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MA in Anthropology


Course Description

The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
To this end, the department of anthropology at Binghamton University offers students training in the four traditional subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and social/cultural anthropology, while encouraging students to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
Recent doctoral graduates are employed in positions at the New York State Department of Health, the National Geographic Society, Museum of International Folk Art, Purdue University, and the University of Tennessee.

Anthropology seeks to understand the nature and origins of human biological variability, cultural diversity and social formations through systematic exploration, scientific examination and the application of theory to human populations and their artifacts, including their social configurations, past and present.
Although anthropology has historically been most successful in the analysis of small sociocultural systems, its current challenge is to situate the direct objects of study in their global contexts in both space and time. The discipline draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
While training in the traditional four subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and social/cultural anthropology are offered in the department at Binghamton, students are encouraged to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
A central objective of graduate training in anthropology is the ability to develop an original research design and to communicate the research findings in a research paper, thesis or dissertation of publishable quality. All recipients of graduate degrees submit and defend formal, written demonstration of their ability to apply appropriate analysis to an original research project, except for the MS degree for which an oral demonstration of ability is required.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

Visit the MA in Anthropology page on the Binghamton University website for more details!

(Student Profile)

April Beisaw, PhD '07

4935.JPG Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Vassar College
Archaeologist

•Was a Scholar in Residence with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, summer 2008.
•Was a visiting assistant professor, then tenure-track assistant professor of anthropology at Heidelberg College (now University) from 2008 to 2011.
•Received the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association Gordon Willey Prize in 2011, for an article published in American Anthropologist.

Accepted a position as assistant professor of anthropology at Vassar College in January 2012.

(Student Profile)

James Hundley

4940.jpg PhD student - Sociocultural Anthropologist
Year admitted: 2010
Advisor: Thomas M. Wilson

Research Interests

James Hundley's research examines the Canada/US border, post-9/11 border securitization, and how transnational governance is emerging as a way of mitigating problems experienced by the Coast Salish indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. He also examines how the Pacific Northwest Economic Region, a bi-national public/private partnership, is similarly exploring transnational opportunities in the region. The varied strategies employed demonstrate the changing nature of sovereignty and ethnicity as diverse groups respond to the state and security policy in different ways. He is currently in the field (2014-2015).

Selected Conference presentations


2013 Graduate Engaged Research Conference, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
Participatory Action Research and the Whatcom Transportation Authority: A Case Study of a Failed Project

2012 American Anthropological Association Meetings, San Francisco, California, USA
The "Anticipated" versus the "Actual" Impacts of the Western Hemisphere, Travel Initiative on Coast Salish Communities

2012 Security's Impact on Border Policies, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Security, Sovereignty and North American Regionalism: Lessons from the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative

2008 Northwest Anthropological Conference, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Anticipated Impacts of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative on Coast Salish Communities

Grants and awards

Whatcom Museum Foundation Research Grant
Canadian Studies Doctoral Student Research Award Program
Border Policy Research Institute Thesis Fellowship

(Student Profile)

Claire J. Brown

4941.jpg PhD student - Sociocultural Anthropologist
Year admitted: 2011
Advisor: Thomas Wilson

Research Interests

My research studies the social and economic centrality of the Connemara pony in western Irish society, and the ways in which the pony influences social networks on a regional and international level. I analyze the changing nature of the pony in a localized context, and how this can be writ large as a symbol of the negotiation of Irish identity in both national and international realms. On a more general level, I am interested in human-animal interaction, and how human relationships with animals define social relationships and our understanding of nature and culture.

I am also involved in an ongoing archaeological field project entitled, "The Cultural Landscapes of the Irish Coast", headed by Dr. Ian Kuijt of the Anthropology Department at the University of Notre Dame. This project combines multiple archaeological techniques as well as cultural
investigations to provide a holistic understanding of life in the coastal Connemara region of Ireland.

Grants and Awards

2012 Binghamton University Department of Anthropology Summer Research Stipend.

2011 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Project Title: Globalization of the Local: The Connemara Pony as a Symbol of Irish Identity Negotiation. Three-year supported fellowship.

Publications

2015 "From Working to Winning: The Shifting Symbolic Value of Connemara Ponies in the West of Ireland." [Claire J. Brown] In The Meaning of Horses: Biosocial Encounters, Dona Lee Davis and Anita Maurstad, editors. London: Routledge Publishing Company.

2015 "Vectors of Improvement: The Archaeological Footprint of 19th and 20th century Irish National Policy, Inishark, Co. Galway, Ireland." [Ian Kuijt, Meagan Conway, Katie Shakour, Casey McNeill and Claire Brown] International Journal of Historical Archaeology 19(1): 122-158.

2009 "A New Generation." [Carolyn Nordstrom; including excerpt by Claire Brown] Notre Dame Magazine Winter 2008-2009 37(4): 25.

Conference presentations

2015 Into the Field: A Multispecies Examination of Connemara Ponies in Western Ireland. Oral paper presentation at the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth Annual Meeting. University of Exeter, United Kingdom. April 13-16, 2015.

2015 Breeding Heritage: Intersections of Tradition and Modernity in the Connemara Pony Industry. Oral paper presentation at the Anthropological Association of Ireland Annual Meeting. University College Cork, Ireland. March 6-7, 2015.

2013 Hoofed Commodities: The Value of the Connemara Pony in Irish Economies. Oral paper presentation at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL. November 20-24, 2013.

(Student Profile)

Kaitlyn Elise Bower

4942.jpg MA/PhD student - Biological Anthropologist
Year admitted: MS (2012), MA/PhD (2014)
Advisor: Michael A. Little

Research Interests

My research interests mainly deal with the effects of modernization on health in regards to chronic and infectious disease burdens as well as growth and development, especially in regards to maternal and childhood health. I also have an interest in evolutionary medicine and approaches to health. I am currently involved with ongoing research on the Vanuatu Health Transitions Project and the Lyme and Other Tick-Borne Disease Project.

Conference Presentations

K Bower, A Pomer, KM Olszowy, C Sun, G Lee, CW Chan, H Silverman, KN Dancause, L Tarivonda, G Taleo, M Abong, R Regenvanu, A Kaneko, C Weitz, JK Lum, RM Garruto. 2015. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and its relationship with muscle and fat composition in Vanuatu. Fortieth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, St. Louis, Missouri, March 25-26.

K Bower, A Roome, KM Olszowy, D Ngwele, L Tarivonda, JK Lum, KN Dancause, RM Garruto. 2014. Evaluating obesity using waist to height ratio as a predictor of cardiometabolic disease risk in adult Melanesians in Vanuatu. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 260-261; also in Abstracts from the 2014 Binghamton University Research Days, March 28.

A Roome, K Bower, CG Murnock, L Hill, B Ho, S Tyurin, V Al-Feghali, H Zeitz , D Rios, R Parwez, I Li, A Leighton, K Lupo, Y Hao, C Pabafikos, J Goodsell, N Scher, S Daivs, T Lamendola, R Singh, J Ma, N DeLeon, JM Darcy II, R Spathis, RM Garruto. 2014. Prevalence of tick-borne pathogens and human behavioral risk factors in built environments of upstate New York suggest a necessity for the development of risk management models. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 279.

KM Olszowy, A Roome, K Bower, D Ngwele, L Tarivonda, JK Lum, KN Dancause, RM Garruto. 2014. Understanding the impact of maternal obesity on childhood nutritional status in an urban Ni-Vanuatu community. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 276.

(Student Profile)

Sarah Cunningham

4943.jpg PhD student - Biological Anthropologist
Year Admitted: 2010
Advisor: Koji Lum

I am a biological anthropology PhD student with interests in molecular anthropology, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology, taphonomy/bone preservation, non-metric skeletal trait variation, skeletal change due to secular change and admixture, pathology, archaeology of the Southeastern US, societal collapse, and genocide studies. My current research focus is studying microbacteria community succession within a postmortem setting to determine time since death.

Publications

Ross, A.H. and Cunningham, S.L. 2011. Time-since-death and bone weathering in a tropical environment. Forensic Science International. Vol. 204 (1): 126-133.

Cunningham, S.L.; Kirkland, S.; and Ross, A. "Bone Weathering of Juvenile-Sized Remains in the North Carolina Piedmont". The Juvenile Skeleton in Forensic Abuse Investigations, eds. Ann H. Ross and Suzanne M. Abel. 2011.

Reiber, E. and Cunningham, S.L. "Absorbed Residue Analysis from the George Reeves site (11S650), an Emergent Mississippian blufftop settlement". Hanneke Hoeffman-Sites and Maria Raviele edited volume (in press).

Conference Presentations

2010 Bone weathering of child sized remains in the central Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA. 5th Annual One-Day Symposium for the Forensic Anthropology Society of Europe, Copenhagen, Denmark (with S. Kirkland and A. Ross).

2010 Septal Aperture Rates Among the Pee Dee of Town Creek Mound, Mt. Gilead, North Carolina. 37th Annual Paleopathology Association Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

2009 Bone Weathering in the North Carolina Piedmont: Pigs as Proxies for Human Juvenile Remains. The 2nd Annual NCSU Forensic Science Symposium, NC State, Raleigh, NC and the 6th Annual North Carolina State University Graduate Research Symposium, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with A. Ross).

2009 Determining Row vs. Ray Development through Adult Hand Correlation. The 5th Annual North Carolina State University Graduate Research Symposium, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland).

Outreach Presentations

2010 “Introduction to Forensic Anthropology”. Discovery and Recovery: Death in Natural Environments crime scene investigation workshop, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland, A. Humphries, and J. Stone)

2010 “Introduction to Forensic Anthropology”. North Carolina Central University Law School visitation program, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland, A. Offenbecker)

2009 “An Introduction to the Human Skeleton and Physical Anthropology”. Creating Awareness of Agriculture and Life Science Disciplines, Discoveries and Degrees (CAALS3D) North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics visitation program, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland)

Fieldwork

Summer 2009 Lopburi, Thailand (biological archaeology field work)

(Student Profile)

Zachary R. Critchley

4944.jpg PhD student - Archaeologist
Year admitted: 2014
Advisor: Dr. William H. Isbell

Research Interests
I am an archaeologist focusing on the Andes, though I still haven't decided my favorite area. I'm quite interested in spear-throwers and am currently working on a project on the symbolic significance of spear-throwers as expressed in Andean iconography. I'm also interested in constructions of space, expressions of power through architecture and access, and craft production.

Publications & Presentations

2015 Explorations of Public Space at the Site of Panquilma. Paper presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, CA

2014 Excavations in the Public Sector During the 2013 Season at the Site of Panquilma. Paper presented at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX

2013 Textile Production and Distribution at Panquilma. Paper presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Honolulu, HI

2013b Aztecs and Their Ancestors, Spring 2013.
Department of Anthropology, Franklin & Marshall College.
Invited guest lecture: “Aztec Warfare” and Atlatl Demonstration

2012 Selling the Past. In The Kituhwan. Edited by Sarah Mills. Student publication, Franklin & Marshall College

(Student Profile)

Hunter Claypatch

4945.jpg MA/PhD student - Archaeologist
Year admitted: 2016
Advisor: Dr. Randy McGuire

Research Interests

My research interests focus on prehistoric ceramic production, and settlement patterns, in the region now encompassing the US/Mexico borderlands (specifically that of northern Sonora and Chihuahua). I have spent the past several years working as a field archaeologist in the southwest United States and have presented on ceramic assemblages of both the upper San Juan and middle Rio Grande.

I also have an interest in 19th century sporting communities of the United States and Great Britain, and have extensively researched American bare-knuckle boxing of the mid-1800s.

Conference Poster/Presentations

2016 Analysis of a late Developmental to Coalition Period ceramic assemblage in Bernalillo County, New Mexico (LA 151618). Poster presented at the Pecos Conference, Alpine, Arizona (with C. Dean Wilson).

2016 Preliminary analysis of brown ware pottery from the Dillard site (5MT10647). Poster presented at the 2nd Biennial Navajo Nation Archaeology Meeting, Shiprock, New Mexico (with Kari Schleher).

2015 Brown Ware Pottery during the Basketmaker III period: Preliminary results from the Dillard site (5MT10647). Poster presented at the Pecos Conference, Mancos, Colorado (with Kari Schleher).

2011 Obsidian Trade and the formation of figurine continuity between Crete and the Cyclades during the Late Neolithic to Early Bronze Age. Paper presented at the 25th National Conference on Undergraduate Research, Ithaca, New York.


(Scholarship)

Clifford D. Clark Diversity Fellowship for Graduate Students - No. of awards TBC

The Clifford D. Clark Diversity Fellowships for Graduate Students, named for Clifford D. Clark, a former president of the University, are designed to support students who contribute to the diversity of the student body. The Clark Fellowship funding package, which is awarded on the basis of academic merit, includes an academic-year stipend, full-tuition scholarship, health insurance, research and travel opportunities and other benefits. Clark Fellows are guaranteed to receive support for a specific period, assuming satisfactory academic progress.

Value of Scholarship(s)

Various

Eligibility

Candidates must:
-Be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents;
-Be newly admitted to a graduate program; and
-Demonstrate how they will contribute to the diversity of the student body in their program.

Application Procedure

To apply, answer "yes" to the Clark Fellowship question on the graduate degree program application and submit the Clark Fellowship Essay.

Further Information

http://binghamton.edu/grad-school/cost-aid-funding/financial-support/clifford-clark-fellowship.html


(Scholarship)

Richard T. Antoun Graduate Fellowship in Anthropology - No. of awards TBC

The Richard Antoun Graduate Fellowship in Anthropology, named for a former professor (1970-2009) of sociocultural anthropology at Binghamton University, is awarded annually based on merit and is designed to support doctoral students in anthropology, preferably in sociocultural anthropology. The Antoun Fellowship funding package includes a stipend, full-tuition scholarship and health insurance.

Value of Scholarship(s)

Various

Eligibility

Candidates for the Antoun Fellowship must be:
-Admitted to the anthropology doctoral program
-Eligible for funding by the standard criteria of the Graduate School
-Making excellent and timely progress toward degree completion

Application Procedure

To apply, complete and submit either of the following documents by the Department of Anthropology deadline:
-Research Fellowship Application and Plan OR
-Dissertation Fellowship Application and Plan

Further Information

http://binghamton.edu/grad-school/cost-aid-funding/financial-support/assistantships-fellowships.html#anthropology-antoun


(Scholarship)

Elizabeth A. Knapp Scholarship for Adult Women - No. of awards TBC

Established in 1985 by colleagues of Elizabeth A. Knapp to honor her 19 years of service to the University, this scholarship assists non-traditional female students with demonstrated financial need who have experienced delays pursuing their education.

Value of Scholarship(s)

Various

Eligibility

The scholarship is awarded to women at least 25 years of age who are admitted to or currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program, with planned enrollment of at least 6 credits per semester.

Application Procedure

To apply or for more information, see the Elizabeth Knapp Scholarship webpage.

Further Information

http://binghamton.edu/financial-aid/scholarship_pages/elizabeth_knapp_scholarship.html


(Scholarship)

University Women Female Graduate Student Scholarship - No. of awards TBC

Other criteria considered include overall financial need; a recent or current demonstrated commitment to community service; and a clear vision of intended career goals. The scholarship is renewable if the recipient continues to meet the criteria.

Value of Scholarship(s)

Various

Eligibility

Established in 2003 by the University Women's Club, this scholarship is awarded annually to a full-time, second-year female graduate student who demonstrates academic merit and a GPA of at least 3.7.

Application Procedure

To apply, complete and submit the University Women Female Graduate Student Scholarship Application form.

Further Information

http://binghamton.edu/grad-school/cost-aid-funding/financial-support/assistantships-fellowships.html#university-women



Entry Requirements

A bachelor's degree or its equivalent from a nationally or regionally accredited college or university; AND Complete set of your undergraduate and graduate transcripts. At minimum, a 3.0 GPA is required.

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Recipient: Binghamton University

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