full-time study during consecutive fall, spring and summer semesters.

During the fall semester, you will begin the program with courses that focus on the science, research and theoretical underpinnings of positive psychology, giving students a strong foundation to build on throughout the remainder of the program.
The spring semester courses offer content to help you learn how to apply positive psychology in various professional settings, including creating a plan for positive interventions in a real organization.
The capstone project, which is completed during the summer semester, allows you to integrate what you’ve learned throughout the program, and apply it in the professional or research domain most significant to you. It often serves as a stepping stone to the application of positive psychology in a particular professional domain or to further research in a specific area.
The curriculum includes the following eight classes, in addition to the capstone project:

Introduction to Positive Psychology
An introduction to the research, theory and intellectual history of positive psychology.

Research Methods and Evaluation
A methodology course exploring the valid and reliable assessment of positive emotions, character strengths and meaning in life.

Foundations of Positive Interventions
An investigation into the theoretical, empirical and experiential nature of positive interventions.

Approaches to the Good Life
An examination of four perspectives on human flourishing.

Applied Positive Interventions
A service-learning course in which students study the applied work of master positive psychology practitioners and create positive psychology applications for non-profit organizations.

Positive Psychology and Individuals
An exploration of positive psychology applications in coaching, clinical and other relational settings.

Positive Psychology and Organizations
An exploration of positive psychology, appreciative inquiry and positive organizational scholarship in traditional and social business settings.

Humanities and Human Flourishing
An exploration of integrating culture and science to support the deeper understanding and more effective cultivation of human flourishing.

Capstone

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Applied Positive Psychology program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. Through the capstone project, you will explore, in depth, the theories and practical applications you’ve learned in the program, to advance the field of positive psychology itself. Previous capstone projects have included empirical studies, literature reviews, book prospectuses, workshops and other endeavors.

The capstone is completed during the summer semester and has no on-site course requirements. You will conduct this project work independently, with your advisor’s ongoing guidance, in a setting that is significant to you and most relevant to your future professional goals.

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The Staffordshire University Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy) is an integrated 3-year full time course leading to a professional qualification in Clinical Psychology. Read more
The Staffordshire University Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy) is an integrated 3-year full time course leading to a professional qualification in Clinical Psychology. It is a collaborative venture between the University and clinical psychologists in Shropshire and Staffordshire. The course is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). The curriculum is based on the HCPC Standards of Education and Training and Standards of Proficiency and the BPS Accreditation Criteria. Graduates are eligible to apply for Practitioner Psychologist Registration with the HCPC and Chartered Psychologist status with the BPS.

Our curriculum is designed to develop clinicians who can draw on a broad range of psychological models and theories to inform their clinical work and who have the confidence to use a variety of research methods appropriate to addressing clinical questions. An important strand running through the course is the impact of society and context upon psychological wellbeing, and we attempt to ensure that issues of difference and diversity are fully addressed. We encourage our trainees to be alert to the changing health needs of the population, the NHS, and the research base that informs clinical practice. We encourage trainees to be mindful of power differences within professional relationships. We value service user and carer perspectives, and the active role service users/carers can play in the planning and development of services.

Course content

The course is full-time for three years and attendance at all course components is mandatory. The length of the course cannot be reduced through the accreditation of prior learning or experience.
Trainees' time on the course is divided between academic work, research, individual study time and clinical experience. Each academic year begins with a mandatory induction block of up to six weeks, plus mandatory NHS Trust training in Year 1, to prepare trainees for safe and effective practice in their supervised clinical work.

Academic Teaching
Academic teaching consists of workshops, lectures, seminars, and online learning. It covers a broad range of topics in psychology, providing the knowledge base for practice and training in clinical, professional, therapeutic, and research skills. Teaching in Years 1 and 2 is closely linked with the competencies that are assessed on placements, whilst teaching in Year 3 focuses more on specialist skills. Teaching is provided by course staff supported by Clinical Psychologists and Service Users from the course area and beyond.

Clinical Experience
Clinical placements are mostly located in services within NHS Trusts in Shropshire and Staffordshire where clinical psychology is a strong and well-developed profession. The Clinical Director is responsible for planning placements with each trainee to offer a coherent and effective experience. Clinical placements start after induction blocks and take place in a wide range of hospitals, clinics, community centres, and independent sector agencies. In Year 1 trainees are normally placed in the same geographical area as their employer. Trainees have a degree of choice over their third year clinical experience. During each year, trainees work with up to three Main Supervisors who assume responsibility for supervising the work over time periods ranging between 3 and 12 months (typically six months), amounting to a minimum number of placement days overall. Trainees may also undertake specific pieces of work with other supervisors. Each trainee develops an Individual Learning Portfolio which is drawn up by the trainee in discussion with the Main Supervisors, the Clinical Director/Tutor and their Personal Tutor.

Research
The research component of the course encompasses research methods training (qualitative and quantitative methods) and the process of conducting clinically relevant research. Assessed research activities include critical appraisal of literature; a research proposal; a research methods examination; a service evaluation project; and a major research thesis incorporating a literature review, an empirical paper, and a summary report. Thesis papers should be of publishable standard and at least one paper must be submitted to a nominated journal. The thesis is initiated early in Year 1 and completed in the second semester of Year 3. There is considerable scope for choice of research topic and methodologies, provided that they are in line with national and/or local research priorities and with available supervision. Trainees are co-supervised by academics from Staffordshire University and local clinicians. Trainees have access to a wide range of University and NHS library and online resources to support research activity.

Other admission requirements

Experience requirements
Candidates must have a minimum of one year full-time (or part-time equivalent) practical experience of working with people in a human service setting. Applicants with experience outside traditional health/caring settings are encouraged to apply, and should clearly outline how the experience is relevant to the profession and study of clinical psychology. If necessary, candidates should include further information to this effect about their relevant work experience in the personal statement section of the application form.

Relevant examples could include the demonstration of skills in: understanding different issues for people across the life-span; understanding the impact of different social circumstances on psychological distress and wellbeing; working with a range of other professionals; experience of psychometric assessment or other forms of assessment; assisting service users to have a voice; gaining some understanding or experience of the NHS and Social Care services etc.

Clinically related research may also be considered appropriate experience, but this would need to comprise involvement in the research process that has included direct client contact, thereby demonstrating appropriate skills. Completion of a higher degree would not in itself evidence sufficient research experience. Doctoral training is clinically, emotionally and academically demanding, therefore candidates need to demonstrate aptitude for this level of work and show how they will manage the demands of training.

Application and Selection Procedure
Applications to this course are made through the Clinical Psychology Clearing House. Full information about the application process, including entry criteria, can be found on the Clearing House website. The Staffordshire course entry is here: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/Clin27Staffordshire.html

Applicants who meet the minimum criteria entry are invited to undertake a written exercise during February at Staffordshire University. The highest scoring candidates are invited to, or placed on a reserve list for, the interview stage of our selection process, subject to satisfactory references. Following this stage, offers are made to the most suitable candidates, subject to satisfactory Occupational Health screening and Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks.

References
Applicants must provide the names of two referees, one able to comment on academic achievement and one on relevant experience.

Funding
Health Education West Midlands (HEWM) funds the salaries and University fees of all trainees throughout their training. Trainees are employed by one of the NHS Trusts in the region, with associated NHS terms and conditions, on Band 6 of the Agenda for Change pay scale.
HEWM will only fund EU/EEA citizens. Owing to pressure on placements, it is regrettably not possible to accept non-EU/EEA citizens and there are currently no self/non-NHS funded places.

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Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. Read more
Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. How we produce, understand, acquire, and use language, and how these processes are affected by ageing and brain damage, are core topics in understanding human behaviour.

Why study Psychology of Language at Dundee?

In addition to its theoretical interest, psycholinguistics has several important applications, including how a second language should best be taught, how children should be taught to learn to read and write, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders. Such applications ensure that there is a wealth of professional career paths available to postgraduates in the area in addition to an academic career.

This course is affiliated with our world-leading Language Research Centre (LaRC).

The School of Psychology also has much specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:

Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.
Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.
Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.
Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis
Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.
Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.
Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.
Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audience
provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

"I enjoyed all aspects of the course, especially the opportunity to conduct two independent pieces of research. Furthermore, I found the taught modules very helpful and a good basis for every researcher. Most importantly, I enjoyed the support of both staff and students in a highly collaborative environment"
MSc student, 2011

Who should study this course?

The course offers students an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in their first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

The course will provide a first year of research training for students intending to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

This course is aimed at

Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of the psychology of language and communication
Graduates considering a professional training in a language-related discipline (e.g. speech pathology)
Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD.

How you will be taught

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided.

What you will study

Students will take the following modules:

Core modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation

Two advanced modules, typically from:

Gesture, Cognition and Communication
Reading Development and Disability
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Altered States of Consciousness

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.

Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields such as education, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders.

Overseas Academic Scholarships

The School of Psychology offers three Overseas Academic Scholarships of £3,000 each to overseas (international) taught postgraduate students. These awards are competitive based on academic merit and a personal statement which details and supports the applicant's interest in their chosen taught postgraduate programme. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is 30th June 2014.

A 5% discount on tuition fees is applicable for international applicants to the School of Psychology who pay the full amount (for the year), in advance, by a given deadline. Please visit our 5% discount webpage for full details.

Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage

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Clinical Academic Programme -. The academic programme is based on a ‘core competency’ model (BPS, 2007) and comprises four main areas of teaching. Read more

About the course

Clinical Academic Programme -

The academic programme is based on a ‘core competency’ model (BPS, 2007) and comprises four main areas of teaching: Professional Practice and Personal Development; Therapeutic Models and Interventions; Research Methods in Clinical Psychology; and Client Groups and Client Contexts.

Each of these four areas is further divided into a number of specific teaching modules that span the three years of training and correspond as much as possible with the structure and sequence of clinical placements. An awareness of the issues of ethical practice and equality for all is highlighted in all modules. Particular consideration is given to the many ways in which issues relating to diversity and inequality impact on the work of practising clinical psychologists within the lectures, and all lectures are formally evaluated on this by the trainees. Additionally, there are specific lectures considering a wide range of diversity issues within the Clients in Context module taught across the three years.

Four models of psychological therapy are currently taught on the programme: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), systemic and family psychotherapy, personal construct therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The content of the introductory CBT module is mapped onto the IAPT curriculum to enable trainees to include this in their portfolio of competencies, should they wish to seek employment where this is a specific requirement. More advanced training is provided in the third year of training. A previous trainee recently gained accreditation with the BABCP based on their CBT training at the University of Hertfordshire.

The academic programme is located within the overall programme philosophy which places particular emphasis on incorporating constructivist and social constructionist approaches to conceptualising psychological difficulties and their management. In line with the programme philosophy, an important aim of the academic programme is to train clinical psychologists who can understand and apply a range of psychological theories and approaches to both clinical practice and research. We teach our trainees to draw on multiple theoretical and evidence bases to develop individually tailored assessments, formulations, interventions and evaluations of complex psychological problems. We emphasise the flexibility to adapt and combine different approaches as a key competence, and our curriculum therefore aims to develop a broad, thorough and sophisticated understanding of various psychological theories and therapeutic approaches.

Service User Participation:

The DClinpsych course encourages service user and carers' participation in the training and have established a committee of service users and carers who consult and participate in the training course.

Problem Based learning -

Problem-based learning (PBL) forms an important part of clinical training at the University of Hertfordshire. As part of the academic programme trainees complete a series of small-group based PBL exercises, which aim to promote reflective, collaborative and self-directed learning.

Throughout the three years, trainees also participate in a series of small group discussions to consider academic papers and clinical cases. These discussions provide an academic context for trainees to integrate theory and research, to highlight theory-practice links, and to enable peer review of formulation and intervention plans. More formal case presentations are undertaken in the third year.

A unique feature of our clinical psychology training at UH is the access that our teachers and trainees have to a purpose-built, advanced simulation training centre.

The trainees are regarded as mature students, and for this reason an adult learning model is adopted. In line with this model and the overall programme philosophy, it is recognised that not only do trainees learn in different ways, but also that they can pursue their own perceptions of the material being taught and interpret it for themselves.

In line with HPC requirements for all clinical training programmes, all trainees selected will be informed of the various activities that form part of the academic curriculum (e.g., role-plays, problem-based learning, simulation training, small group discussions, etc). Consent to participate in all aspects of the academic programme will be sought prior to the programme commencing.

How to apply

All applications for funded places to the Doctorate are made through the national Clearing House for Postgraduate Courses in Clinical Psychology (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp)

Our next intake of Trainees will be at the end of September 2016. Application packs are available from the Clearing House from September 2015, and the deadline for applications is early December 2015.

Each academic year starts at the end of September or beginning of October with a compulsory four-week, full-time introductory block of teaching. This is followed by teaching all day on Thursdays and Fridays during term-time.

We are now accepting self funding trainees from September 2015: See below on how to apply.

Up to two fee-paying places, on our doctoral programme for International, European and British applicants, are available for entry in Autumn 2015. Fee-paying students will follow the same programme of study as trainees with NHS funded places.

Applications for our fee-paying places need to be made directly to the programme, using our application form. The closing date for these applications is 1st March 2016.

Overseas applicants are strongly advised to apply for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) from the British Psychological Society (BPS) before applying. For further details about how to go about this, please view the BPS website.

How to contact us

For further information, please contact the Course Administrators Ms Neeli Clarke () or Catriona Roy () or tel +44 (0)1707 286322 +44 (0)1707 286322

How to find us

We are based in the Health Research Building on the College Lane Campus. Where to find us - http://www.herts.ac.uk/contact-us/where-to-find-us/college-lane-maps-and-directions

Why choose this course?

The course has a particular remit to train clinical psychologists to take up NHS positions. Clinical psychologists working in the region support the course, and many are working in collaboration with the Programme Team to provide placement supervision, research supervision, teaching and skills workshops.
The DClinPsy Trainees attend the University for their lectures, seminars and tutor support, but also spend approximately three days per week on their clinical placements.

Careers

In line with the concept of the "scientist-practitioner", the programme of research aims to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills required to undertake high-quality research, appraise literature critically, and adopt an evidence-based approach to clinical practice, where possible. It also aims to foster in trainees an awareness of the need for, and motivation to undertake, research in clinical settings - both during their placements and after qualification - to contribute to the evidence base of the profession.

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The MSc in Clinical Applications of Psychology provides modules in aspects of psychology relevant to clinical practice, for students who are intending to apply to doctoral programmes in clinical psychology. Read more
The MSc in Clinical Applications of Psychology provides modules in aspects of psychology relevant to clinical practice, for students who are intending to apply to doctoral programmes in clinical psychology. Whilst there is no guarantee that students will ultimately be successful in gaining entry to doctoral programmes, this course is intended to strengthen your CV and enable you to get the most out of your relevant experience.

It is expected that most students accepted onto the MSc will be currently working in clinically relevant posts, such as psychology assistants, nursing assistants or therapy aides.

Module Information
There are six taught modules, taught sequentially over two years:
• Research Methods in Clinical Psychology
• Adult Psychopathology
• Neuropsychological Assessment
• Professional Issues, Ethics and Diversity
• Clinical Forensic Psychopathology
• Childhood Psychopathology.

The dissertation can be studied in three ways:
• In year 1, with study across 2 years alongside taught modules
• In year 2, with study alongside the remaining taught modules
• In year 3, after completing the taught modules.

After completing three modules, you will be eligible to receive a Postgraduate Certificate, and after six modules a Postgraduate
Diploma. Successful completion of the dissertation leads to the award of the MSc.

The research methods module will further develop your knowledge of the breadth of methods used in psychological research,
and the legal and ethical implications of conducting research.

The adult psychopathology aspects of the programme will enable you to conceptualise, describe and differentiate between the various psychological disorders, and develop your awareness and critical understanding of empirically derived treatment systems.

Within the neuropsychological assessment module you will gain experience and knowledge of key neuropsychological tests, and how cognition is affected by neurological conditions. This is informed by studying the principles of neuropsychological assessment and disorders of memory, attention, executive function and language.

The MSc will also improve your understanding of professional issues, ethics and diversity, considering the current and developing structure of clinical psychology in the UK. You will engage with current debates in ethics and diversity and learn how to competently apply ethical principles to real and hypothetical case examples. You will also relate these experiences to your own professional development.

In the clinical forensic psychopathology module consideration will be given to perspectives on offending behaviour, approaches to assessment and treatment, particularly examining these issues with specific offender types.

The area of childhood psychopathology will be explored, and you will be expected to apply psychological theories, research and case studies to a range of childhood psychopathologies. You will examine behavioural disorders, emotional disorders and, developmental and learning disorders in childhood and adolescence including assessment, diagnosis and treatment.

Finally, the dissertation will provide you with the opportunity to select an area of particular interest relevant to the field of clinical psychology and to design, plan and execute an in-depth research project.

Attendance
This programme is delivered predominantly on-line, with some Newman-based workshops held at weekends.

Assessment
Throughout the course you will develop the skills to successfully disseminate information to both specialist and non-specialist audiences. You will be assessed using a range of techniques such as on-line quizzes, essays, journal article presentations and
examinations.

Research Areas
Research in this area is fundamental to the mission of Newman University. The subject area welcomes applications from suitably qualified students who wish to pursue postgraduate research degrees (MPhil and PhD awarded by the University of Leicester).

“This course occupies a niche in higher education in psychology that does not seem to be filled elsewhere: a grounding in clinical psychology theory and research that can support and provide an additional dimension to the experience of psychology
graduates who are aiming to go on in the future to train in clinical or other related areas of applied psychology. The syllabus has been carefully designed to meet the course aims. The outcomes can be demonstrated in the level of performance of the students (and also in their reported success in gaining places on Doctorate courses).”
External Examiner

For MSc please contact

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Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public. Read more
Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public.

Who is it for?

The course is for highly motivated students who have intellectual curiosity to learn about complex problems of health and healthcare and the ambition to conduct research that may lead to a solution to these problems. The programme is especially suited to students who want to go on to do doctoral studies – either a DPsych Health Psychology (for practitioner training) or a PhD (for research training).

The Health Psychology course is also for those who have an undergraduate degree that is accredited by the British Psychological Society. If you are an international student and would like to undertake a Masters degree in this subject but do not have the BPS accreditation, we offer the MSc Psychology and Health as an alternative programme (with identical modules) for students who have not achieved the Graduate Basis for Registration with the British Psychological Society.

Objectives

Health psychology explores the psychological and behavioural processes that influence the development of illness, the promotion of health, and the delivery of healthcare through rigorous research that feeds into evidence-based practice.

Teaching at City promotes the scientist-practitioner model in which research influences how we practice, while allowing our experiences in practice to shape the research questions we ask.

We recognise that great research will not make a difference to people’s lives unless the insights feed into evidence-based practice. You will therefore learn how to make research evidence accessible to help maximise its impact. Taught by a team of leading research-active academics, who are members of the Centre for Health Services Research (CHSR), the MSc Health Psychology programme is designed to give you the foundations that will propel you to an exciting career in the discipline.

Here are some examples of the kinds of questions the course poses:
-How can we help people cope with a diagnosis?
-What are the main challenges facing individuals living with long-term conditions?
-What is psychological theory and how can this be used to understand health and illness behaviours?
-How can we make complex interventions more effective by using theory and empirical evidence?

Academic facilities

City University has recently opened the TECS Lab, a dedicated ‘smart home’, to showcase some of the exciting technologies that are being implemented around the UK to support patients with long-term conditions and complex health and social care needs.

This is a one-of-a-kind resource that is already being used for teaching and research purposes. You will visit the TECS Lab in the spring term and the resource will be available to conduct your own dissertation research on a related topic. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course uses a range of teaching methods including classroom teaching, seminars and workshops. You will be assessed through a varied combination of formats throughout the programme including coursework, examination, a diary component, online discussion forums and a significant piece of empirical research.

The assessment for the Doctorate includes:
-A reflective report (3,000 words) detailing how supervised practice has enabled you to fulfil the generic professional competence.
-A report (1,000 words) summarising the involvement of service users and/or carers in your training.
-Log of experiences that enabled you to gain competence in each component of all core units over the equivalent of two years’ full-time supervised practice (this should include a record of your attendance at core CPD workshops)
-A case study (3,000 words excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A contract and working agreement conditions document (3,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-Two teaching and training case studies (1 x 1,000 & 1 x 2,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices. One of the populations must be health care professionals and an observer’s report (500 words)
-A case study describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been implemented through face-to-face work with an individual client (3000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A case study (2,000 words, excluding appendices) describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been delivered through a medium other than face-to-face with an individual client with a reflective report on delivering this intervention included in the appendices.
-A research thesis (approximately 15,000 words, excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.
-A systematic review (6,000 words excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.

You will also be able to learn from our on-site TECS lab. This is a dedicated smart home equipped with tele-health and tele-care applications and an adjacent monitoring system.

The purpose of the TECS lab is to enable researchers to monitor long-term conditions, and use technology to track an individual’s health in real time. For example seat and bed occupancy sensors enable health psychologists to monitor physical movement and intervene when routine behaviours are disrupted.

Modules

The programme consists of eight compulsory modules and all the teaching takes place in the first two terms. In term one you will be introduced to behavioural medicine, lifestyle, gender and culture, theoretical foundations of health psychology and research design and statistics. In the second term you study understanding and managing long term conditions, developing complex interventions, professional practice and contextual issues in health psychology and advanced research design and statistics. The third term is dedicated to the dissertation.

You may have the opportunity to interact directly with patients or healthcare professionals at the dissertation stage of this Masters degree. You will be conducting your own independent research and this may, for example, involve interviewing patients or professionals about a particular subject, or delivering behaviour change interventions.

To become a qualified researcher and practitioner, you will need to be able to understand and critique published research and to understand practitioner issues, so you can conduct your own research from scratch. At City we will encourage you to conduct research on the front line working on projects that require ethical approval, where you are engaging with real people so you can have a direct impact on their lives.

Core modules
-Theoretical foundations of health psychology (15 credits)
-Behavioural medicine (15 credits)
-Understanding and managing long-term conditions (15 credits)
-Lifespan, gender & culture (15 credits)
-Developing complex interventions (15 credits)
-Professional and contextual Issues in health psychology (15 credits)
-Introduction to research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Advanced research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

Health psychologists work in academia as researchers and within the NHS and the wider healthcare sector. The nature of the work means you will be trying to influence public health policy in terms of the way that health care is practised. You will also be evaluating how health care professionals do their work while adhering to the best clinical standards.

As a UK student, because the Health Psychology MSc is accredited, it is known as Stage 1 of the standard training in healthcare psychology. By successfully completing this course you will be able to move on to Stage 2 training (a doctoral level qualification in health psychology). This leads to becoming a fully recognised health psychologist whereby you can apply for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Full membership of the Division of Health Psychology means you will also be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Chartered Health Psychologist. You can only use the protected title ‘Health Psychologist’ by registering with the HCPC, the statutory regulator.

Graduates of the MSc in Health Psychology and MSc in Psychology & Health take a variety of career paths across the NHS and wider public sector. Here are some examples of the kinds of roles our graduates go on to do:
-A PhD student studying a Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology.
-A research assistant in higher education, NHS or the private sector.
-An assistant psychologist in an applied setting.
-An NHS or third sector healthcare professional, such as a smoking cessation officer, or a public health and health promotion practitioner.

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The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists. Read more
The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists.

The programme was introduced in October 1995, and the School of Psychology has a long tradition of research in the area of criminal justice and legal psychology. Currently, several members of the School are actively involved in research and consultancy, and several PhD students are currently conducting research under their supervision.

This MSc is the only programme that offers an entire module on offender cognition, which helps you to understand how offence-supportive thinking can increase the chances of sexual offenders, firesetters and other individuals committing offences. With the support of forensic psychology staff you will also gain real-world writing skills such as journal writing, risk assessment reports, court reports and government research reports.

We are particularly interested in receiving applications from suitably qualified graduates who have direct experience of the application of psychological principles in custodial or other forensic settings, although such experience is not essential. As a significant element of the programme involves training in advanced methodological and statistical techniques, we are unable to consider applications from candidates who do not qualify for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS - Graduate Membership of the BPS is insufficient.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/69/forensic-psychology

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The modules below are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology is composed of the following six compulsory modules:

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP809 - Research Project in Criminology,Legal or Forensic Psychology (60 credits)
SP805 - Psychology of Criminal Conduct (20 credits)
SP806 - Psychology of Law and Justice (20 credits)
SP825 - Assessment and Treatment of Offenders in Forensic Settings (20 credits)

Assessment

The MSc in Forensic Psychology aims to satisfy the academic component of professional training in forensic psychology (that is, to become a Chartered Forensic Psychologist). Throughout the programme, you attend non-assessed seminars and go on site visits.

The programme includes lecture, workshop and seminar-based teaching, as well as an individually supervised empirical research project.

Advanced Statistics and Methodology is assessed by examination. All other taught modules are assessed by written work and presentations. Research is assessed by two articles: one empirical paper and one review article on your chosen topic.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster your intellectual development by providing you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical approaches to forensic psychology and statistical and methodological expertise in order that you should be well equipped to make your own original contribution to psychological knowledge

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as psychologists

- satisfy the academic requirements of the knowledge base specified by the British Psychological Society

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology at Kent is accredited by The British Psychological Society as providing the first (academic) year of professional training for those who wish to qualify as Chartered Forensic Psychologists. Graduates from the programme are then required to gain the equivalent of a further two years' relevant experience under the supervision of a Chartered Forensic Psychologist before qualifying for Chartered status themselves. You should contact the BPS directly if you have enquiries about the nature of the supervised practice element of qualification.

Please note that only students who gain a mark of 40% or above in every module, with an overall mark of at least 50%, are eligible for accreditation by the British Psychological Society.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Master's degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience aims to equip students with the skills necessary for research careers across a range of scientific areas.

Key Features of Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

Performance:

- One of four Psychology departments to achieve a 100% 4* rating (maximum score possible) for the reach and significance of its work in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Based on this measure Psychology at Swansea was ranked 14th (out of 82) in the UK

- Top third ranking for UK Psychology Departments (2016 Complete University Guide)

- Joint 12th UK ranking for Psychology (Graduate prospects)

- The MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is unique and novel in the range of modules and techniques the programme offers

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of cognitive neuroscience research areas and publishing in top international journals

- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities

- Ability to offer international students mentoring throughout the course

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is at the intersection of cognitive science, brain imaging, and clinical neuroscience.

It is considered one of the most significant areas of contemporary science and it is beginning to transform the understanding of both normal and damaged brain function.

The importance of cognitive neuroscience has been recognised by the Welsh Government which created the multi-centre Wales Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, drawing together the psychology departments at Swansea, Cardiff and Bangor Universities.

A core aspect of the provision for MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience will also be collaboration with the College of Medicine at Swansea University.

Modules

Modules on the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience may include:

Theoretical Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience

Practical Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience

Statistical Methods

Computing skills

Generic Research Skills

Special Research Skills

Neuropsychology

Introduction to Research Programming

Psychology of Ageing

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Course Structure

The full-time master's degree for Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is studied over one year and involves attending University for two full days a week (Monday and Tuesday).

The part-time degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, which is studied over two years, normally involves attending the University for one full day a week.

Taught modules are provided in the first two semesters, with a final high credit-bearing empirical research project with a strong cognitive neuroscience component typically undertaken over the summer.

Sessions may be arranged occasionally on other days of the week (e.g. visiting clinician talks/workshops and employability sessions).

Who should apply?

The Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course is suitable for:

- anyone looking for a valuable academic foundation for future doctoral training

- anyone looking to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science

- UK and international psychology graduates seeking positions as researchers in psychology, cognitive neuroscience or related fields.

- psychology graduates aiming to secure a PhD by research in a psychology, cognitive neuroscience, or a related discipline

- graduates from other disciplines such as Biology, Neuroscience, and Medicine who wish to develop further skills related to psychology and cognitive neuroscience

Career Prospects

Students have successfully used the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience qualification to gain positions on PhD research programmes. Others have successfully gained employment as Research Associates/ Officers, as well as working in Teaching positions, the Business Sector and in Administration.

On completion of the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course students should also be able to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science.

Staff Expertise

Many of the College of Human and Health Sciences team are leaders in their specialist fields of research. They undertake novel and original research in a variety of areas, including clinical and health psychology, brain injury, sleep, cognition, neuroscience and developmental psychology.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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Health psychology is an exciting and growing branch of psychology that applies psychological theory and research to behaviours and beliefs related to health and illness. Read more
Health psychology is an exciting and growing branch of psychology that applies psychological theory and research to behaviours and beliefs related to health and illness.

Health psychologists’ interests are firmly in line with government health agendas, and include the promotion of positive health behaviours in adults and children; reducing obesity, binge drinking, smoking and stress; and increasing psychological wellbeing.

The route to Chartered Psychologist status is through the attainment of an accredited MSc Health Psychology (stage 1 training), followed by supervised professional practice (stage 2 training).

USW’s MSc Health Psychology is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as providing students with the knowledge and skills required for Stage 1 of your training in qualifying as a Chartered Psychologist and practitioner health psychologist.

The MSc Health Psychology is taught by registered practitioner health psychologists (who are also BPS Chartered) with many years of specialist teaching, research and clinical experience in a range of areas of health psychology. Specialist practitioners contribute a contemporary perspective as guest lecturers.

We have ongoing research collaborations with NHS clinicians that provide opportunities for students to have access to clinical populations for dissertation research projects and work experience placements. These currently include psychiatry liaison, pain management, eating disorders and cardiac rehabilitation.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/300-msc-health-psychology

Five BPS Commendations

The course recently received five commendations from the British Psychological Society who praised the relationships we have with external health and clinical practitioners, and the opportunities these provide to students; the programme’s development in relation to the health needs of the local and wider population in response to the priorities of the Welsh Government Department of Health; the high level of student support; the emphasis on Continuing Professional Development (CPD) to prepare students for the reflective skills they will need in practice; and the opportunities provided to students by Psychology Plus (employability scheme).

Work Experience Opportunities

We have ongoing research collaborations with four Welsh Health Boards and NHS clinicians that provide opportunities for students to have access to clinical populations for dissertation research projects and work experience placements.

Pawb, our on-campus clinic offers a wide range of psychological services to the public. Students will be able to benefit from supervised voluntary experience and in-house research opportunities.

What you will study

You will study the following modules:
- Contexts and Perspectives in Health Psychology
- Research Methods in Health Psychology: Measurement & Professional Issues* Applications of Health Psychology
- Health-related Cognitions and Behaviour
- Stress, Health and Illness
- A Lifespan Perspective on Health, Illness & Disability
- Independent Research Dissertation
-

Learning and teaching methods

Teaching includes lectures, seminars and workshops, some of which will be student-led. There will be a variety of assessment activities such as examinations, essays, case study analysis, poster presentations and the design of a health promotion campaign.

The MSc Health Psychology provides students with opportunities for work experience in the School of Psychology’s own Psychology and Well-Being Clinic (PAWB Wales), in addition to research projects with our NHS partners on issues such as pain management, eating disorders and cardiac rehabilitation.

As well as our excellent dedicated teaching facilities, the University has recently invested in a new clinic facility that offers a wide range of psychological services to the public. The Psychology and Well-Being Clinic Wales (PAWB Wales) services include play therapy, health psychology, sport psychology, occupational psychology and behaviour analysis. Through the clinic, MSc Health Psychology students and trainee practitioners can gain access to real life training opportunities.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The Sc Health Psychology provides current, up-to-date theory, knowledge and skills related to therapeutic play and enables graduates to work as therapeutic play specialists in educational, healthcare or social care settings.

In addition, an understanding of play is key to current government education initiatives and course content addresses the Welsh Government’s Foundation Phase and other early years educational curricula. Hence this award offers excellent career development in the field of play, whether as a teacher or education specialist, play worker or play development officer, nursery manager, or work in health or social services.

Assessment methods

Assessment uses a variety of methods, including essays, diaries, research reports, presentations, portfolios of observations and clinical notes. There are opportunities for work placements.

Facilities

As an MSc Health Psychology student, you’lll have access to the latest learning technologies, facilities and equipment, including excellent designated facilities.

These include observation and interview rooms equipped with two-way mirror, CCTV and audio and allow research and interview practice sessions to be conducted and recorded onto DVD. We also have a custom-built air-conditioned PC laboratory which provides access to specialist software for running psychology experiments and conducting careers guidance interviews. More specialist equipment is also available in our cognitive suite and more details about this are given below.

The cognitive psychology suite houses specialist psychology equipment. This includes eye tracking equipment which is capable of studying the eye movements of individuals whilst they complete cognitive tasks. The suite includes EEG (electroencephalogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram) facilities for recording electrical activity in the heart and scalp. There is also a driving simulator which is currently being used by postgraduate students to complete a study which examines the effects of stressors on driving performance.

As well as our excellent dedicated teaching facilities, the School of Psychology offers a wide range of psychological services to the general public. These are offered through our new PAWB Wales clinic facility and include play therapy, behaviour analysis, health and sport psychology interventions. The clinic activities support our wide range of postgraduate opportunities and undergraduate students can also get involved in some of the clinic’s work.

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Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society. Read more

Why take this course?

Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society.

This is a unique course informed by research at the forefront of the field, with many opportunities to get involved with ongoing projects within the Department.

Applications for this course close 15 January 2016 to be considered for interview on 23 or 25 February and close 15 February 2016 to be considered for interview on 22 and 24 March.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by the largest group of actively researching academics at the cutting edge of forensic psychology research in the UK
Put your investigative techniques to the test in our Forensic Interviewing Suite
Benefit from our connections with a variety of custodial establishments including adult male and women's prisons, young offenders' institutions and secure hospitals

What opportunities might it lead to?

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing an important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. It aims to provide you with a systematic knowledge and understanding of forensic psychology, in accordance with the academic requirements of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP), the British Psychological Society (BPS) for accredited courses and eventual progression to autonomous practice.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Working in prisons
Probation work
The police force
Social work
Health services
The courts
Academia
Private practice

Module Details

The course content is structured to reflect developments and priorities in the field of forensic psychology and is kept under constant review to keep it up-to-date.

Here are the units you will study:

Theory into Practice: Foundations of Professional Competence in Forensic Psychology: This unit provides a foundation for working as a scientist-practitioner. From an early introduction to concepts of reflective practice, personal development and core skills relevant to completing the course, it moves to encouraging an awareness of factors involved in criminal behaviour and their implications. The focus is on the application and development of skills in analysis and less on the learning of facts and theories. In the second part of the unit, the focus moves to tasks and challenges that forensic psychologists encounter in applied settings. Some, such as the design and evaluation of training for other personnel or consultancy skills, are of major relevance to Stage 2 of the system for progression to chartered status that usually follows the course. Others such as countering manipulation, stress and managing aggression can be crucial to survival as well as effectiveness as a practitioner.

Assessment and Interventions with Offenders: This unit is concerned with providing an understanding of the theoretical and empirical underpinnings, contents and methods of current and widely-used approaches to assessment (including risk assessment) and interventions with offenders. These approaches are linked and provide a framework for the organisation and evaluation of information, particularly in relation to efficient, useful and accurate formulation and what works in the delivery of interventions. It will build upon knowledge of factors related to criminal behaviour with a focus on effective approaches and context-related factors in the understanding and management of offenders in a variety of settings.

Empirical Research Project for Forensic Psychology: For this unit you will undertake a complete piece of empirical research in an area of forensic psychology that you find particularly interesting. It provides an opportunity to develop and integrate a range of skills and areas of knowledge including creative formulations, problem-solving, ethics, handling interpersonal demands, use of IT and analytical techniques, and writing to a publishable standard.

Investigative Psychology and the Legal Process: This focuses on the contribution made by psychology in the context of forensic investigations and the role of psychologists in criminal and civil law proceedings. It is concerned with the application of psychological research and theory in an effort to critique (and improve) practice in criminal and civil justice systems as an applied context for testing the validity and efficacy of psychological theories and innovative practice derived from these theories. Topics cover relevant procedural information to ensure you appreciate investigative, judicial and custodial processes, and the role of psychologists within these frameworks. Theory and research relevant to applied cognitive and social psychology are presented to inform an understanding of eyewitness recall and recognition memory (and memory errors), effective protocols for testing/probing witness memory, detecting deception and juror decision making.

Research Methods and Data Analysis: This unit is designed to provide a familiarity with psychological research methods and data analysis commensurate with understanding and conducting research at the postgraduate and professional level. Specific methodologies and issues of relevance to specific research areas are addressed within a perspective that emphasises creative problem-solving.

Programme Assessment

We give high priority to integrating our research activities with your teaching programme. This ensures that you learn about the most important and current issues in forensic psychology that effect real-life practice.

Teaching usually takes the form of lectures and small tutorial groups, together with practical sessions in our labs and studios.

We assess you in a variety of ways throughout the course. Here’s how:

Written examinations
Briefing reports and essays
Oral presentations
The giving of expert testimony
A research dissertation

Student Destinations

The work of forensic psychologists is varied. Depending on where practitioners work, it can range from criminal investigations to organisational change, from work with offenders to work with staff who work with offenders, and from matters of civil justice such as child access to operational emergencies such as hostage incidents.

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing the next important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. Following successful completion of this course, you will usually go on to do a minimum of two years full-time supervised practice in an employment setting.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Clinical psychologist
Forensic psychologist
Educational psychologist
Counsellor
Health planning analyst

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