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Masters Degrees (Scientific Computing)

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems
Research Project in Environmental Biology
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Software Engineering
Data Visualization
MSc Project
+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems
Research Project
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Physics Project
+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering
Data Visualization
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Modelling Earth Systems
Satellite Remote Sensing
Climate Change – Past, Present and Future
Geographical Information Systems
Conservation of Aquatic Resources
Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium
a number of CW and pulsed laser systems
scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
a Raman microscope
a 72 CPU parallel cluster
access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.

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The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Read more
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Covering topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques, it produces graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well-equipped to proceed to doctoral research or directly into employment in industry, the professions, and the public service. It also provides training for the academic researchers and teachers of the future, encouraging the pursuit of research in computational methods for science and technology disciplines, thus being an important gateway for entering PhD programmes containing a substantial component of computational modelling.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpscm

Course detail

The MPhil in Scientific Computing has a research and a taught element. The research element is a project on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. The taught element comprises of core lecture courses on topics of scientific computing and elective lecture courses relevant to the science or technology topic of the project. Most of the projects are expected to make use of the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

The students will attend lecture courses during Michaelmas Term (some courses may be during Lent Term) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for continuation to a PhD programme or employment, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners who are working with the participating Departments and may be sponsoring the research project.

There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively.

Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments on the core courses 25%; written examinations on the elective courses 25%.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project.

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core lectures are on topics of high performance scientific computing numerical analysis and advanced numerical methods and techniques. They are organized by the Centre for Scientific Computing and are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their dissertation and for their general education in scientific computing.

In particular, their objective is to introduce students to the simulation science pipeline of problem identification, modelling, simulation and evaluation - all from the perspective of employing high-performance computing. Numerical discretisation of mathematical models will be a priority, with a specific emphasis on understanding the trade-offs (in terms of modelling time, pre-processing time, computational time, and post-processing time) that must be made when solving realistic science and engineering problems. Understanding and working with computational methods and parallel computing will be a high priority. To help the students understand the material, the lecturers will furnish the courses with practical coursework assignments.

The lectures on topics of numerical analysis and HPC are complemented with hands-on practicals using Linux-based laptops provided by the course (students may bring their own), as well as on the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

Appropriate elective lecture courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor. While every effort is made within the Departments to arrange the timetable in a coherent fashion, it is inevitable that some combinations of courses will be ruled out by their schedule, particularly if the choices span more than one department.

Continuing

For continuation to a PhD programme in Scientific Computing, students are required to gain a Distinction (overall grade equal or greater than 75%).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Scientific Computing, a part of the natural sciences, has experienced probably the most rapid growth of all sciences in the last decade. Read more
Scientific Computing, a part of the natural sciences, has experienced probably the most rapid growth of all sciences in the last decade. With the advent of computers, a new way of studying the properties of nature became available. One no longer has to make approximations in the analytical solutions of models to obtain closed forms and interesting but intractable terms no longer have to be omitted from models right from the beginning of the modeling phase. Now, by employing methods of scientific computing, complicated equations can be solved numerically, simulations allow the solution of hitherto intractable problems, and visualization techniques reveal the beauty of complex as well as simple models.

At the CSC, we offer training in scientific computing by research. Project opportunities exist for entry every academic year. Applications are welcomed for Research Council funded projects and from self-funding students.

You will work with an academic on a subject of current research associated with scientific computing.

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As an interdisciplinary centre we offer relevant modules run by other departments as well as the Centre’s own modules. The list of modules offered is reviewed annually and is dependent on those offered by each department. Read more
As an interdisciplinary centre we offer relevant modules run by other departments as well as the Centre’s own modules. The list of modules offered is reviewed annually and is dependent on those offered by each department.

This MSc provides an exciting mixture of fundamental methods and cutting-edge applications of Scientific Computing. Formal training covers software engineering for both workstations and high-performance computers, and underpinning algorithms. You may then choose a project within one of the many interdisciplinary Scientific Computing research groups at Warwick.

Our interdisciplinary focus gives you access to a breadth of expertise across the natural sciences at Warwick. You will benefit from extra contact time with staff and other students, while also being able to work across departments in accordance with your subject interests. Recent graduate destinations include the financial and IT sector. A large proportion of our MSc students continue on to a PhD programme in a science discipline and others have advanced to roles in IT development, modelling and consultancy.

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Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. Read more
Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. It trains students in advanced computational techniques and in the application of these techniques to at least one scientific area, such as Applied Mathematics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Physics, or Physical Oceanography. Students can expect to gain knowledge and experience in: (1) state-of-the-art numerical methods, (2) high performance computer architectures, (3) use of software development tools for parallel and vector computers, (4) graphics, visualization, and multimedia tools, and (5) acquisition, processing, and analysis of large experimental data sets.

The Scientific Computing program is interdisciplinary, enriched by the expertise of faculty members in a range of academic units. Researchers in external organizations contribute by co-supervising students, providing placements for co-op students, providing computing resources, and teaching some courses. The program has close links with ACEnet, the Atlantic Canada Excellence network of high performance computers on which much of our computational work is carried out.

The program is offered in both thesis and non-thesis (project) versions, with a cooperative education (co-op) option also available. Both full-time and part-time studies are possible. A distinguishing characteristic of this program is the emphasis on interdisciplinary studies. Graduating students will have mastered a broader range of science and engineering areas than graduates from the more traditional, discipline-based programs.

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Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. Read more
Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. It trains students in advanced computational techniques and in the application of these techniques to at least one scientific area, such as Applied Mathematics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Physics, or Physical Oceanography. Students can expect to gain knowledge and experience in: (1) state-of-the-art numerical methods, (2) high performance computer architectures, (3) use of software development tools for parallel and vector computers, (4) graphics, visualization, and multimedia tools, and (5) acquisition, processing, and analysis of large experimental data sets.

The Scientific Computing program is interdisciplinary, enriched by the expertise of faculty members in a range of academic units. Researchers in external organizations contribute by co-supervising students, providing placements for co-op students, providing computing resources, and teaching some courses. The program has close links with ACEnet, the Atlantic Canada Excellence network of high performance computers on which much of our computational work is carried out.

The program is offered in both thesis and non-thesis (project) versions, with a cooperative education (co-op) option also available. Both full-time and part-time studies are possible. A distinguishing characteristic of this program is the emphasis on interdisciplinary studies. Graduating students will have mastered a broader range of science and engineering areas than graduates from the more traditional, discipline-based programs.

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The primary aim of this course is to educate you to MSc level in the theoretical and practical aspects of mathematical problem solving, mathematical model development, creating software solutions and communication of results. Read more
The primary aim of this course is to educate you to MSc level in the theoretical and practical aspects of mathematical problem solving, mathematical model development, creating software solutions and communication of results.

This course provides training in the use and development of reliable numerical methods and corresponding software. It aims to train graduates with a mathematical background to develop and apply their skills to the solution of real problems. It covers the underlying mathematical ideas and techniques and the use and design of mathematical software. Several application areas are examined in detail. It develops skills in mathematical problem-solving, scientific computing, and technical communication.

Training is also provided in general computing skills, mathematical typsetting, mathematical writing, desktop and web-based mathematical software development, and the use of computer languages and packages including Mathematica, parallel computing, C#, 3D graphics and animation, and visualisation.

The MSC is now available fully online and can be taken over 12 months full time or 24 months part time.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr36/

Course Details

By the end of the course, you will be able to:

- use the description of a real world problem to develop a reasonable mathematical model in consultation with the scientific literature and possibly experts in the area
- carry out appropriate mathematical analysis
- select or develop an appropriate numerical method and write a computer programme which gives access to a sensible solution to the problem
- present and interpret these results for a potential client or a non-technical audience

Modules

Module descriptions - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/science/page05.html#mathematical

AM6001 Introduction to Mathematica (5 credits)
AM6002 Numerical Analysis with Mathematica (5 credits)
AM6003 Cellular Automata (5 credits)
AM6004 Applied Nonlinear Analysis (Computational Aspects) (5 credits)
AM6005 Modelling of Systems with Strong Nonlinearities (5 credits)
AM6006 Mathematical Modelling of Biological Systems with Differential Equations (5 credits)
AM6007 Object Oriented Programming with Numerical Examples (10 credits)
AM6008 Developing Windowed Applications and Web-based Development for Scientific Applications (5 credits)
AM6009 3D Computer Graphics and Animation for Scientific Visualisation (5 credits)
AM6010 Topics in Applied Mathematical Modelling (5 credits)
AM6011 Advanced Mathematical Models and Parallel Computing with Mathematica (5 credits)
AM6012 Minor Dissertation (30 credits)

Format

The course places great emphasis on hands-on practical skills. There is a computer laboratory allocated solely for the use of MSc students. PCs are preloaded with all the required software and tools. Online students are expected to have a suitable PC or laptop available; all required software is provided for installation to faciliate course work. Online teaching hours, involving lecturers, tutorials and practical demonstrations, usually take place in the morninbg. The rest of the time, you are expected to do exercises, assignments and generally put in the time required to acquire key skills.

Assessment

Continuous assessment is the primary method of examining. In each module, typically 40% of the marks are available for take-home assignments and the remaining 60% of marks are examined by a practical computer-based examination. Final projects are read and examined by at least two members of staff.

For more information, please see the Book of Modules 2015/2016 - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/science/page05.html#mathematical

Careers

Quantitative graduates with software skills are in high demand in industry according to the Governments Expert Group on Future Skills Needs. Demand for these skills is project to rise over the coming years not just in Ireland but in the EU and globally. Graduates have recently secured jobs in the following areas: banking, financial trading, consultancy, online gambling firms, software development, logistics, data analysis and with companies such as AIB, McAfee, Fexco, DeCare Systems, MpStor, the Tyndall Institute, Matchbook.com, First Derivatives and KPMG.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Read more
Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Numerical methods can only play an even more important role in the future as we face even bigger challenges. Therefore, skilled scientific programmers are in high demand in industry and academia and will drive forward much of the future economy.

Degree information

This programme aims to produce highly computationally skilled scientists and engineers capable of applying numerical methods and critical evaluation of their results to their field of science or engineering. It brings together best practice in computing with cutting-edge science and provides a computing edge over traditional science, engineering and mathematics programmes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), is also offered.

Core modules
-Computational and Simulation Methods
-Numerical Methods
-Numerical Optimisation
-Research Computing with C++
-Research Software Engineering with Python
-Techniques of High-Performance

Optional modules - options include a wide selection of modules across UCL Engineering and UCL Mathematical & Physical Sciences.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and hands-on programming and includes a variety of short programming projects, delivered as part of the taught component. Students are encouraged to participate in scientific seminars, for example, weekly seminars at the UCL Centre for Inverse Problems. Assessment is through examinations, assignments, small projects and the dissertation, including a computer programme.

Careers

We expect our graduates to take up exciting science and engineering roles in industry and academia with excellent prospects for professional development and steep career advancement opportunities. This degree enable students to work on cutting-edge real-life problems, overcome the challenges they pose and so contribute to advancing knowledge and technology in our society.

Employability
Students develop a comprehensive set of skills which are in high demand both in industry and academia: professional software development skills including state-of-the-art scripting and compiled languages; knowledge of techniques used in high-performance computing; understanding and an ability to apply a wide range of numerical methods and numerical optimisation; a deeper knowledge of their chosen science subject; oral and written presentational skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a global reputation for excellence in research and is committed to delivering impact and innovations that enhance the lives of people in the UK, across Europe and around the world. UCL is consistently placed in the global top 20 across a wide range of university rankings (currently fifth in QS World University Rankings 2014/15). Furthermore, the Thomson Scientific Citation Index shows that UCL is the 2nd most highly cited European university and 13th in the world.

Our wide-ranging expertise provides opportunities for groundbreaking interdisciplinary investigation. World-leading experts in the field and students benefit from a programme of distinguished visitors and guest speakers in many scientific seminars. In this way a network of collaborators, mentors and peers is created, which students can access in their future career.

This degree has been designed to balance a professional software development and high performance computing skills with a comprehensive selection of numerical mathematics and scientific subjects, culminating in a scientific computing dissertation project. The dual aspect of a science and computing degree enable students to tackle real-life problems in a structured and rigorous way and produce professional software for their efficient solution.

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The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering. Read more

Overview

Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering.
By its very nature, scientific computing is a fundamentally multidisciplinary subject. The various application areas give rise to mathematical models of the phenomena being studied.

Examples range in scale from the behaviour of cells in biology, to flow and combustion processes in a jet engine, to the formation and development of galaxies. Mathematics is used to formulate and analyse numerical methods for solving the equations that come from these applications.

Implementing the methods on modern, high performance computers requires good algorithm design to produce efficient and robust computer programs. Competence in scientific computing thus requires familiarity with a range of academic disciplines. The practitioner must, of course, be familiar with the application area of interest, but it is also necessary to understand something of the mathematics and computer science involved.

Whether you are interested in fundamental science, or a technical career in business or industry, it is clear that having expertise in scientific computing would be a valuable, if not essential asset. The question is: how does one acquire such expertise?

This course is one of a suite of MScs in Scientific Computation that are genuinely multidisciplinary in nature. These courses are taught by internationally leading experts in various application areas and in the core areas of mathematics and computing science, fully reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of the subject. The courses have been carefully designed to be accessible to anyone with a good first degree in science or engineering. They are excellent preparation either for research in an area where computational techniques play a significant role, or for a career in business or industry.

Key facts:
- This course is offered in collaboration with the School of Computer Science.
- It is one of a suite of courses focusing on scientific computation.
- The School of Mathematical Sciences is one of the largest and strongest mathematics departments in the UK, with over 50 full-time academic staff.
- In the latest independent Research Assessment Exercise, the school ranked 8th in the UK in terms of research power across the three subject areas within the School of Mathematical Sciences (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and operational research).

Modules

Advanced Techniques for Differential Equations

Computational Linear Algebra

Operations Research and Modelling

Programming for Scientific Computation

Scientific Computation Dissertation

Simulation for Computer Scientists

Stochastic Financial Modelling

Variational Methods

Vocational Mathematics

Data Mining Techniques and Applications

Mathematical Foundations of Programming

English language requirements for international students

IELTS: 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any element)

Further information



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The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Read more
The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Expertise in the group encompasses a broad range of topics, including Continuum Mechanics, Analysis & Dynamical Systems, Industrial & Applied Mathematics, Inverse Problems, Mathematical Finance, and Numerical Analysis & Scientific Computing. The group has a strongly interdisciplinary research ethos, which it pursues in areas such as Mathematics in the Life Sciences, Uncertainty Quantification & Data Science, and within the Manchester Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics.

The Applied Mathematics group offers the MSc in Applied Mathematics as an entry point to graduate study. The MSc has two pathways, reflecting the existing strengths within the group in numerical analysis and in industrial mathematics. The MSc consists of five core modules (total 75 credits) covering the main areas of mathematical techniques, modelling and computing skills necessary to become a modern applied mathematician. Students then choose three options, chosen from specific pathways in numerical analysis and industrial modelling (total 45 credits). Finally, a dissertation (60 credits) is undertaken with supervision from a member of staff in the applied mathematics group with the possibility of co-supervision with an industrial sponsor.

Aims

The course aims to develop core skills in applied mathematics and allows students to specialise in industrial modelling or numerical analysis, in preparation for study towards a PhD or a career using mathematics within industry. An important element is the course regarding transferable skills which will link with academics and employers to deliver important skills for a successful transition to a research career or the industrial workplace.

Special features

The course features a transferable skills module, with guest lectures from industrial partners. Some dissertation projects and short internships will also be available with industry.

Teaching and learning

Students take eight taught modules and write a dissertation. The taught modules feature a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, coursework, and computing and modelling projects (both individually and in groups). The modules on Scientific Computing and Transferable Skills particularly involve significant project work. Modules are examined through both coursework and examinations.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment comprises course work, exams in January and May, followed by a dissertation carried out and written up between June and September. The dissertation counts for 60 credits of the 180 credits and is chosen from a range of available projects, including projects suggested by industrial partners.

Course unit details

CORE (75 credits)
1. Mathematical methods
2. Partial Differential Equations
3. Scientific Computing
4. Dynamical Systems
5. Transferrable skills for mathematicians

Industrial modelling pathway
1 Continuum mechanics
2. Stability theory
3. Conservation and transport laws

Numerical analysis pathway
1. Numerical linear algebra
2. Finite Elements
3. Optimization and variational calculus

Career opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a career in research (via entry into a PhD programme) or direct entry into industry. Possible subsequent PhD programmes would be those in mathematics, computer science, or one of the many science and engineering disciplines where applied mathematics is crucial. The programme develops many computational, analytical, and modelling skills, which are valued by a wide range of employers. Specialist skills in scientific computing are valued in the science, engineering, and financial sector.

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The ideas of applied mathematics pervade several applications in a variety of businesses and industries as well as government. Sophisticated mathematical tools are increasingly used to develop new models, modify existing ones, and analyze system performance. Read more

Program overview

The ideas of applied mathematics pervade several applications in a variety of businesses and industries as well as government. Sophisticated mathematical tools are increasingly used to develop new models, modify existing ones, and analyze system performance. This includes applications of mathematics to problems in management science, biology, portfolio planning, facilities planning, control of dynamic systems, and design of composite materials. The goal is to find computable solutions to real-world problems arising from these types of situations.

The master of science degree in applied and computational mathematics provides students with the capability to apply mathematical models and methods to study various problems that arise in industry and business, with an emphasis on developing computable solutions that can be implemented. The program offers options in discrete mathematics, dynamical systems, and scientific computing. Students complete a thesis, which includes the presentation of original ideas and solutions to a specific mathematical problem. The proposal for the thesis work and the results must be presented and defended before the advisory committee.

Curriculum

Several options available for course sequence:
-Discrete mathematics option
-Dynamical systems option
-Scientific computing option

See website for individual module details.

Other entry requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a personal statement of educational objectives.
-Have an undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Submit two letters of recommendation, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose primary language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 550 (paper-based) or 79-80 (Internet-based) is required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.5. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org. Those who cannot take the TOEFL will be required to take the Michigan Test of English Proficiency at RIT and obtain a score of 80 or higher.
-Although Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, submitting them may enhance a candidate's acceptance into the program.
-A student may also be granted conditional admission and be required to complete bridge courses selected from among RIT’s existing undergraduate courses, as prescribed by the student’s adviser. Until these requirements are met, the candidate is considered a nonmatriculated student. The graduate program director evaluates the student’s qualifications to determine eligibility for conditional and provisional admission.

Additional information

Student’s advisory committee:
Upon admission to the program, the student chooses an adviser and forms an advisory committee. This committee oversees the academic aspects of the student’s program, including the selection of a concentration and appropriate courses to fulfill the program’s requirements.

Cooperative education:
Cooperative education enables students to alternate periods of study on campus with periods of full-time, paid professional employment. Students may pursue a co-op position after their first semester. Co-op is optional for this program.

Part-time study:
The program is ideal for practicing professionals who are interested in applying mathematical methods in their work and enhancing their career options. Most courses are scheduled in the late afternoon or early evening. The program may normally be completed in two years of part-time study.

Nonmatriculated students:
A student with a bachelor’s degree from an approved undergraduate institution, and with the background necessary for specific courses, may take graduate courses as a nonmatriculated student with the permission of the graduate program director and the course instructor. Courses taken for credit may be applied toward the master’s degree if the student is formally admitted to the program at a later date. However, the number of credit hours that may be transferred into the program from courses taken at RIT is limited for nonmatriculated students.

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This course is for you if you wish to enter knowledge-led industrial sectors or to embark upon doctoral interdisciplinary study. This interdisciplinary programme between Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, and Astronomy gives you access to a broad range of knowledge and application in industry and academia. Read more

Why is this course for you?

•This course is for you if you wish to enter knowledge-led industrial sectors or to embark upon doctoral interdisciplinary study.
•This interdisciplinary programme between Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, and Astronomy gives you access to a broad range of knowledge and application in industry and academia.

What will you gain as a student?

•practical skills in computation in a range of languages and professional software
•rigorous understanding of the theory of common numerical methods
•technical knowledge in numerical modelling
•exposure to a range of common areas of application

Core Modules

Scientific Computing
Practical Programming
Computational Methods for PDEs or Finite Element Methods

Optional Modules include:

Topics in Mathematical Biology
Particle Methods in Scientific Computing
Advanced Fluid Dynamics
Data Mining and Neural Networks
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics of Mechanical Systems
Applications in Theoretical Physics

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Financial Mathematics is a branch of Mathematics where advanced mathematical and statistical methods are developed for and applied to financial markets and financial management. Read more

Overview

Financial Mathematics is a branch of Mathematics where advanced mathematical and statistical methods are developed for and applied to financial markets and financial management. Its main aims are to quantify and hedge risks in the financial marketplace.

Effective computational methods are crucial for the successful use of mathematical modelling in finance. The MSc in Financial and Computational Mathematics is designed to reflect this combination of knowledge and skills so that its graduates are well equipped to enter the competitive job markets of quantitative finance and related fields.

The course is focused on computational techniques and mathematical modelling used in the financial industry and on the required background in finance. The course is provided by the School of Mathematical Sciences with valuable input from the School of Economics. To ensure that the degree keeps pace with changes in employer expectations and employment opportunities, the course has its own advisory board which consists of leading experts from the financial industry and academia.

Key facts:

- The School of Mathematical Sciences is one of the largest and strongest mathematics departments in the UK, with over 60 full-time academic staff.
- In the latest independent Research Assessment Exercise, the school ranked 8th in the UK in terms of research power across the three subject areas within the School of Mathematical Sciences (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and operational research).
- In the last independent Teaching Quality Assessment, the School scored 23 out of 24.
- The course has its own advisory board (see below) consisting of leading experts from the financial industry and academia.
- The course is offered in collaboration with the School of Economics.

Module details

Core modules include: financial mathematics, advanced financial mathematics, scientific computing and c++, advanced scientific computing, financial mathematics dissertation.

Optional Stream 1 (Maths/Stats and Computing): Optimisation, Time Series and Forecasting, Statistical Foundations.

Optional Stream 2A: Econometic Theory, Financial and Macro Econometrics, Time Series Econometrics, Mathematics for Engineering Management, Game Theory.

Optional Stream 2B: Microeconomic Analysis, Financial Economics, Options and Futures Markets, Mathematics for Engineering Management, Game Theory.

English language requirements for international students

IELTS: 6.5 (with no less than 6.0 in any element)

Further information



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Applicants to this programme are numerate and logically-minded, and it is likely that they will have previously studied software engineering, programming, computer science, maths or physics. Read more
Applicants to this programme are numerate and logically-minded, and it is likely that they will have previously studied software engineering, programming, computer science, maths or physics. Such students will seek more specialised, technical programming and software engineering skills. They would learn in-depth, a range of programming concepts, languages and software development techniques to develop sophisticated and complex programs. Graduates will seek positions as software developers, systems engineers, software testers, programmers, etc.

Course Overview

The main themes of the programme are:
-Current and emerging Software Engineering principles and practices
-Current and emerging programming practices
-Large scale software project management

This programme will equip students with those skills at a high academic level and also crucially enable them to practically implement their knowledge because of the ‘hands-on’ emphasis of the programme.

The Current and emerging Software Engineering principles and practices includes aspects of generic programming.

The Current and emerging programming practices theme covers advanced topics in modules such as Generic Programming and aspects of Scientific Computing and Virtualisation

The Large scale project management theme will concentrate on management and systems analysis skills to be developed by the students both of which are in great demand by employers.

Modules

Part 1
-Agile Software Development (20 credits)
-Generic Programming (20 credits)
-Leadership and Management (20 credits)
-Managing Information Systems and Projects (20 credits)
-Research Methods and Data Analysis (20 credits)
-Scientific Computing & Virtualisation (20 credits)

Part 2
-Major Project (60 credits)

Key Features

Software Engineering as a subject evolved from a desire to incorporate engineering practices including, analysis, design, testing and project management to the process of creating computer programs. As a discipline, software engineering is as broad as the software created, with applications as diverse as plant control (real-time critical systems) to commercial trading software (database driven software) to image processing applications for mobile phones (computer graphics based mobile applications).

Assessment

The School of Applied Computing aims to produce graduates that help shape the future of computing and information systems development. The course content is contemporary and shaped for employability through close links with local and national employers.

Students are assessed through a combination of worksheets, practicals, presentations, projects and examinations. Module assessment is often by assignment, or assignment and examination. The final mark for some modules may include one or more pieces of course work set and completed during the module. Project work is assessed by written report and presentation.

Students are encouraged to use our links with Software Alliance Wales and Go Wales to work on commercial schemes for their Major Project module. Go Wales provides the opportunity of paid work placements with local businesses.

Career Opportunities

Graduates from this programme will be skilled and knowledgeable in the technical aspects of software development, and are likely to find employment either within specialist software organisations, or within organisations which commit resources to developing highly technical software systems. They are likely to have to work as a member of a team, conceiving, designing, developing and implementing complex software systems. Graduates from this programme would expect to be initially employed as software engineers. Those employed by SMEs are likely to work in smaller teams or perhaps as sole developers. Students finding employment with larger companies are most likely to work in larger teams building a variety of large-scale applications.

It is expected that graduates would seek positions such as:
-Software Engineers
-Senior software Engineers
-Software Developers
-Application Developers
-System Engineers
-Software Technical Lead
-System Analyst
-Version control manager
-Project lead/manager

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