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Masters Degrees (Wearable Technology)

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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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Get paid to do a Masters with the. Centre for Global Eco-Innovation. at. Lancaster University. , The Sunday Times University of the Year 2018, and. Read more

Get paid to do a Masters with the Centre for Global Eco-Innovation at Lancaster University, The Sunday Times University of the Year 2018, and Mobetrics.

One year enterprise-led funded Masters by Research, Ref. No. 101

·        Get paid £15,000 tax-free

·        Have your tuition fees reduced. Your partner company pays £2,000 towards your fees, meaning UK/EU students pay £2,260, and international students pay £15,945.

·        Be part of the multi award winning Centre for Global Eco-Innovation with a cohort of 50 talented graduates working on exciting business-led R&D.

·        The Centre is based at Lancaster University, so you will gain your Masters from a Top Ten University, recognised as The Sunday Times University of the Year 2018.

·        Finish in a strong position to enter a competitive job market in the UK and overseas.

Air pollution is a global threat with an estimated 7 million people dying worldwide from exposure to both indoor and outdoor air pollution every year. One of the most effective measures to mitigate against poor air quality is through temporary restrictions on car use.

Even in urban areas and cities the available data and measurements relating to air quality are at a macro level and are, simply, not granular enough to reliably inform policy, decision making and action at a local level. In a rural setting such as Cumbria and the Lake District the detail of the data is even poorer. This project aims to provide a system of data collection, including citizen science-based options, and visualisation to provide a more granular picture to support real-time and longer term decision-making in order to manage, and reduce, pollution levels locally.  

Working with academics in the Management School, the Environment Centre and the company you will work on the development of new ways of aggregating and analysing air quality and traffic flow data from networks of sensors and developing a proof of concept by prototyping and testing the new solutions and demonstrating this to potential end-users and clients.

Candidates with a numerate degree with a scientific leaning and an interest in environmental issues are encouraged to apply.

Enterprise and collaborative partners

This Masters by Research is a collaborative research project between Lancaster University, with supervision from Prof Edward Truch, Prof Juliana Sutanto and Dr Duncan Whyatt, and Mobetrics.

Mobetrics is a streamlined mobile technology and app development company based in Cumbria. We specialise in introducing businesses to the opportunities that mobile apps and wearable technology offer them. Put simply, we build apps rapidly and to the highest quality, for IOS, Android and Blackberry.

Apply Here

To apply for this opportunity please email with:

·    A CV (2 pages maximum)

·    Application Form

·    Application Criteria Document

·    Reference Form

This project is part funded by the European Regional Development Fund and is subject to confirmation of funding. For further information about the Centre for Global Eco-Innovation, please see our website.

 

Deadline:           Midnight Wednesday 18th July 2018

Start:                    October 2018



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The future of information and communication technology (ICT) is driven by mobile and networked embedded systems. Read more

About Mobile and Embedded Systems

The future of information and communication technology (ICT) is driven by mobile and networked embedded systems: tomorrow’s digital cities, Industry 4.0, cyber-physical systems (CPS) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will all depend on embedded sensing of real-world phenomena, in-situ computation as well as automated information exchange and data distribution using machine-to-machine (M2M) com­munications between local and distributed control systems and machinery.

The ‘smart grid’ is one example of an application for future embedded systems, as it uses real-time sensing of the available renewable energy to determine where energy is to be routed across the power grid and controls intelligent machinery to increase production during peak times; this requires that internet-connected smart meters are installed in industrial plants and private homes alike to facilitate real-time sensing and control of technical systems.

Another exciting area of application for embedded systems is mobile and wearable technology, which allows users to access and manipulate information ‘on the go’ as the system provides relevant and timely information — indeed, this is one of the main purposes of mobile information technology such as smartphones and tablet computers. Additional meaning for this Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is generated by the context of the device, the user, the location and many more factors, all of which are sensed and computed by a plenitude of embedded sensors and collocated or connected systems.

Wearable devices such as fitness trackers and smart watches collect bio-physiological and health-related data to facilitate novel applications, including smart contact lenses and feedback systems for the learning of physical activities. At the same time, increasing cross-device interoperability means that users of head-mounted augmented reality and virtual reality displays can, for instance, use their entire smartphone screen as a keyboard and have the typed text displayed on augmented reality glasses.

Programme content

The programme is divided into three module groups with core and elective modules. These are:

1. Human-Computer Interaction
2. Systems Engineering
3. Data Processing, Signals and Systems

Features

- Excellent rankings for computer science, e.g. in U-Multirank and the CHE rankings
- A strongly research-oriented two-year programme with a modern, broad range of subjects
- Allows flexible interest-based selection of modules from the groups ‘Human-Computer Interaction’, ‘Systems Engineering’ and ‘Data Processing, Signals and Systems’
- A fully English-taught programme
- An outstanding staff-student ratio
- Participation in cutting-edge research projects
- Excellent research and teaching infrastructure
- An extensive network of partnerships with academic institutions and businesses worldwide
- A great student experience in Passau, the ‘City of Three Rivers’

Language requirements

Unless English is your native language or the language of your secondary or undergraduate education, you should provide an English language certificate at level B2 CEFR, e.g. TOEFL with a minimum score of 567 PBT, 87 iBT or ITP 543 (silver); IELTS starting from 5.5; or an equivalent language certificate.

To facilitate daily life in Germany, it would be beneficial for you to have German language skills at level A1 CEFR (beginner’s level). If you do not have any German skills when starting out on the programme, you will complete a compulsory beginner’s German course during your first year of study.

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Would you like to improve your career prospects, start your own business or develop further specialist design skills?. Read more
Would you like to improve your career prospects, start your own business or develop further specialist design skills?

Offering the perfect blend of theory and practice in the context of business and society, the MA Design course will enable you to focus on your own specialist area of design practice, in disciplines such as 3D design, fashion communication, fashion design, fashion marketing, graphic design, communication design, service design, interaction design, industrial design, interior design, 3D design and transportation design.

Developed specifically for those with a design background or relevant qualification, you will undertake a series of taught modules to develop your knowledge and practical skills, before competing a final project or thesis around your chosen specialism.

In addition to the taught aspect of this course, you will also have the opportunity to undertake a series of collaborative projects with industry and, where possible, field trips to collaborative companies or exhibitions to further enhance your learning experience.

Learn From The Best

Our academic team is made up of research-active experts with extensive knowledge of the design industry. This knowledge is integrated into all aspects of their teaching to ensure that all content within this course is relevant to the workplace and current and emerging trends.

All staff within this department have a strong commitment to developing your skills and knowledge by developing your critical thinking and your ability to apply your skills to complex real-world problems.

They will be there to support you through every step of your course, ensuring you leave with confidence and full understanding of all aspects of this dynamic industry.

In addition to our teaching staff, you will also have access to specialist communities of practice that will provide the foundation for your learning journey through research networks and cross-organisational collaboration. These communities will focus on strategic innovation, performance products and service design.

Teaching And Assessment

This MA Design course incorporates practice-based learning that is informed by contemporary and contextual influences and founded on your own personal aims and professional direction.

The first two semesters of this course will focus on developing your core skills through the completion of four modules: design thinking, design practice, direction and experimentation.

Teaching is delivered via a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials, which are assessed by coursework and design projects. You will also undertake collaborative projects and, where possible, field trips to allow you to put your skills into practise in a real-world context.

Upon completion of the taught modules, you will undertake a final project or thesis to demonstrate all of the skills you have acquired on this course. This will be undertaken under the supervision of your dedicated tutor who will provide advice and guidance at all stages.

Module Overview
DE7001 - Design Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7002 - Design Process (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7003 - Project / Thesis (Core, 60 Credits)
DE7004 - Design Practice 1: Professional Direction (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7005 - Design Practice 2 : Experimentation (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)

Learning Environment

This course is delivered at the Northumbria School of Design, which is located at City Campus East – a dedicated learning space that is located within Newcastle city centre.

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities such as our University library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – and well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Your learning experience will be enhanced though the use of technology and learning materials such as module guides, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists will be available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Design course is taught by our team of research-active academics who incorporate their individual areas of specialism into the course’s contextual modules to ensure they reflect the realities of the design industry and today’s modern working environment.

The development of your own research skills is at the core of the MA Design course and you will develop research-informed methods of understanding the complexity inherent in real-world situations. These methods will enable you to make better decisions, advance the field of your practice and add new knowledge that will help you perfect your skills in your own particular discipline.

Supported by subject specialists and industry networks, you will also have the opportunity to join an expert-led community of practice in strategic design and innovation, performance product design or service design, as well as engaging with traditional disciplines such as fashion and industrial design.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course will allow you to enhance your practical skills and knowledge in a specialist area of design.

You will work on live industry projects that will enhance your CV and personal development through collaboration with those currently working within this dynamic industry. Some of the recent examples of industry projects include work on oral healthcare with Procter and Gamble, wearable technology projects with the CPI National Centre for Printable Electronics, person-centred healthcare services with the Academic Health Science Network and the development of innovative kitchenware with Lakeland.

You will also develop your business and employability skills, in addition to achieving a master’s level qualification in this discipline.

Your Future

Once you have completed the MA Design course you will possess the skills and ability to make an impact in the design industry, whether you are just starting out in your career or looking to enhance your professional development.

This course will prepare you for broad range of jobs within design companies, private organisations and the public sector, in addition to specialist jobs within your chosen specialism.

Completion may enhance promotion prospects in some professions, in addition to providing enhanced opportunities for management level roles.

This course will also provide you with the knowledge and experience to be able to set up your very own design company, in addition to providing a strong foundation for progression to PhD studies.

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This exciting new multidisciplinary Master's programme is fully designed to reflect the needs of contemporary interactive media industries, bringing together creative technologies, interactivity and design practices within digital cultures with the user in mind. Read more

This exciting new multidisciplinary Master's programme is fully designed to reflect the needs of contemporary interactive media industries, bringing together creative technologies, interactivity and design practices within digital cultures with the user in mind.

Interactive Media Practice combines a wide range of digital creative technologies primarily combining digital literacies design, technology and interaction, through user-centred design for commercial outputs to an industry standard.

Interactive Media Practice places the user at the centre of the experience and focuses on design and content creation in areas such as mobile app development, wearables, games, rich media websites, interactive guides and installations, immersive VR, next generation advertising and virtual and augmented reality systems, through to social media powerful eMarketing and entrepreneurship through innovation protocol.

According to the late CEO of Apple, Steve Jobs, the app industry "is worth several billion pounds annually and employs around 40,000 people, representing approximately 10% of the total audio-visual workforce. Sectors such as sound-driven games and apps show an even wider growth where providers such as Apple have paid a total of two billion dollars to apps within the US alone".

Adobe Systems (UK) fully support the programme with high recommendation, based on the development and key principles the course offers, which is rare and unique. We embrace excellent contacts within the interactive media and games industries, including regular visits and master classes from industry professionals at the top of their game.

Adobe Systems (UK), said: “This Interactive Media degree offers an ideal grounding for those wishing to work in the digital media industries, which increasingly require people who work with technology from a creative perspective. This is the course that will create the next generation of interactive media stars! ”

The course embraces a hackathon culture with specialist hack labs boasting newly designed flexible learning spaces for students to work more collaboratively on innovation protocols fostering cross-pollination of new ideas creatively. Many students will be working on live industry briefs as well as their own projects independently within and outside our course clusters. This collaborative approach to learning and research often leads to successful projects, which are commercially viable and quickly gain industry recognition through our end-of-year show.

“It’s a really multi-faceted MA, bringing together creativity, technology skills and digital media, with an entrepreneurial thread.” – 2015 graduate. 

Our students learn to examine the communication of ideas in a networked world through our entrepreneurship incubator programme and consider the many impacts of digital media in everyday life, for commercial trajectories through practice-based projects.

As one of the top 100 international universities in the world, the University of Westminster's School of Media, Arts and Design currently boasts a series of professional recording studios, a new teaching recording studio, professional technology labs and access to an array of post-production, and multimedia facilities built and equipped to the highest standards.

Using the leading industry software, you will be involved in designing and making interactive digital media content for delivery over the Internet, on tablets and mobile devices and for installations to designing compelling user interfaces creating a great user experience, this also extends to the development towards creating content for the ‘internet of things’.

The MA in Interactive Media Practice course will prepare you for this sector, by leveraging and integrating the fine blend between creativity and technical capacities. You will also benefit from having access to a range of highly regarded industry practitioners who will offer you exceptional insight and working knowledge within the field, both challenging and encouraging your technical and creative fair. On this master's degree you will develop commercial-level interactive media and digital content production skills.

This multidisciplinary course prepares you to work in a wide range of industry combining theory, practice, and bringing together technical, creative perspective on new media systems, interactive technologies and digital culture as well as exploring new emerging creative technologies, producing an industry professional who can produce as well as explore future creative technologies.

Students are encouraged to work with technology experimentally in a creative way, collaboratively, and to apply emerging and existing technology in new and innovative ways, research and the experimental application. You will also have hands-on experience creating content for mobile, tablet wearables, VR, AR and content-rich media websites, advanced web production, and UX design, all of this with the user in mind.

The course will provide skills in the relevant multimedia software, media-rich web production, Unity, UdK, website design and development to mobile app development. You will be taught creative coding, where the course encourages the use of a wide range of programming languages delivered by industry practitioners. We also have accreditation and training opportunities for those students wanting to develop their skills more prolifically within selected software via triple A initiative, outside of the Master's.

These include mobile apps, mainstream games, interactive installation, and eMarketing, with an emphasis on core creative skills. The course also prepares and enhances your ability in producing interactive media, methodologies and production workflows, supported by a robust understanding of the technologies and theories involved.

The Interactive Media Practice degree offers an ideal underpinning for those seeking employment in the digital media industries, which increasingly require people who work with technology from a creative perspective. This is the course that will create the next generation of interactive media talent who are both enterprising and creative.

Our approach on the course is implemented through hackathon culture as seen in technology start-up sectors, where cross collaboration through interdisciplinary approach is very welcomed. Students are encouraged to apply from design, non-programming or non-technical backgrounds as well as technical backgrounds.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you study on this course.

Modules



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Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. The Masters provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more

Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. The Masters provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition.

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation. 

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++. 

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles. 

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking. 

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Should I study the MFA or MA Computational Arts?

As well as the MFA, we also offer an MA in Computational Arts. The MA is 1 year (full-time), the MFA 2 years (full-time).

The first year of the MFA is identical to the MA. You take the same classes and you learn the same things. The differences between the two courses is that in the MFA you get a 2nd year in which you take additional courses which help you develop your arts practice further. These courses mean that you get a space to work under a tutor's supervision.

Modules & structure

Year 1

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme: 

The follwing are core modules:

You may then pick modules of your own choice from the optional modules listed below: 

In year 2 you will study the following: 

Assessment  

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more

Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing.

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a year (full-time) or two years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation. 

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++. 

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles. 

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. These modules provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking. 

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

MA or MFA Computational Arts?

As well as the MA, we also offer an MFA in Computational Arts. The MA is 1 year (full-time), the MFA 2 years (full-time).

The first year of the MFA is identical to the MA. You take the same classes and you learn the same things. The differences between the two courses is that in the MFA you get a 2nd year in which you take additional courses which help you develop your arts practice further. These courses mean that you get a space to work under a tutor's supervision. 



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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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Postgraduate degree programme Electronic and Computer Engineering Masters/MSc. Electronics is at the heart of a wide range of business and entertainment systems and is vital to the growth of the global economy. Read more

Postgraduate degree programme Electronic and Computer Engineering Masters/MSc:

Electronics is at the heart of a wide range of business and entertainment systems and is vital to the growth of the global economy. This programme is designed to equip you with the knowledge and skills you will need to play a leading part in the future research, development and application of these technologies.

Course details

Electronics is at the heart of a wide range of business and entertainment systems. The integration of computing and communications with interactive digital media is evident in many modern innovations that are creating a revolution in business and the life of individuals. 

These systems are vital to the growth of the global economy; reducing costs, improving quality and providing ever more sophisticated services. All aspects of business, from research and development to production, marketing and sales, benefit from rapid advances in such technology. Our social lives, entertainment and education are also enhanced by continuing advances in personal electronic systems, media compression and seamless connectivity using communications systems.  

This degree programme is designed to equip you with the knowledge and skills you will need to play a leading part in the future research, development and application of these technologies.

The wide range of modules allows you to create a personalised study package and your individual project is an opportunity for you to develop your specialist knowledge even further. Some projects are undertaken in collaboration with companies and, in some cases, you may work on company premises investigating issues of direct concern to future product development. Example projects include wireless access systems, 3G mobile radio for light aircraft, the creation of 3D worlds for surgery simulation and wearable computing.

Related links

Learning and teaching

Patterns of study

The majority of students study our taught Masters programmes full time. Our programmes are also suitable for practising engineers who wish to study part-time or take a single module to earn Continuing Professional Development (CPD) points. Many modules are completed in three-day sessions allowing you to focus one topic at a time. Following each session of lectures there is an opportunity for you to deepen your understanding through private study and in most cases there is also an assessed assignment.

Overview module

There is a shared introduction to topics from communications engineering, requirements analysis and object-oriented design, and an introduction to and recap of C programming. For the communications engineering programmes there is an introduction to key issues in the design of antennas, radio frequency circuits and link budgets. For the computing programmes there is an introduction to object-oriented programming.

Core modules

These modules cover the advanced specialist topics required for your specific degree programme, such as statistical signal processing and coding and advanced digital design. These technologies are at the heart of many current developments in modern electronic systems. 

Cross-programme option modules

These options specialize in topics relevant to each degree programme and give you the opportunity to adapt the programme that you have chosen to study. The prior knowledge needed for each module is specified in the student handbook to help you make the most appropriate choice. This allows you the greatest possible freedom to customise your study package appropriately.

Individual project

This is an opportunity for you to develop specialist knowledge. Some projects are undertaken in collaboration with companies and, in some cases, you may work on company premises investigating issues of direct concern to future product development. Typical projects include the development of hardware for automotive radar signal processing and the detection of leaks in landfill sites, wireless access systems, 3G mobile radio for light aircraft, the creation of 3D worlds for surgery simulation and wearable computing.

Assessment and awards

Assessment is by a combination of written examination and course work. There is a strong emphasis on course work to deepen understanding. The pass mark is 50%. A merit is awarded to students with an average of 60% or more and a distinction is awarded to students with an average of 70% or more, in both taught and project modules. There are prizes for students who perform especially well overall and for those who complete exceptionally good individual projects.

Employability

This course will equip you for a rewarding career in a dynamic field. Students with this degree have readily found work in the past. Companies in both mature and rapidly growing economics are keen to secure professionals with specialist knowledge in the topics covered throughout this course, meaning that upon graduation your career prospects will be excellent.

University Careers Network

Preparation for your career should be one of the first things you think about as you start university. Whether you have a clear idea of where your future aspirations lie or want to consider the broad range of opportunities available once you have a Birmingham degree, our Careers Network can help you achieve your goal.

Our unique careers guidance service is tailored to your academic subject area, offering a specialised team (in each of the five academic colleges) who can give you expert advice. Our team source exclusive work experience opportunities to help you stand out amongst the competition, with mentoring, global internships and placements available to you. Once you have a career in your sights, one-to-one support with CVs and job applications will help give you the edge.

If you make the most of the wide range of services you will be able to develop your career from the moment you arrive



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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

Have you ever wanted to invent something mechanical, prevent environmental damage to a building from floods, fire, explosions, landslides and other natural disasters, understand risks and reliability across buildings, renewables, and other areas? Do you want to improve quality of life across environmental remediation, farming, smart grid, green technology, food production, housing, transportation, safety, security, healthcare and water? Do you find it fascinating to try to make things work from what you have available? There will be plenty of major challenges to get involved with in the coming years crossing over into Nano technologies, advanced materials, electronic printing, grapheme technologies, wearable's, 3d printing, renewables and recycling and biotechnologies. Technology now means that you can design and engineer from anywhere in the world, including your home. Advanced Mechanical Engineering looks at computational mechanics, response to materials and reliability engineering. The Victorians set up some of the most advanced mechanical engineering of our times and in many ways they were the biggest mechanical engineering innovators ever.

This programme specialises in mechanical engineering so you are becoming proficient in designing anything that has background moving parts to allow it to work such as engines, motor driven devices and the effects of nature on mechanical objects and their ability to perform. You also look at how material composition can alter performance issues and provide new innovative methods to solve challenges in every day life and natural and other risks to machinery in all situations.  Your employment options are very varied, you may want to work within consumer goods to design and improve everyday objects like white goods, or you may like to be involved in very large scale hydro electric and power driving machinery in energy , manufacturing or large scale developments, or you may decide to get involved in innovation and enterprise yourself.

Courses listed for the programme

SEMESTER 1

  • Compulsory Courses
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • Numerical Simulation of Waves
  • Advanced Composite Materials

Optional Courses

  • Fire and Explosion Engineering
  • Structural Dynamics

SEMESTER 2

  • Compulsory Courses
  • Finite Element Methods
  • Mathematical Optimisation
  • Engineering Risk and Reliability Analysis

Optional Courses

  • Project Management
  • Risers Systems Hydrodynamics
  • Renewable Energy 3 (Wind, Marine and Hydro

SEMESTER 3

  • Project

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • Your skills and knowledge can have huge application potential within newly disruptive industries affecting life and work
  • You can improve employability in Aerospace, Marine, Defences, Transport Systems and Vehicles
  • Some of the knowledge you build directly relates to industries in Aberdeen such as the energy industry.
  • Mechanical Engineering cuts into high growth Industry 4.0 and IOT related areas across many areas disrupted by climate, population growth, and quality of life
  • We ensure close links with industries to attend industry events, visits and teaching by professionals from the industry
  • Graduates are very successful and many work in senior industry roles

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about international fees:

  • International
  • EU and Scotland
  • Other UK

Find out more about fees on the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs

Other engineering disciplines you may be interested in:



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The Specializing Master in Fashion Tech meets the needs of the market that requires innovative products and . designers with technical and creative skills. Read more

The Specializing Master in Fashion Tech meets the needs of the market that requires innovative products and designers with technical and creative skills and knowledge on new materials, technologies and fashion languages.

The Master consists of a theoretical part devoted to new materials and technologies, sport’s culture, the new scenarios of interactive design for fashion and the methods of digital and multimedia representation. The testimonies of many athletes will complete the theoretical knowledges with their agonistic experiences. There are also five design workshops devoted to the production of finished products focused on Fashion Tech for Lifestyle DesignActivewear DesignSportswear DesignPerformance Sportswear DesignInteractive Fashion

In each workshop, lecturers will be professionals of the sector, who will interact with leading companies in order to provide students with skills and professional methodologies.

The Specializing Master is held in English.

Goals

The Specializing Master provides skills for the design of active and interactive sportswear products, for lifestyle in terms of innovative materials and technology performance, for wearables accessories able to integrate fashion aesthetics with new contents and functions of the wearable technologies. The goal is to train designers able to work in sportswear but also in those areas where are required skills capable of combining technical materials, new technologies and performance. Fashion Tech designer has a crucial role in Fashion, Sportswear and Lifestyle areas given his ability to connect the different worlds of fashion, sports, electronics and information technology. 

For information, visit http://www.polidesign.net/en/fashiontech



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Apply by: 1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU). 5G mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems lie at the heart of many emerging applications. Read more

Apply by: 1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU)

5G mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems lie at the heart of many emerging applications. These include:

  • the internet-of-things
  • connected and driverless cars
  • smart cities
  • eHealth
  • virtual reality
  • robotics
  • smart manufacturing.

We’ve designed this new MSc course to give you the up-to-date knowledge and skills needed in modern digital technologies.

It's for newly qualified or practising engineers who’d like to extend their knowledge and practical skills in these rapidly growing areas of mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems.

We also offer this course with an industrial placement year.

Why choose this course?

How will I study?

You’ll study taught modules and work on an individual MSc project.

You’ll benefit from hands-on learning, using for example:

  • wireless communications design tools
  • software-defined radios
  • IoT platforms
  • wearable and reconfigurable technologies.

The modules are taught by a combination of lectures, seminars and practical laboratory work. Assessment is linked to the modules’ learning outcomes and involves unseen exam and/or coursework. The MSc project is mainly assessed by a project dissertation and oral presentation.

MSc project

You’ll complete a substantial MSc project, which is often practical as well as theoretical. You may have opportunities to work with an industrial partner.

Some of our previous students’ project work has led to journal and conference publication, giving them a head start in their careers.

The project allows you to develop your skills as an engineer and will involve:

  • an in-depth study of an advanced topic in mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems
  • further development of your critical awareness, creative thinking and project planning skills
  • enhancing your ability to describe complex technical issues clearly and concisely
  • developing your presentation skills to effectively communicate your work and ideas to senior colleagues within an organisation.

Project assessment can include interim reports, presentations and a dissertation. Some projects are undertaken in groups and replicate the type of professional teamwork expected in industry. Topics are generated from the academic research and industrial collaborations in our Department. A member of faculty supervises the project.

Modules

Core modules

Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

  • MSc Individual Project
  • Internet-of-Things
  • Mobile Communications
  • Real Time Embedded Systems
  • Reconfigurable System on Chip
  • Topics in Wireless Communications
  • Wearable Technologies

Options

Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

  • Advanced Digital Signal Processing
  • Cryptography
  • Cybernetics and Neural Networks
  • Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
  • Fibre Optic Communications
  • Image Processing
  • Satellite and Space Systems

This course is currently subject to validation, in line with our procedures for assuring the quality of our degrees. This means that some course detail may change. The validation process will be concluded before the course starts.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Careers

As a graduate, you’ll have the skills for a career in areas such as:

  • mobile and satellite telecommunications (where large industry players include Samsung, Vodafone, Ericsson, Huawei, Nokia, Cobham, British Telecom, Telefonica)
  • aerospace (where large industry players include Airbus, Rolls-Royce and GE)
  • automotive and transport (where large industry players include Jaguar, BMW, Continental, Network rail)
  • defence and security (where large industry players include BAE Systems, QinetiQ and Thales)
  • healthcare (where large industry players include Siemens and GE).

The MSc is also an ideal entry point for doctoral research in the fields of telecommunications and embedded systems.



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Apply by: 1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU). 5G mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems lie at the heart of many emerging applications. Read more

Apply by: 1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU)

5G mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems lie at the heart of many emerging applications. These include:

  • the internet-of-things
  • connected and driverless cars
  • smart cities
  • eHealth
  • virtual reality
  • robotics
  • smart manufacturing.

We’ve designed this new MSc course to give you the up-to-date knowledge and skills needed in modern digital technologies.

It's for newly qualified or practising engineers who’d like to extend their knowledge and practical skills in these rapidly growing areas of mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems.

The MSc offers you the opportunity, and the support, to go on an industrial placement at a UK company. This means you’ll gain industry experience, ready for your future career.

We also offer this course without the industrial placement year.

Why choose this course?

How will I study?

You’ll study taught modules and work on an individual MSc project.

You’ll benefit from hands-on learning, using for example:

  • wireless communications design tools
  • software-defined radios
  • IoT platforms
  • wearable and reconfigurable technologies.

The modules are taught by a combination of lectures, seminars and practical laboratory work. Assessment is linked to the modules’ learning outcomes and involves unseen exam and/or coursework. The MSc project is mainly assessed by a project dissertation and oral presentation.

MSc project

You’ll complete a substantial MSc project, which is often practical as well as theoretical. You may have opportunities to work with an industrial partner.

Some of our previous students’ project work has led to journal and conference publication, giving them a head start in their careers.

The project allows you to develop your skills as an engineer and will involve:

  • an in-depth study of an advanced topic in mobile communications and intelligent embedded systems
  • further development of your critical awareness, creative thinking and project planning skills
  • enhancing your ability to describe complex technical issues clearly and concisely
  • developing your presentation skills to effectively communicate your work and ideas to senior colleagues within an organisation.

Project assessment can include interim reports, presentations and a dissertation. Some projects are undertaken in groups and replicate the type of professional teamwork expected in industry. Topics are generated from the academic research and industrial collaborations in our Department. A member of faculty supervises the project.

Modules

Core modules

Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

  • MSc Individual Project
  • Internet-of-Things
  • Mobile Communications
  • Real Time Embedded Systems
  • Reconfigurable System on Chip
  • Topics in Wireless Communications
  • Wearable Technologies

Options

Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

  • Advanced Digital Signal Processing
  • Cryptography
  • Cybernetics and Neural Networks
  • Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
  • Fibre Optic Communications
  • Image Processing
  • Satellite and Space Systems

This course is currently subject to validation, in line with our procedures for assuring the quality of our degrees. This means that some course detail may change. The validation process will be concluded before the course starts.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Careers

As a graduate, you’ll have the skills for a career in areas such as:

  • mobile and satellite telecommunications (where large industry players include Samsung, Vodafone, Ericsson, Huawei, Nokia, Cobham, British Telecom, Telefonica)
  • aerospace (where large industry players include Airbus, Rolls-Royce and GE)
  • automotive and transport (where large industry players include Jaguar, BMW, Continental, Network rail)
  • defence and security (where large industry players include BAE Systems, QinetiQ and Thales)
  • healthcare (where large industry players include Siemens and GE).

The MSc is also an ideal entry point for doctoral research in the fields of telecommunications and embedded systems.



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Apply by: 1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU). Digital signal and image processing lies at the heart of modern society – we all use mobile phones, watch digital tv and may soon ride in automated vehicles guided by embedded vision systems. Read more

Apply by: 1 August (International), 1 September (UK/EU)

Digital signal and image processing lies at the heart of modern society – we all use mobile phones, watch digital tv and may soon ride in automated vehicles guided by embedded vision systems.

All these technologies rely on signal processing methods and specialised hardware. This new MSc is designed to give you the specialised knowledge and skills needed in modern digital technology.

This course is for you if you have an undergraduate degree in Engineering, or if you’re a practising engineer and would like to update your knowledge and practical skills in the areas of digital signal processing and image processing.

Why choose this course?

How will I study?

You’ll study taught modules and work on an individual MSc project.

The modules are taught by a combination of lectures, seminars and practical laboratory work. Assessment is linked to the modules’ learning outcomes and involves unseen exam and/or coursework. The MSc project is assessed by a project dissertation and oral presentation.

MSc project

You’ll complete a substantial MSc project, which is often practical as well as theoretical. You may have opportunities to work with an industrial partner.

Some of our previous students’ project work has led to journal and conference publication, giving them a head start in their careers.

The project allows you to develop your skills as an engineer and will involve:

  • an in-depth study of an advanced topic in digital signal or digital image processing
  • further development of your critical awareness, creative thinking and project planning skills
  • enhancing your ability to describe complex technical issues clearly and concisely
  • developing your presentation skills to effectively communicate your work and ideas to senior colleagues within an organisation.

Project assessment can include interim reports, presentations and a dissertation. Some projects are undertaken in groups and replicate the type of professional teamwork expected in industry. Topics are generated from the academic research and industrial collaborations in our Department. A member of faculty supervises the project.

Modules

Core modules

Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

  • MSc Individual Project
  • Advanced Digital Signal Processing
  • Cybernetics and Neural Networks
  • Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
  • Image Processing

Options

Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

  • Fibre Optic Communications
  • Internet-of-Things
  • Mobile Communications
  • Real Time Embedded Systems
  • Reconfigurable System on Chip
  • Topics in Wireless Communications
  • Wearable Technologies

This course is currently subject to validation, in line with our procedures for assuring the quality of our degrees. This means that some course detail may change. The validation process will be concluded before the course starts.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Careers

As a graduate, you’ll have the skills for a career in areas such as:

  • mobile and satellite telecommunications (where large industry players include Samsung, Vodaphone, Nokia and Arm Holdings)
  • aerospace (where large industry players include Airbus, Rolls-Royce and GE)
  • automotive (where large industry players include Jaguar, BMW and Continental)
  • defence and security (where large industry players include BAE Systems, QinetiQ and Thales)
  • healthcare (where large industry players include Siemens and GE).

The MSc is also an ideal entry point for doctoral research in the field of digital signal and image processing.



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At the University of Calgary, we formed the Computational Media Design Program to enable students to conduct research at the intersection of art, music, dance, drama, design and computer science. Read more
At the University of Calgary, we formed the Computational Media Design Program to enable students to conduct research at the intersection of art, music, dance, drama, design and computer science.

The Computational Media Design (CMD) graduate program is composed of the Faculty of Science: Department of Computer Science, the Faculty of Environmental Design and the Faculty of Arts: School of Creative and Performing Arts, Department of English and Department of Art. Students can earn graduate degrees, both Master of Science and PhD. The research-based graduate degrees explore the relationships between and among art, design, science and technology.

In the expanding world of multimedia and design, there is an increasing need for graduates who can conduct and direct complex projects that combine computing expertise with the creative energies of artists and designers. Numerous opportunities exist for our graduates in companies whose primary business is game design and development, film, TV, web design, simulation, networking, interactive media, and mobile and wearable computing to name just a few. Interest in our graduates also comes from the creative fields of dance, music, theatre and the visual arts.

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