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Masters Degrees (Natural Sciences)

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What are the solutions to the environmental issues on a global scale, like climate change, sustainable development and the greenhouse effect? What alternative sources of energy do we need to explore?. Read more
What are the solutions to the environmental issues on a global scale, like climate change, sustainable development and the greenhouse effect? What alternative sources of energy do we need to explore?

The Master's degree programme in Energy and Environmental Sciences focuses on the large-scale issues and tries to contribute to possible solutions to the energy and environmental challenges.

The programme is connected to the Energy and Sustainability Research Institute Groningen (ESRIG). Several research groups are joining forces in ESRIG resulting in a variety of research subjects, such as:

* Polymer and organic solar cells

* Climate and atmosphere

* Geo-energy

* Combustion technology

* Bio-fuels technology, land and ocean-based

* Renewable energy

* Energy and land use scenario's and modeling


The Master's programme is accessible for several Bachelor degrees in Natural Sciences.

Why in Groningen?

- Energy and Sustainability are main research focus areas
- Accessible for several Bachelor's degrees in Natural Sciences
- Excellent career prospects
- Offering interdisciplinary system and several experimental specialisations

Job perspectives

Energy and Environmental scientists from the University of Groningen are renown for their interdisciplinary systems-approach and/or specialised experimental skills. In general they easily obtain jobs in their field of study at or in:
- Research institutes or universities
- Industry
- Companies like major consultancy firms
- Governmental agencies

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Data encryption, risk management in finance and insurance and mathematical imaging – mathematicians use analytic and computer-assisted techniques to understand the increasing complexity in natural sciences, life sciences, economics and engineering. Read more

Data encryption, risk management in finance and insurance and mathematical imaging – mathematicians use analytic and computer-assisted techniques to understand the increasing complexity in natural sciences, life sciences, economics and engineering.

Josef Strini, master's degree student in Mathematics:

"Whether we’re solving sample exercises or discussing the most recent lectures, there are always possibilities for exchanging information with the students and lecturers in my programme. I recommend my programme to all those who are interested in mathematical relationships, are prepared to critically examine these and have the drive and patience to ensure their accuracy."

Content

In compulsory and advanced courses, you develop mathematical knowledge in the following areas:

  • Analysis
  • Algebra
  • Stochastics
  • Numerical mathematics
  • Discrete mathematics

You choose from one of the following specialisations:

  • Applied mathematics
  • Discrete mathematics
  • Financial and actuarial mathematics
  • Statistics and operations research
  • Mathematical engineering

For the individual courses, please see the semester plan.

Career Options

Mathematicians work in areas such as industry, commerce and science.

  • They apply mathematical methods in industry, technology and the natural sciences.
  • They use deterministic and stochastic models in commerce, administration, finance and insurance.
  • They tackle questions of data security and communication technology in theory and practice.
  • They develop methods without which many devices and technologies of modern day life would not exist - for example, imaging processes in medicine and technology, communication and security in data transfer, risk management for banks and insurance companies, and computer-aided processes in natural sciences and technology.


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In order to cover the need for environmental specialists, the program "Master of Science in Environmental Sciences" at the University of Koblenz-Landau… Read more

About the Program

In order to cover the need for environmental specialists, the program "Master of Science in Environmental Sciences" at the University of Koblenz-Landau (Landau Campus) provides a research-oriented, unique blend in the core disciplines of natural sciences (including environmental chemistry, landscape and applied ecology) complemented by selected aspects of social sciences such as environmental economics. You can acquire advanced methodical skills, a profound understanding of environmental problems across different scales from molecules to landscapes, and the capacity to develop solutions for these complex, interdisciplinary problems. The job-related training in soft skills (e.g. oral and written presentation) and the experience in interdisciplinary teamwork will enable you to efficiently communicate findings and solutions to scientists and the public.

The master's program in Environmental Sciences is offered by the Institute for Environmental Sciences. Find out more about the structure of the institute under: https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/en/campus-landau/faculty7/environmental-sciences/environmental-sciences

Program Structure

All students take the six required modules (Compulsory part). Afterwards, students personalize the program by choosing two of the eight Specialty Areas and completing four modules in each, with an additional module of their choice. An external internship and the Master Thesis with colloquium round out the 4-semester program. The 6-week internship can be performed at an external university or governmental or industrial research institute in Germany or abroad.

Specialty Areas

Environmental Analysis
Applied Ecology
Socioeconomics & Environmental Management
Aquatic Systems
Soil Systems
Landscapes & Scales
Modeling
Chemicals in the Environment

You can also find more information and an overview of the module structures per each semester under:
https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/en/campus-landau/faculty7/info-prospective-students/master-environmental-sciences

Employment outlook

Due to the interdisciplinary structure and individual choices of the Master of Environmental Sciences program, graduates have many employment opportunities in environmental research and management in Germany and beyond.

Potential Employment Areas:
Research institutes
Industry and environmental consulting firms
Planning and engineering companies
Government, public relations, environmental education
Professional organizations and societies, foundations, NGOs, political organizations
Environmental protection and conservation, media and publishers
The degree also qualifies students for acceptance into doctoral programs.

“The Environmental Sciences Program in Landau is varied. You are exposed to information from all the natural sciences that, for me personally, was fun and very interesting. This interdisciplinarity is a huge advantage for a scientific career. As a polar researcher, the training has helped me to quickly adapt to new environments and take on new challenges daily.” Christian Wolf (Graduate, doctoral student at Alfred-Wegener-Institute)

Internationally Networked

The Institute for Environmental Sciences is globally connected through international research projects and student exchange programs. The international nature of the Program is achieved through numerous international research and teaching staff, regular seminars from guest lecturers from abroad, and possible internships all over the world.

You can find a map which displays the locations of our cooperation partners worldwide under:
https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/en/campus-landau/faculty7/info-prospective-students/master-environmental-sciences/international-network

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Why choose this course?. Develop the practical and theoretical knowledge you need to work in the fields of intelligence, security, emergency planning, crisis and disaster risk reduction and management in the UK and overseas. Read more

Why choose this course?

  • Develop the practical and theoretical knowledge you need to work in the fields of intelligence, security, emergency planning, crisis and disaster risk reduction and management in the UK and overseas
  • Combine the knowledge and skills developed in an inter-disciplinary programme where social sciences, natural sciences and public and environmental health provide real-life solutions to real-life resilience issues
  • Improve your skills as you engage with all aspects of emergency preparedness, resilience and response across a range of natural and man-made hazards, from terrorism and extreme weather events to public health and humanitarian crisis
  • Wherever you are in your career, develop your professional focus and ability in emergency preparedness, resilience or response
  • Combine theory and best practice as your learning includes practical multi-agency exercises, simulations and response structures across all emergency services.
  • At Derby you don’t just study the theory and background to resilience, through security, intelligence and planning for emergency and disaster risk reduction and response. You will take these aspects into real life situations and develop knowledge, skills and vocational attributes that will give you the necessary experience to develop or enhance career paths in these fascinating areas.

A unique combination

  • This course uniquely combines the social science disciplines of criminology and sociology with natural sciences in the field of geoscience, and through public and environmental health. This unique combination examines resilience, risk reduction and response to real world concerns associated with terrorism, extremism, radicalisation and applied intelligence studies, exploring climate, migration and natural hazard risk reduction and response through emergency and disaster management.
  • You will study at Masters level developing critical skills which bring together work-based learning approaches and innovation in the teaching of research methods using scenario building, exercises and simulations in a multi-agency environment to enhance your development, communication and planning.

Developing your skills through practice

  • You will work with emergency services first responders and local authority leads, and also benefit from the university’s relationship with the Cabinet Office Emergency Planning College (EPC).
  • You will also develop GIS mapping skills and benefit from opportunities to work with Derbyshire Emergency Planning Officers and volunteer teams involved in crisis management. Field trips will involve command and control visits, humanitarian aid facilities and multi-agency simulations of real world hazards.

Aligned to UK standards

  • The programme examines National Occupational Standards in the UK for Civil Contingencies (NOSCC) in support of employer demands and the Core Competencies of the Emergency Planning Society (EPS).


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The Complex Systems Modelling - From Biomedical and Natural to Economic and Social Sciences MSc programme will teach you to apply mathematical techniques in the rapidly developing and exciting interdisciplinary field of complex systems and examine how they apply to a variety of areas including biomedicine, nature, economics and social sciences. Read more

The Complex Systems Modelling - From Biomedical and Natural to Economic and Social Sciences MSc programme will teach you to apply mathematical techniques in the rapidly developing and exciting interdisciplinary field of complex systems and examine how they apply to a variety of areas including biomedicine, nature, economics and social sciences. This research-led course is suitable for graduates who wish to work in research and development in an academic or industrial environment.

Key benefits

  • Located in the heart of London, giving unparalleled access to research facilities.
  • You will be studying innovative modules covering modern theories of complex systems modelling.
  • Research-led study programme taught by staff who are recognised leaders in their field.

Description

The Complex Systems Modelling MSc is an innovative study programme that explores the latest research in the rapidly developing and exciting interdisciplinary field of cpmplex systems.

Modern societies rely on a broad range of infrastructures, institutions and technologies, and their complexities have grown dramatically in the recent past. Consequently, there is a rapidly expanding demand for expertise in complex systems modelling as a foundation for understanding, maintaining and further developing of such systems.

The programme offers you the choice to study either full or part-time. You must take a combination of required and optional modules totalling 180 credits to complete the course. If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your programme will take two years to complete. You will study the required modules in the first year, and a further selection of required and optional modules including the complex systems modelling module in your second year.

You will study key natural and biomedical scientific topics as well as economic and social sciences. We also offer the opportunity to study an additional zero-credit module called foundations for complex systems modelling and cross-disciplinary approaches to non-equilibrium systems and is designed as a refresher module covering vital mathematics and physics skills.

Course purpose

For graduates in mathematics, or in other suitable scientific disciplines with a strong background in mathematics, who want to work in research and development in an academic or industrial environment. The programme aims to develop a knowledge and understanding of complex systems modelling and their uses, and to enable students to use mathematical techniques to quantify, predict and improve such systems.

Course format and assessment

Primarily written examinations, some with coursework element, in eight lecture modules, plus an oral presentation and assessed report on the research project.

Career destinations

Our graduates are highly sought after: the applicability of complex systems modelling to areas as diverse as biomedical, natural, economic and social sciences, results in a broad range of opportunities. Some graduates are employed by the companies or laboratories that supervise their MSc research projects, or continue to PhD study.

Other career destinations include:

  • Complexity science consultancies and software development
  • Information Processing 
  • Data Analysis
  • NHS Research
  • Financial and re-insurance sectors
  • Industrial sectors linked to Physics, Science Materials and Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Entertainment and Gaming 
  • Research and further studies


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The School of Earth Sciences has strong international links and the presence of researchers from all over the world makes for an exciting and stimulating environment. Read more
The School of Earth Sciences has strong international links and the presence of researchers from all over the world makes for an exciting and stimulating environment. Research involves the full breadth of the earth sciences and has benefited from major investment in new laboratories and equipment in the past few years. Important initiatives include experimental and theoretical studies of physical, chemical and biological processes of the Earth.

Please note: If you are applying for this programme, you need to select Geology as the programme choice when completing your online application form.

Research groups

The research programme at Bristol is characterised by an expanding range of exciting subject areas. Research in the School of Earth Sciences encourages interdisciplinary collaboration between its five research groups, which in turn nurtures revolutionary research.

Geochemistry
The Geochemistry group uses fundamental chemical techniques to understand natural processes on a range of temporal and spatial scales. This can be from single atoms on mineral surfaces and the environmental geochemistry of the modern Earth to the large-scale chemical structure of planets and the birth of the solar system. The group has considerable expertise in isotopic measurements, spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

Geophysics
Geophysics uses physical properties of the solid Earth to measure structure and processes on scales from the single crystal to the entire planet. Members of the Bristol Geophysics group use gravity, seismic and satellite data to image the Earth in a variety of different contexts. These include the Earth's core, mantle and tectonic processes, volcanoes, oil and gas reservoirs and mines.

Palaeobiology
The Palaeobiology group uses the fossil record to study the history of life. Research focuses on major diversifications, mass extinctions, dating the tree of life, phylogenomics and molecular palaeobiology, morphological innovation, biomechanics, and links between evolution and development; the organisms of interest range from foraminifera to dinosaurs.

Petrology
The Petrology group uses a combination of high-pressure and high-temperature experiments, petrology, geochemistry and mineral physics to attack a wide range of problems in the solid Earth - from the core to the surface.

Volcanology
The Volcanology group at Bristol aims to understand the physical processes underlying volcanic phenomena and develop methods of hazard and risk assessment that can be applied to volcanoes worldwide.

Recent case studies and collaborators include the Met Office, Montserrat Volcano Observatory, Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland and INGEOMINAS in Columbia.

Research centres

The School of Earth Sciences is involved in a number of collaborative research groups on an international level. Inter-faculty research centres such as the Biogeochemistry Research Centre and the Cabot Institute involve collaboration across several departments and faculties.

Centre for Environmental and Geophysical Flows
This interdisciplinary research centre brings together expertise from the Schools of Earth Sciences, Geographical Sciences, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. This creates diverse research activities and interests, from traffic flow to explosive volcanic flows, meteorology to oceanography.

Biogeochemistry Research Centre
The Biogeochemistry Research Centre involves staff from the Schools of Earth Sciences, Geographical Sciences and Chemistry. The research aims to develop our understanding of the biogeochemistry of modern-day and ancient environments and the way that it is affected by natural processes and the actions of mankind.

Bristol Isotope Group
The Bristol Isotope Group is a world-class research facility for isotope measurements directed at understanding natural processes, from the formation of the solar system, the origin of Earth - its deep structure and atmosphere, through to the evolution of that atmosphere and contemporary climate change.

Interface Analysis Centre
The Interface Analysis Centre specialises in the application of a wide range of analytical techniques and is used by the Schools of Chemistry, Earth Sciences and Physics.

The Cabot Institute
The Cabot Institute carries out fundamental and responsive research on risks and uncertainty in a changing environment. Interests include climate change, natural hazards, food and energy security, resilience and governance, and human impacts on the environment.

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The Gerontology course will build your awareness of global perspectives on ageing and the lives of older people by drawing on the views and experience of a wide range of experts including geriatricians, clinicians, demographers, policy analysts and sociologists. . Read more

The Gerontology course will build your awareness of global perspectives on ageing and the lives of older people by drawing on the views and experience of a wide range of experts including geriatricians, clinicians, demographers, policy analysts and sociologists. 

Key benefits

  • Taught by faculty in the Institute of Gerontology, one of the leading centres for the study of aging. The Institute is located in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, a unique, research-led interdisciplinary social science department directed by internationally recognised scholars.
  • A highly flexible study course, drawing on a broad range of professional and disciplinary expertise, including geriatrics, demography, sociology and social policy.
  • We offer close links with, and regular speakers from, social policy and various healthcare fields, providing insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of these areas as they affect ageing and older people.
  • You will gain an awareness of national, crossnational and comparative perspectives of ageing populations, the ageing process and older people in society throughout the course.
  • We have strong links with King’s Health Partners, one of only six Academic Health Sciences Centres in England bringing together three NHS Trusts (Guy’s and St. Thomas’, King’s College Hospital, and South London and Maudsley).

Description

The Gerontology course offers you flexibility with the choice to study either full or parttime. This interdisciplinary course is an ideal study pathway for health professionals including geriatricians, psychiatrists, GPs, nurses, social workers, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. The course is also suited to graduates from the social and natural sciences, management, policy and politics, economics, law and the humanities.

The course is made up of required and optional modules totalling 180 credits (60 of which come

from a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words).

Course purpose

Aimed at: health professionals including geriatricians, psychiatrists, GPs, nurses, social workers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and others from the medical and health sciences, as well as students from other disciplines including social and natural sciences, management, policy and politics, economics, law and humanities.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, and you will typically have 15 hours of this per module, over a 10 week term. We also expect you to undertake 135 hours of independent study for each module. For your 12,000 word dissertation, we will provide six half-hour supervisory sessions and three 2-hour workshops to complement your 591 hours of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

The department assesses students using a combination of essays, written examinations, oral presentations and the dissertation. The nature of assessment varies by module. The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect.

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to pursue of a range of careers including consultant positions in geriatric medicine and psychiatry, specialist healthcare roles with older people, and strategic positions influencing the lives of older people in government, policy and voluntary and non-governmental organisations.



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The programme was established in 1975 and is housed within the School of Psychology of the University of East London. The programme is characterised by a distinctive approach to its subject matter. Read more
The programme was established in 1975 and is housed within the School of Psychology of the University of East London. The programme is characterised by a distinctive approach to its subject matter. As well as providing teaching on the major approaches to clinical psychology theory and practice, it examines the assumptions which inform scientific activity, the problems in applying philosophies and methods from the natural sciences to human behaviour and the relationship between the philosophy of science and research activity; the programme also encourages the formulation of psychological problems within their social context.

Training at UEL is seen as a collaborative venture between the university and clinical psychologists in the North Thames region, who, in addition to supervising trainees’ clinical practice, are also closely involved in selection procedures and management of the programme. The long history of the Programme, together with a good retention rate of trainees within the region, has helped create effective working relationships with local NHS psychologists. The programme enjoys an extensive range of placement resources, particularly in specialist areas. There is an emphasis on reflexive practice and a serious commitment to equal opportunities, both in practice and in the curriculum. Trainees are actively involved in all aspects of programme organisation.

About the programme
In addition to providing teaching on the major approaches to clinical psychology theory and practice, this programme examines the assumptions which inform scientific activity, the problems in applying philosophies and methods from the natural sciences to human behaviour, and the relationship between the philosophy of science and research activity. The doctorate also encourages the formulation of psychological problems within their social context.


Programme structure
Professional doctorate programmes can be either ‘taught’ or ‘research’ in their emphasis (that is, when measured by student effort). Both have equal status and share the same learning outcomes. You should check with the relevant school to find out where the emphasis is for this particular programme.

The Programme is 3 years, full time. Approximately 50% of Programme time is spent in clinical placements; 20% on academic teaching; 20% on research and 10% on self-directed study. Placements and academic teaching run in parallel throughout the three years, following a four week induction in year 1.

Career opportunities
This doctorate will enable you to work as a qualified clinical psychologist in clinical psychology services or other settings. You could also progress to senior management in NHS services and a range of other clinical settings, or take up specialist positions in projects dealing with, for example, trauma and homelessness.

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Goal of the pro­gramme. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing technologies? Do you want to know how we could improve the healthiness, safety, ecology and ethics of food and food processing? Are you interested in exploring innovations in food, such as "pulled oats" or using insects as food? If you answered yes, enrol in Food Sciences master’s programme.

The food industry is the 4th most important employer both in Finland and internationally. This industry is constantly looking for experts to solve new problems. With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences you could embark on a career in the food industry; in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher, researcher, or self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in government ministries or other expert organisations.

As a master in Food Sciences you will be able to help the food industry develop and renew itself, since you will possess know-how on:

  • Raw materials and processes, including their theoretical basics
  • Different food constituents and their impact on food quality
  • Factors that ensure good quality and food safety

You can enrol in the Food Sciences masters' programme if you hold a bachelors' degree in Food Sciences or in Molecular Biosciences. You can also apply to the programme if you have a bachelors' degree in a related area of the natural sciences from a Finnish or foreign university, or if you have a degree from a Finnish university of applied sciences within food sciences or other related areas of the natural sciences.

Your studies in the Food Sciences masters' programme will offer you a broad education covering courses in the composition and processing of food, in the structures and chemical reactions of food proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, and in food legislation and the safety of food additives.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

Food Sciences on the Viikki campus is a nationally unique programme that covers the whole food production chain from primary production via food processing to consumers. Food Sciences is an internationally appreciated field of education: food research at the University of Helsinki has been highly ranked.

Your masters' studies in food sciences will enable you to make an impact on the the creation of innovative solutions for the whole chain of food production. You will:

  • Study the theory and applications of the broad area of food sciences in lecture courses and in group work 
  • Increase your knowledge of food composition, processing, structure, and legislation
  • Deepen your knowledge of how the reactions of different food components, production processes and packaging affect the structure, sensory quality, healthiness and safety of animal and plant based foods
  • Learn laboratory working skills
  • Acquire employment skills for example by training in the food industry

Se­lec­tion of the study track

You can affect the sort of expertise you would like to gain. You can tailor your Master’s degree by choosing special studies in food chemistry, food technology, and in the science and technology relating to meat, dairy and cereals.

You can also complement your expertise in food sciences with, for example, studies in food development, food safety, food research and analysis, economics, marketing, sustainable food production, microbiology, biotechnology or nutrition.



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Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques. Read more
Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques.

-Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
-Masters course developed and delivered by leading researchers in the field
-Excavation and bioarchaeological analysis of real human remains
-Gain hands-on experience in field and laboratory techniques using specialised bioarchaeological labs and facilities
-Substantial bone selection for research and for experience as teaching toolstools


Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing science that combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences. Study focuses on the key topics pertaining to human remains from archaeological sites.

Bioarchaeology includes areas of scientific investigation including palaeodemography, past behaviour, biological affinity, subsistence strategy, and health and well-being in the past.

The MSc in Bioarchaeology will help you to develop a broad understanding of these issues, through the excavation and analysis of human and animal remains. Analytical techniques will cover dental and osteological analyses, archaeological field methods, and ancient genetics.

The programme aims to develop your advanced practical skills in skeletal analysis, making use of the department’s well-equipped specialist laboratories and reference collections.

A particular strength of our provision and Faculty expertise is that we are able to address the bioarchaeology of many world areas and time periods. When you complete the course, you will have all the skills necessary to continue into an academic career or gain employment in research, museums, education or commercial organisations.

During the year you will be given a personal tutor that will support you throughout your time at LJMU and be following both your academic and professional development.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Semester 1 (three core modules)

Advanced Osteology and Skeletal Pathology
Provides students with an advanced knowledge of the human skeleton and the ability to identify animal bones, methods of curation of skeletal collections and understanding of pathological modifications.
Research Design and Quantitative Methods
Provides extensive training in generic research knowledge and statistical techniques for the Natural Sciences. Students design a research project and are assessed via the preparation of a full grant application for the project.
Dental Anthropology
Provides students with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience required by bioarchaeologists to identify and examine human teeth.
Semester 2 (two core modules and one option)

Bioarchaeology: Bones, Teeth and Genes
Focuses on the different methods used to study human remains in archaeological and anthropological contexts. Delivery is through a combination of lectures, practicals, workshops and seminar sessions by experts in different fields, followed by reading and in-class discussion of recent literature.
Excavation
Covers field survey, site management, excavation and related data analysis. In addition to practicals and lectures, the course includes a non-residential field experience.
Dissertation
Comprises an independent, in-depth scientific research study on a chosen relevant topic. The following options are typically offered:
Ballistics and Arson Investigation
Teaches the fundamental principles of fire science, fire dynamics and material science, enabling students to demonstrate their application of fire investigation.
Taphonomy Trauma Analysis
Provides students with an extensive understanding of the biomechanics of human bones and the reaction of bones to the environment for a taphonomic history of the remains. Students gain a broad appreciation of different types of weapons to reconstruct a traumatic event using skeletal evidence.
Human Identification and Forensic DNA
Analyses the issues related to the identification of an unknown subject from both skeletal and genetic features. The module also introduces students to the use of a DNA typing approach for the identification of human remains.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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A flexible and interdisciplinary programme, which challenges you to use your specific knowledge to unravel the workings of the human brain. Read more
A flexible and interdisciplinary programme, which challenges you to use your specific knowledge to unravel the workings of the human brain.

Our brain contains many ingenious networks of millions of interconnected neurons. Together, they have a storage capacity and flexibility that far exceed modern supercomputers, or any artificial intelligent system. The Master’s specialisation in Neuroscience aims at unravelling the neuro-biological and neuro-computational mechanisms of this fascinating, complex system. We study the full spectrum from molecule to man, and from experiment to advanced theory and models.

The brain, as part of the human body, may at a first glance seem the exclusive domain of Biology. However, as the communication between neurons involves neurotransmitters and electrical ionic currents, understanding these mechanisms calls for knowledge of Chemistry and Physics. Moreover, studying mechanisms of coding and encoding of neural signals, requires advanced concepts from Mathematics and Informatics. By working together, our students learn to view complex issues from all these different sides.

Choose your own angle

Neuroscience at the Science Faculty ranges from biology to physics and mathematics, and will thus appeal to students from different Master’s programmes. The programme can be readily adapted to your individual academic background – whether that is in the field of Biology, Mathematics, Physics or Computing Science. Apart from fundamental knowledge of the brain, the Neuroscience specialisation also provides you with a general background in the principles of complex systems, and of intelligent behaviour of living and artificial systems.

Why study Neuroscience at Radboud University?

- Radboud University is the only university in the Netherlands that covers the complete research field of Neuroscience, from cognition to behaviour, and from sub-cellular processes, to single cell analysis and big data.
- The specialisation is closely connected to the world-renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (DI). You will get the chance to work with DI researchers during your internship, and build up a high profile network for your future career.
- The courses have a strong focus on research: they will cover the latest developments in brain research and technology, and train you the essential academic skills.
- You will work with students and researchers from different backgrounds in the natural sciences and become acquainted with a wide variety of research methods and scientific approaches.

Change perspective

The brain, as part of the human body, may at a first glance seem the exclusive domain of Biology. However, as the communication between neurons involves neurotransmitters and electrical ionic currents, understanding these mechanisms calls for knowledge of Chemistry and Physics. Moreover, studying mechanisms of coding and encoding of neural signals, requires advanced concepts from Mathematics and Informatics. By working together, our students learn to view complex issues from all these different sides.

Career prospects

Master’s specialisation in Neuroscience
The Master’s specialisation in Neuroscience gives you the chance to work at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, and build up your own network of international renowned scientists who are working on the human brain: an excellent preparation for a future career in science. Neuroscience will also provide you with general skills that are required for any other job you aspire:
- the ability to structure complex problems
- excellent social skills for working in a multidisciplinary team
- extensive experience in presentations
- academic writing skills

Our approach to this field

At Radboud University, all branches of Neuroscience are accounted for, and strongly intertwined through the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (DI). This unique combination of expertises is a real advantage for Neuroscience students: it gives you absolute freedom to develop your knowledge in your field of interest and a high profile network for your future career.

- Science faculty
In this specialisation at the Science faculty, you will use your background in the natural sciences to unravel neurobiological processes. When completed, you will receive a Master’s degree in Medical Biology, Molecular Life Sciences, Physics & Astronomy or Science. For highly talented students it is possible to obtain a second Master’s degree at the selective Research Master’s in Cognitive Neuroscience of the DI, which has a more cognitive approach. This extra Master’s degree takes one additional year (60 EC) to complete.

- Themes
The Master’s specialisation in Neuroscience focuses on three of the four research themes of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour:

- Perception, Action and Control
Focus: Studying sensorimotor mechanisms, their cognitive and social components, their clinical implications, and their relevance for robotics.

Research: Researchers use theoretical analysis, psychophysical and behavioural studies, neurophysiological techniques, neuroimaging, clinical and pharmacological interventions, developmental and genetic approaches.

- Plasticity and Memory
Focus: The development and decay of the healthy and the maladaptive brain.

Research: Researchers in this field study the mechanistic underpinnings and behavioural consequences of long-term changes in neural structure and function. Genetic, molecular and cellular methods, animal models, as well as human neuroimaging and cognitive neuropsychology are used.

- Brain Networks and Neuronal Communication
Focus: Complex neural networks, ranging from the very smallest – communication between individual neurons – to the largest: communication between different brain areas and the outside world.

Research: The research groups combine the development of new techniques for measurements of connectivity and activation, with the experimental application of these techniques in studies of cognition in humans, non-human primates and rodents. Computational modelling is an important component.

- Custom approach
The specialisation programme depends on the Master’s programme that you will follow. In this way, it will perfectly fit to your current knowledge and practical skills. However, as all neuroscience research topics are interdisciplinary, you will become acquainted with other disciplines as well. This will help you to develop a common ground that is necessary to communicate in a multi-faceted (research) team.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology/neuro

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The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus. Read more
The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
To this end, the department of anthropology at Binghamton University offers students training in the four traditional subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and social/cultural anthropology, while encouraging students to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
Recent doctoral graduates are employed in positions at the New York State Department of Health, the National Geographic Society, Museum of International Folk Art, Purdue University, and the University of Tennessee.

Anthropology seeks to understand the nature and origins of human biological variability, cultural diversity and social formations through systematic exploration, scientific examination and the application of theory to human populations and their artifacts, including their social configurations, past and present.
Although anthropology has historically been most successful in the analysis of small sociocultural systems, its current challenge is to situate the direct objects of study in their global contexts in both space and time. The discipline draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
While training in the traditional four subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and social/cultural anthropology are offered in the department at Binghamton, students are encouraged to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
A central objective of graduate training in anthropology is the ability to develop an original research design and to communicate the research findings in a research paper, thesis or dissertation of publishable quality. All recipients of graduate degrees submit and defend formal, written demonstration of their ability to apply appropriate analysis to an original research project, except for the MS degree for which an oral demonstration of ability is required.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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Galway’s identity is intertwined with the coast. The Discipline of Geography, with strong links with The Ryan Institute which identifies marine and coastal processes as a Priority Research Area, is delighted to offer a brand new structured postgraduate programme in NUIG. Read more

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Galway’s identity is intertwined with the coast. The Discipline of Geography, with strong links with The Ryan Institute which identifies marine and coastal processes as a Priority Research Area, is delighted to offer a brand new structured postgraduate programme in NUIG. This programme is designed to train skilled personnel, who can advise on, organise and regulate an informed development of coastal and marine resources and activities in Ireland, the European Union and worldwide. Ireland’s coastal and marine environments are a vital natural resource. This value is reflected in a broad range of current EU directives and strategies aimed at taking full advantage of these resources while also enhancing our natural environments. The Irish Government has recently launched an integrated plan (Our Ocean Wealth), seeking to put into operation these EU policies for our coastal and marine resources. While rapid growth is expected as these new plans come into action, they are not without risks. A recent report by the Marine Institute outlined some challenges: a need to develop our environmental understanding; the challenge posed by climate change; protecting biodiversity; enhancing monitoring capability; greater integration of science, management and advice. The key to achieving the true sustainable development of our coastal and marine resources may be through new educational programmes. On the one hand, facilitating existing managers and planners through targeted learning in this expanding field, while on the other hand, training our current students to be the future decision-makers in these coastal and marine environments.

This is a highly opportune time for an MSc in Coastal and Marine Environments: physical processes, policy and practice. This MSc programme, theoretically informed and with a strong field-based and applied focus, is offered in direct response to newly emerging discourses on the long term health of coastal and marine environments. It seeks to challenge and facilitate students to engage with but go beyond established scientific conceptual and theoretical perspectives, engage new ways of understanding the complexities of our evolving physical coastal and marine environments, and develop critical insights that can support policy and practice in sustaining these increasingly vulnerable environments.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MSc in Coastal and Marine Environments is a full-time postgraduate course delivered over 3 semesters (12 months). The programme was devised by a team of academics from the Discipline of Geography who have been involved in priority EU-funded and US National Science Foundation (NSF) research on contemporary and future challenges facing coastal and marine areas, including the ANCORIM (Atlantic Network for Coastal Risk Management) (INTERREG) and MARNET (Marine Atlantic Regions Network) (FP7) projects, as well as local and national-level projects on the same. The team is engaged in a broad range of scientific investigation of the physical environment, with an excellent international publication record. Students will become active members of ongoing research programmes and will learn the research and publication process.

There is a strong focus on the formulation of coastal and marine policies and strategies; the identity and role of stakeholders; the nature and impact of local, national and European governance; and the historic and contemporary approaches used to understand the physical processes that control the characteristics of our coast. Development of skills is supported by a significant focus on practical and field-based learning, including short field courses in Ireland and work placements.

It is directed at graduates from Geography, Natural Sciences and other related disciplines in the social and natural sciences, and at professionals in the field who are interested in furthering their knowledge of coastal and marine environments. Students will be required to conduct socially relevant research that addresses the roles of agencies and policy structures in coastal and marine environments.

CAREER OPPORTUNTIES

With coastal and marine resources increasingly promoted as being central to revitalising the Irish economy, the coming years will require well-informed and educated leaders who understand the complexities of the interaction between the economy and health of these environments. This, added to the broader national and European focus on the coastal zone and the urgent need for more Higher Education courses which recognise the renewed importance of sustainability of coastal and marine activities and the multifunctional facets of these areas, should present graduates of this course with opportunities across various fields ( coastal and marine science, environmental consultancy, local/regional/state management agencies, government and policy institute research, politics and governance of the environment, sustainable energy, research laboratories and programmes, teaching, heritage, tourism, etc.). The work placement programme will aid in professional development and offer links with potential employers, giving our students realistic and desirable career opportunities, and built-in work experience upon graduation.

PhD Entry: the MSc Programme can be used as a platform for potential doctoral PhD candidates for research programmes in Geography and our partners in NUIG, especially the Ryan Institute, and abroad. This will encourage the growth and visibility, at home and abroad, of the coastal and marine priority theme research clusters in NUIG.

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The two-year master's programme in Philosophy at Leiden University investigates the fundamental principles underpinning human knowledge while cultivating your capacity for reason and sound argumentation. Read more

The two-year master's programme in Philosophy at Leiden University investigates the fundamental principles underpinning human knowledge while cultivating your capacity for reason and sound argumentation.

This demanding and high-level programme is ideal for students who wish to enhance their knowledge of a particular discipline with complementary understanding of its philosophical foundations combined with further honing of their analytical thinking skills. 

Five specialisations; five academic disciplines

The master in Philosophy offers you the choice of five specialisations: humanities, law, natural sciences, political science, and psychology. Each specialisation delves deep into the philosophical foundations and methodological approaches underpinning that discipline. Content incorporates the very latest academic theory and the field’s historical development across a number of branches of philosophy.

Hone your intellect

The intellectual tools yielded by the study of philosophy are typically transferable skills to complement any given profession. The master in Philosophy will train you to become an outstanding critical thinker, capable of breaking down the most complex ideas and evaluating the principles upon which various positions are based. During your master, you will study, analyse and discuss primary philosophical texts while learning how to develop and communicate your own theories and ideas.

Learn from thought leaders

At Leiden University, great minds have been gathering for over five hundred years to explore fundamental questions relating to human existence. Today, the Institute for Philosophy at Leiden University is an international centre for research and education, with an expansive network of partner institutes and an active programme of visiting lecturers.

During your master’s programme in Philosophy, you learn from researchers of the highest international standing. These lecturers are committed to helping you reach your potential, from using their contacts to help you get the internship you want, to inspiring you to challenge traditional ways of thinking. At Leiden, small classes allow for plenty of direct contact between you and your lecturers. Outside of class, an open door policy means that support is on hand at any time.

Specialisations



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How should psychology be positioned between the humanities, life sciences and natural sciences? How do we weigh the evidence coming from such diverse sources as experiments, case histories or introspection? Reflecting on Psychology teaches students to put their skills and knowledge in a broader context. Read more
How should psychology be positioned between the humanities, life sciences and natural sciences? How do we weigh the evidence coming from such diverse sources as experiments, case histories or introspection? Reflecting on Psychology teaches students to put their skills and knowledge in a broader context.

Using perspectives from Philosophy of Science, Science and Technology Studies (STS), Sociology, Anthropology and Cultural Studies, this master encourages students to open up the black box of Psychology, and to explore its relations with other parts of science and society. Questions that might be discussed or explored include:
• How should psychology be positioned between the humanities, life sciences and natural sciences?
• How do we weigh the evidence coming from such diverse sources as experiments, case histories or introspection?
• What is the value of MRI-scans in moral and scientific debates?
• Where should we draw the line between treatment and enhancement when it comes to psychotropic drugs?
• How do media creations of autism in novels and films influence the clinical reality of autism?

Reflecting on Psychology aims to attract a relatively small number of students who will be supervised individually and encouraged to come up with their own research topics. Students from Reflecting on Psychology will become skilled in writing, qualitative analysis and reflection

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