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The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context. Read more
The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a first degree looking to become journalists with an international perspective rooted in the UK’s journalistic traditions. Students with degrees in all disciplines are welcome. Law, Business, Agriculture, and Science are among the first degree subjects that are in demand by many publishers and broadcasters. Overseas applicants are especially welcome. Prospective students need excellent general knowledge based on a worldview and a thorough briefing of what is in the news each day.

Students who successfully complete this MA in International Journalism are very employable in the media.

Objectives

The MA in International Journalism is a keystone course at City and has built up a worldwide reputation. This course has been running since 1982 and has more than 1,000 alumni working in journalism around the world.

During the course, you will become adept at print, broadcast and online journalism in a global context by:
-Studying news in all its forms
-Obtaining a profound understanding of international journalism from a UK perspective
-Practising all platforms of journalism (print, broadcast and online) Exploring theory as well as reflect on your practice

You will learn how to gather and report in various styles and modes for a range of media (print, broadcast, online). You will also explore the contemporary global domain of journalism.

The course attracts students from all over the world, who will become your future professional network. You will benefit from being in one of the world’s most significant media cities with access to thousands of international journalists and sources.

On this course you will gain from using both traditional and contemporary journalism tools, and acquire comprehensive skills,which you can take back to your own country or move on with to anywhere in the world.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of all MA Journalism courses, giving you the chance to put your learning into practice and, more importantly, make contacts in the industry.

They are also a way you can build up evidence of what you can do to a potential employer (cuttings, video and audio clips).

You are encouraged to undertake work experience during the breaks in the terms.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

The International Journalism MA is a professional/practice course with an emphasis on developing practical skills in journalism. The teaching staff are all professional journalists in print, broadcast or online. We focus on "learning by doing" - you cover real stories and produce newspapers, run a radio station, broadcast on the internet, and produce television news programmes and multimedia websites.

During the course, you have opportunities to meet, listen to and question journalists and other people from the media. You are encouraged to reflect on your own experiences as journalists and the ways in which practicing journalists do their jobs by developing an understanding of ethical issues in journalism, the media and international reporting.

You will be treated as a professional journalist throughout the practice-based elements of the course. Learning is intensive and at times teaching hours will resemble those of a full-time job.

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, such as Global Journalism and Society and Ethics, Rules and Standards, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Industry visitors
The MA International Journalism course prides itself on its close connections with journalism practitioners. Here are some of the high-level industry figures who have contributed to the course in recent years:
-David Schlesinger, Global Managing Editor, Reuters
-Lindsey Hilsum, International Editor, Channel 4 News
-Phil Harding, Director English Networks & News, BBC World Service (as External Examiner)
-Yosri Fouda, London bureau chief and host "Top Secret", Al Jazeera
-Salim Amin, ceo A-24 African network and head Camera Pix
-Mark Brayne, Director, Dart Europe
-Waleed Ibrahim, Reuters Iraq Bureau
-Tim Lambon, Deputy Foreign Editor, Channel 4 News
-Gavin McFaydean, Director, Centre of Investigative Journalism
-David Leigh, Investigations Editor, The Guardian
-Sandy McIntyre, head of APTN.

Assessment
Assessment is part of learning, and course assessments vary to reflect the learning being
achieved. They include workshop exercises, studio work, oral presentations, essays, reflections
and production (making journalism products), and different forms (written, oral, visual, aural), as
well as being individual and team-based.

Modules

All students on the International Journalism MA take modules in storytelling and online journalism before specialising in either print, broadcast or online journalism. This choice informs your studies for the rest of the course through to the completion of a final project.

There is a dissertation option for students who prefer a more academic route through the course.

You are encouraged to complete an internship, either in the UK or overseas. This must be arranged by you.

Core modules
-Global Journalism (20 credits)
-Journalistic Storytelling (20 credits)
-International News (15 credits)
-Production (30 credits)
-International Online Journalism (10 credits)
-Journalism Ethics (15 credits)
-Professional Project or Dissertation (30 credits)
-Specialism Journalism or Journalism and Conflict (20 credits)

Elective modules - choose from:
-Print Journalism (20 credits)
-Broadcast Journalism (20 credits)

Career prospects

92.6 per cent of graduates from this course are in employment six months after completing the course (95 per cent in work or further study) (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2014-15). Graduates work in both global and national media and in allied occupations around the world.

Most recently, these have included roles from researchers to editors in broadcasting such as:
-BBC Radio and TV (including BBC World Service)
-ITN
-Channel 4
-Al Jazeera
-Deutsche Welle
-CNN
-France24
-Bloomberg,
-Sky News
-Fox News
-NHK (Japan)
-Thomson Reuters
-Associated Press
-Dow Jones

And major newspapers and magazines including:
-The New York Times
-Financial Times
-The Hindu
-Politiken
-GQ
-Fairfax Media (New Zealand)

In the heart of London’s huge and diverse media district,students have unrivalled access to industry internships and contacts.

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The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Read more
The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:
-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education
-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education
-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1
-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)
-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse Analysis
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Approaches to English teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental Psycholinguistics
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-The practice of English language teaching
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:
-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)
-An exam in Research Methods in Education
-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit
-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. Read more
Are you passionate about the dialogue between science and the public? Are you curious about how scientific knowledge is created and consumed in the past, present and future? Scientific change in disciplines ranging from biological and physical sciences to engineering and medicine feels like it has never been so rapid. It is increasingly important that developments in science, medicine and technology are effectively communicated so as to allow individuals to have an informed opinion on controversial issues.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/93/science-communication-society

Course detail

The Kent MSc in Science, Communication and Society gives experienced, practical, professional and critical perspectives on science communication. Students will explore how journalists, documentary makers, lobbyists, museum curators, politicians and government research bodies enter into scientific dialogue with the public. The course evaluates different strategies for tailoring science to particular audiences, and is illustrated by specific historical examples and present day issues and controversies. It provides training in practical transferable skills pivotal to communicating science across a range of professional settings, making appropriate use traditional modes of communication alongside current and developing technologies.

Purpose

It is intended primarily, though not exclusively, for the following:

• Science graduates intending to pursue a career in media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Practising scientists wanting a career change into media, education, policy or other communicational area of science;
• Continuing professional development for scientists or teachers of science;
• Humanities graduates with an interest in history of science, technology or medicine.

Format and assessment

The MSc has been developed by the School of Biosciences, a leading school in teaching, research and science communication, and the School of History, which has a dedicated research centre in the History of the Sciences. It integrates current theory and practice in communicating science with insights from historical and ethical perspectives. Two core modules have a case study-driven approach to science communication, learning from key scientific moments in history and from science communicators who work in a variety of different professions (eg, media, politics, education, journalism).

Two optional modules allow you to specialise in a particular area relevant to science communication, based on your interests and experience, focusing on either practical/scientific or humanities-based approaches to the study of science communication. An extended research project allows you to take a practical approach to science communication, or to do in-depth research on a historical or contemporary episode in science.

In some cases, these projects may be undertaken in conjunction with external partners, such as Research Councils, charities and NGOs.

You can opt to take only the core modules, resulting in a postgraduate certificate, or to take the compulsory plus two optional modules, leading to a postgraduate diploma.

Continuous assessment throughout the year is diverse, innovative and context-driven, from short pieces of writing to longer essays, and from the development and evaluation of science communication activities to mock professional reports and grant applications. The aim of each assessment is not only to monitor understanding, but also to integrate information across modules and give you practical experience in a range of transferable skills for future employability.

Careers

The opportunities for careers in science communication are significant as professional science organisations recognise the increasing importance of public engagement. Graduates of this MSc bring together skills drawn from both sciences and humanities, and the programme is designed to build a portfolio of outputs that can be used in subsequent applications, including blogs, funding applications and the development of specific science communication events. Graduates from the programme have moved into roles in museums, medical writing agencies, research funding councils, public engagement roles in professional science organisations, as well as PhD positions in science communication.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/93

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. Read more

Description

This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. The course will show you how to balance the excitement of scientific discovery and development of innovative delivery methods with an accurate representation of the facts and data that underpin it.

The taught aspects of the course combine practical skills of science journalism, medical writing and SciArt, (the interdisciplinary study of science and art), with theoretical learning about the history and philosophy of science and the study of science communication as an academic discipline.

You will also have the opportunity to work on live science communication projects with external organisations. The programme will give you the necessary analytical and communication skills to be a successful science communicator – in person as well as in writing.

Core units

- Live Project
- Practical Science Communication
- Science and Society
- Science Communication as an Academic Discipline

Option units

- Science Journalism
- Medical Writing
- SciArt

Career prospects

The academic team uses information gained from alumni, graduate destinations and also from industry regarding graduate prospects for science communication students. This information is used to inform curriculum design, e.g. in the development of the curriculum for employability. The programme provides the foundations for future study or advancement on to a variety of professional pathways, including working in outreach or public engagement. In particular, this MSc in Science Communication can lead to career opportunities in medical communications, science journalism, science communication research, science advocacy, and scientific publishing.

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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Our MSc Science Communication course is an excellent opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, our MSc programme gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course combines a solid theoretical background with practical skill development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs. Visiting specialists also help you understand what they are looking for in future employees.

Introductory modules provide a broad theoretical foundation in issues such as the rationale for public engagement with science, understanding the audience, the role of the media in society, communication theory and models of informal learning. You'll then have the opportunity to specialise by choosing from modules that cover practical skills related to taking science directly to the public, as well as new approaches to science communication such as digital media. This allows you to hone your practical skills and develop a portfolio that shows your expertise as a science communicator. In the final year, you may choose to further develop your portfolio, for example by mounting a practical science communication project, or take on a more theoretical or research-based project, perhaps with an external science communication organisation.

Modules

You will take the following three modules:
• Science and Society
• Science, the Public and Media

You then choose two from these three modules:
• Science on Air and on Screen
• Science in Public Spaces
• Writing Science

Format

Unlike most Master's courses in this area, the MSc Science Communication addresses the needs of working students. There are short, intensive teaching blocks of three to five days, and you can expect to attend three teaching sessions for each 30 credit module.

If you study this programme part-time, you'll take two 30 credit modules each for two academic years. It's possible to complete the part-time course in two years by finishing your project during the summer of the second year, or you may prefer to take a third year. Full-time students take four taught modules and complete the project in 14 months.

Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, tutorials and mentoring.

Assessment

The modules are assessed in a variety of ways, to reflect the theoretical concepts, knowledge and practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations all of which you can use to attract prospective employers. The ability to evaluate your own work and others' is critical to success in the workplace, and several assessments are designed to help you acquire these skills.

Careers / Further study

Science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, we'll encourage you to develop the professional skills to help you secure employment or research positions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. The Postgraduate Certificate in Practical Science Communication, linked to the world-class MSc Science Communication course, and also designed by the Science Communication Unit, is aimed at students seeking an additional qualification. It is an opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, the course gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course focuses on practical skills development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs, with visiting specialists helping you to understand what they seek in future employees.

Depending on the options you take, you will develop skills in science writing, cutting-edge science communication techniques, and the abilities you'll need to develop and run science communication projects. This includes devising and managing projects, evaluations and funding.

Modules

You will choose two from these three modules (30 credits each):

• Science on Air and on Screen - Build your radio, TV and digital skills by critically exploring the role of broadcast media in the communication of science. You'll also make an 'as live' radio magazine programme about science, and a short film.

• Science in Public Spaces - Develop your own science communication initiative in this hands-on module from developing a creative concept, to seeking funding, and managing and evaluating a project. You'll explore a range of innovative approaches from sci-art, to museums, festivals to theatre.

• Writing Science - Develop journalistic and other writing styles, including writing for news media, public relations and educational purposes, with a view to developing a portfolio, as well as working on a magazine project.

Format

The course comprises short, intensive teaching blocks of three days (Thursday to Saturday) and you'll most likely need to attend three teaching sessions for each 30-credit module. Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, and tutorials.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways, to reflect the practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations - all of which you can use to attract prospective employers.

Careers / Further study

Practical science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to develop the professional skills that will help you secure employment or research positions in science communication, or to combine it with your existing career.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Journalism at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Journalism at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Journalism offers an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approach to contemporary journalism studies under the impact of globalisation and digitalisation, drawing upon expertise in Media and Communication Studies.

Key Features of MA in International Journalism

The MA in International Journalism provides an international and cross-cultural approach to journalism in the 21st century and aims to develop the knowledge and understanding of the role of journalism in society. The International Journalism course combines the teaching of practical skills and techniques of journalistic production with the exploration of practice from a range of theoretical and analytical perspectives. Graduates have careers in journalism, media, communication and PR, broadcasting, publishing, marketing and sales.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The International Journalism course structure is split across the year allowing three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component allows students to either write a 20,000 word dissertation or a journalism/media project of their own (with 10,000 word report) which draws upon issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Journalism typically include:

• Global Media
• Conceptual Issues in the Theory and Practice of Social Sciences
• Development and Communications
• Risk Reporting
• The Digital Edge
• The Business and Politics of Digital Media
• Digital Skills and Defence
• Online Journalism
• War Reporting
• Promotional and Professional Writing

Who should Apply?

Students interested in journalism and media studies, from a media studies, literature, history, sociology, politics and international relations, social science, or other related background. Professionals interested in journalism and global media both in terms of their professional practice, but also related to fields in policy research and public administration.

Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to global media and international journalism.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Journalism graduates. Media organizations, non-profit organizations, government and the public sector and private companies value the fact that our graduates have developed a range of critical abilities and skills in problem solving. Our International Journalism graduates enter careers in journalism (Guardian Online), broadcasting (BBC Wales), advertising, publicity, arts and cultural bodies or are employed as NGOs. Others go on to study a PhD and have a career in academia.

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The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. Read more

About the course

The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. A major part of your studies will be writing for the media. In our newsroom, you’ll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling. You’ll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

Your career

The MSc puts you in an enviable position. Employers in science and technology, the medical and pharmaceutical industries, cultural industries, the science policy sector, education and the media will see your potential.

If you decide on a research career in science, your masters will enable you to communicate your own research effectively.

The course is now five years old. Our graduates have already gone on to careers in the pharmaceutical industry, with medical and educational charities, in a variety of science communication roles.

About us

This course is taught by experts from the faculties of science, social science and medicine, giving you access to world-leading scientists and media practitioners in the field of science communication and journalism. They include fertility expert Professor Allan Pacey who has considerable experience of TV and film, and Dr Louise Robson, a biomedical scientist who works with schools.

Our combined experience covers science communication via newspapers and magazines, radio and television, websites and social networks as well as writing articles and books.

Facilities

You’ll be based in the Science Communication Lab on the main University campus. Much of the practical work is done there and in the Department of Journalism Studies where you’ll have access to all the latest equipment for print, web and broadcast journalism.

Our print facilities include networked computers with Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. For broadcasting we have access to radio and TV studios, digital TV editing suites and DV and HD camcorders. We also have multimedia and web authoring software including Dreamweaver and Adobe Premiere.

Core modules

Developing Communication Skills; Topical Science; Dissertation; Ethics and Regulation; Writing for the Media; Communicating with the Media; Online Journalism Studies; Research Methods.

Teaching and assessment

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching. There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You’ll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. You’re assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

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Our course explores in both theoretical and practical terms current issues in journalism in the context of the digital revolution and media convergence. Read more
Our course explores in both theoretical and practical terms current issues in journalism in the context of the digital revolution and media convergence.

• It combines solid foundations of journalism practice with the latest developments in multimedia techniques, digital journalism and social media
• It puts students through the fast-paced newsroom environment experience and offers opportunities to get engaged in specialisms such as foreign affairs correspondent, health and science reporter, business and finance writer or data journalist
• It builds students’ professional portfolios, launches live brief media and journalism projects and embeds students in community programmes on work experience.

Key benefits:

• Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus, alongside students from around the world
• Strengthen your CV with work experience opportunities in the UK or abroad
• Explore potential solutions to international multimedia journalistic issues.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/international-journalism-for-digital-media

Suitable for

Students progressing from an undergraduate journalism course or media professionals looking for a cutting-edge journalism postgraduate course. You should want to explore concepts, trends and challenges in journalism and related fields of communication. And you should have an interest in the impact of social media on journalism.

Programme details

With guest lecturers from the BBC and other media organisations, practical workshops and newsdays in industry standard radio and TV studios, the syllabus is as close to real life in the world of digital media as one can get. The theory informs the practice to produce critical and autonomous professionals capable of working with confidence in any global media environment.

Format

For the full MA International Journalism for Digital Media award you will take two core 30-credit modules in Semester 1, one 30-credit core and one elective module in Semester 2, and you will complete your final major project in Semester 3 either as an academic dissertation or a journalistic project. For overseas students this project may be completed in your home country subject to approval. The PgDip will be awarded on successful completion of the first 120 credits.

This course will be taught through lectures, presentations, seminars and workshops aimed at developing your understanding of the theory and practice of international and online journalism. There will be a number of visiting speakers and guest lecturers, and full use will be made of the growing links between our courses and the BBC and ITV through our base at MediaCityUK to facilitate joint projects and enable students to attend and participate in industry events.

Student-led independent research, independent study, and project work such as newsdays, will be used alongside ‘problem-based’ and ‘task-based’ teaching, learning and assessment strategies. These will be integrated with an assessment strategy based on outcomes, students’ reflective self-assessments and learning plans. You will also undertake a period of work placement within the journalism community of practice, which will be supported by your module tutors. In certain cases, international students may be able to undertake this work placement in their home country.

Semester 1

• Core Module: Global Perspectives on Journalism
• Core Module: Digital Journalism

Semester 2

Core Module:

• Journalism Practice in a Multimedia Newsroom

One of the following optional modules:

• Specialist Journalism Practice
• Sports Journalism
• Community Project

Semester 3

• Major Project

Assessment

Assessment methods will include:

• production exercises and portfolios of work
• practical media projects
• peer reviewing
• essays
• oral presentations by students
• work-based learning diaries and reports
• a dissertation or major project supported by substantial self-reflection.

Career potential

Graduates can enter careers in various forms of journalism (print, broadcast or online) either in reporting or management roles, public relations, researchers, media analysts and advisers all either working in this country or abroad. Journalists could work as UK-based foreign correspondents travelling abroad or full-time in overseas postings.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The Master of Science in Communication Studies. Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. Read more

About the programme

The Master of Science in Communication Studies: Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. The Master looks at journalism and media from an economic, political-ideological and policy perspective. It pays attention to the impact of recent economic, political and technological developments on journalism and media. The Master zooms in on media and journalism in a European context, looking comparatively at journalism across Europe and at journalism in the context of European integration. It makes optimal use of Brussels with its range of European and international institutions and the many media, journalism and communication professionals working in and around those institutions.

This master offers...

- A high-level and integrated programme and interdisciplinary approach to journalism and media in Europe
- Teaching in small groups, using interactive methods, stimulating individual participation
- The possibility of writing your thesis in English, Dutch, French or German (the last three on approval)
- Close collaboration with researchers from the research centers Studies on Media, Information and Telecommunication (SMIT), Studies on Media and Culture (Cemeso), and Democracy, Signification, Resistance (Desire), and the Brussels Platform for Journalism (BPJ)
- Teaching in Brussels, the capital of Europe and home to an emerging European communication space. The Master will acquaint you with European institutions and media players. The Master includes a yearly lecture series with representatives of European media industry, journalism and institutions, organizes site visits, and offers the possibility of an internship.

Structure

https://my.vub.ac.be/sites/default/files/faculteit/ES/Documenten/msc_in_communication_studies_jnm.pdf

This daytime programme consists of two semesters and can be completed in one academic year.
Alternatively, it can be completed in one and half or two years. It comprises compulsory courses including a master's thesis (48 ECTS), and two optional courses or an internship (12 ECTS).

Compulsory Courses (48 ECTS)

Advanced Methods for Journalism Research
Advanced Theoretical Debates: Journalism, Politics and Ideology
Brussels talking: Lecture Series on Europe, Media and Society
Current Case Studies in Journalism
The Political Economy of Journalism in the EU
Master's Thesis in Communication Studies

Optional Courses (12 ECTS)

Traineeship in Communication Studies
Journalism Practice in Europe
Media, Public Spheres and Public Opinions in Europe
Policy Advocacy and Media in the EU
Challenges and Mutations of Journalism (course at the Université Libre de Bruxelles - in English)

Admission requirements

Direct access is granted for students with a Belgian Bachelor’s degree in Communication Studies.

All other applicants' files will be evaluated by the Admission Board on an individual basis. Applicants with a bachelor diploma in a field other than Communication Studies may still be accepted provided they take a few additional courses in the form of a short preparatory programme (consisting of maximum 24 ECTS credits). This preparatory programme can be followed while starting the Master.

Please note: An academic BA or MA degree is required to apply.

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This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine. Read more
This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine.

You learn from experts working in these diverse fields, being taught how different societies, cultures, and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and encouraged to approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/83/history-of-science-medicine-environment-and-technology

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- place the study of texts, images and documentaries in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis

- ensure that students of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis

- enable you to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology in different academic contexts and develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines

- develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences

- encourage you to relate the academic study of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology to questions of public debate and concern

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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A unique two year Masters course, part of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus programme bringing together five leading European institutions in journalism and media education. Read more
A unique two year Masters course, part of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus programme bringing together five leading European institutions in journalism and media education.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a firm grounding in an Arts subject, looking to specialise in the area of TV or broadcast journalism with a view to starting a career in this field. Students will have a keen interest in the media specifically this area of Journalism. City students with a keen interest in finance and business, have the opportunity in year 2 to consider the Reporting business and finance specialisms.

Objectives

This Masters course is part of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus programme.

Students study as part of a diverse cohort of individuals from around the world.

The Erasmus Mundus MA in Journalism, Media and Globalisation is truly an international course.

The first year is spent in the University of Aarhus, Denmark, the second at City, University of London (where students specialise in financial and business journalism) or at the University of Swansea (Wales), Hamburg University (Germany) or University of Amsterdam (Netherlands).

The Mundus Journalism degree explores the practice and performance of journalism and the media in the context of a new environment brought about by globalisation, modernisation, commercialisation and professional developments.

The course also offers some exchange opportunities for students to travel to one of the following three institutions in the spring of the first year: University of California, Berkeley, USA; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile; or University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. There is a broad range of national and international guest lecturers from media and research institutions features.

Academic facilities

During your second year studies at City, University of London, you will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios, and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-4 radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-2 radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-2 digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-2 TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

The Erasmus Mundus Global Journalism MA brings together five leading European institutions in journalism and media education.

Study Abroad
Between the first and second years of the programme some students have the opportunity to participate in summer exchanges at our international partners:
-University of California at Berkeley, USA
-University of Technology Sydney, Australia
-Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile

Modules

Danish School of Journalism / Aarhus University
Semester 1 core modules:
-Globalisation: Reporting global change (20 credits)
-Globalisation and the transformation of the state (20 credits)
-Globalisation, culture and the roles of the media (20 credits)

Semester 2 core modules:
-Social science methods for journalists (20 credits)
-Researching journalism (20 credits)
-Analytical journalism (20 credits)

City, University of London
Semester 3 core modules:
-Global capitalism: past, present, future (20 credits)
-World of Financial Journalism (20 credits)
-World of Business (20 credits)

Semester 4:
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

Students from the programme have gone on to work for Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones, the BBC, the Financial Times, Reuters, China Daily, Danish Broadcasting Corporation, Helsingin Sanomat, TV 2 Norway, Xinhua News Agency, Bangkok Post, Associated Press and Platts. Other students are working for international organisations, including the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Companies and the European Commission, and for international corporations including Morgan Stanley.

Alumni of the course are now working in organisations including:
-Financial Times
-SunTec
-Greenpeace
-Savivo A/S
-Bloomberg
-Handelsblatt
-Slovenian Press Agency
-WirtschaftsWoche

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This course is about analysing the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation. Read more

Overview

This course is about analysing the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation.
Philosophy and science don't mix. Or do they? What we nowadays call "science" used to be part of "philosophy." It is not a coincidence that Isaac Newton called his physical masterpiece "The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy." And today, the two are still closely connected. Our current worldview is strongly shaped by scientific thought. We look to science for both answers to our theoretical questions and solutions to our practical problems.

The Master's specialisation in Philosophy and Science analyses the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation. How did the scientific worldview come about? What are its components? What models have been proposed for the relationship between philosophical and scientific thinking?

This Master's specialisation will give you a better understanding of the evolution, the current status and the implications of the scientific worldview. Professionally, it prepares you for several possible avenues, in fields including science administration, research, journalism, and policy-making.

Why study Philosophy and Science at Radboud University?

- The focus on the historical and systematic relationship between philosophy and science is unique in the Netherlands.
- The Philosophy Faculty has close ties with scientists and professors at the other faculties on campus - and philosophy as a subject is an integral part of all the faculties at Radboud University. This makes it easier for our students to combine Philosophy with any discipline when working on their thesis.
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups.
- The seminars specifically train skills such as critical reading, analytical thinking, policy writing and debating.
- This Master's specialisation is run by the Center for the History of Philosophy and Science (CHPS), the only centre in the world that studies philosophy and science as historically intertwined phenomena.
- This Master's specialisation is aimed at career prospects in, as well outside of, research.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophyandscience

Career prospects

During the specialisation Philosophy and Science you will learn to think about issues in debates with major thinkers. You will study texts by philosophers of the past and present. What you learn here is applicable to the social, scientific and political situations around us.

After you graduate, you’ll be well situated to analyse texts and extract concepts. You’ll have the ability to think out of the box and to think creatively about possible solutions. You can use those skills in society, in political or social debates and in your work.

Job positions

Graduates of the Master’s specialisation in Philosophy and Science have many options. You can work within journalism and become a journalist, editor or critic. You can also become a policy advisor for a governmental organisation, or for other cultural and social institutions. You can also work as a philosopher in business, communications advisor or ethical expert. And Dutch students who would like to become teachers within the Netherlands could continue to attain the academic teacher’s degree for the subject of Philosophy (leraar Filosofie).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophyandscience

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This Master’s is designed to offer the practical and theoretical training in journalism needed by those with an interest in science and environmental issues to communicate their subject to the public. Read more
This Master’s is designed to offer the practical and theoretical training in journalism needed by those with an interest in science and environmental issues to communicate their subject to the public.

There is demand for science journalists who can report on issues such as health or the environment accurately and succinctly. You will have the opportunity to learn how to take scientific news and turn it into engaging stories, without resorting to sensationalism or technical jargon.

There are opportunities for you to work on community radio, student
newspapers and magazines and to participate in our professional placement scheme. Students have previously worked for BBC Focus magazine, New Scientist and the Vegan Society.

You may also have the opportunity to hear from leading names in the journalism industry. Previous speakers include Channel 4 Science Editor Tom Clarke, naturalist and broadcaster Chris Packham and Sense About Science founder Lord Taverne.

Students on this programme are expected to complete an assessed work placement as part of the Research and Professional Placement module.

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The MSc in Computational and Data Journalism is a cutting-edge programme based at the UK’s leading Journalism School (Guardian’s University Guide 2016). Read more
The MSc in Computational and Data Journalism is a cutting-edge programme based at the UK’s leading Journalism School (Guardian’s University Guide 2016). It is jointly delivered by the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and the School of Computer Science and Informatics.

This programme provides the perfect vantage point from which to succeed in digital journalist and allows you to develops skills in both data journalism and newsroom development. No previous knowledge of computing is necessary and the programme is open to graduates from any discipline.

This MSc is ideal for recent graduates looking for specialist skills in digital journalism and coding that are proven to be in demand by leading organisations. We also work with working journalists looking to develop their skills in this growing area of the industry.

As a hands-on programme, it focuses on the development of knowledge and skills through research-informed practical learning in journalism, data science, computer coding and digital development.

During this one-year, full-time Master's degree, you will benefit from a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops to develop your skills in an open, discussion-driven environment.

You will develop a solid foundation in journalism and computing, before specialising in your areas of interest and finally completing a practical and research-based dissertation project using the unique skills that you have acquired.

This programme is the perfect foundation for a career at the forefront of digital journalism. It has been designed to respond to a shortage in skills reported by employers and built to develop professional writing and editorial skills. In addition, it delivers specialist training to understanding data, coding and web application development.

Distinctive features

This innovative programme is the first of its kind in the UK and is supported by leading industry bodies such as the Financial Times, the BBC and the Office for National Statistics
Specialist modules include science reporting, sport, business journalism, crisis reporting, visual communication and information design
The course has a strong focus on practical application of the skills acquired

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