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Masters Degrees (Computer Architecture)

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Research profile. The Institute for Computing System Architecture (ICSA) will provide you with academic resources and industry links that are among the best in the world. Read more

Research profile

The Institute for Computing System Architecture (ICSA) will provide you with academic resources and industry links that are among the best in the world.

We are home to the UK’s largest group of PhD researchers in the field, and host a Centre of Excellence in partnership with ARM, the world’s largest microprocessor intellectual property provider. We are also a member of the European Network of Excellence on High Performance and Embedded Architecture and Compilation.

Our current research is focused on the areas of:

  • compilers and architectures
  • parallel computing
  • wireless networking
  • processor-automated synthesis by iterative analysis.

Our wireless communication group is particularly strong, and presently working on expanding wireless reach within Scotland.

While the scope for research is wide, each area is underpinned by our fundamental aims:

  • to extend understanding of existing systems
  • to improve current systems
  • to develop new architecture and engineering methods

Training and support

You’ll be supported in your research by award-winning academic staff – including four Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering. They and other research colleagues have contributed to what is an enviable publications portfolio, featuring some of the most prestigious publications in the field.

You’ll graduate with more than an intensive knowledge of your field: you’ll also have established academic and personal links that will last a lifetime.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

Our students see their degrees as a launchpad for their careers, and many have established themselves as world-class researchers and developers. By joining their ranks, you will be able to make your mark on the next generation of technological innovations.

Academic and business employers actively recruit ICSA graduates, many of whom are now designing the next generation of products for major software developers, or taking the lead in other entrepreneurial ventures.



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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. Read more
The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. The program provides students with an understanding of the theory and practice of automating the representation, storage and processing of information, while emphasizing experimental research to design and engineer a wide variety of computer and information systems.

The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. If you have bachelor's degree in computer science or a related field, you're invited to apply for admission to our MSCS program.

The doctoral program leads to a PhD in Computer Science. Students admitted into the program typically have a master's degree in computer science or a closely related discipline. Students with a bachelor's degree and a strong academic record may also be directly admitted.

Recent doctoral graduates have gone on to careers in as software engineering at Intel, eBay, Cisco Systems, positions at Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, Twitter, Bloomberg, the Air Force Research Lab, and the U.S. Census. Academic placements include assistant professorships at California State University at Fullerton, Valdosta State University, and Harran University, Turkey.

The Master's program leads to a Master of Science in Computer Science. It is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. Holders of the baccalaureate degree in computer science or a related field are invited to apply for admission to the MSCS program. Students whose undergraduate degree is not in computer science may be required to complete some preparatory work in addition to fulfilling the requirements listed below.
Program requirements include four core courses taken over the first two semesters of study. These courses are Computer Organization and Architecture, Operating Systems, Programming Languages and Design & Analysis of Computer Algorithms. Three graduating options are offered: a thesis option, a project option and a comprehensive exam. Beyond the 4 core courses, these options require students to complete 4, 5 and 6 elective courses, respectively, chosen from a broad set of courses offered by the Department.

Applicant Qualifications

- Undergraduate major in computer science or related field desirable for admission
- Applicants are additionally expected to have completed coursework in the following areas:
*Algorithms and data structures
*Computer organization and architecture
*Operating systems
*Programming languages
*Discrete mathematics

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Two letters of recommendation (three letters of recommendation for PhD applicants)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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On City's MSc in Computer Games Technology you can develop specialist technical skills for a career in the Computer Games Industry. Read more
On City's MSc in Computer Games Technology you can develop specialist technical skills for a career in the Computer Games Industry.

Who is it for?

This course is aimed at students with a passion for computer games and a strong interest in programming. It is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in a numerate subject with substantial computing content, or those who wish to update their skills after a time in industry as a computing professional.

Objectives

The course is designed for you to develop:
-Strong technical skills suitable for professional programming roles in the game industry.
-Specialist knowledge in computer graphics, AI, physics and audio.
-The ability to design and build game engines from scratch in industry standard languages, including C++.
-Knowledge of the games development process, including the pitch, design, and use of a game engine to build a demo.
-Experience of the planning, management and execution of a major games technology project.

Academic facilities

With over 1,300 workstations, the on-campus computer rooms provide a valuable learning resource and give an opportunity for individuals to do coursework and projects. Computers have games development software including:
-Unity3D
-Unreal
-Microsoft Visual Studio
-Microsoft XNA Game Studio
-MonoDevelop
-MonoGame
-NShader
-FMOD Studio
-FMOD Studio API
-OGRE SDK
-WildMagic Geometric Tools
-Blender
-Adobe Photoshop.

City has recently invested in a new computer lab equipped with high specification NVidia GPUs.

Through City's Interaction Lab and the Department of Computing, there is hardware that can be used for student projects, including:
-Oculus Rift VR Headset
-Emotiv Epoc EEG Headset
-Neurosky Mindwave EEG Headset
-X-Box One Kinect Sensor
-X-Box 360 Kinect Sensor
-Leap Motion (Gestural input device)
-Affectiva Q Band Galvanic Skin Response sensor
-Tobii X-60 Eye Tracker

Placements

As a postgraduate student on a Computing and Information Systems course, you will have the opportunity to complete up to six months of professional experience as part of your degree.

Our longstanding internship scheme gives you the chance to apply the knowledge and skills gained from your taught modules within a real business environment. An internship also provides you with professional development opportunities that enhance your technical skills and business knowledge.

Internships delivered by City, University of London offer an exceptional opportunity to help you stand out in the competitive IT industry job market. The structure of the course extends the period for dissertation submission to January, allowing you to work full-time for up to six months. You will be supported by our outstanding Professional Liaison Unit (PLU) should you wish to consider undertaking this route.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy increase as you progress through each module. Active researchers guide your progress in the areas of Games Development, Computer Graphics, Artificial Intelligence and Audio, which culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently and, where appropriate, in collaboration with industrial partners.

Taught modules are delivered through a series of 20 hours of lectures and 10 hours of tutorials/laboratory sessions. Lectures are normally used to:

present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject;
highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus;
indicate additional topics and resources for private study.
Tutorials help you develop the skills to apply the concepts we have covered in the lectures. We normally achieve this through practical problem solving contexts.

Laboratory sessions give you the opportunity to apply concepts and techniques using state-of-the-art software, environments and development tools. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules from lecture notes and lab materials, to coursework feedback, model answers, and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Modules are assessed through written examination and coursework, where you will need to answer theoretical and practical questions to demonstrate that you can analyse and apply computer games technology methods.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop an autonomous research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply your learning to solve a real-world problem, designing and implementing a solution and evaluating the result. At the end of the project you submit a substantial MSc project report, which becomes the mode of assessment for this part of the programme.

Modules

The programme is composed of eight taught modules and a final project.

The eight modules provide you with a firm grounding in computer games technology, including mathematics, programming, and game engines and architecture along with specialist topics in computer graphics, physics, AI, and audio.

The project component gives you an opportunity to carry out an extended piece of work under the supervision of one of our specialist academic and research staff, at the cutting edge of games technology, in an industrial or academic context.

Core Modules - there are eight Core Modules.
-Games development process
-Computer game architectures
-Computer graphics
-Game Physics and Artificial Intelligence
-Digital Signal Processing and Audio Programming
-Programming in C++
-Systems Specification
-Research, Methods and Professional Issues

Career prospects

Graduates are equipped with advanced knowledge and skills in a range of topics in games technology in preparation for a career in computer games development.

Alumni of the course are working in companies including Rockstar, Sony Computer Entertainment, Electronic Arts, and Codemasters, as well as start-ups and independent studios.

City has a dedicated incubation space, called the Hangout, located in the heart of Tech City that is specially designed for student entrepreneurs from City, University of London who want to get their idea off the ground.

Professional roles include:
-3D Graphics Programmer
-Audio Programmer
-Physics Programmer
-Artificial Intelligence Programmer
-Simulation and Game Engine Programmer
-User Interface Programmer
-Tools and Utility Programmer
-Scripting Languages Programmer
-Networking Specialist
-Porting Programmer

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The M.Sc. programme Computer Science for Digital Media at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is an internationally oriented 2-years degree programme. Read more
The M.Sc. programme Computer Science for Digital Media at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is an internationally oriented 2-years degree programme. It aims at creative and innovative thinking graduates of Computer Science or related subjects with the desire of deepening their knowledge in applied Computer Science, with a focus on applications relevant to the media.

Programme Features

In accordance with the »Weimar Model«, research-oriented projects are a large and defining part of the Master’s programme. Additional elective modules allow students to select courses from other degree programmes such as Computational Engineering, Arts and Design, Architecture, as well as courses from the Computer Science for Digital Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included. The fourth and final semester is dedicated entirely to the Master’s thesis.

The degree programme offers students to focus on different fields. Core components of the programme and areas of specialisation include:
• Web Technologies
• Information Retrieval and Data Mining
• Big Data Analytics
• Intelligent Software Systems
• Computer Graphics and Visualization
• Computer Vision
• Virtual Reality, 3D Interfaces
• Human Computer Interfaces
• Usability
• Secure Protocols and Cryptographic Algorithms

Key skills and competences are acquired through a project-based teaching approach: on a semester basis, students work in teams to solve assigned research tasks in the labs of the faculty. This approach provides our graduates with soft- and hard- skills which are very welcome in research and development institutions. Within the recently built »Digital Bauhaus Lab«, the faculty of media has excellent research facilities equipped with the latest advanced hardware.

Visit the Computer Science for Digital Media on the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar website for more details on the programme.

Career Options

Our graduates find employment in the R&D departments of companies in the automotive, telecommunication, software, gaming and animation industry, as well as at academic institutions in Germany and overseas. A specialisation in Computer Science with focus on media opens the door for employment and research in innovative areas such as system development, algorithm development, data analysis, data mining, scientific visualisation, image processing, physical simulation, interface development and testing and security protocols development.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe should apply online on http://www.uni-assist.de/index_en.html. Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa can apply online at: https://movein-uni-weimar.moveonnet.eu/movein/portal/studyportal.php?_language=en

Please find further information for your application on http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-csm/

We also maintain a FAQ page: http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-csm/

Studying in Weimar

The »Bauhaus « was the most influential design school in the 20th century and was founded in 1919 in Weimar. The Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is the living continuation of this tradition. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum! Experimentation and excellence are our mission throughout our university faculties Media, Architecture and Urbanism, Civil Engineering and Art and Design. Across our Faculties, transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are an important part of this mission.

Find out more about student life in Weimar on http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/university/studies/einblickbauhaus/university-town-of-weimar/

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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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The fields of graphics, vision and imaging increasingly rely on one another. Read more
The fields of graphics, vision and imaging increasingly rely on one another. This unique and timely MSc provides training in computer graphics, geometry processing, virtual reality, machine vision and imaging technology from world-leading experts, enabling students to specialise in any of these areas and gain a grounding in the others.

Degree information

Graduates will understand the basic mathematical principles underlying the development and application of new techniques in computer graphics and computer vision and will be aware of the range of algorithms and approaches available, and be able to design, develop and evaluate algorithms and methods for new problems, emerging technologies and applications.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Mathematical Methods, Algorithmics and Implementation
-Image Processing
-Computer Graphics
-Research Methods

Optional modules
-Machine Vision
-Graphical Models
-Virtual Environments
-Geometry of Images
-Advanced Modelling, Rendering and Animation
-Inverse Problems in Imaging
-Computation Modelling for Biomedical Imaging
-Computational Photography and Capture
-Acquisition and Processing of 3D Geometry

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project related to a problem of industrial interest or on a topic near the leading edge of research, which culminates in a 60–80 page dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and tutorials. Lectures are often supported by laboratory work with help from demonstrators. Student performance is assessed by unseen written examinations, coursework and a substantial individual project.

Careers

Graduates are ready for employment in a wide range of high-technology companies and will be able to contribute to maintaining and enhancing the UK's position in these important and expanding areas. The MSc provides graduates with the up-to-date technical skills required to support a wealth of research and development opportunities in broad areas of computer science and engineering, such as multimedia applications, medicine, architecture, film animation and computer games. Our market research shows that the leading companies in these areas demand the deep technical knowledge that this programme provides. Graduates have found positions at global companies such as Disney, Sony and Siemens. Others have gone on to PhD programmes at MIT, Princeton University, and Eth Zurich.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Post-Doctoral Research Associate, University of Oxford
-Software Engineer, Sengtian Software
-Graduate Software Engineer, ARM
-IT Officer, Nalys
-MSc in Computer Games and Entertainment, Goldsmiths, University of London

Employability
UCL Computer Science was one of the top-rated departments in the country, according to the UK Government's most recent research assessment exercise, and our graduates have some of the highest employment rates of any university in the UK. This degree programme also provides a foundation for further PhD study or industrial research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Computer Science contains some of the world's leading researchers in computer graphics, geometry processing, computer vision and virtual environments.

Research activities include geometric acquisition and 3D fabrication, real-time photo-realistic rendering, mixed and augmented reality, face recognition, content-based image-database search, video-texture modelling, depth perception in stereo vision, colour imaging for industrial inspection, mapping brain function and connectivity and tracking for SLAM (simultaneous localisation and mapping).

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Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. Read more
Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. The aim of the MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) programme is to provide advanced coursework with options for a research element or industrial element, and additional professional development coursework. Students choose from a range of courses in Analogue, Mixed Signal, and RF Integrated Circuit Design, VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. A range of electives for the coursework-only stream includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr47/

Course Details

The MEngSc (EEE) has three Streams which include coursework only, coursework with a research project, or coursework with an industrial placement. Students following Stream 1 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out a Minor Research Project to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 2 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out an Industrial Placement to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 3 take course modules to the value of 90 credits, up to 20 credits of which can be in topics such as business, law, and innovation.

Format

In all Streams, students take five core modules from the following range of courses: Advanced Analogue and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced RF Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, and Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. In addition, students following Stream 1 (Research Project) and Stream 2 (Industry Placement) carry out a Research Report. Following successful completion of the coursework and Research Report, students in Streams 1 and 2 carry out a research project or industry placement over the summer months.

Students who choose the coursework-only option, Stream 3, take additional courses in lieu of the project or placement. These can be chosen from a range of electives that includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship.

Assessment

Part I consists of coursework modules and mini-project to the value of 60 credits. These are assessed using a combination of written examinations and continuous assessment. Successful completion of the initial tranche of coursework modules qualifies the student to progress to Part II, the research project, industrial placement, or additional coursework to the value of 30 credits in the cases of Streams 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

Placement and Study Abroad Information

For students following Streams 1 and 2, research projects and industrial placements are normally in Ireland. Where the opportunity arises, a research project or work placement may be carried out outside Ireland.

Careers

MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) graduates will have a competitive advantage in the jobs market by virtue of having completed advanced coursework in Electrical and Electronic Engineering and, in the case of Streams 1 and 2, having completed a significant research project or work placement.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Software development is one of the most rapidly evolving industries in the world, presenting an ever-greater number of creative opportunities and exciting challenges. Read more

Overview

Software development is one of the most rapidly evolving industries in the world, presenting an ever-greater number of creative opportunities and exciting challenges. Software developers therefore need a special set of skills to keep pace with technology and innovation. Our course gives you the knowledge and confidence to do just that. We focus on large-scale development of advanced software, teaching you how to make use of the latest frameworks, methodologies and technology to produce professional-quality applications. Crucially, you will also learn how to be an effective member of a development team. With close links to software giants like Microsoft, Sony, and IBM, we work hard to ensure that our course is always up to date and that our graduates leave with the cutting-edge skills highly sought-after by industry. Therefore, this MSc is appropriate not just for fresh Computer Science graduates, but also for those with existing commercial experience who wish to update their skills and knowledge.

The course begins in September each year and lasts twelve months. There are two trimesters of taught modules, followed by an individual dissertation project during the third trimester. An optional extra trimester – either immediately before or after the dissertation – gives you significant industrial experience through a module based in our software development unit, working with commercial clients and software. This is unique to Hull.

The Department of Computer Science creates an excellent experience for students, with a supportive student community. We have an international reputation for our research activities, with a strong record of industrial and public grant funding. We are also affiliated with Microsoft’s DreamSpark programme, which allows you to access the latest Microsoft operating systems and development software for home use. Once registered with the department, you can download the software free of charge.

Industrial Experience

There is the option to take an Industrial Experience variant, with the opportunity to extend the period of study by a trimester, to gain experience of working alongside commercial software developers within a commercial software development facility on site (SEED), promoting real-world applications of the advanced concepts met in the course.

Study

The MSc Computer Science (Software Engineering) programme is designed to support students with various levels of computing and programming practice experience. There is suitable content on professional skills and the importance of ethics for practising computer scientists. Material on software engineering, referencing and unfair means supports the transition into the postgraduate environment.
As a route into research, the programme supports the development of postgraduate technical skills, alongside critical research, analysis and planning activities.
In lectures you’ll benefit from a range of techniques, from interpreting complex ideas through interactive discussions, to live programming or other problem-solving demonstrations.

Core modules

• Oriented Design and Development Using C++
• Component-based Architecture
• Maintaining Large Software Systems
• Development Project
• Distributed Applications
• Trustworthy Computing
Optional modules
• Computer Science Software Development Practice – pass/fail module
• Dissertation (There is the option of taking this module either in trimester 3 or trimester 4, depending on whether you take the Industrial Experience module.)

Teaching and learning

We place a strong emphasis on practical laboratory sessions. This will significantly develop your core computer science skills, and enhance your employability through exposure to commercial projects.
As teamwork plays a key role in commercial software development and has great value as an employable skill, group work is used in a number of modules.

Assessment

Practical coursework is the main form of assessment, and you will design, build and test software solutions to a variety of problems. This is complemented by written coursework.
The largest assessment is the dissertation, which is based on the work done in the third trimester and documented in a report of up to 20,000 words.

Careers

The MSc Computer Science (Software Engineering) is designed to open up pathways to postgraduate research, as well as careers in a wide range of areas within your discipline. The industrial placement option will enable you to practise your skills and knowledge of computer science ‘in situ’, giving you a useful insight and advantage when it comes to starting your career.
We have a range of inspirational extra-curricular activities including the Three Thing Game, Imagine Cup Worldwide Software Development Challenge, Really Useful Seminars and Global Game Jam. They are designed to boost your CV and employability, and taking part costs very little.

Our graduates gain a wide range of roles including: Applications Developer, Business Systems Analyst, Computer Analyst, Computer Programmer, Computer Operations Manager, Data Management Analyst, Database Assistant, Developer Support Engineer, Games Programmer, Games Programmer (Engine design), Information Manager, IT Design, IT Systems Manager, IT Technician, IT user Support, Mobile Developer, Operations Director, Software Designer, Software Developer, Software Engineer, Solutions Developer, Systems Engineer, Technical Sales, Technical Specialist, Web Developer.

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Computer science has an ever-greater influence on our lives, and the technological breakthroughs of today shape the way we live tomorrow. Read more

Overview

Computer science has an ever-greater influence on our lives, and the technological breakthroughs of today shape the way we live tomorrow. Opportunities continue to grow for highly skilled practitioners, and the taught Masters course allows you to make great advancements on your existing skills and knowledge. By the end of the programme you will be equipped to thrive in one of the fastest moving industries in the world.

Industrial Placement Trimester

There is the option to take an Industrial Experience variant, with the opportunity to extend the period of study by a trimester, to gain experience of working alongside commercial software developers within a commercial software development facility on site (SEED), promoting real-world applications of the advanced concepts met in the course.

You will learn specialist computer science techniques and fundamental theories, but you’ll also have the opportunity to put this knowledge into practice by developing applications and working with real software. We cover a range of topics, including real time graphics and computational science, and you can choose from options including artificial intelligence, robotics and visualisation – built upon a solid foundation of good programming skills.

The course begins each September each year and lasts twelve months. There are two trimesters of taught modules, followed by an individual dissertation project during the third trimester. There is an option to take an extra trimester – either immediately before or after the dissertation – gaining industrial experience through a module based in SEED, our software development unit working with commercial clients and software. This is unique to Hull.

The Department of Computer Science creates an excellent experience for students, with a supportive student community. We have an international reputation for our research activities, with a strong record of industrial and public grant funding. We are also affiliated with Microsoft’s DreamSpark programme, which allows you to access the latest Microsoft operating systems and development software for home use. Once registered with the department, you can download the software free of charge.

Study

The MSc programme is designed to support students with various levels of computing and programming practice experience. However, this programme is particularly suited to those with significant experience of writing code. There is a focus on the transition to postgraduate study, with suitable content on professional skills and the importance of ethics for practising computer scientists.
In lectures you’ll benefit from a range of techniques, from interpreting complex ideas through interactive discussions, to live programming or other problem-solving demonstrations.

Core modules

• C++ Programming and Design
• Real Time Graphics
• Advanced Computational Science
• Development Project

Optional modules

• Game Development Architecture
• Simulation and Concurrency
• Visualization
• Advanced Rendering and Artificial Intelligence for Games
• Trustworthy Computing
• Dissertation (There is the option of taking this module either in trimester 3 or trimester 4, depending on whether you take the Industrial Experience module.)
• The Industrial Experience optional 60-credit single trimester module allows students to gain significant commercial experience.

Teaching and learning

We place a strong emphasis on practical laboratory sessions. This will significantly develop your core computer science skills, and enhance your employability through exposure to commercial projects.
As teamwork plays a key role in commercial software development and has great value as an employable skill, group work is used in a number of modules.

Assessment

Practical coursework is the main form of assessment, and you will design, build and test software solutions to a variety of problems.
Written coursework is used to assess your descriptive and critical skills, as well as verify the methodology used to complete your practical coursework. The largest assessment is the dissertation, which is based on the work done in the third trimester (or fourth, depending on your option choices) and documented in a report of up to 20,000 words.

Careers

The MSc Advanced Computer Science programme is designed to open up pathways to postgraduate research, as well as a wide range of careers. The computational science module introduces concepts and ideas which will help prepare you for postgraduate study; the industrial placement option, meanwhile, will enable you to practise your skills and knowledge of computer science ‘in situ’, giving you a useful insight and advantage when it comes to starting your career.
We have a range of inspirational extra-curricular activities including the Three Thing Game, Imagine Cup Worldwide Software Development Challenge, Really Useful Seminars and Global Game Jam. They are designed to boost your CV and employability, and taking part costs very little.

Our MSc graduates typically gain roles including: Applications Developer, Business Systems Analyst, Computer Analyst, Computer Programmer, Computer Operations Manager, Data Management Analyst, Database Assistant, Developer Support Engineer, Games Programmer, Games Programmer (Engine design), Information Manager, IT Design, IT Systems Manager, IT Technician, IT user Support, Mobile Developer, Operations Director, Software Designer, Software Developer, Software Engineer, Solutions Developer, Systems Engineer, Technical Sales, Technical Specialist, Web Developer.

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Modern devices often rely on data that is distributed across multiple computers, whether closely located or more distant. Read more

Overview

Modern devices often rely on data that is distributed across multiple computers, whether closely located or more distant. Developing software for such systems offers many benefits, but it also poses new challenges to be overcome, particularly in guaranteeing the security and robustness of the communication between devices.

The MSc at Hull is designed to enable you to overcome those challenges. It prepares you to exploit the extraordinary potential of distributed systems, both in terms of storage capacity and processing power, whilst being aware of the unique constraints and security problems they introduce. You will have access to cutting-edge equipment and facilities, and you will finish with a much greater understanding of how software development needs to adapt to the unique environment of a distributed system. These skills and knowledge are highly sought-after in an industry that is increasingly adopting new distributed technology, such as cloud-based solutions.

The course begins in September each year and lasts twelve months. There are two trimesters of taught modules, followed by an individual dissertation project during the third trimester. There is an option to take an extra trimester – either immediately before or after the dissertation – gaining industrial experience through a module based in SEED, our software development unit working with commercial clients and software. This is unique to Hull.

The Department of Computer Science creates an excellent experience for students, with a supportive student community. We have an international reputation for our research activities, with a strong record of industrial and public grant funding. We are also affiliated with Microsoft’s DreamSpark programme, which allows you to access the latest Microsoft operating systems and development software for home use. Once registered with the department, you can download the software free of charge.

Industrial Experience

There is the option to take an Industrial Experience variant, with the opportunity to extend the period of study by a trimester, to gain experience of working alongside commercial software developers within a commercial software development facility on site (SEED), promoting real-world applications of the advanced concepts met in the course.

Study

The MSc Computer Science (Security and Distributed Computing) programme supports students with various levels of computing and programming practice experience, with material that supports the transition into the postgraduate environment. There is also suitable content on professional skills and the importance of ethics for practising computer scientists.
As a route into research, the programme supports the development of postgraduate technical skills, alongside critical research, analysis and planning activities.
In lectures you’ll benefit from a range of techniques, from interpreting complex ideas through interactive discussions, to live programming or other problem-solving demonstrations.
Core modules
• Oriented Design and Development Using C++
• Component-based Architecture
• Network Security
• Development Project
• Distributed Applications
• Trustworthy Computing
Optional modules
• Computer Science Software Development Practice (pass/fail module)
• Dissertation (There is the option of taking this module either in trimester 3 or trimester 4, depending on whether you take the Industrial Experience module.)
• The Industrial Experience optional 60-credit single trimester module allows students to gain significant commercial experience.

Teaching and learning

We place a strong emphasis on practical laboratory sessions. This will significantly develop your core computer science skills, and enhance your employability through exposure to commercial projects.
As teamwork plays a key role in commercial software development and has great value as an employable skill, group work is used in a number of modules.

Assessment

Practical coursework is the main form of assessment, and you will design, build and test software solutions to a variety of problems. This is complemented by written coursework.
The largest assessment is the dissertation, which is based on the work done in the third trimester (or fourth, depending on your option choices) and documented in a report of up to 20,000 words.

Careers

The MSc Computer Science (Security and Distributed Computing) is designed to open up pathways to postgraduate research, as well as careers in a wide range of areas within your discipline. The industrial placement option will enable you to practise your skills and knowledge of computer science ‘in situ’, giving you a useful insight and advantage when it comes to starting your career.
We have a range of inspirational extra-curricular activities including the Three Thing Game, Imagine Cup Worldwide Software Development Challenge, Really Useful Seminars and Global Game Jam. They are designed to boost your CV and employability, and taking part costs very little.

Our graduates typically gain roles including: Applications Developer, Business Systems Analyst, Computer Analyst, Computer Programmer, Computer Operations Manager, Data Management Analyst, Database Assistant, Developer Support Engineer, Games Programmer, Games Programmer (Engine design), Information Manager, IT Design, IT Systems Manager, IT Technician, IT user Support, Mobile Developer, Operations Director, Software Designer, Software Developer, Software Engineer, Solutions Developer, Systems Engineer, Technical Sales, Technical Specialist, Web Developer.

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The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. Read more
The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. As the need for skilled modellers and animators with an awareness of architectural, as well as cinematic, issues increases in both Architecture and Film, the MA in Architectural Visualisation builds on the connections between these two industries. This MA programme develops skills to communicate architecture and urbanity for a variety of applications and audiences.

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture (http://www.kent.ac.uk/architecture/) and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/).

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting new field of digital media. The School was established over 40 years ago and has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

Kent School of Architecture is a young school that has built an excellent reputation, based on high quality teaching and excellent resources. For architecture graduate employment prospects, Kent was ranked 6th in the UK in The Times Good University Guide 2014 and 7th in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/245/architectural-visualisation

Course structure

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts. Building on the successful Master's programmes in Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects, this MA enables students to develop at an advanced level the skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling which will equip them to become highly skilled professionals in architectural visualisation.

Drawing influence from both architecture and film, this programme offers a progression route into both industries, highlighting the different requirements needed for each profession while exploring the similarities of these markets. In this programme, the professions of architecture, film and animation fuse together, providing students with the ability and understanding to work in each or all of them.

Modules

Stage 1
AR821 - Film and Architecture (15 credits)
AR822 - Virtual Cities (30 credits)
AR823 - Digital Architecture (15 credits)
AR846 - Architectural Photography (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL868 - High Definition Compositing (15 credits)
EL869 - Film and Video Production (15 credits)
Stage 2
Either
EL870 - Visual Effects Project (60 credits)
OR
AR845 - Independent Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules are taught over three terms, concluding with a Major Project Visualisation, which accounts for one third of the programme. The content of the visualisation is agreed with programme staff and you build a showreel to a professional standard. Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop advanced level skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling, which will equip you to become a highly skilled professional in architectural visualisation

- train you in the requirements and skills needed for work in high definition

- produce professionally-trained architectural visualisers who are highly skilled in using state-of-the-art 3D modelling and visual effects software

- provide proper academic guidance and welfare support for all students

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential.

Research areas

- Digital Media

The Digital Media group is a multidisciplinary group with interests in many areas including social computing (eg, social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile/ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction and digital arts (eg, computer games, 3D animation, digital film). Our work is applied across a wide range of domains including e-health, cultural heritage and cyber influence/identity.

Current research themes include:

- interface/interaction design and human-computer interaction
- cyber behaviour/influence
- social computing and sociability design
- natural user interfaces
- virtual worlds
- online communities and computer-mediated communication
- mobile applications
- digital film-making and post-production.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers seek, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Computer science has an ever-greater influence on our lives, and the technological breakthroughs of today shape the way we live tomorrow. Read more

Overview

Computer science has an ever-greater influence on our lives, and the technological breakthroughs of today shape the way we live tomorrow. Opportunities continue to grow for highly skilled practitioners, and the taught Masters course allows you to make great advancements on your existing skills and knowledge. By the end of the programme you will be equipped to thrive in one of the fastest moving industries in the world.

Industrial Placement Trimester

This degree comprises of 4 trimesters - including Industrial Experience to benefit from working alongside commercial software developers within a commercial software development facility on site (SEED), promoting real-world applications of the advanced concepts met in the course.

You will learn specialist computer science techniques and fundamental theories, but you’ll also have the opportunity to put this knowledge into practice by developing applications and working with real software. We cover a range of topics, including real time graphics and computational science, and you can choose from options including artificial intelligence, robotics and visualisation – built upon a solid foundation of good programming skills.

The course begins each September each year and lasts twelve months. There are two trimesters of taught modules, followed by
industrial experience through a module based in SEED, our software development unit working with commercial clients and software. This is unique to Hull. The degree ends with an individual dissertation project during the fourth trimester.

The Department of Computer Science creates an excellent experience for students, with a supportive student community. We have an international reputation for our research activities, with a strong record of industrial and public grant funding. We are also affiliated with Microsoft’s DreamSpark programme, which allows you to access the latest Microsoft operating systems and development software for home use. Once registered with the department, you can download the software free of charge.

Study

The MSc programme is designed to support students with various levels of computing and programming practice experience. However, this programme is particularly suited to those with significant experience of writing code. There is a focus on the transition to postgraduate study, with suitable content on professional skills and the importance of ethics for practising computer scientists.
In lectures you’ll benefit from a range of techniques, from interpreting complex ideas through interactive discussions, to live programming or other problem-solving demonstrations.

Core modules

• C++ Programming and Design
• Real Time Graphics
• Advanced Computational Science
• The Industrial Experience single trimester module allows students to gain significant commercial experience
.• Development Project

Optional modules

• Game Development Architecture
• Simulation and Concurrency
• Visualization
• Advanced Rendering and Artificial Intelligence for Games
• Trustworthy Computing
For details see https://www.courses.hull.ac.uk/programmes/1617/081671.html

Teaching and learning

We place a strong emphasis on practical laboratory sessions. This will significantly develop your core computer science skills, and enhance your employability through exposure to commercial projects.
As teamwork plays a key role in commercial software development and has great value as an employable skill, group work is used in a number of modules.

Assessment

Practical coursework is the main form of assessment, and you will design, build and test software solutions to a variety of problems.
Written coursework is used to assess your descriptive and critical skills, as well as verify the methodology used to complete your practical coursework. The largest assessment is the dissertation, which is based on the work done in the third trimester (or fourth, depending on your option choices) and documented in a report of up to 20,000 words.

Careers

The MSc Advanced Computer Science programme is designed to open up pathways to postgraduate research, as well as a wide range of careers. The computational science module introduces concepts and ideas which will help prepare you for postgraduate study; the industrial placement option, meanwhile, will enable you to practise your skills and knowledge of computer science ‘in situ’, giving you a useful insight and advantage when it comes to starting your career.
We have a range of inspirational extra-curricular activities including the Three Thing Game, Imagine Cup Worldwide Software Development Challenge, Really Useful Seminars and Global Game Jam. They are designed to boost your CV and employability, and taking part costs very little.

Our MSc graduates typically gain roles including: Applications Developer, Business Systems Analyst, Computer Analyst, Computer Programmer, Computer Operations Manager, Data Management Analyst, Database Assistant, Developer Support Engineer, Games Programmer, Games Programmer (Engine design), Information Manager, IT Design, IT Systems Manager, IT Technician, IT user Support, Mobile Developer, Operations Director, Software Designer, Software Developer, Software Engineer, Solutions Developer, Systems Engineer, Technical Sales, Technical Specialist, Web Developer.

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The MSc Digital Architecture and Robotic Construction focuses on digital design methods and construction technologies in Architecture, Engineering and Design. Read more
The MSc Digital Architecture and Robotic Construction focuses on digital design methods and construction technologies in Architecture, Engineering and Design. It provides a scientific and practical foundation and gives an overview of latest developments in Advanced Modelling, Computational Design and Robotic Construction.

Digital technologies have altered the field of architecture and the architectural profession significantly – from design to production. In this context, the course combines the professional quality of an architectural qualification with the theory and practice behind the latest digital developments in the field.

You'll use computer-aided methods for design and study the construction and fabrication process in-depth. As part of the School of the Built Environment and Architecture, you'll work in a transdisciplinary environment where knowledge is shared. Architecture students are also able to work in our Architecture Design Studio, a dedicated studio space with views across the London landscape.

You'll be able to exploit LSBU's extensive industry connections during the course and your dissertation will be closely linked to practice. You'll be encouraged to work together with partners; an engineering company or another academic School within LSBU.

Visit the Digital Architecture and Robotics lab (DARLAB) website, where you can find more information about the facilities and the latest projects taking place

http://www.dar-lab.net/

Modules

Integrative technologies and robotic manufacturing
Advanced digital design techniques
Design project material behaviour
Design project adaptive systems and structures
Technology for building systems
Design research architectural project
Dissertation

Modules will be assessed by a mix of coursework and examinations.

Teaching and learning

The academic team are qualified experts from all over the world, with experience in working with avant-garde technologies to gain the best results in architecture and design. In addition, all are actively involved in research and consultancy, which enables staff to draw on the latest industry developments in both lectures and practical work. You'll enjoy guest lectures from world experts.

The course makes extensive use of DARLAB (Digital Architectural Robotics lab), a research platform in architectural education that advances experimentation and cross-discipline collaboration among professors, students and industry partners to expand the boundaries of architectural practice. The modules' contents are oriented toward integrated learning assignments. The course is delivered through lectures, seminars, projects and internships.

You'll be supported throughout your final project by your tutors and will have access to a range of e-learning materials.

Currently 50% of our full-time student cohort is from overseas. This allows our students to network across America, India, the Middle-East, Australia and Europe.

Placements

Staff use their professional connections to help students find work experience and job opportunities on graduation. All students will be involved in the construction of a large-scale pavilion in central London.

Professional links

The Digital Architecture and Robotics laboratory (DARLAB) partners with industry to provide solutions to their business problems and challenges that they currently face or expect to arise in the near future. We offer businesses a number of avenues for accessing our research expertise. We also undertake research projects for small and big businesses alike at competitive rates and where speed and confidentially are key requirements.

Partners Include:

• Hiteco: designers and manufacturers of high-tech machine components for machining wood, light alloys, plastic and composite materials.
• QDesign: a team of experts in engineering sciences. Their solutions offer a wide range of robotics plants applications and continuous software development.
• SCM Group: company world leader in the production of woodworking machinery and systems.
• CIMsystem: a leading provider of CAD/CAM technology and technological solutions with a worldwide technical and sales partner network.
• HAL: a Grasshopper plugin for industrial robots programming supporting ABB, KUKA and Universal Robots machines. Allows to simulate, program, control and monitor robotic cells.
• KUKA: pioneer in robotics and automation technology, one of the leading manufacturers of robotic systems worldwide.

Employability

The Master's program opens up various possibilities for professional development. You could go on to work in the area of architecture, building construction, engineering, interior or product design. You could also work as a specialist or consultant in the field of computational design and robotic construction.

The course could also lead on to a PhD or employment in engineering research.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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