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Masters Degrees in English Literature & Language, USA

We have 27 Masters Degrees in English Literature & Language, USA

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The M.A. in English offers three tracks. one in literature; one in writing, teaching, and criticism; and, one in creative writing. Read more
The M.A. in English offers three tracks: one in literature; one in writing, teaching, and criticism; and, one in creative writing. In the literature and writing, teaching, and criticism tracks, students may choose between thesis and non-thesis options. Students in the creative writing track must write a creative thesis. The master of arts in English helps students attain a number of goals. It offers opportunities for the study of language, literature, rhetoric and composition, pedagogy, creative writing, and literary and cultural critical theory. The diverse and comprehensive selection of courses cultivates scholarly knowledge and enhances cultural literacy in an atmosphere that engages students intellectually and creatively. The program prepares students to enroll in advanced graduate programs (for the Ph.D. in literature or composition and rhetoric, for example), to teach literature or writing in secondary schools or two-year colleges, and to enter a range of other professions in which writing expertise and analytical thinking are valued.

Curriculum

Required core modules for all English MA students:

• ENG 500 The Discipline of English Studies
• ENG 501 Critical Theory

For additional modules taught on the literature track, please see the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/arts-humanities/english/english-ma-literature-track/

For additional modules taught on the creative writing track, please see the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/arts-humanities/english/english-ma-creative-writing-track/

For additional modules taught on the writing, teaching and criticism track, please see the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/arts-humanities/english/english-ma-writing-teaching-criticism-track/

Culture and Community

The English Department sponsors a vibrant cultural life that includes a renowned Poetry Center, readings by notable authors, two student literary journals (Daedalus and Literati), an English Club, an English Alumni organization, numerous student awards and scholarships, and local chapters of the Sigma Tau Delta English honors society and the National Council of Teachers in English (NCTE). Our students and faculty are also actively involved in the university’s ongoing sustainability efforts. All of these opportunities enable students to expand their learning experience beyond the classroom and collaborate with others who share their passions.

Careers

To the question "What can you do with an English degree?" we say: "What can't you do?" Our graduates enjoy successful careers in publishing, journalism, education, management, law, marketing, advertising, social media, human resources, and business. Many seek advanced degrees in English, law, information & library science, and other fields. Whatever career path you pursue, English will prepare you for any profession that values the kind of interpretive analysis, creative problem-solving, and polished communication central to the discipline of English Studies.

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

English

Through the study of English, students learn to evaluate sensibilities both past and present, acquiring a profound knowledge of their own humanity and of the human condition in general. The study of English helps develop fluency of expression, skill in logical analysis, and facility in planning, organizing, and revising.

Undergraduate and graduate programs in English with a concentration in literature offers you an opportunity to explore the world around you and enduring issues of identity, morality, spirituality, and material success through the great minds of Western civilization.

The writing concentration explores various forms of creative expression through course work in literature, creative writing and non-fiction writing. Students pursuing this concentration have the opportunity to take courses in “Academic Writing” (expository, argumentative, creative writing), “Performance Writing” (screenplays, teleplays), “Writing for the Marketplace” (business, public relations), and “Rhetorical Theory” (ancient and modern).

With deep study of great literature, development of effective writing and communication skills, and courses in logic and political science, English is an excellent, traditional pre-law major, and with appropriate introductory sequences in the sciences, English is also an excellent pre-medical or pre-dental major. With a minor in Business or Computer Science, a student who majors in English will prepare especially well for many executive positions in business and government.

M.A. in English

The English language is arguably the most flexible instrument of thought and expression in the world. From the poetic drama of the Elizabethans to the experimental pyrotechnics of the modern novel, the study of English literature offers ever-fresh insights into the human condition, while helping students improve their command of today’s most influential language.

The 36-credit Master of Arts in English curriculum combines in-depth study of the wealth of the British and American literary traditions with an examination of how the language developed over time and how it is used in everyday discourse. As a degree candidate you will take three required courses designed to strengthen your critical reading and writing skills: “Text(s) in Context,” “Research and Criticism,” and “The Critical Tradition.” A thesis is also required.

You will also choose seven electives from a rich array of options that include: “Style and Syntax” (for writers and others who need a theoretical and technical knowledge of the field); “Cultural Linguistics” (an exploration of human communication in its cultural context, including the origins of language); “Middle English Literature” (lyric, romance, tale, fable and drama in the period 1100-1500); and “20th Century American Literature” (an intensive study of writers such as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Pynchon and Morrison).

Through its wide-ranging subject matter and focus on reading and writing proficiency, the study of English prepares students for the broadest variety of careers. Studies show that an ability to learn new skills and procedures is an outstanding characteristic of those who have majored in English. Many graduates of master’s programs in English go on to become elementary or secondary school teachers or pursue doctorates and become college professors, but a graduate degree in English can also be excellent preparation for a career in business, law, journalism, public relations and many other fields.

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The Department of English, General Literature and Rhetoric offers students the opportunity to study literature and language in their many manifestations. Read more
The Department of English, General Literature and Rhetoric offers students the opportunity to study literature and language in their many manifestations. Although English and American literature and the practice of creative and expository writing are primary, the department conceives of neither literature nor writing in a narrow or parochial way. Literature courses deal broadly with genres and themes from the past and present, and teach students how to read and analyze texts; creative writing courses foster, in qualified students, the development of serious creativity; rhetoric courses deal with both the theory and practice of communication, as well as the history of oral and written argument.

Recent doctoral graduate employment placements include: Assistant Professor at Pfeiffer University, Assistant Professor at University of California Channel Island, Lead Editor and Writer at Kathy Layne & Associates, Assistant Professor at Virginia State University, Assistant Professor at Ithaca College.

MA English/American Literature with a creative writing concentration also available.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you have attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores
- Writing sample: All applicants: critical writing sample (10-20 pages). Creative writing applicants: portfolio of creative work (not more than 40 pages of fiction or 20 pages of verse)

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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Rutgers University offers a 30-credit general Master’s Degree in English on the Newark campus, an urban yet intimate and leafy environment near downtown easily accessible by public transportation. Read more

Rutgers University offers a 30-credit general Master’s Degree in English on the Newark campus, an urban yet intimate and leafy environment near downtown easily accessible by public transportation. Our students take six electives in addition to four required courses: Introduction to Graduate Literary Study, two in pre-1800 literatures, and one in American literature. Those choosing to concentrate in Women’s and Gender Studies take two interdisciplinary core courses in feminist theory and methods (see separate description) and two W&GS-designated literature courses in the English Program (such as Women in Medieval Literature, Jane Austen, Autobiography and Gender, or Race, Gender, and the Holocaust, three recent offerings by our strong women’s studies faculty in the English Department). All must pass an examination on a common reading list, offered in March, and a one-hour translation test, rendering a passage of literary biography or history written in a foreign language into idiomatic English. These tests are scheduled throughout the year during Department office hours at the individual’s convenience. 

Course offerings

We mount 14-16 courses a year in the literatures and cultures of the Americas, Britain, and the English-speaking world as well as literature in translation. Besides more traditional courses (Chaucer) and innovative versions of traditional subjects, like Race and Gender in the Renaissance, or Global Romanticism, we offer considerable topical variety: for example, Transnational Muslim Fiction; The Vietnam War and American Culture, 1945-2009; African Diaspora Literature; The Gilded Age; Harlem Renaissance; Empire and the Spy Novel; War Stories; various film offerings; and courses on postcolonial, feminist, marxist, narrative, or other critical theories. Courses in Rhetoric and the Teaching of Writing, in Advanced Research and Archives, and in Editing and Publishing offer professional development. We also have occasional graduate Summer Session courses.

Degree students may arrange with a professor for Independent Study or a course of Advanced Readings tailored to their interests; some choose the two-semester Master’s Thesis,although this is not required for the degree. (Tailored studies must be arranged with the professor a semester in advance.) Seminarsare small (8-15), allowing for personal attention from professors and lively exchange with peers. Three classes constitute full-time status; given their busy lives, most students are part-time, registering for one or two courses per term. Each class is held once a week, 5:30 to 8:10, Monday through Thursday, allowing people to attend school after work. Occasionally we schedule a Saturday class. Degree students who need to take time out from their studies register for Matriculation Continued, which holds their place in the Program.

Who we are

Even though most students are part-time and commute, we form a surprisingly close-knit community of 21 graduate English faculty and more than 40 students, diverse in age, interests, ethnicities, and nationalities. Some students live on campus. Our faculty are serious research scholars and writers who publish regularly, participate actively in professional organizations, receive national and international recognition for their work, and love to teach. Two of our Full Professors hold University Chairs; other colleagues both teach and provide administrative direction for other campus units, such as the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing, Women’s and Gender Studies, and African American Studies. 

  Film and other courses are sometimes taught by experts from the Metropolitan area. A distinct advantage of studying here is the prospect of being helped along with recommendation letters, introductions, and publication advice from well-connected professionals.

Our students’ statistical profile:  In case you’re wondering, in a typical semester our degree students are 65% female; about evenly divided between the age groups of 21-34 and 35-44, with a handful of older students. In 2004, 50 identified themselves on their applications as Caucasian, 10 as Black, 3 as “Other Hispanic,” 4 as Asian, the rest unidentified. 90% or more of our degree students live in New Jersey, with some having moved here to establish NJ residency. We are also pleased to welcome international students–recently, from Japan, Turkey, France, South Africa, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. Overall R-N is the most diverse university campus in the nation.

Students’ vocational plans and interests:  The fact that our students arrive with a variety of agendas makes for an interesting mix in the classroom, and for reasons we can’t claim to understand completely, diversity really ‘works’ in our Program.

Those planning on doctoral study choose courses that ground them in literary theory and find Rutgers–Newark a superior place for conducting serious research, given the resources of the University’s many libraries, including the Dana and Rutgers Law Libraries on our campus, networked with hundreds of others nationwide. Graduates also choose to study library science or earn education Ph.D’s in Rutgers-New Brunswick’s highly-regarded graduate schools in these field.

Graduates often find college teaching work without the Ph.D.; a few find it even before they receive the M.A. A strong presence among us are seasoned, beginning, or aspiring high school teachers, who come to deepen literary learning, enhance their options in their institution, and enjoy intellectual exchange among peers. We also attract students who are pivoting for career changesworking journalists and professionals in other media fields who are hungry for literary study, people who seek intensive study of literature to feed their own creative writing, late bloomers, and the recently unemployed who’ve decided to return to school.

We do admit applicants who weren’t college English majors or are working in various business fields, computer science, public relations, or law but have been reading literature extensively on their own. Introduction to Graduate Literary Study helps all students make the transition with instruction and practice in the latest scholarly research methods and literary theories.



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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• A writing sample, preferably a recent essay written showing evidence of scholarly research and writing. For applicants who have significant work experience, a substantial piece of workplace writing may be substituted.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Arts program in English and Communication challenges students to develop integrated competencies in the highly sought skills of reading, writing, and speaking. The program focuses attention on the many uses of language and on the nature of language itself. It requires students to become familiar with the connections between the written and the spoken word, and with the varied ways that language is shaped to serve aesthetic, social, and practical ends. By fostering research and analytic skills, the program prepares students for a variety of career opportunities. Program Start Dates: Fall.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 36 credit hours

GECD 601, Introduction to Research Methods .......................3 credits
GECD 606, Thesis Workshop .............................................3 credits
Electives .....................................................................21 credits (Students will select, with prior advisor approval, seven grad- uate English and Communication courses; at least 12 credit hours must be completed at the 600 level. Nine credit hours may be taken at the 500 level in any courses with LITR, COMP, or COMM designators.)
GECD 690, Thesis .........................................................9 credits

Uniqueness of Program

The MA English and Communication program is home to scholars of literature, rhetoric, speech communication, composition, and linguistics, making it unique within the SUNY system. It best serves students who wish to study in more than one of these disciplines. Students’ thesis projects can be rooted in one of these disciplines, or they may cross or blur disciplinary boundaries. A comprehensive approach to these distinct, yet related, fields defines the core graduate experience at Potsdam, making our program ideal for a variety of purposes. We also take a lot of pride in providing personalized attention, professional/academic achievement, unique program design, and flexible course scheduling. Graduates of our program have obtained positions as faculty at community colleges; editors and publishers of speeches, documents, and multimedia; and employees for business, governmental agencies, and/or the corporate world in a multitude of capacities.

Testimonials

“The program helped me grow as a writer, critical reader/thinker, and oral presenter. It prepared me to work as a professional and taught me a lot about how to interact with students and provide meaningful feedback.” —Becca Jewell

“The program nurtures a longer-term project focus, as compared to semester-based projects. I thoroughly enjoyed the freedom to design my own projects and the unpredictable, yet focused, discussions during class.” —Josh Clark

“I gained a better understanding of the world and an enhanced ability to analyze, synthesize, and critically think. In my view, studies like these prepare us to understand, analyze, dissect, and influence the academic and non-academic conversations that define our politics, work environments, and society at large.” —Adam Bulizak

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We are now reading applications for the January 2017 residency. The application deadline is Nov. 20, 2016. We are pleased to continue our merit-based scholarship program for incoming students. Read more
We are now reading applications for the January 2017 residency. The application deadline is Nov. 20, 2016.

We are pleased to continue our merit-based scholarship program for incoming students. Before the January 2017 residency, we will award merit-based scholarships in three separate rounds. In order to be considered for the first round, submit your application and supporting documents before Sept. 30, 2016.

Visit the website http://www.ut.edu/mfacw/

MFA in Creative Writing

The University of Tampa Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing is a low-residency program designed to help poets, fiction writers and creative nonfiction writers advance their command of craft through exposure to literature from a writerly perspective and with supportive critique and mentoring. The course of individualized study covers four semesters over two calendar years, followed by a fifth culminating residency. Our program focuses on individualized instruction, while fostering the rich interplay of participation in an extended literary community; as working writers, all of us seek to deepen the understanding of writing as an ongoing engagement with discovery and transformation.

Students attend four, 10-day working residencies on UT’s historic campus in downtown Tampa, on the banks of the Hillsborough River. Each residency is followed by a semester-long one-on-one tutorial with a faculty mentor focused on the student’s written work and readings as negotiated in an individual plan of study. View a photo gallery of the inaugural class (http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.336373403051241.78945.268982289790353&type=1).

As part of the requirements for the degree, the student completes many drafts and revisions, resulting in the master's thesis, a substantial manuscript of original work in the selected genre. Along the way, the student reads and comments on works that have shaped the genre, completes a 25-page critical essay in the third semester and assembles an annotated bibliography that conveys the importance and influence of great writers on their own work. In the fifth, culminating residency, the student teaches a seminar on a pre-arranged topic of interest and gives a public reading of his/her own work. Each semester grade is pass/fail accompanied by a narrative evaluation composed by the student’s mentor. All students have the opportunity to serve in an editorial capacity on Tampa Review Online, the 100 percent MFA student-edited cousin of the award-winning Tampa Review.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ut.edu/apply

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies program (IDS) is designed for those students whose career or educational goals are not reflected in one of LIU Post’s established graduate programs. An individual course of study, subject to the approval of the IDS Faculty Committee, will be developed by the student with the assistance of appropriate graduate advisors and the program coordinator. Students may incorporate courses from any of the five LIU Post colleges and schools. The student’s plan of study must be approved before full matriculation is granted.

In addition to designing a unique interdisciplinary degree, students can also elect to follow several other interdisciplinary concentrations: American Studies, Environmental Studies, Liberal Arts, Literacy Studies, Museum Studies, Public History/Archives and Records Management, Public History/Non-Profit Management, Social Studies, among others.

M.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies

LIU Post offers both the Master of Arts and Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies. The Interdisciplinary Studies program (IDS) is designed for those students whose career or educational goals are not reflected in one of LIU Post’s established graduate programs. An individual course of study, subject to the approval of the IDS Faculty Committee, will be developed by the student with the assistance of appropriate graduate advisors and the program coordinator. Students may incorporate courses from any of the five LIU Post colleges and schools. The student’s plan of study must be approved before full matriculation is granted.

In addition to designing a unique interdisciplinary degree, students can also elect to follow several other interdisciplinary concentrations: American Studies, Environmental Studies, Liberal Arts, Literacy Studies, Museum Studies, Public History/Archives and Records Management, Public History/Non-profit Management and Social Studies among others.

A total of 36 credits is required for the degree, of which 6 credits are in thesis work

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The M.Ed in Reading is a 36 credit program that grants a master’s degree and fulfills all PDE requirements in order for students to apply for their PA Reading Specialist Certification for grades K–12. Read more
The M.Ed in Reading is a 36 credit program that grants a master’s degree and fulfills all PDE requirements in order for students to apply for their PA Reading Specialist Certification for grades K–12. If you have your Initial Teaching Certification (or even a master’s degree already) and want to focus on Literacy education, then our program may be right for you.

Curriculum

Professional Education Requirements

Select two of the following, chosen under advisement:

EDA 511 Inclusion & Collaboration
EDA 542 Foundations of Special Education
LAN 569 Teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) PK-12
EDE 551 Child and Adolescent Development I
EDF 501 Research Methods For Teachers
EDF 510 Educational Foundations
EDF 589 Sociological Foundations Of Education
EDP 550 Advanced Educational Psychology
EDP 569 Adolescent Development & Learning
EDT 500 Integrating Ed Tech For Effective Instruction
EDR 604 Literacy Program Evaluation & Data Analysis

Professional Education Electives:

EDR 535 Language, Learning And Literacy

Reading Education Requirements:

EDR 505 Orthographic Knowledge Language And Lit Dev
EDR 507 Comprehension & Vocabulary: Dev & Instruc
EDR 509 Writing Development and Instruction
EDR 512 Literacy Practicum and Seminar I
EDR 514 Reading In The Content Areas
EDR 515 Teaching Reading with Child's and Adolescent's Lit
EDR 516 Problems in Literacy Development
EDR 519 Issues of Diversity in Teaching Reading
EDR 532 Literacy and Practicum Seminar II
EDR 541 Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs

For detailed information about these modules please visit the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/education-social-work/literacy/reading-med/

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The PA Reading Specialist Certification, K–12 is a 30 credit program for students wanting to fulfill PDE requirements for Reading Specialist Certification only. Read more
The PA Reading Specialist Certification, K–12 is a 30 credit program for students wanting to fulfill PDE requirements for Reading Specialist Certification only. Students in this program take 30 credits of Literacy core courses, in addition to any PDE 49.13 Competency deficiencies that exist at intake. This program does not result in a master degree; upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to apply for their PA Reading Specialist Certificate.

Curriculum

Required Literacy Modules (30 Credits):

EDR 505: Orthographic Knowledge, Language, and Literacy Development
EDR 507: Comprehension and Vocabulary: Development and Instruction
EDR 509: Writing Development and Instruction
EDR 514: Reading in the Content Areas
EDR 515: Teaching Reading with Children’s and Adolescents’ Literature
EDR 516: Problems in Literacy Development
EDR 512: Literacy Practicum and Seminar I
EDR 519: Issues of Diversity in Teaching Reading
EDR 532: Literacy Practicum and Seminar II
EDR 541: Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs: K – 12

For more information regarding the curriculum for this course please visit the website:

https://wcupa.edu/education-socialWork/literacy/prospectiveLiteracy.aspx

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For students who are not seeking either a M.Ed. in Reading or Reading Specialist Certificate, we offer an 18 credit literacy certificate. Read more
For students who are not seeking either a M.Ed. in Reading or Reading Specialist Certificate, we offer an 18 credit literacy certificate. This program is for students who already have their Initial Teaching Certification and want to improve their classroom practice in Literacy. This program also benefits students who already have their master’s degree but would like to focus on Literacy education.

Curriculum

Literacy courses required (18 credits):

EDR 505: Orthographic Knowledge, Language, and Literacy Development
EDR 507: Comprehension and Vocabulary: Development and Instruction 3
EDR 509: Writing Development and Instruction 3
EDR 514: Reading in the Content Areas 3
EDR 515: Teaching Reading with Children’s and Adolescents’ Literature
EDR 512: Literacy Practicum and Seminar I

For more information regarding the curriculum of this course, please visit the website:

https://wcupa.edu/education-socialWork/literacy/prospectiveLiteracy.aspx

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This program is designed for current Reading Specialist seeking to expand their professional services with recognition of the continuation of their specialised education validated by PDE. Read more
This program is designed for current Reading Specialist seeking to expand their professional services with recognition of the continuation of their specialised education validated by PDE. The Coaching Endorsement recognises the completion of additional coursework that prepares reading specialists to lead and support colleagues as they teach children to read and write.

Curriculum

Literacy Coaching Courses Required for Endorsement (12 credits):
(Students may transfer in three (3) credits based on transcript analysis)

EDR 602: Literacy Coaching and Professional Development
EDR 604: Literacy Program Evaluation and Data Analysis
EDE 605: Educational Leadership and Change Theory
EDR 606: Practicum and Seminar in Literacy Coaching

For detailed information about these modules please see the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/undergraduate/education-social-work/literacy/#coursestext

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Students in our. Creative Writing. graduate program ask questions that redefine narratives, to develop as daring voices of a new generation. Read more

Students in our Creative Writing graduate program ask questions that redefine narratives, to develop as daring voices of a new generation.

Join a close-knit community of talented MFA peers from around the world as you live the writer’s life in NYC. Take inspiration from your experiences, challenge convention, and pioneer the evolution of the literary world.

Change begins with a question. What will you ask?

Program Highlights

  • Choose a concentration in Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, or Writing for Children and Young Adults
  • Take part in workshops and seminars led by an internationally recognized faculty with close ties to NY’s literary scene
  • Immerse yourself in the publishing world, learning crucial skills and techniques to get published
  • Enter the creative process from the inside out, learning to read like a writer, and take courses in publishing and multimedia storytelling

One third of the curriculum consists of Writing Workshops. Guided by an experienced writer-teacher, students work intensively on their manuscripts, with a focus on the creative acts of self-editing and revision. Workshops meet for two hours; structure and content are adapted to the student's area of concentration



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The Department of English offers a Master of Arts degree with three concentrations: . Literary Study. , . Rhetoric and Writing. Read more

The Department of English offers a Master of Arts degree with three concentrations: Literary StudyRhetoric and Writing, and Creative Writing.

An M.A. in English allows you to deepen your critical reading and writing skills, hone your creative skills, and allow you to read the world more deeply. To achieve this we offer a small, focused program that allows for personalized study and strong advisement. Our students have gone on to Ph.D. programs ranging from University of California Irvine to Syracuse University. Others have chosen to enter the workforce as instructors or advanced high school teachers. A growing number are opting for careers that recognize their critical thinking, problem solving and writing skills including corporate communications, publishing, editing, grant writing, and a range of work in the non-profit sector.

Learn more about the program in the Graduate Student Handbook.

Programs of Study

Literary Study (33 hours)

Degree Requirements:

  • ENGL 5000 - Introduction to Graduate Studies in English: Methodology and Bibliography (3)
  • ENGL 5050 - Theory and Criticism (3) OR Literary Theory (3)
  • Two literature courses before 1800 (6)
  • Literature electives (9)
  • Elective English courses/Thesis (12)
  • ▪Oral Comprehensive Exam/Thesis or Paper

Rhetoric and Writing (33 hours)

Degree Requirements:

  • ENGL 5000 - Introduction to Graduate Studies in English: Methodology and Bibliography (3)
  • ENGL 5115 - History of Rhetorical Theory I: Ancient Greece to Renaissance (3)
  • ENGL 5125 - History of Rhetorical Theory II: Early Modern to Contemporary (3)
  • Other rhetoric and writing courses (12 hours)
  • Elective English courses/Thesis (12)
  • Oral Comprehensive Exam/Thesis or Paper

Creative Writing

Degree Requirements:

Poetry Track (33 Hours)

  • ENGL 5510r - Fiction Writing Or ENGL 5950 - Workshop: Writing (3 Hours)
  • ENGL 5520 - Poetry Workshop (9 hours)
  •  Elective English Courses (15 hours)
  • ENGL 5999r - Thesis (6 Hours)

Prose Track (33 Hours)

  • ENGL 5510r - Fiction Writing Or ENGL 5950 - Workshop: Writing (9 Hours)
  • ENGL 5520 - Poetry Workshop (3 Hours)
  • Elective English courses   (15 Hours)
  • ENGL 5999r - Thesis (6 Hours)

Both tracks include a final Oral Comprehensive Exam/Thesis or Paper



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Do you have prior knowledge of English, but need to improve your language skills to apply to one of our programs? Then this preparatory program is for you. Read more

Do you have prior knowledge of English, but need to improve your language skills to apply to one of our programs? Then this preparatory program is for you. You'll focus on developing your English-language and test-taking skills needed to succeed at UC Berkeley.

BGA-Start is a language program intended to be taken before participating in one of our programs or tracks, which focus on academic subjects as opposed to English language development.

Courses:

You'll take one approved UC Berkeley course and various UC Berkeley Extension courses so that you can focus on your English as a Second Language (ESL) skills and TOEFL test preparation. You'll take a minimum of 12 units and maximum of 18 units total of credit-bearing, in-person courses (online courses are not eligible). Enrollment in all courses is subject to availability.

Suggested course structure: 1 UC Berkeley course +1 TOEFL preparation course + 2 ESL courses + 1 or 2 non-language-focused Extension course(s).

  • UC Berkeley Extension courses—Recommended courses include:
  • TOEFL preparation
  • Two to three ESL courses in academic reading and writing, listening and speaking (required)
  • Courses related to major or subject of interest (optional)
  • UC Berkeley Courses—To view available courses, select the academic term and then the subject you are interested in. Upon acceptance into the program, we'll work with you to choose an appropriate UC Berkeley course that meets your English proficiency level so that you can succeed.

If you successfully complete the BGA-Start program, you will have the opportunity to join the BGA Discover program or a program track focused on a specific academic subject. You must maintain a 3.0 GPA and receive recommendations from your instructors and the Program Director before being accepted into a BGA program.

UC Berkeley undergraduate and graduate-level courses must be approved in advance. You must meet listed prerequisite requirements to be eligible for any course.



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