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MRes instead of MSc


User: Eagerbeaver - 16 February 2022 16:51

Will employers accept a MRes instead of a MSc if they require a MSc for the job? The MRes I'm interested in is exactly the same as a taught MSc (it has taught parts and a dissertation etc). Don't want to say what subject as I don't want to be too specific.

The jobs I'm interested in usually ask for a MSc or PhD.

User: eng77 - 18 February 2022 10:24

Quote From Eagerbeaver:
Will employers accept a MRes instead of a MSc if they require a MSc for the job? The MRes I'm interested in is exactly the same as a taught MSc (it has taught parts and a dissertation etc). Don't want to say what subject as I don't want to be too specific.

The jobs I'm interested in usually ask for a MSc or PhD.
Hi. I am an MRes holder. The main advantage of MRes is that it gives more practical and research experience. The degree is a Master degree after all same as MSc. But if you want my opinion, it has a downside if there are no taught modules as employees would like to see transcripts and grades. It is also not very well known outside the UK. You need sometimes to explain what MRes is. Also make sure you have enough fund or self fund because it might take longer than MSc.

User: Eagerbeaver - 18 February 2022 10:47

Quote From eng77:
. I am an MRes holder. The main advantage of MRes is that it gives more practical and research experience. The degree is a Master degree after all same as MSc. But if you want my opinion, it has a downside if there are no taught modules as employees would like to see transcripts and grades. It is also not very well known outside the UK. You need sometimes to explain what MRes is. Also make sure you have enough fund or self fund because it might take longer than MSc.

Thanks for your reply. It was helpful. The MRes I'm interested in has taught modules. In fact it is exactly the same as a MSc but they decided to call it MRes. The only difference between it and the MSc is what is taught is more advanced.

User: jequestrian - 22 February 2022 12:49

I have an MSc by Research (basically an Mres, but without any taught modules). I find it has pros and cons. I am applying for PhDs, so this may not be relevant if you want to go into industry. My MSc by Res 100% helped me gain my research assistant post as it proved I could complete research, lab work etc. It is probably also beneficial for my PhD applications - however, it wasn't graded. It was pass/fail, and I believe that is holding me back somewhat as I can't say I was awarded a percentage grade. If yours has taught modules, then this may not be the case for you?

Perhaps email the companies you would like to work for to ask their advice?

User: eng77 - 23 February 2022 07:28

Quote From jequestrian:
I have an MSc by Research (basically an Mres, but without any taught modules). I find it has pros and cons. I am applying for PhDs, so this may not be relevant if you want to go into industry. My MSc by Res 100% helped me gain my research assistant post as it proved I could complete research, lab work etc. It is probably also beneficial for my PhD applications - however, it wasn't graded. It was pass/fail, and I believe that is holding me back somewhat as I can't say I was awarded a percentage grade. If yours has taught modules, then this may not be the case for you?

Perhaps email the companies you would like to work for to ask their advice?
You have said all what I feel about Msc by research, both pros and cons. Well said.