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Masters Degrees in International Economics, USA

We have 5 Masters Degrees in International Economics, USA

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The rapid pace of globalization has increased the demand for professionals with training in international economics and economic development. Read more
The rapid pace of globalization has increased the demand for professionals with training in international economics and economic development. Our one of a kind Master's in International and Development Economics (IDEC) provides students with the knowledge and skills to understand how market forces can be harnessed to empower developing countries to break from cycles of poverty.

International Fieldwork

During the summer, you’ll form a small group with fellow students to collect primary data and access secondary data as part of an internship or partnership with an international institution. Your research will be the basis for your master’s thesis, which you’ll develop under your adviser’s supervision.

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The. University of Maryland School of Public Policy. will offer a for-credit international graduate course on understanding and synthesizing evidence-based research in Summer 2018. Read more

The University of Maryland School of Public Policy will offer a for-credit international graduate course on understanding and synthesizing evidence-based research in Summer 2018. (This course will also be offered in Summer 2019.)

Classes will be held in Paris, France from June 4-15, 2018, with some assignments being due before and after the two weeks in Paris.

With the assistance of the Economics Department at Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), this study abroad course is designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students studying public policy, public administration, and related subjects such as education, governance, international development, political science, public health, social welfare, sociology, and urban planning.

Faculty

  • Douglas J. Besharov, University of Maryland, College Park (Program Director);
  • Douglas M. Call, University of Maryland, College Park;
  • Neil Gilbert, University of California, Berkeley;
  • David Myers, President and CEO, American Institutes for Research;
  • Anu Rangarajan, Senior Vice President and Managing Director, International Research Division, Mathematica Policy Research;
  • Stefano Scarpetta, Director of Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, OECD.

Course Summary

This course is designed to help students understand and synthesize policy-oriented, evidence-based research in a real-world setting. The course will cover project planning; conducting the literature review (such as the development and implementation of the search strategy and the use of EndNote Web to manage references); interpreting evidence (and evaluating causal claims); synthesizing the available research; drawing conclusions (based on the research and theory); and communicating those conclusions to policy makers, advocates, and the public.

Students will prepare either a structured literature review, research synthesis, or policy analysis for the OECD or a similar agency or organization located in or near Paris. The students will work with their clients while in Paris, but they will plan their projects with their clients beforehand and complete their project after leaving Paris.

The research topics will be initially identified by the client and the UMD faculty, with the final details to be worked out between the client and the student. Possible policy areas include aging and pensions, child welfare, criminal justice, education, employment and the labor market, families and children, health, housing, migration, social welfare, and, perhaps, the environment.

Prior to arriving in Paris, students will be matched to clients and will work with them to create an initial project description, which will include a delineation of the policy question to be addressed and the scope of research to be conducted. While in Paris, besides attending classes, students will prepare and present project plans to their clients (and others) and make site visits to international organizations that conduct similar policy-oriented research. After leaving Paris, students will complete their projects, interacting with their clients as needed. Final projects will be due about two months after leaving Paris.

A preliminary syllabus will be available on the course web page.

(Classes will be in English.)

Course Schedule and Facilities

Prior to their arrival in Paris, students will be matched to clients and there will be a preliminary online meeting to discuss the course syllabus. In Paris, the course will meet daily (tentatively 9:30-13:00) Monday–Friday for two weeks from June 4 through June 15, 2018 on the campus of the Economics Department at Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, which is located in the heart of the Latin Quarter. As mentioned above, final projects will be due about two months after students leave Paris.



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USF’s Master’s in International Studies is a three-semester program, which provides students with in-depth, interdisciplinary knowledge of the issues and challenges that face the global community. Read more

USF’s Master’s in International Studies is a three-semester program, which provides students with in-depth, interdisciplinary knowledge of the issues and challenges that face the global community. Our curriculum focuses on development and the environment, political and economic aspects of globalization, human rights, peace and conflict resolution, and international law and organizations.

Our students arrive on campus from all over the world, representing different ethnic and cultural backgrounds. That diversity makes our classrooms rich and dynamic, with perspectives and experiences that cross generations and borders. Our students graduate with the skills needed for a variety of areas, including international and governmental affairs, advocacy work, policy and project development, foreign service, international non-governmental organizations, international development and further graduate study.

You can find more information on our website

Internships

Our internship program provides an opportunity for students to gain practical professional work experience by working at one of the many international studies-related organizations in the San Francisco Bay Area and around the world. Our students have completed internships across five continents.

The San Francisco Advantage

San Francisco is a vibrant, intellectual, global environment, and our campus is uniquely situated in the middle of it all. MAIS students take advantage of our location through internships, volunteering, and attending talks and activities at the World Affairs Council, the Commonwealth Club, and nearby academic institutions.

Our Faculty

Our professors are not only scholars, they've also held leadership positions in governmental and non-governmental agencies. They’re activists in fields such as development, regional conflicts, refugees, law, human rights, environmental protection, and indigenous rights.



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Graduate students at. The New School for Social Research. ask the kind of questions that challenge the status quo across the social sciences and humanities. Read more

Graduate students at The New School for Social Research ask the kind of questions that challenge the status quo across the social sciences and humanities.

Guided by rigorous scholarship and a desire to apply academic discourse and discovery to current social problems, they critically examine interdisciplinary fields to become a force of new knowledge and ideas in the world.

All graduate programs at The New School for Social research can be completed full-time or part-time on our New York City campus. Competitive merit-based scholarships are available in all departments -- in recent years, 85% of master’s students have received merit scholarships at The New School for Social Research.

Change begins with a question. What will you ask?

Program Highlights

  • 30-credit MA, 45-credit MS, 60-credit PhD.
  • Explore a wide spectrum of heterodox theories and methodologies, including post-Keynesian, Marxian, and neo-Ricardian.
  • Curriculum emphasizes the evolution of economic thought, financial markets and institutions, development and labor markets, social policy, and economics of class, gender, race, and ethnicity.

Why the New School?

The New School for Social Research was founded in 1919 as a home for progressive thinkers, and housed the University in Exile in 1933, providing an academic haven for scholars persecuted in Nazi Europe. The school became the foundation for a comprehensive university – The New School – and continues the legacy of critical thought, civic engagement, and academic freedom today.



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