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Full Time Masters Degrees in Economics, York, United Kingdom

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Join a programme with a long-standing international reputation for excellence. At York we are proud of the impact and influence of our economics research in society and our contribution to scholarship. Read more
Join a programme with a long-standing international reputation for excellence.

Overview

At York we are proud of the impact and influence of our economics research in society and our contribution to scholarship. You'll join a course which, for the last 30 years, has constantly received the highest accreditation from the Economic and Social Research Council.

The MSc in Economics emphasises problem-solving and practice in economic theory, applied economics and econometrics. You'll have opportunities to study areas of application at the frontiers of economics such as experimental economics, regulatory policy, industrial organisation, intertemporal and international macroeconomics, financial markets, and labour economics.

Students who have a Bachelor degree in Economics with a very high average mark and a research proposal of outstanding quality may wish to enrol for the 1+3 PhD. This gives you the chance to first study for a masters (Year 0) then a PhD in Economics in Years 1, 2 and 3.

Course Content

The MSc in Economics will give you graduate-level skills in economic analysis and relevant quantitative techniques. A sound training in best practice methods of mainstream economics, combined with the opportunities of studying optional areas in depth, will allow you to reach your full potential.

Taught by leading experts, you will complete modules to the value of 180 credits. These include 100 credits of taught modules - some core and some optional - and an 80 credit dissertation.

Modules
For the Masters you will need to take 100 credits of taught modules. There are five compulsory core modules which amount to 70 of your 100 required credits:
-Advanced Microeconomics (20 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Advanced Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Project (10 credits)

Either Econometrics 1 & 2 or Econometric Methods for Research or Econometrics 1 and Applied Microeconometrics (20 credits)
In addition you'll choose 30 credits of options from:
-Applied Microeconometrics
-Design and Analysis of Mechanisms and Institutions
-Development Economics: Theory and Evidence
-Emerging Market Macroeconomics
-Experimental Economics
-Financial Markets
-Financial Risk Management
-Industrial Economics
-Labour Economics
-Public Finance
-Public Sector Economics: Microeconomic Applications
-Theory of Finance
-Time Series

You'll complete a piece of independent research carried out over three months of the summer, guided by a supervisor. The dissertation, of up to 10,000 words, is worth 80 credits and offers you the chance to examine a topic in depth and to develop your academic research skills.

The Department of Economics and Related Studies is one of the largest economics departments in the UK. It is ranked in the Top 10 in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework for 'research power' and for the impact of our research on wider society.

Since its foundation, members of the Department have made pioneering contributions in areas including economic theory, econometrics, finance and macroeconomics. York is one of only three UK institutions to receive five stars from the Centre of Higher Education Development for postgraduate economics.

Careers

The MSc in Economics will act as a springboard to a wide variety of careers, as employers will highly value your analytical problem-solving abilities, as well as your research and communication skills. The Masters is also an ideal basis for progression to a PhD.

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This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Gain a thorough grounding in applied and theoretical econometrics. The public and private sectors are gaining an increasing awareness of the value of quantitative skills to assess and use evidence from large amounts of data, making econometricians highly sought after. Read more
Gain a thorough grounding in applied and theoretical econometrics.

Overview

The public and private sectors are gaining an increasing awareness of the value of quantitative skills to assess and use evidence from large amounts of data, making econometricians highly sought after. Our MSc in Econometrics and Economics will provide you with the essential skills that you need to follow a professional career, or to pursue further research, in applied and theoretical econometrics. The Masters is aimed at those with a prior knowledge of economics and econometrics, and/or mathematics and statistics.

You'll follow a core course in advanced economic and econometric theory. The modules are taught by world-leading experts in areas of economic theory, microeconometrics, panel data analysis, time series, spatial econometrics and nonparametric methods. Applied econometrics modules will equip you with state-of-the-art data analysis skills. You'll also develop your skills in analysing economic and financial data, and using econometric software widely employed by the leading researchers in the world.

Course Content

To achieve an MSc in Econometrics and Economics you'll complete modules to the value of 180 credits. This includes 90 credits from the core taught modules, 10 credits from the optional taught modules, and an 80 credit dissertation.

Modules
For the Masters you will need to take 100 credits of taught modules. There are seven compulsory core modules which amount to 90 of these credits:
-Advanced Microeconomics (20 credits)
-Advanced Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Econometric Methods for Research (20 credits)
-Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)
-Time Series (10 credits)
-Either Project or Topics in Financial Econometrics (10 credits)

In addition, you'll choose one 10 credit option from:
-Design and Analysis of Mechanisms and Institutions (10 credits)
-Development Economics: Theory and Evidence (10 credits)
-Emerging Market Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Experimental Economics (10 credits)
-Industrial Economics (10 credits)
-Labour Economics (10 credits)
-Project (10 credits)
-Public Finance (10 credits)
-Public Sector Economics: Microeconomic Applications (10 credits)
-Topics in Financial Econometrics (10 credits)

You'll complete a piece of independent research carried out over three months of the summer, guided by a supervisor. The dissertation, of up to 10,000 words, is worth 80 credits and offers you the chance to examine a topic in depth and to develop your academic research skills.

The Department of Economics and Related Studies was ranked eighth in the UK for the impact of its research in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Since its foundation, members of the Department have made pioneering contributions in econometrics, as well as in public economics, health economics, macroeconomics and finance, experimental economics, economic theory, and economic history. York is one of only three UK institutions to receive five stars from the Centre of Higher Education Development for postgraduate economics.

Careers

The Masters will act as a springboard to a professional career in applied economics and econometrics. It is also an ideal preparation for a PhD. Research shows that around 80 per cent of our department's MSc graduates go on to economics related careers.

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Gain a thorough foundation in the tools required to analyse aspects of public policy. York enjoys a prominent international reputation in public economics and in the use of economics in the design of social policy. Read more
Gain a thorough foundation in the tools required to analyse aspects of public policy.

Overview

York enjoys a prominent international reputation in public economics and in the use of economics in the design of social policy. If you already work in the public sector, the NHS or for an international agency, the MSc in Economics and Public Policy will help you upgrade your existing skills. You'll gain more exposure to up-to-date techniques and knowledge relevant to policy analysis in social and other public policy areas, and to public sector administration and financial management.

If you have completed a degree in economics, the Masters will allow you to build on this by gaining further knowledge and expertise in more specialised areas, such as health economics, social policy analysis and public finance.

The programme is also suitable for those with a background in disciplines such as government, sociology, mathematics or natural sciences, who wish to develop their abilities in economics and related areas, particularly economic and social policy, administration and management. If you don't have a strong background in economics, but have other relevant qualifications or experience, you can take a Summer Session course in Economics and Quantitative Methods.

Course Content

The MSc in Economics and Public Policy will offer you a thorough training in core areas of economics used in the evaluation of public policy. Taught by leading experts, you'll complete modules to the value of 180 credits. This includes 100 credits of taught modules - some core and some optional - and an 80 credit dissertation.

Modules
For the Masters you will take 100 credits of taught modules. There are five core modules which make up 80 of your 100 taught credits:
-Applied Microeconomics 1 and Applied Microeconomics 2 or Advanced Microeconomics (20 credits)
-Public Policy Analysis (20 credits)
-Econometrics 1 & 2 or Statistics and Econometrics or Econometric Methods for Research orEconometrics 1 and Applied Microeconometrics (20 credits)
-Public Finance (10 credits)
-Public Sector Economics (10 credits)

In addition you can choose 20 credits from:
-Advanced Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)
-Design and Analysis of Mechanisms and Institutions (10 credits)
-Evaluation of Health Policy (10 credits)
-Experimental Economics (10 credits)
-Health and Development (10 credits)
-Industrial Economics (10 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Labour Economics (10 credits)
-Project (10 credits)

You'll complete a piece of independent research carried out over three months of the summer, guided by a supervisor. The dissertation, of up to 10,000 words, is worth 80 credits and offers you the chance to examine a topic in depth and to develop your academic research skills.

Careers

The MSc in Economics and Public Policy will open up a broad range of career options in government, the public sector, health or public administration. It is an ideal basis for progression to a PhD.

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Gain a thorough grounding in theoretical and applied finance and economics. Globalisation means an ever-increasing demand for specialists in economics and finance. Read more
Gain a thorough grounding in theoretical and applied finance and economics.

Overview

Globalisation means an ever-increasing demand for specialists in economics and finance. This intellectually demanding course will provide you with the essential skills you need to follow professional careers in these areas or to pursue further research.

Aimed at students with a prior knowledge of economics, our MSc in Economics and Finance will give you a thorough grounding in theoretical and applied finance and economics. You'll join one of the largest and most successful economics departments in the country and be taught by highly qualified staff.

Course Content

On the Economics and Finance masters degree you'll follow five compulsory core components, in areas such as advanced macroeconomics and econometrics, theory of finance and econometrics. You’ll be able to supplement this with a wide choice of optional modules.

Taught by leading experts, you will complete modules to the value of 180 credits. This includes 100 credits of taught modules - some core and some optional - and an 80 credit dissertation.

Modules
For the Masters you will need to take 100 credits of taught modules. There are five compulsory core modules which amount to 80 of your 100 required credits:
-Advanced Microeconomics (20 credits)
-Advanced Macroeconomics or International Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Theory of Finance (20 credits)
-Financial Markets (10 credits)
-Econometrics 1 (10 credits) and Econometrics 2 (10 credits) or
-Econometric Methods for Research (20 credits) or
-Econometrics 1 (10 credits) and Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)

In addition, you can choose 20 credits of options from:
-Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)
-Corporate Finance (10 credits)
-Continuous-time Finance and Derivative Assets (10 credits)
-Design and Analysis of Mechanisms and Institutions (10 credits)
-Development and Finance (10 credits)
-Emerging Market Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Experimental Economics (10 credits)
-Financial Engineering (10 credits)
-Financial Market Microstructure (10 credits)
-Financial Risk Management (10 credits)
-Fixed Income Securities (10 credits)
-Investment and Portfolio Management (10 credits)
-Labour Economics (10 credits)
-Project (10 credits)
-Public Finance (10 credits)
-Public Sector Economics: Microeconomic Applications (10 credits)
-Time Series (10 credits)
-Topics in Financial Econometrics (10 credits)

You'll complete a piece of independent research carried out over three months of the summer, guided by a supervisor. The dissertation, of up to 10,000 words, is worth 80 credits and offers you the chance to examine a topic in depth and to develop your academic research skills.

Careers

The Economics and Finance masters degree will act as a springboard into a career in an area related to economics and finance. It is also an ideal preparation for a PhD. Around 80 per cent of MSc graduates from the department go on to economics related careers.

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Comprehensive training in the theory and practice of health economics. York pioneered study in 'health economics' and received the Queen's Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work at world-class level in this field in 2007. Read more
Comprehensive training in the theory and practice of health economics.

Overview

York pioneered study in 'health economics' and received the Queen's Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work at world-class level in this field in 2007. Studying for a Health Economics masters at York therefore means you'll be joining a programme with an international reputation for excellence.

The course will equip you with the experience and leading-edge skills you need for a career in research and health service decision-making. During your time at York, you'll have access to The Health Economics Resource Centre which provides a suite of rooms combining teaching materials, computing facilities and information resources.

Course Content

You'll study five compulsory core components, supplemented by a wide choice of optional units, to gain a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of health economics.

Taught by world-leading experts, you will complete modules to the value of 180 credits. This includes 100 credits of taught modules - some core and some optional - and an 80 credit dissertation.

Modules
For the Masters you will need to take 100 credits of taught modules. There are five core modules which amount to 90 of your 100 required credits:
-Evaluation of Health Care (20 credits)
-Health Economics (20 credits)
-Clinical Decision Analysis (10 credits)

One set from these choices:
-Econometrics 1 (10 credits) and Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)
-Econometrics 1 & 2 (20 credits)
-Statistics and Econometrics (20 credits)
-Econometric Methods for Research (20 credits)

One set from these choices:
-Advanced Microeconomics (20 credits)
-Applied Microeconomics 1 (10 credits) and Applied Microeconomics 2 (10 credits)

In addition you can choose one 10 credit option from:
-Advanced Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)
-Design and Alalysis of Mechanisms and Institutions (10 credits)
-Evaluation of Health Policy (10 credits)
-Experimental Economics (10 credits)
-Health and Development (10 credits)
-Industrial Economics (10 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Labour Economics (10 credits)
-Management Decision Analysis (10 credits)
-Public Finance (10 credits)
-Public Sector Economics: Microeconomic Applications (10 credit)

Over the three months of summer, you'll complete a piece of independent research, guided by a supervisor. The 10,000 word dissertation is worth 80 credits and offers you the chance to examine a topic in depth and to develop your academic research skills.

Most students on the MSc in Health Economics choose to do a summer placement under the supervision of an experienced health economist. These differ from the standard dissertation as the placement supervisor suggests the research topic. A list of topics is circulated in the middle of the Spring term and you are allocated to your preferred placement before the Easter vacation.

The summer placements involve many different institutions including academic research units, the NHS and pharmaceutical companies. Most students are based in UK but in recent years placements have taken students to Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Finland, France, Greece, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, Vietnam and the USA.

While you shouldn't try to organise your own placement, suggestions for topics and host institutions are always welcome. These should be given to your course director.

Careers

This course is ideal for people who want to work in research and health service decision-making. Potential employers will value the experience you'll gain on your summer placement. The MSc is also an ideal basis for progression to a PhD.

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Explore best practice methods in development economics with special emphasis on emerging market economies. Our intellectually-challenging MSc in Development Economics and Emerging Markets will equip you with the skills crucial to your interests and career ambitions in development economics. Read more
Explore best practice methods in development economics with special emphasis on emerging market economies.

Overview

Our intellectually-challenging MSc in Development Economics and Emerging Markets will equip you with the skills crucial to your interests and career ambitions in development economics. You'll join a vibrant programme which provides a structured transition to independent research.

Taught by leading researchers in the field, you'll gain a sound training in best practice methods of theory and applications in development economics with special emphasis on emerging market economies. You'll also have the opportunity to follow specialist pathways in, for example, finance and health.

The Department of Economics and Related Studies is one of the largest economics departments in the UK. It is ranked in the top 10 in the UK and top 100 in the world based on reputation and research citations.

Since its foundation, members of the Department have made pioneering contributions in areas including economic theory, econometrics, finance and macroeconomics. York is one of only three UK institutions to receive five stars from the Centre of Higher Education Development for postgraduate economics.

Course Content

During your time at York, you'll learn to problem-solve and apply economics to development contexts. You'll study five compulsory core components, supplemented by a wide choice of optional units. The flexible course structure means you can follow specific pathways, for example, in finance and health. As well as taught modules you'll also complete a dissertation.

Careers

The Masters degree provides the essential research training you'll need for a career in economics and development. It is an ideal basis for a career in a government or non-government organisation at the international and national level, or for progression to a PhD.

Career opportunities
You'll gain the skills you need to work in a variety of organisations:
-Universities
-International financial institutions (eg World Bank, IMF, UN organisations)
-Government organisations (eg the UK's Department for International Development)
-NGO sector
-Consultancies

Transferable skills
You'll develop a range of transferable skills during the course, including:
-Independent working
-Time management and people skills
-Communicating research
-Performing statistical analysis
-Analytical and technical research skills

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University of York Environment Department
Distance from York: 0 miles
Explore sustainable solutions for environmental problems. You'll develop the skills needed by today's environmental managers, policymakers and scientists to tackle environmental issues at local, regional and global levels. Read more
Explore sustainable solutions for environmental problems.

Overview

You'll develop the skills needed by today's environmental managers, policymakers and scientists to tackle environmental issues at local, regional and global levels. You'll be prepared for a wide range of careers across the public and private sectors. This Masters also provides a good basis for further study at PhD level.

The core modules will provide you with knowledge in Environmental Economics and a appreciation of the challenges to which economic analysis can be applied. You'll also be equipped to incorporate environmental feedback into economic decision making in a way that satisfies both ecological managers and economists.

This Masters is suitable for students from a wide range of backgrounds, including economics, human geography, business, sociology, politics, environmental science and more. You'll be taught by a range of interdisciplinary staff with varied Environmental research interests.

Course Content

You'll learn about the economics and management of natural resources and develop your critical and analytical skills in these areas. You'll gain both theoretical and practical experience of issues in environmental economics and management. You will be trained in suitable research methods and relevant ethical and legal issues. You'll develop your research skills and experience through completing a large research project.

For the Masters you will need to take a 100 credits of taught modules. There are four core modules, which amount to 50 of your 100 required credits:
-Current Research in Environment, Economics and Ecology (10 credits)
-Applied Environmental Economics (10 credits)
-Biodiversity Conservation and Protected Areas (10 credits)
-Research Skills and Statistical Methods (20 credits)

You'll also choose 50 credits from a range of optional modules:
-Business and Environment (10 credits)
-Development Economics (20 credits)
-Economics for Natural Resources and Environmental Management (20 credits)
-Environmental Governance (10 credits)
-Environmental Impact Assessment (10 credits)
-Spatial Analysis (10 credits)

You'll also complete a 8,000 word dissertation, worth 80 credits, as part of the MSc. Staff will suggest a range of possible subjects and titles, but you can also devise your own dissertation title. You'll have a dissertation supervisor who will provide regular guidance and will be able to comment on your first draft of the dissertation.

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge you will need to follow a career in an environmental organisation in both the public and private sectors. The Masters in Environmental Economics and Environmental Management also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD.

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Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research. Read more
Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research.

The flexible structure of this course means it is suitable for a wide range of students with interests in politics and economics.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take one of two 20 credit international political economy modules: either 'Critical Theories of International Political Economy', or 'Contemporary Issues in International Political Economy'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics or Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Economy prepares you for many careers in economics and politics, ranging from finance to international organisations and development. It also provides training for doctoral research in politics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Read more
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Building on the range of staff at the University with interests in the area, it covers both the political and economic dimensions of international development, and gives you a foundation in economics. It also provides essential research training in the Social Sciences.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take the 'Theories and Policies of Development Governance' module in your first term, followed by one of three development modules in your second term: 'Development and Conflict', 'Politics of International Trade and Development', or 'Development Economics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics or Politics departments, with at least 20 credits being from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Politics and Development prepares you for careers in public life and development, including careers in international organisations, politics and research.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. Read more
This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. The course provides you with a foundation in economics and research skills, and offers a wide range of philosophy and politics option modules.

Course Content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. You will also take a core 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' module, which prepares you for undertaking research, covering areas such as formulation of research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 80 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by Politics, Economics, Philosophy or PEP. These will include at least 20 credits from Politics and 20 credits from Philosophy.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour work week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer term and vacation working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

Career pathways for MA in PPE graduates are hugely varied, and have included accounting, the civil service, finance, international development, journalism, law, politics and research. The international dimension of the course allows students to pursue job opportunities both in the UK and abroad.

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The Department of Economics at the University of York is one of the largest and most research active Economics Departments in the UK. Read more
The Department of Economics at the University of York is one of the largest and most research active Economics Departments in the UK. It offers a vibrant PhD programme in Economics with, in 2013/14, some 50 students enrolled on the programme from 25 different countries.

For more information about this course, please view this web-page: https://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/research-degrees/msc-research/

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