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Masters Degrees (Science Journalism)

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The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context. Read more
The International Journalism MA is a one-year professional practice course in which you will develop skills in journalism and thinking about journalism in a global context.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a first degree looking to become journalists with an international perspective rooted in the UK’s journalistic traditions. Students with degrees in all disciplines are welcome. Law, Business, Agriculture, and Science are among the first degree subjects that are in demand by many publishers and broadcasters. Overseas applicants are especially welcome. Prospective students need excellent general knowledge based on a worldview and a thorough briefing of what is in the news each day.

Students who successfully complete this MA in International Journalism are very employable in the media.

Objectives

The MA in International Journalism is a keystone course at City and has built up a worldwide reputation. This course has been running since 1982 and has more than 1,000 alumni working in journalism around the world.

During the course, you will become adept at print, broadcast and online journalism in a global context by:
-Studying news in all its forms
-Obtaining a profound understanding of international journalism from a UK perspective
-Practising all platforms of journalism (print, broadcast and online) Exploring theory as well as reflect on your practice

You will learn how to gather and report in various styles and modes for a range of media (print, broadcast, online). You will also explore the contemporary global domain of journalism.

The course attracts students from all over the world, who will become your future professional network. You will benefit from being in one of the world’s most significant media cities with access to thousands of international journalists and sources.

On this course you will gain from using both traditional and contemporary journalism tools, and acquire comprehensive skills,which you can take back to your own country or move on with to anywhere in the world.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of all MA Journalism courses, giving you the chance to put your learning into practice and, more importantly, make contacts in the industry.

They are also a way you can build up evidence of what you can do to a potential employer (cuttings, video and audio clips).

You are encouraged to undertake work experience during the breaks in the terms.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

The International Journalism MA is a professional/practice course with an emphasis on developing practical skills in journalism. The teaching staff are all professional journalists in print, broadcast or online. We focus on "learning by doing" - you cover real stories and produce newspapers, run a radio station, broadcast on the internet, and produce television news programmes and multimedia websites.

During the course, you have opportunities to meet, listen to and question journalists and other people from the media. You are encouraged to reflect on your own experiences as journalists and the ways in which practicing journalists do their jobs by developing an understanding of ethical issues in journalism, the media and international reporting.

You will be treated as a professional journalist throughout the practice-based elements of the course. Learning is intensive and at times teaching hours will resemble those of a full-time job.

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, such as Global Journalism and Society and Ethics, Rules and Standards, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Industry visitors
The MA International Journalism course prides itself on its close connections with journalism practitioners. Here are some of the high-level industry figures who have contributed to the course in recent years:
-David Schlesinger, Global Managing Editor, Reuters
-Lindsey Hilsum, International Editor, Channel 4 News
-Phil Harding, Director English Networks & News, BBC World Service (as External Examiner)
-Yosri Fouda, London bureau chief and host "Top Secret", Al Jazeera
-Salim Amin, ceo A-24 African network and head Camera Pix
-Mark Brayne, Director, Dart Europe
-Waleed Ibrahim, Reuters Iraq Bureau
-Tim Lambon, Deputy Foreign Editor, Channel 4 News
-Gavin McFaydean, Director, Centre of Investigative Journalism
-David Leigh, Investigations Editor, The Guardian
-Sandy McIntyre, head of APTN.

Assessment
Assessment is part of learning, and course assessments vary to reflect the learning being
achieved. They include workshop exercises, studio work, oral presentations, essays, reflections
and production (making journalism products), and different forms (written, oral, visual, aural), as
well as being individual and team-based.

Modules

All students on the International Journalism MA take modules in storytelling and online journalism before specialising in either print, broadcast or online journalism. This choice informs your studies for the rest of the course through to the completion of a final project.

There is a dissertation option for students who prefer a more academic route through the course.

You are encouraged to complete an internship, either in the UK or overseas. This must be arranged by you.

Core modules
-Global Journalism (20 credits)
-Journalistic Storytelling (20 credits)
-International News (15 credits)
-Production (30 credits)
-International Online Journalism (10 credits)
-Journalism Ethics (15 credits)
-Professional Project or Dissertation (30 credits)
-Specialism Journalism or Journalism and Conflict (20 credits)

Elective modules - choose from:
-Print Journalism (20 credits)
-Broadcast Journalism (20 credits)

Career prospects

92.6 per cent of graduates from this course are in employment six months after completing the course (95 per cent in work or further study) (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2014-15). Graduates work in both global and national media and in allied occupations around the world.

Most recently, these have included roles from researchers to editors in broadcasting such as:
-BBC Radio and TV (including BBC World Service)
-ITN
-Channel 4
-Al Jazeera
-Deutsche Welle
-CNN
-France24
-Bloomberg,
-Sky News
-Fox News
-NHK (Japan)
-Thomson Reuters
-Associated Press
-Dow Jones

And major newspapers and magazines including:
-The New York Times
-Financial Times
-The Hindu
-Politiken
-GQ
-Fairfax Media (New Zealand)

In the heart of London’s huge and diverse media district,students have unrivalled access to industry internships and contacts.

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The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. Read more

The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. The text below is for information only.

The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:

-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education

-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education

-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1

-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)

-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Bilingualism

-Citizenship education

-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition

-Discourse Analysis

-Education and social justice

-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice

-Intercultural communication in education

-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading

-Motivation in education

-Teaching and assessing speaking skills

-Teaching and assessing writing skills

-Teaching and learning in schools

-Teaching World English

-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2

-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Approaches to English teaching

-Contemporary issues in teaching

-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse

-Developmental Psycholinguistics

-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language

-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication

-Psychology of language and language learning

-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis

-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education

-Teaching English for academic purposes

-The practice of English language teaching

-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3

Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:

-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)

-An exam in Research Methods in Education

-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit

-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.



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Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career. Read more
Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career.

Developed by academic staff from The University of Manchester's Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the programme will feature masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in print, broadcast and online journalism, museums and science centres, public policy and advocacy, specialist public relations and editorial services, project and event management, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

Aims

Science communication deals with the communication of scientific ideas, practices and issues to diverse audiences. Students on this programme will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?
The course considers these questions among others through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and feeds the discussion back into its approach to practical skills.

Special features

This programme provides a framework that enables to students to enhance their academic and 'real world' learning at the same time. By bringing practitioners into the classroom, and enabling students to participate in the many forms of science communication that are happening in Manchester, students gain a good sense of the range of science communication activity, and of the personal, intellectual and professional skills that will support them as they set off in their careers.

Applicants may informally request from the Course Director, or may be sent, examples of study materials to enable them to test their ability to engage effectively with the course.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements, for individual students and for groups. Students will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, with professional literatures, and with mass media products about science, technology and medicine. Students will learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events. Participation and volunteering will be encouraged so that students can further their own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Coursework and assessment

All modules are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. Students should expect assessments, which are written and spoken, and use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

Students may choose their own topic or medium for the many of the assessments. There is a small taught element which is assessed through a formal exam. Assessed work also includes a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional.
The final assessment piece is a substantial piece of original research (the dissertation).

Career opportunities

This programme is intended for students interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering who are seeking to work in journalism, science policy, science publishing, medical, environmental and other related campaigning and advocacy groups, public relations in the public and private sectors, museums and science centres, science festivals, or other public engagement fields. It also provides an appropriate grounding for PhD-level research in science communication studies.

Past MSc graduates who took our former science communication pathway in History of Science, Technology and Medicine have gone on to a wide range of relevant posts, including:
-Public Engagement Officer, Centre for Life, Newcastle
-Senior Policy Analyst, Department of Energy and Climate Change
-Director, Scientia Scripta (science-focused copywriting agency)
-Assistant Curator of Technology and Engineering, Science Museum
-Education Assistant, Catalyst Science Centre, Widnes
-Junior Consultant, Six Degrees PR
-Technical Author, Calrec Audio
-Researcher, Pioneer Productions (TV)

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The MSc in Computational and Data Journalism is a cutting-edge programme based at the UK’s leading Journalism School (Guardian’s University Guide 2016). Read more
The MSc in Computational and Data Journalism is a cutting-edge programme based at the UK’s leading Journalism School (Guardian’s University Guide 2016). It is jointly delivered by the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and the School of Computer Science and Informatics.

This programme provides the perfect vantage point from which to succeed in digital journalist and allows you to develops skills in both data journalism and newsroom development. No previous knowledge of computing is necessary and the programme is open to graduates from any discipline.

This MSc is ideal for recent graduates looking for specialist skills in digital journalism and coding that are proven to be in demand by leading organisations. We also work with working journalists looking to develop their skills in this growing area of the industry.

As a hands-on programme, it focuses on the development of knowledge and skills through research-informed practical learning in journalism, data science, computer coding and digital development.

During this one-year, full-time Master's degree, you will benefit from a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops to develop your skills in an open, discussion-driven environment.

You will develop a solid foundation in journalism and computing, before specialising in your areas of interest and finally completing a practical and research-based dissertation project using the unique skills that you have acquired.

This programme is the perfect foundation for a career at the forefront of digital journalism. It has been designed to respond to a shortage in skills reported by employers and built to develop professional writing and editorial skills. In addition, it delivers specialist training to understanding data, coding and web application development.

Distinctive features

• This innovative programme is the first of its kind in the UK and is supported by leading industry bodies such as the Financial Times, the BBC and the Office for National Statistics

• Specialist modules include science reporting, sport, business journalism, crisis reporting, visual communication and information design

• The course has a strong focus on practical application of the skills acquired

Structure

This is a year-long, full-time course. It is taught through a mix of formal lectures, demonstrations, and practical exercises as well as individual and team projects but always with a focus on applying the skills in the real world.

The course is structured in three phases – foundation, application and specialisation, dissertation - to support you in the development of skills and knowledge in the key aspects of the course.

You will initially gain a solid foundation in journalism and computing before specialising in your areas of interest and finally, completing a practical and research-based dissertation project using the unique skills that you have acquired.

Core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Reporters and the Reported
Digital Investigation
Data Journalism
Data Journalism
Dissertation Project

Optional modules:

Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Human Centric Computing
Visual Communication and Information Design
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Global Crisis Reporting
Reporting Health and Science
Managing Print Media in a Digital World
Motoring Journalism
Business and Financial Journalism
Lifestyle & Consumer Journalism
Political Reporting
Sports Journalism
Data Journalism
Yr Agenda Cymreig

Teaching

You will be taught through a variety of formal lectures, practical exercises, and individual or group projects which replicate an industry environment.

You will benefit from a dedicated programme of seminars to complement your skills and understanding across the two different disciplines and to bring together the issues arising from the existing teaching modules.

You will also attend a cross-computing/journalism set of workshops and seminars, which support early application and development of the skills developed through each of the subject areas.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a wide range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. These range from practical class room activities to academic essays and examinations.

Career prospects

The skills taught by this MSc are in demand with employers. Students from the course have gone on to work as data journalists with national news organisations. Students on this programme have also included working journalists looking to specialise in this important area of growth within the media.

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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Our MSc Science Communication course is an excellent opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, our MSc programme gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course combines a solid theoretical background with practical skill development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs. Visiting specialists also help you understand what they are looking for in future employees.

Introductory modules provide a broad theoretical foundation in issues such as the rationale for public engagement with science, understanding the audience, the role of the media in society, communication theory and models of informal learning. You'll then have the opportunity to specialise by choosing from modules that cover practical skills related to taking science directly to the public, as well as new approaches to science communication such as digital media. This allows you to hone your practical skills and develop a portfolio that shows your expertise as a science communicator. In the final year, you may choose to further develop your portfolio, for example by mounting a practical science communication project, or take on a more theoretical or research-based project, perhaps with an external science communication organisation.

Modules

You will take the following three modules:
• Science and Society
• Science, the Public and Media

You then choose two from these three modules:
• Science on Air and on Screen
• Science in Public Spaces
• Writing Science

Format

Unlike most Master's courses in this area, the MSc Science Communication addresses the needs of working students. There are short, intensive teaching blocks of three to five days, and you can expect to attend three teaching sessions for each 30 credit module.

If you study this programme part-time, you'll take two 30 credit modules each for two academic years. It's possible to complete the part-time course in two years by finishing your project during the summer of the second year, or you may prefer to take a third year. Full-time students take four taught modules and complete the project in 14 months.

Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, tutorials and mentoring.

Assessment

The modules are assessed in a variety of ways, to reflect the theoretical concepts, knowledge and practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations all of which you can use to attract prospective employers. The ability to evaluate your own work and others' is critical to success in the workplace, and several assessments are designed to help you acquire these skills.

Careers / Further study

Science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, we'll encourage you to develop the professional skills to help you secure employment or research positions.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. Read more
The Science Communication Unit at UWE Bristol is renowned for its innovative and diverse range of national and international activities designed to engage the public with science. The Postgraduate Certificate in Practical Science Communication, linked to the world-class MSc Science Communication course, and also designed by the Science Communication Unit, is aimed at students seeking an additional qualification. It is an opportunity to benefit from the Unit's expertise, resources and contacts.

As well as drawing on the academic and practical experience of staff within the Science Communication Unit, the course gives you an opportunity to meet a range of visiting lecturers and benefit from their practical experience. This also provides an excellent networking opportunity for students interested in developing contacts among science communication practitioners.

Course detail

The course focuses on practical skills development, and has excellent links with the sectors and industries it informs, with visiting specialists helping you to understand what they seek in future employees.

Depending on the options you take, you will develop skills in science writing, cutting-edge science communication techniques, and the abilities you'll need to develop and run science communication projects. This includes devising and managing projects, evaluations and funding.

Modules

You will choose two from these three modules (30 credits each):

• Science on Air and on Screen - Build your radio, TV and digital skills by critically exploring the role of broadcast media in the communication of science. You'll also make an 'as live' radio magazine programme about science, and a short film.

• Science in Public Spaces - Develop your own science communication initiative in this hands-on module from developing a creative concept, to seeking funding, and managing and evaluating a project. You'll explore a range of innovative approaches from sci-art, to museums, festivals to theatre.

• Writing Science - Develop journalistic and other writing styles, including writing for news media, public relations and educational purposes, with a view to developing a portfolio, as well as working on a magazine project.

Format

The course comprises short, intensive teaching blocks of three days (Thursday to Saturday) and you'll most likely need to attend three teaching sessions for each 30-credit module. Group sessions are supplemented by directed and independent study, email discussions, and tutorials.

Assessment

We assess modules in a variety of ways, to reflect the practical skills you'll develop. For example, through portfolios, reports and oral presentations - all of which you can use to attract prospective employers.

Careers / Further study

Practical science communication skills are in high demand in a wide range of sectors and industries, such as journalism, public relations, science centres and museums, science education, professional consultancy and Research Council/learned institutions.

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to develop the professional skills that will help you secure employment or research positions in science communication, or to combine it with your existing career.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Journalism at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Journalism at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Journalism offers an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approach to contemporary journalism studies under the impact of globalisation and digitalisation, drawing upon expertise in Media and Communication Studies.

Key Features of MA in International Journalism

The MA in International Journalism provides an international and cross-cultural approach to journalism in the 21st century and aims to develop the knowledge and understanding of the role of journalism in society. The International Journalism course combines the teaching of practical skills and techniques of journalistic production with the exploration of practice from a range of theoretical and analytical perspectives. Graduates have careers in journalism, media, communication and PR, broadcasting, publishing, marketing and sales.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The International Journalism course structure is split across the year allowing three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component allows students to either write a 20,000 word dissertation or a journalism/media project of their own (with 10,000 word report) which draws upon issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Journalism typically include:

• Global Media

• Conceptual Issues in the Theory and Practice of Social Sciences

• Development and Communications

• Risk Reporting

• The Digital Edge

• The Business and Politics of Digital Media

• Digital Skills and Defence

• Online Journalism

• War Reporting

• Promotional and Professional Writing

Who should Apply?

Students interested in journalism and media studies, from a media studies, literature, history, sociology, politics and international relations, social science, or other related background. Professionals interested in journalism and global media both in terms of their professional practice, but also related to fields in policy research and public administration.

Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to global media and international journalism.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Journalism graduates. Media organizations, non-profit organizations, government and the public sector and private companies value the fact that our graduates have developed a range of critical abilities and skills in problem solving. Our International Journalism graduates enter careers in journalism (Guardian Online), broadcasting (BBC Wales), advertising, publicity, arts and cultural bodies or are employed as NGOs. Others go on to study a PhD and have a career in academia.



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The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. Read more

About the course

The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. A major part of your studies will be writing for the media. In our newsroom, you’ll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling. You’ll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

Your career

The MSc puts you in an enviable position. Employers in science and technology, the medical and pharmaceutical industries, cultural industries, the science policy sector, education and the media will see your potential.

If you decide on a research career in science, your masters will enable you to communicate your own research effectively.

The course is now five years old. Our graduates have already gone on to careers in the pharmaceutical industry, with medical and educational charities, in a variety of science communication roles.

About us

This course is taught by experts from the faculties of science, social science and medicine, giving you access to world-leading scientists and media practitioners in the field of science communication and journalism. They include fertility expert Professor Allan Pacey who has considerable experience of TV and film, and Dr Louise Robson, a biomedical scientist who works with schools.

Our combined experience covers science communication via newspapers and magazines, radio and television, websites and social networks as well as writing articles and books.

Facilities

You’ll be based in the Science Communication Lab on the main University campus. Much of the practical work is done there and in the Department of Journalism Studies where you’ll have access to all the latest equipment for print, web and broadcast journalism.

Our print facilities include networked computers with Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. For broadcasting we have access to radio and TV studios, digital TV editing suites and DV and HD camcorders. We also have multimedia and web authoring software including Dreamweaver and Adobe Premiere.

Core modules

Developing Communication Skills; Topical Science; Dissertation; Ethics and Regulation; Writing for the Media; Communicating with the Media; Online Journalism Studies; Research Methods.

Teaching and assessment

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching. There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You’ll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. You’re assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

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The Master of Science in Communication Studies. Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. Read more

About the programme

The Master of Science in Communication Studies: Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. The Master looks at journalism and media from an economic, political-ideological and policy perspective. It pays attention to the impact of recent economic, political and technological developments on journalism and media. The Master zooms in on media and journalism in a European context, looking comparatively at journalism across Europe and at journalism in the context of European integration. It makes optimal use of Brussels with its range of European and international institutions and the many media, journalism and communication professionals working in and around those institutions.

This master offers...

- A high-level and integrated programme and interdisciplinary approach to journalism and media in Europe
- Teaching in small groups, using interactive methods, stimulating individual participation
- The possibility of writing your thesis in English, Dutch, French or German (the last three on approval)
- Close collaboration with researchers from the research centers Studies on Media, Information and Telecommunication (SMIT), Studies on Media and Culture (Cemeso), and Democracy, Signification, Resistance (Desire), and the Brussels Platform for Journalism (BPJ)
- Teaching in Brussels, the capital of Europe and home to an emerging European communication space. The Master will acquaint you with European institutions and media players. The Master includes a yearly lecture series with representatives of European media industry, journalism and institutions, organizes site visits, and offers the possibility of an internship.

Structure

https://my.vub.ac.be/sites/default/files/faculteit/ES/Documenten/msc_in_communication_studies_jnm.pdf

This daytime programme consists of two semesters and can be completed in one academic year.
Alternatively, it can be completed in one and half or two years. It comprises compulsory courses including a master's thesis (48 ECTS), and two optional courses or an internship (12 ECTS).

Compulsory Courses (48 ECTS)

Advanced Methods for Journalism Research
Advanced Theoretical Debates: Journalism, Politics and Ideology
Brussels talking: Lecture Series on Europe, Media and Society
Current Case Studies in Journalism
The Political Economy of Journalism in the EU
Master's Thesis in Communication Studies

Optional Courses (12 ECTS)

Traineeship in Communication Studies
Journalism Practice in Europe
Media, Public Spheres and Public Opinions in Europe
Policy Advocacy and Media in the EU
Challenges and Mutations of Journalism (course at the Université Libre de Bruxelles - in English)

Admission requirements

Direct access is granted for students with a Belgian Bachelor’s degree in Communication Studies.

All other applicants' files will be evaluated by the Admission Board on an individual basis. Applicants with a bachelor diploma in a field other than Communication Studies may still be accepted provided they take a few additional courses in the form of a short preparatory programme (consisting of maximum 24 ECTS credits). This preparatory programme can be followed while starting the Master.

Please note: An academic BA or MA degree is required to apply.

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This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in. Read more

This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in.

You’ll explore the themes, concepts and debates in the study of the history of science through core modules. These will also allow you to develop your historical research skills, using our excellent library resources to work with primary and secondary sources. But you’ll also choose from a range of optional modules that allow you to specialise in topics areas that suit your interests, from birth, death and illness in the Middle Ages to modern science communication.

Guided by leading researchers and supported by our Centre of History and Philosophy of Science, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment with access to a wide range of activities. You could even gain research experience by getting involved in the development of our Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

We have world-class research resources to support your studies. The Brotherton Library houses extensive manuscript, archive and printed material in its Special Collections, including Newton’s Principia, a first edition of his Opticks and thousands of books and journals on topics from the 16th century onwards on topics such as astronomy, botany, medicine, physiology, chemistry, inventions and alchemy. You’ll also have access to the collections of artefacts across campus that we have brought together through the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

The Centre also hosts a number of research seminars given by visiting speakers, staff members and doctoral students and which all postgraduate students are encouraged to attend. There are also regular reading groups on a wide range of topics and the seminar series of other centres within the School are also available.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module introducing you to different approaches and debates in history of science, technology and medicine, as well as how they have been used over time to help us understand scientific developments. You’ll build on this in the following semester with a second core module that will give you a foundation in historical skills and research methods, equipping you to work critically and sensitively with primary and secondary sources.

You’ll have the chance to demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve gained in your dissertation, which you’ll submit by the end of the year. This is an independently researched piece of work on a topic of your choice within the history of science, technology and medicine – and you can choose to take an extended dissertation if you want to go into even greater depth.

Throughout the year you’ll be able to choose from a range of optional modules, allowing you to develop your knowledge by specialising in a topic of your choice such as science and religion historically considered, or science in the museum. You’ll take one optional module if you take the extended dissertation, or two if you do the standard dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

You’ll take three compulsory modules, though you can choose whether to take a standard (60 credits) or extended (90 credits) dissertation. You’ll then choose one or two optional modules.

  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • Current Approaches in the History of Science, Technology & Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • The European Enlightenment 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules combine seminars and tutorials, where you will discuss issues and concepts stemming from your reading with a small group of students and your tutor. You’ll also benefit from one-to-one supervision while you complete your dissertation. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

We assess your progress using a combination of exams and coursework, giving you the freedom to research and write on topic areas that suit your interests within each module you study.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a range of in-depth subject knowledge throughout this programme, as well as a set of high-level transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication that are very attractive to employers.

As a result, you’ll be equipped for a wide range of careers. Some of these will make direct use of your subject knowledge, such as museum work or public engagement with science, while your skills will enable you to succeed in fields such as business and finance, publishing, IT and teaching.

Graduates of our School also regularly go onto careers in journalism, the media, social work, human resources, PR, recruitment and the charity sector. Many also continue with their studies at PhD level and pursue careers in academia.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of how media work across a variety of social, cultural, economic and political contexts. Read more
The course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of how media work across a variety of social, cultural, economic and political contexts.

We focus on the academic study of journalism, but also offer opportunities for the development of professional skills through optional modules in the second semester and through research.

The course provides insights into how journalism is changing in a globalised context, exploring key debates and issues in journalism studies today. It also provides training in the use of a range of research skills in journalism studies, to support academic scholarship in the field of journalism studies.

You will learn to assess how media are linked to forces of globalisation, political institutions, global responses to war and conflict, and environmental challenges, amongst others.

You will explore the roles of new information and communication technologies, their opportunities and challenges, their democratic potential and their regulation

We will consider issues of citizenship, race, gender, ethnicity and class that are shaping contemporary forms of news media content.

This programme offers knowledge and expertise for a career in the journalism, media and communication industries or as a foundation for PhD research.

This programme is not designed as a vocational degree and does not provide training in Journalism. You should not consider this degree as a professional qualification towards becoming a journalist.

Distinctive features

• The course is designed for those with no previous experience in journalism and for mid-career journalism practitioners wanting a period of reflection to deepen their understanding of journalism practice.

• It aims to promote an awareness of the place and importance of journalism in the contemporary world, and in local and global contexts.

• It attracts students from all over the world, providing a rich and diverse environment for academic study and critique.

Structure

The taught component of the course amounts to 120 credits and is taught across two semesters (Autumn and Spring) from the end of September to the beginning of June and combines core and elective modules.

You will submit a dissertation at the end of August. The dissertation carries 60 credits.

Core modules:

Introduction to Journalism Studies
Mediatised Conflict: The Politics of Conflict Reporting
Politics of Global Communication
Putting Research into Practice I
Putting Research into Practice II
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions
Big Data, Society and Everyday Life

Teaching

You will be taught through lecture and seminars series which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career Prospects

Graduates of MA Journalism, Media and Communications are employed in a range of occupations in journalism, media and communication institutions both in the UK and globally, taking on a variety of leading roles.

As an academic course focusing on critical analysis, this programme also provides a perfect starting-point for PhD research and prepares students for careers in research institutions, both at university and other public or private institutions.

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A unique two year Masters course, part of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus programme bringing together five leading European institutions in journalism and media education. Read more
A unique two year Masters course, part of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus programme bringing together five leading European institutions in journalism and media education.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a firm grounding in an Arts subject, looking to specialise in the area of TV or broadcast journalism with a view to starting a career in this field. Students will have a keen interest in the media specifically this area of Journalism. City students with a keen interest in finance and business, have the opportunity in year 2 to consider the Reporting business and finance specialisms.

Objectives

This Masters course is part of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus programme.

Students study as part of a diverse cohort of individuals from around the world.

The Erasmus Mundus MA in Journalism, Media and Globalisation is truly an international course.

The first year is spent in the University of Aarhus, Denmark, the second at City, University of London (where students specialise in financial and business journalism) or at the University of Swansea (Wales), Hamburg University (Germany) or University of Amsterdam (Netherlands).

The Mundus Journalism degree explores the practice and performance of journalism and the media in the context of a new environment brought about by globalisation, modernisation, commercialisation and professional developments.

The course also offers some exchange opportunities for students to travel to one of the following three institutions in the spring of the first year: University of California, Berkeley, USA; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile; or University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. There is a broad range of national and international guest lecturers from media and research institutions features.

Academic facilities

During your second year studies at City, University of London, you will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios, and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-4 radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-2 radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-2 digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-2 TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

The Erasmus Mundus Global Journalism MA brings together five leading European institutions in journalism and media education.

Study Abroad
Between the first and second years of the programme some students have the opportunity to participate in summer exchanges at our international partners:
-University of California at Berkeley, USA
-University of Technology Sydney, Australia
-Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile

Modules

Danish School of Journalism / Aarhus University
Semester 1 core modules:
-Globalisation: Reporting global change (20 credits)
-Globalisation and the transformation of the state (20 credits)
-Globalisation, culture and the roles of the media (20 credits)

Semester 2 core modules:
-Social science methods for journalists (20 credits)
-Researching journalism (20 credits)
-Analytical journalism (20 credits)

City, University of London
Semester 3 core modules:
-Global capitalism: past, present, future (20 credits)
-World of Financial Journalism (20 credits)
-World of Business (20 credits)

Semester 4:
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

Students from the programme have gone on to work for Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones, the BBC, the Financial Times, Reuters, China Daily, Danish Broadcasting Corporation, Helsingin Sanomat, TV 2 Norway, Xinhua News Agency, Bangkok Post, Associated Press and Platts. Other students are working for international organisations, including the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Companies and the European Commission, and for international corporations including Morgan Stanley.

Alumni of the course are now working in organisations including:
-Financial Times
-SunTec
-Greenpeace
-Savivo A/S
-Bloomberg
-Handelsblatt
-Slovenian Press Agency
-WirtschaftsWoche

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This course is about analysing the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation. Read more

Overview

This course is about analysing the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation.
Philosophy and science don't mix. Or do they? What we nowadays call "science" used to be part of "philosophy." It is not a coincidence that Isaac Newton called his physical masterpiece "The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy." And today, the two are still closely connected. Our current worldview is strongly shaped by scientific thought. We look to science for both answers to our theoretical questions and solutions to our practical problems.

The Master's specialisation in Philosophy and Science analyses the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation. How did the scientific worldview come about? What are its components? What models have been proposed for the relationship between philosophical and scientific thinking?

This Master's specialisation will give you a better understanding of the evolution, the current status and the implications of the scientific worldview. Professionally, it prepares you for several possible avenues, in fields including science administration, research, journalism, and policy-making.

Why study Philosophy and Science at Radboud University?

- The focus on the historical and systematic relationship between philosophy and science is unique in the Netherlands.
- The Philosophy Faculty has close ties with scientists and professors at the other faculties on campus - and philosophy as a subject is an integral part of all the faculties at Radboud University. This makes it easier for our students to combine Philosophy with any discipline when working on their thesis.
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups.
- The seminars specifically train skills such as critical reading, analytical thinking, policy writing and debating.
- This Master's specialisation is run by the Center for the History of Philosophy and Science (CHPS), the only centre in the world that studies philosophy and science as historically intertwined phenomena.
- This Master's specialisation is aimed at career prospects in, as well outside of, research.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophyandscience

Career prospects

During the specialisation Philosophy and Science you will learn to think about issues in debates with major thinkers. You will study texts by philosophers of the past and present. What you learn here is applicable to the social, scientific and political situations around us.

After you graduate, you’ll be well situated to analyse texts and extract concepts. You’ll have the ability to think out of the box and to think creatively about possible solutions. You can use those skills in society, in political or social debates and in your work.

Job positions

Graduates of the Master’s specialisation in Philosophy and Science have many options. You can work within journalism and become a journalist, editor or critic. You can also become a policy advisor for a governmental organisation, or for other cultural and social institutions. You can also work as a philosopher in business, communications advisor or ethical expert. And Dutch students who would like to become teachers within the Netherlands could continue to attain the academic teacher’s degree for the subject of Philosophy (leraar Filosofie).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophyandscience

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On this established and well respected course, you gain the knowledge, skills and attributes needed to be an effective sport and exercise science practitioner and/or researcher. Read more

On this established and well respected course, you gain the knowledge, skills and attributes needed to be an effective sport and exercise science practitioner and/or researcher. You develop strong technical, analytical, practical and professional skills, alongside specialist skills in • biomechanics and performance analysis • physiology and nutrition • strength and conditioning.

The course enables you to

  • develop your understanding of science
  • develop your ability to apply theory to practice in sport and exercise
  • work towards British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accreditation, (at the discretion of BASES, graduates are able to apply for exemption from some elements of the BASES supervised experience accreditation scheme)
  • conduct independent research, for which you can seek publication through our project module
  • gain experience as a sport or exercise science consultant

We offer a first-class suite of research and teaching laboratories alongside excellent facilities offered by our partnership venue at the English Institute of Sport, Sheffield. Our laboratories are all British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accredited.

The four overarching themes in the programme are

  • analysis of performance
  • improving performance
  • research methods and data analysis in both research and applied practice
  • professional practice

Many of the teaching staff support elite athletes as part of their work and undertake research in sport and exercise. We benefit from the expertise of our staff in the Centre for Sport and Exercise Science (CSES). The team for sport performance have worked successfully with athletes competing at the Olympics, Paralympics, and Winter Olympics. They have provided, or are currently providing, sport science research and consultancy services at elite level for the • Amateur Boxing Association • Amateur Swimming Association (diving and swimming) • British Cycling • British Speed Skating Association • British Skeleton-Bob Team • English Bowls Association • English Golf Union • Royal Yachting Association • GB table tennis • GB volleyball.

You benefit from CSES' activities as they allow us to keep course content at the cutting edge, based on our knowledge and experience of sport and exercise science delivery. You can also benefit from a work-based learning programme to help develop your experience of working in multidisciplinary teams, supporting athletes and coaches.

During the course you use a mix of traditional and online learning resources to ensure the course is flexible and can fit in with your existing commitments.

The quality of our provision was rated 24/24 by the Higher Education Council.

Sheffield Hallam are a Skills Development Partner of the Chartered Institute for Managing Sport and Physical Activity.

Professional recognition

This course is designed to meet some of the needs of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES), and the United Kingdom Strength and Conditioning Association accreditation.

Course structure

The masters award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

Core modules

  • Analysis and evaluation of performance: technical and tactical (15 credits)
  • Analysis and evaluation of performance: functional and metabolic (15 credits)
  • Inter-professional practice in sport and exercise science (15 credits)
  • Work-based learning in sport and exercise science (15 credits)
  • Research methods (15 credits)
  • Data analysis (15 credits)
  • Project (60 credits)

Optional modules

30 credits from:

  • Improving performance: strength and conditioning (15 credits)
  • Improving performance: physiology and nutrition (15 credits)
  • Applied performance analysis (15 credits)
  • Applied movement analysis (15 credits)
  • Human factors in sports engineering (15 credits)

Assessment

  • laboratory reports
  • project/ethics proposal
  • needs analysis
  • qualitative data analysis
  • managing projects
  • problem solving exercises
  • group work
  • oral presentations
  • poster presentations
  • case study defence or report
  • quantitative data analysis examination
  • project file
  • abstract writing
  • article prepared for publication (MSc only)
  • reflective portfolio
  • technology-based communication package

Employability

As a graduate you benefit from the skills and experience gained from the employability modules and our connections with industry.

Previous graduates have gone into careers as • developers for suppliers of sport equipment • sport science officers • advisors for national governing bodies and the English Institute of Sport • coaches • developing corporate wellness programmes in the health and fitness industry • advisors to local authorities and local health trusts • strength and conditioning coaches • sport and exercise nutritionists • researchers • technicians • university lecturers.

The course's strong focus on research skills provides an ideal platform for further study at PhD level. It is also an important first step into employment and can open many other doors into further training.

Sport scientists

Sport scientists support athletes or sports clubs, they generally provide advice and support, designed to monitor and improve sport performance, alongside a team of specialists including coaches, psychologist, performance managers and medical staff. Areas of expertise include • strength and conditioning • physiology • nutrition and analysis of movement and tactical performance.

Exercise scientists

Exercise scientists are more concerned with improving a person's health and helping them recover from illness through a structured programme of physical activity and other health-based interventions. They are also involved with preventative treatments and work closely with GPs and primary care trusts or private healthcare organisations. Exercise scientists might be employed by local authorities to run community based health and exercise initiatives.

It may be possible to move into a particular clinical area, such as cardiology, or work as a health promotion specialist for a local authority or healthcare trust. Our close links with the National Centre for Sport and Exercise medicine, part of which is based in Sheffield, will provide additional opportunities to those wishing to pursue careers in this area.

Other careers

Other careers also include • the pharmaceutical industry • the armed and uniformed services • journalism • teaching. If you are thinking about an academic career, many universities with sport-related courses require staff to have a higher degree.



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This course is offered jointly by Cardiff University School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, and Techniquest, a science discovery centre based in Cardiff. Read more
This course is offered jointly by Cardiff University School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, and Techniquest, a science discovery centre based in Cardiff. 

The course aims to offer knowledge and expertise relating to the organisation and funding of scientific research, the reporting of scientific innovation and controversy, and the role of citizens, experts and the media in decision making.

You will receive practical, hands-on training in presenting science via news media or directly to audiences ranging from school children to the general public.

Distinctive features

This is innovative, interdisciplinary degree based on collaboration between internationally respected academics and a leading science discovery centre.

The programme has strong links to a wide range of media and science organisations including National Museum Wales, Wales Gene Park, local and national media, science communication centres, and policy makers in regional, national and European institutions.

It offers excellent opportunities to develop expertise in an area of increasing importance for policy, industry and scientific communities.

The course offers students the opportunity to take a mixture of research-led and vocationally orientated modules in order to engage with current debates about topics such as: the organisation and funding of scientific research; the reporting of scientific innovation and controversy; and the role of citizens, experts and the media in decision-making about science and technology

Structure

This is a one-year full-time programme.

The MSc in Science Media and Communication is organised around a sequence of five 20-credit specialist modules, one 20-credit option and one 60-credit supervised dissertation on a relevant topic of your choice.

A 20-credit module comprises 200 hours of study, including about 30 hours of contact time, and the MSc as a whole, 1800 hours of study.

Core modules:

Media, Science and Health
International News Production 1
Research Design For Masters Students
Introduction to Science, Technology and Society
Public Engagement with Science and Technology
Dissertation

Teaching

Modules employ a diverse range of teaching including lectures, seminars, group and individual tutorials, and independent guided study. All modules within the programme make use of Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Learning Central, on which you will find course materials, links to related materials and information on assessment.

You will be expected to attend lectures, seminars and tutorials as set out in the timetable for MSc students. These sometimes sit outside the regular pattern of university attendance and may include day, evening and weekend study and on occasion may fall outside the standard semester dates. You will also be expected to undertake independent study in preparation for lectures, seminars and assessments. 

The Presenting Science module offered by Techniquest (subject to availability in any given year) has limited places and involves presenting work to live audience including school children and the general public. As a result, there is an audition at the start of each year, at which students will be selected for the module. Those students who are not selected for this module will need to take an alternative module to complete their taught programme.

Assessment

Taught modules are assessed in ways that reflect their particular learning outcomes. So, as appropriate to the module, and across the programme as a whole, the following in-course assessments are used:

Essay assignments
Portfolios
Fieldwork reports
Oral presentations
News reports, documentaries, posters
A dissertation or extended project.

Career Prospects

This course is particularly suitable for those interested in pursuing careers in science communication, and the interface of scientific knowledge and the public domain. These include: policy research; political communication, public relations, government agencies; statutory and voluntary organisations; ‘think tanks’, museums and schools; and the mass media.

Some previous graduates have gone on to study for higher degrees, whilst others are, or have been, employed in museums, schools, advertising agencies, medical research charities, government department, NGOs, television companies and science communication organisations.

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